WorldWideScience

Sample records for dose-volume histogram shapes

  1. Decomposition analysis of differential dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, Frank van den

    2006-01-01

    Dose volume histograms are a common tool to assess the value of a treatment plan for various forms of radiation therapy treatment. The purpose of this work is to introduce, validate, and apply a set of tools to analyze differential dose volume histograms by decomposing them into physically and clinically meaningful normal distributions. A weighted sum of the decomposed normal distributions (e.g., weighted dose) is proposed as a new measure of target dose, rather than the more unstable point dose. The method and its theory are presented and validated using simulated distributions. Additional validation is performed by analyzing simple four field box techniques encompassing a predefined target, using different treatment energies inside a water phantom. Furthermore, two clinical situations are analyzed using this methodology to illustrate practical usefulness. A comparison of a treatment plan for a breast patient using a tangential field setup with wedges is compared to a comparable geometry using dose compensators. Finally, a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculation is refined using this decomposition. The NTCP calculation is performed on a liver as organ at risk in a treatment of a mesothelioma patient with involvement of the right lung. The comparison of the wedged breast treatment versus the compensator technique yields comparable classical dose parameters (e.g., conformity index ≅1 and equal dose at the ICRU dose point). The methodology proposed here shows a 4% difference in weighted dose outlining the difference in treatment using a single parameter instead of at least two in a classical analysis (e.g., mean dose, and maximal dose, or total dose variance). NTCP-calculations for the mesothelioma case are generated automatically and show a 3% decrease with respect to the classical calculation. The decrease is slightly dependant on the fractionation and on the α/β-value utilized. In conclusion, this method is able to distinguish clinically

  2. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D 50% ) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies

  3. Comments on 'Reconsidering the definition of a dose-volume histogram'-dose-mass histogram (DMH) versus dose-volume histogram (DVH) for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Plataniotis, Georgios A; Gorka, Magdalena Adamus; Lind, Bengt K

    2006-01-01

    In a recently published paper (Nioutsikou et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 L17) the authors showed that the use of the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept is a more accurate descriptor of the dose delivered to lung than the traditionally used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept. Furthermore, they state that if a functional imaging modality could also be registered to the anatomical imaging modality providing a functional weighting across the organ (functional mass) then the more general and realistic concept of the dose-functioning mass histogram (D[F]MH) could be an even more appropriate descriptor. The comments of the present letter to the editor are in line with the basic arguments of that work since their general conclusions appear to be supported by the comparison of the DMH and DVH concepts using radiobiological measures. In this study, it is examined whether the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept deviated significantly from the widely used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept regarding the expected lung complications and if there are clinical indications supporting these results. The problem was investigated theoretically by applying two hypothetical dose distributions (Gaussian and semi-Gaussian shaped) on two lungs of uniform and varying densities. The influence of the deviation between DVHs and DMHs on the treatment outcome was estimated by using the relative seriality and LKB models using the Gagliardi et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 46 373) and Seppenwoolde et al (2003 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 55 724) parameter sets for radiation pneumonitis, respectively. Furthermore, the biological equivalent of their difference was estimated by the biologically effective uniform dose (D-bar) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concepts, respectively. It is shown that the relation between the DVHs and DMHs varies depending on the underlying cell density distribution and the applied dose distribution. However, the range of their deviation in terms of

  4. Treatment plan evaluation using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and spatial dose-volume histogram (zDVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Das, Indra J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The dose-volume histogram (DVH) has been accepted as a tool for treatment-plan evaluation. However, DVH lacks spatial information. A new concept, the z-dependent dose-volume histogram (zDVH), is presented as a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning to provide the spatial variation, as well as the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional dose calculations were carried out with various plans for three disease sites: lung, breast, and prostate. DVHs were calculated for the entire volume. A zDVH is defined as a differential dose-volume histogram with respect to a computed tomographic (CT) slice position. In this study, zDVHs were calculated for each CT slice in the treatment field. DVHs and zDVHs were compared. Results: In the irradiation of lung, DVH calculation indicated that the treatment plan satisfied the dose-volume constraint placed on the lung and zDVH of the lung revealed that a sizable fraction of the lung centered about the central axis (CAX) received a significant dose, a situation that warranted a modification of the treatment plan due to the removal of one lung. In the irradiation of breast with tangential fields, the DVH showed that about 7% of the breast volume received at least 110% of the prescribed dose (PD) and about 11% of the breast received less than 98% PD. However, the zDVHs of the breast volume in each of seven planes showed the existence of high-dose regions of 34% and 15%, respectively, of the volume in the two caudal-most planes and cold spots of about 40% in the two cephalic planes. In the treatment planning of prostate, DVHs showed that about 15% of the bladder and 40% of the rectum received 102% PD, whereas about 30% of the bladder and 50% of the rectum received the full dose. Taking into account the hollow structure of both the bladder and the rectum, the dose-surface histograms (DSH) showed larger hot-spot volume, about

  5. Dose-volume histograms for optimization of treatment plans illustrated by the example of oesophagus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Huenig, R.; Huegli, C.

    1995-01-01

    Using the example of oesophagus carcinoma, dose-volume histograms for diverse treatment techniques are calculated and judged by means of multiplanar isodose representations. The selected treatment plans are ranked with the aid of the dose-volume histograms. We distinguish the tissue inside and outside of the target volume. The description of the spatial dose distribution in dependence of the different volumes and the respective fractions of the tumor dose therein with the help of dose-volume histograms brings about a correlation between the physical parameters and the biological effects. In addition one has to bear in mind the consequences of measures that influence the reaction and the side-effects of radiotherapy (e.g. chemotherapy), i.e. the recuperation of the tissues that were irradiated intentionally or inevitably. Taking all that into account it is evident that the dose-volume histograms are a powerful tool for assessing the quality of treatment plans. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Brachytherapy dose-volume histogram computations using optimized stratified sampling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karouzakis, K.; Lahanas, M.; Milickovic, N.; Giannouli, S.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.

    2002-01-01

    A stratified sampling method for the efficient repeated computation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in brachytherapy is presented as used for anatomy based brachytherapy optimization methods. The aim of the method is to reduce the number of sampling points required for the calculation of DVHs for the body and the PTV. From the DVHs are derived the quantities such as Conformity Index COIN and COIN integrals. This is achieved by using partial uniform distributed sampling points with a density in each region obtained from a survey of the gradients or the variance of the dose distribution in these regions. The shape of the sampling regions is adapted to the patient anatomy and the shape and size of the implant. For the application of this method a single preprocessing step is necessary which requires only a few seconds. Ten clinical implants were used to study the appropriate number of sampling points, given a required accuracy for quantities such as cumulative DVHs, COIN indices and COIN integrals. We found that DVHs of very large tissue volumes surrounding the PTV, and also COIN distributions, can be obtained using a factor of 5-10 times smaller the number of sampling points in comparison with uniform distributed points

  7. Calculation of complication probability of pion treatment at PSI using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Akanuma, Atsuo; Aoki, Yukimasa

    1991-01-01

    In the conformation technique a target volume is irradiated uniformly as in conventional radiations, whereas surrounding tissue and organs are nonuniformly irradiated. Clinical data on radiation injuries that accumulate with conventional radiation are not applicable without appropriate compensation. Recently a putative solution of this problem was proposed by Lyman using dose-volume histograms. This histogram reduction method reduces a given dose-volume histogram of an organ to a single step which corresponds to the equivalent complication probability by interpolation. As a result it converts nonuniform radiation into a unique dose to the whole organ which has the equivalent likelihood of radiation injury. This method is based on low LET radiation with conventional fractionation schedules. When it is applied to high LET radiation such as negative pion treatment, a high LET dose should be converted to an equivalent photon dose using an appropriate value of RBE. In the present study the histogram reduction method was applied to actual patients treated by the negative pion conformation technique at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Out of evaluable 90 cases of pelvic tumors, 16 developed grade III-IV bladder injury, and 7 developed grade III-IV rectal injury. The 90 cases were divided into roughly equal groups according to the equivalent doses to the entire bladder and rectum. Complication rates and equivalent doses to the full organs in these groups could be represented by a sigmoid dose-effect relation. When RBE from a pion dose to a photon dose is assumed to be 2.1 for bladder injury, the rates of bladder complications fit best to the theoretical complication curve. When the RBE value was 2.3, the rates of rectal injury fit the theoretical curve best. These values are close to the conversion factor of 2.0 that is used in clinical practice at PSI. This agreement suggests the clinical feasibility of the histogram reduction method in conformation radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Evaluation of dose-volume histograms after prostate seed implantation. 4-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, C.; Lehmann, D.; Winkler, C.; Herrmann, T.; Hakenberg, O.W.; Wirth, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: permanent interstitial brachytherapy by seed implantation is a treatment alternative for low-volume low-risk prostate cancer and a complex interdisciplinary treatment with a learning curve. Dose-volume histograms are used to assess postimplant quality. The authors evaluated their learning curve based on dose-volume histograms and analyzed factors influencing implantation quality. Patients and methods: since 1999, 38 patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were treated at the authors' institution with seed implantation using palladium-103 or iodine-125, initially using the preplan method and later real-time planning. Postimplant CT was performed after 4 weeks. The dose-volume indices D90, V100, V150, the D max of pre- and postplans, and the size and position of the volume receiving the prescribed dose (high-dose volume) of the postplans were evaluated. In six patients, postplan imaging both by CT and MRI was used and prostate volumes were compared with preimplant transrectal ultrasound volumes. The first five patients were treated under external supervision. Results: patients were divided into three consecutive groups for analysis of the learning curve (group 1: n = 5 patients treated under external supervision; group 2: n = 13 patients; group 3: n = 20 patients). D90 post for the three groups were 79.3%, 74.2%, and 99.9%, the V100 post were 78.6%, 73.5%, and 88.2%, respectively. The relationship between high-dose volume and prostate volume showed a similar increase as the D90, while the relationship between high-dose volume lying outside the prostate and prostate volume remained constant. The ratio between prostate volumes from transrectal ultrasound and CT imaging decreased with increasing D90 post , while the preplanning D90 and V100 remained constant. The different isotopes used, the method of planning, and the implanted activity per prostate volume did not influence results. Conclusion: a learning curve characterized by an increase

  9. A theoretical approach to the problem of dose-volume constraint estimation and their impact on the dose-volume histogram selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinkel, Colleen; Stavrev, Pavel; Stavreva, Nadia; Fallone, B. Gino

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines a theoretical approach to the problem of estimating and choosing dose-volume constraints. Following this approach, a method of choosing dose-volume constraints based on biological criteria is proposed. This method is called ''reverse normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) mapping into dose-volume space'' and may be used as a general guidance to the problem of dose-volume constraint estimation. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are randomly simulated, and those resulting in clinically acceptable levels of complication, such as NTCP of 5±0.5%, are selected and averaged producing a mean DVH that is proven to result in the same level of NTCP. The points from the averaged DVH are proposed to serve as physical dose-volume constraints. The population-based critical volume and Lyman NTCP models with parameter sets taken from literature sources were used for the NTCP estimation. The impact of the prescribed value of the maximum dose to the organ, D max , on the averaged DVH and the dose-volume constraint points is investigated. Constraint points for 16 organs are calculated. The impact of the number of constraints to be fulfilled based on the likelihood that a DVH satisfying them will result in an acceptable NTCP is also investigated. It is theoretically proven that the radiation treatment optimization based on physical objective functions can sufficiently well restrict the dose to the organs at risk, resulting in sufficiently low NTCP values through the employment of several appropriate dose-volume constraints. At the same time, the pure physical approach to optimization is self-restrictive due to the preassignment of acceptable NTCP levels thus excluding possible better solutions to the problem

  10. A novel method for the evaluation of uncertainty in dose-volume histogram computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Francisco Cutanda; Castrillón, Silvia Vargas

    2008-03-15

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are a useful tool in state-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning, and it is essential to recognize their limitations. Even after a specific dose-calculation model is optimized, dose distributions computed by using treatment-planning systems are affected by several sources of uncertainty, such as algorithm limitations, measurement uncertainty in the data used to model the beam, and residual differences between measured and computed dose. This report presents a novel method to take them into account. To take into account the effect of associated uncertainties, a probabilistic approach using a new kind of histogram, a dose-expected volume histogram, is introduced. The expected value of the volume in the region of interest receiving an absorbed dose equal to or greater than a certain value is found by using the probability distribution of the dose at each point. A rectangular probability distribution is assumed for this point dose, and a formulation that accounts for uncertainties associated with point dose is presented for practical computations. This method is applied to a set of DVHs for different regions of interest, including 6 brain patients, 8 lung patients, 8 pelvis patients, and 6 prostate patients planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Results show a greater effect on planning target volume coverage than in organs at risk. In cases of steep DVH gradients, such as planning target volumes, this new method shows the largest differences with the corresponding DVH; thus, the effect of the uncertainty is larger.

  11. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  12. Inverse optimization of objective function weights for treatment planning using clinical dose-volume histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babier, Aaron; Boutilier, Justin J.; Sharpe, Michael B.; McNiven, Andrea L.; Chan, Timothy C. Y.

    2018-05-01

    We developed and evaluated a novel inverse optimization (IO) model to estimate objective function weights from clinical dose-volume histograms (DVHs). These weights were used to solve a treatment planning problem to generate ‘inverse plans’ that had similar DVHs to the original clinical DVHs. Our methodology was applied to 217 clinical head and neck cancer treatment plans that were previously delivered at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Canada. Inverse plan DVHs were compared to the clinical DVHs using objective function values, dose-volume differences, and frequency of clinical planning criteria satisfaction. Median differences between the clinical and inverse DVHs were within 1.1 Gy. For most structures, the difference in clinical planning criteria satisfaction between the clinical and inverse plans was at most 1.4%. For structures where the two plans differed by more than 1.4% in planning criteria satisfaction, the difference in average criterion violation was less than 0.5 Gy. Overall, the inverse plans were very similar to the clinical plans. Compared with a previous inverse optimization method from the literature, our new inverse plans typically satisfied the same or more clinical criteria, and had consistently lower fluence heterogeneity. Overall, this paper demonstrates that DVHs, which are essentially summary statistics, provide sufficient information to estimate objective function weights that result in high quality treatment plans. However, as with any summary statistic that compresses three-dimensional dose information, care must be taken to avoid generating plans with undesirable features such as hotspots; our computational results suggest that such undesirable spatial features were uncommon. Our IO-based approach can be integrated into the current clinical planning paradigm to better initialize the planning process and improve planning efficiency. It could also be embedded in a knowledge-based planning or adaptive radiation therapy framework to

  13. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  14. Optimization of radiation therapy, III: a method of assessing complication probabilities from dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.; Wolbarst, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the likelihood of success of a therapeutic strategy, one must be able to assess the effects of the treatment upon both diseased and healthy tissues. This paper proposes a method for determining the probability that a healthy organ that receives a non-uniform distribution of X-irradiation, heat, chemotherapy, or other agent will escape complications. Starting with any given dose distribution, a dose-cumulative-volume histogram for the organ is generated. This is then reduced by an interpolation scheme (involving the volume-weighting of complication probabilities) to a slightly different histogram that corresponds to the same overall likelihood of complications, but which contains one less step. The procedure is repeated, one step at a time, until there remains a final, single-step histogram, for which the complication probability can be determined. The formalism makes use of a complication response function C(D, V) which, for the given treatment schedule, represents the probability of complications arising when the fraction V of the organ receives dose D and the rest of the organ gets none. Although the data required to generate this function are sparse at present, it should be possible to obtain the necessary information from in vivo and clinical studies. Volume effects are taken explicitly into account in two ways: the precise shape of the patient's histogram is employed in the calculation, and the complication response function is a function of the volume

  15. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  16. Towards the elimination of Monte Carlo statistical fluctuation from dose volume histograms for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, J.; Bielajew, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo calculation of dose for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes introduces unavoidable statistical noise into the prediction of dose in a given volume element (voxel). When the doses in these voxels are summed to produce dose volume histograms (DVHs), this noise translates into a broadening of differential DVHs and correspondingly flatter DVHs. A brute force approach would entail calculating dose for long periods of time - enough to ensure that the DVHs had converged. In this paper we introduce an approach for deconvolving the statistical noise from DVHs, thereby obtaining estimates for converged DVHs obtained about 100 times faster than the brute force approach described above. There are two important implications of this work: (a) decisions based upon DVHs may be made much more economically using the new approach and (b) inverse treatment planning or optimization methods may employ Monte Carlo dose calculations at all stages of the iterative procedure since the prohibitive cost of Monte Carlo calculations at the intermediate calculation steps can be practically eliminated. (author)

  17. First impressions of 3D visual tools and dose volume histograms for plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattray, G.; Simitcioglu, A.; Parkinson, M.; Biggs, J.

    1999-01-01

    Converting from 2D to 3D treatment planning offers numerous challenges. The practices that have evolved in the 2D environment may not be applicable when translated into the 3D environment. One such practice is the methods used to evaluate a plan. In 2D planning a plane by plane comparison method is generally practiced. This type of evaluation method would not be appropriate for plans produced by a 3D planning system. To this end 3D dose displays and Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) have been developed to facilitate the evaluation of such plans. A survey was conducted to determine the impressions of Radiation Therapists as they used these tools for the first time. The survey involved comparing a number of plans for a small group of patients and selecting the best plan for each patient. Three evaluation methods were assessed. These included the traditional plane by plane, 3D dose display, and DVHs. Those surveyed found the DVH to be the easiest of the three methods to use, with the 3D display being the next easiest. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  19. Calculation of normal tissue complication probability and dose-volume histogram reduction schemes for tissues with a critical element architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemierko, Andrzej; Goitein, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate a model of normal tissue complication probability for tissues that may be represented by a critical element architecture. They derive formulas for complication probability that apply to both a partial volume irradiation and to an arbitrary inhomogeneous dose distribution. The dose-volume isoeffect relationship which is a consequence of a critical element architecture is discussed and compared to the empirical power law relationship. A dose-volume histogram reduction scheme for a 'pure' critical element model is derived. In addition, a point-based algorithm which does not require precomputation of a dose-volume histogram is derived. The existing published dose-volume histogram reduction algorithms are analyzed. The authors show that the existing algorithms, developed empirically without an explicit biophysical model, have a close relationship to the critical element model at low levels of complication probability. However, it is also showed that they have aspects which are not compatible with a critical element model and the authors propose a modification to one of them to circumvent its restriction to low complication probabilities. (author). 26 refs.; 7 figs

  20. Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of the Safety of Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nakachi, Kohei; Nishio, Teiji; Mitsunaga, Shuichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Konishi, Masaru; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Arahira, Satoko; Zenda, Sadamoto; Ogino, Takashi; Kinoshita, Taira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy using proton beam (PRT) for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients who underwent PRT between May 1999 and July 2007 were analyzed. There were 42 males and 18 females, with a median age of 70 years (48-92 years). All but 1 patient had a single lesion with a median diameter of 45 mm (20-100 mm). Total PRT dose/fractionation was 76-cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE)/20 fractions in 46 patients, 65 CGE/26 fractions in 11 patients, and 60 CGE/10 fractions in 3 patients. The risk of developing proton-induced hepatic insufficiency (PHI) was estimated using dose-volume histograms and an indocyanine-green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15). Results: None of the 20 patients with ICG R15 of less than 20% developed PHI, whereas 6 of 8 patients with ICG R15 values of 50% or higher developed PHI. Among 32 patients whose ICG R15 ranged from 20% to 49.9%, PHI was observed only in patients who had received 30 CGE (V30) to more than 25% of the noncancerous parts of the liver (n = 5) Local progression-free and overall survival rates at 3 years were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80-99%) and 56% (95% CI, 43-69%), respectively. A gastrointestinal toxicity of Grade ≥2 was observed in 3 patients. Conclusions: ICG R15 and V30 are recommended as useful predictors for the risk of developing PHI, which should be incorporated into multidisciplinary treatment plans for patients with this disease.

  1. Hippocampal dose volume histogram predicts Hopkins Verbal Learning Test scores after brain irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Okoukoni, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Radiation-induced cognitive decline is relatively common after treatment for primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, identifying dosimetric parameters that are predictive of radiation-induced cognitive decline is difficult due to the heterogeneity of patient characteristics. The memory function is especially susceptible to radiation effects after treatment. The objective of this study is to correlate volumetric radiation doses received by critical neuroanatomic structures to post–radiation therapy (RT memory impairment. Methods and materials: Between 2008 and 2011, 53 patients with primary brain malignancies were treated with conventionally fractionated RT in prospectively accrued clinical trials performed at our institution. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for the hippocampus, parahippocampus, amygdala, and fusiform gyrus. Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised scores were obtained at least 6 months after RT. Impairment was defined as an immediate recall score ≤15. For each anatomic region, serial regression was performed to correlate volume receiving a given dose (VD(Gy with memory impairment. Results: Hippocampal V53.4Gy to V60.9Gy significantly predicted post-RT memory impairment (P < .05. Within this range, the hippocampal V55Gy was the most significant predictor (P = .004. Hippocampal V55Gy of 0%, 25%, and 50% was associated with tumor-induced impairment rates of 14.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2%-28.7%, 45.9% (95% CI, 24.7%-68.6%, and 80.6% (95% CI, 39.2%-96.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The hippocampal V55Gy is a significant predictor for impairment, and a limiting dose below 55 Gy may minimize radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

  2. Optimization of stereotactically-guided conformal treatment planning of sellar and parasellar tumors, based on normal brain dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Julian R.; Jalali, Rakesh; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Shepherd, Stephen F.; Warrington, Alan P.; Brada, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal treatment plan for stereo tactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) of sellar and parasellar lesions, with respect to sparing normal brain tissue, in the context of routine treatment delivery, based on dose volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) data sets for 8 patients with sellar- and parasellar-based tumors (6 pituitary adenomas and 2 meningiomas) have been used in this study. Treatment plans were prepared for 3-coplanar and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 30-noncoplanar-field arrangements to obtain 95% isodose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) for each plan. Conformal shaping was achieved by customized blocks generated with the beams eye view (BEV) facility. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the normal brain (excluding the PTV), and comparisons made for normal tissue sparing for all treatment plans at ≥80%, ≥60%, and ≥40% of the prescribed dose. Results: The mean volume of normal brain receiving ≥80% and ≥60% of the prescribed dose decreased by 22.3% (range 14.8-35.1%, standard deviation σ = 7.5%) and 47.6% (range 25.8-69.1%, σ 13.2%), respectively, with a 4-field noncoplanar technique when compared with a conventional 3-field coplanar technique. Adding 2 further fields, from 4-noncoplanar to 6-noncoplanar fields reduced the mean normal brain volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose by a further 4.1% (range -6.5-11.8%, σ = 6.4%), and the volume receiving ≥60% by 3.3% (range -5.5-12.2%, σ = 5.4%), neither of which were statistically significant. Each case must be considered individually however, as a wide range is seen in the volume spared when increasing the number of fields from 4 to 6. Comparing the 4- and 6-field noncoplanar techniques to a 30-field conformal field approach (simulating a dynamic arc plan) revealed near-equivalent normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: Four to six widely spaced, fixed-conformal fields provide the optimum class solution

  3. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  4. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  5. Estimation of pneumonitis risk in three-dimensional treatment planning using dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetzel, Dieter; Schraube, Peter; Hensley, Frank; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Menke, Markus; Flentje, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Investigations to study correlations between the estimations of biophysical models in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and clinical observations are scarce. The development of clinically symptomatic pneumonitis in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignomas was chosen to test the predictive power of Lyman's normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the assessment of side effects for nonuniform irradiation. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective analysis individual computed-tomography-based 3D dose distributions of a random sample of (46(20)) patients with lung/esophageal cancer were reconstructed. All patients received tumor doses between 50 and 60 Gy in a conventional treatment schedule. Biological isoeffective dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were used for the calculation of complication probabilities after applying Lyman's and Kutcher's DVH-reduction algorithm. Lung dose statistics were performed for single lung (involved ipsilateral and contralateral) and for the lung as a paired organ. Results: In the lung cancer group, about 20% of the patients (9 out of 46) developed pneumonitis 3-12 (median 7.5) weeks after completion of radiotherapy. For the majority of these lung cancer patients, the involved ipsilateral lung received a much higher dose than the contralateral lung, and the pneumonitis patients had on average a higher lung exposure with a doubling of the predicted complication risk (38% vs. 20%). The lower lung exposure for the esophagus patients resulted in a mean lung dose of 13.2 Gy (lung cancer: 20.5 Gy) averaged over all patients in correlation with an almost zero complication risk and only one observed case of pneumonitis (1 out of 20). To compare the pneumonitis risk estimations with observed complication rates, the patients were ranked into bins of mean ipsilateral lung dose. Particularly, in the bins with the highest patient numbers, a good correlation was achieved. Agreement was not reached for the lung functioning as

  6. Dose-volume histograms based on serial intravascular ultrasound: a calculation model for radioactive stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, Christian; Wexberg, Paul; Gottsauner-Wolf, Michael; Pokrajac, Boris; Ortmann, Elisabeth; Aiginger, Hannes; Glogar, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radioactive stents are under investigation for reduction of coronary restenosis. However, the actual dose delivered to specific parts of the coronary artery wall based on the individual vessel anatomy has not been determined so far. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) permit an estimation of the actual dose absorbed by the target volume. We present a method to calculate DVHs based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements to determine the dose distribution within the vessel wall. Materials and methods: Ten patients were studied by intravascular ultrasound after radioactive stenting (BX Stent, P-32, 15-mm length) to obtain tomographic cross-sections of the treated segments. We developed a computer algorithm using the actual dose distribution of the stent to calculate differential and cumulative DVHs. The minimal target dose, the mean target dose, the minimal doses delivered to 10 and 90% of the adventitia (DV10, DV90), and the percentage of volume receiving a reference dose at 0.5 mm from the stent surface cumulated over 28 days were derived from the DVH plots. Results were expressed as mean±SD. Results: The mean activity of the stents was 438±140 kBq at implantation. The mean reference dose was 111±35 Gy, whereas the calculated mean target dose within the adventitia along the stent was 68±20 Gy. On average, DV90 and DV10 were 33±9 Gy and 117±41 Gy, respectively. Expanding the target volume to include 2.5-mm-long segments at the proximal and distal ends of the stent, the calculated mean target dose decreased to 55±17 Gy, and DV 90 and DV 10 were 6.4±2.4 Gy and 107±36 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of DVHs seems in principle to be a valuable tool for both prospective and retrospective analysis of dose-distribution of radioactive stents. It may provide the basis to adapt treatment planning in coronary brachytherapy to the common standards of radiotherapy

  7. IMRT: Improvement in treatment planning efficiency using NTCP calculation independent of the dose-volume-histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorov, Grigor N.; Chow, James C.L.; Grigorov, Lenko; Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B.

    2006-01-01

    The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the dose-volume-histogram (DVH) which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Including the NTCP in the objective function for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization would make the planning more effective in reducing the postradiation effects. However, doing so would lengthen the total planning time. The purpose of this work is to establish a method for NTCP determination, independent of a DVH calculation, as a quality assurance check and also as a mean of improving the treatment planning efficiency. In the study, the CTs of ten randomly selected prostate patients were used. IMRT optimization was performed with a PINNACLE3 V 6.2b planning system, using planning target volume (PTV) with margins in the range of 2 to 10 mm. The DVH control points of the PTV and OAR were adapted from the prescriptions of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol P-0126 for an escalated prescribed dose of 82 Gy. This paper presents a new model for the determination of the rectal NTCP ( R NTCP). The method uses a special function, named GVN (from Gy, Volume, NTCP), which describes the R NTCP if 1 cm 3 of the volume of intersection of the PTV and rectum (R int ) is irradiated uniformly by a dose of 1 Gy. The function was 'geometrically' normalized using a prostate-prostate ratio (PPR) of the patients' prostates. A correction of the R NTCP for different prescribed doses, ranging from 70 to 82 Gy, was employed in our model. The argument of the normalized function is the R int , and parameters are the prescribed dose, prostate volume, PTV margin, and PPR. The R NTCPs of another group of patients were calculated by the new method and the resulting difference was <±5% in comparison to the NTCP calculated by the PINNACLE3 software where Kutcher's dose

  8. Principal Component Analysis-Based Pattern Analysis of Dose-Volume Histograms and Influence on Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Alber, Markus; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) shapes in a patient population can be quantified using principal component analysis (PCA). We applied this to rectal DVHs of prostate cancer patients and investigated the correlation of the PCA parameters with late bleeding. Methods and Materials: PCA was applied to the rectal wall DVHs of 262 patients, who had been treated with a four-field box, conformal adaptive radiotherapy technique. The correlated changes in the DVH pattern were revealed as 'eigenmodes,' which were ordered by their importance to represent data set variability. Each DVH is uniquely characterized by its principal components (PCs). The correlation of the first three PCs and chronic rectal bleeding of Grade 2 or greater was investigated with uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Rectal wall DVHs in four-field conformal RT can primarily be represented by the first two or three PCs, which describe ∼94% or 96% of the DVH shape variability, respectively. The first eigenmode models the total irradiated rectal volume; thus, PC1 correlates to the mean dose. Mode 2 describes the interpatient differences of the relative rectal volume in the two- or four-field overlap region. Mode 3 reveals correlations of volumes with intermediate doses (∼40-45 Gy) and volumes with doses >70 Gy; thus, PC3 is associated with the maximal dose. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, only PC2 correlated significantly with toxicity. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis with the first two or three PCs revealed an increased probability of bleeding for DVHs with more than one large PC. Conclusions: PCA can reveal the correlation structure of DVHs for a patient population as imposed by the treatment technique and provide information about its relationship to toxicity. It proves useful for augmenting normal tissue complication probability modeling approaches

  9. Dose-volume histogram analysis of hepatic toxicity related to carbon ion radiation therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Shigeo; Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hitohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the correlation of hepatic toxicity with dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy in the liver. Forty-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy delivered in 4 fractions over 4 to 7 days. Six patients received a total dose of 48 GyE and 43 received 52.8 GyE. The correlation of various blood biochemistry data with dose-volume histogram (DVH) data in non-cancerous liver were evaluated. The strongest significant correlation was seen between percent volume of non-cancerous liver with radiation dose more than 11 GyE (V 11 GyE ) and elevation of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level as early adverse response after carbon ion beam radiation therapy (p=0.0003). In addition, significant correlation between DVH data and change of several other blood biochemistry data were also revealed in early phase. In late phase after carbon ion radiotherapy, the strongest significant correlation was seen between decrease of platelet count and V 26GyE (p=0.015). There was no significant correlation between other blood biochemistry data and DVH data in the late phase. It was suggested that dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy influenced only transient aggravation of liver function, which improved in the long term after irradiation. (author)

  10. Oriented Shape Index Histograms for Cell Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel extension to the shape index histogram feature descriptor where the orientation of the second-order curvature is included in the histograms. The orientation of the shape index is reminiscent but not equal to gradient orientation which is widely used for feature description. We...... evaluate our new feature descriptor using a public dataset consisting of HEp-2 cell images from indirect immunoflourescence lighting. Our results show that we can improve classification performance significantly when including the shape index orientation. Notably, we show that shape index orientation...

  11. A dose-volume histogram based decision-support system for dosimetric comparison of radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, J. C. L.; Herrero, M. A.; Núñez, L.

    2015-01-01

    The choice of any radiotherapy treatment plan is usually made after the evaluation of a few preliminary isodose distributions obtained from different beam configurations. Despite considerable advances in planning techniques, such final decision remains a challenging task that would greatly benefit from efficient and reliable assessment tools. For any dosimetric plan considered, data on dose-volume histograms supplied by treatment planning systems are used to provide estimates on planning target coverage as well as on sparing of organs at risk and the remaining healthy tissue. These partial metrics are then combined into a dose distribution index (DDI), which provides a unified, easy-to-read score for each competing radiotherapy plan. To assess the performance of the proposed scoring system, DDI figures for fifty brain cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided in three groups depending on tumor location and malignancy. For each patient, three tentative plans were designed and recorded during planning, one of which was eventually selected for treatment. We thus were able to compare the plans with better DDI scores and those actually delivered. When planning target coverage and organs at risk sparing are considered as equally important, the tentative plan with the highest DDI score is shown to coincide with that actually delivered in 32 of the 50 patients considered. In 15 (respectively 3) of the remaining 18 cases, the plan with highest DDI value still coincides with that actually selected, provided that organs at risk sparing is given higher priority (respectively, lower priority) than target coverage. DDI provides a straightforward and non-subjective tool for dosimetric comparison of tentative radiotherapy plans. In particular, DDI readily quantifies differences among competing plans with similar-looking dose-volume histograms and can be easily implemented for any tumor type and localization, irrespective of the planning system and

  12. Temporal Evolution and Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Visual Acuity After Proton Beam Radiation Therapy of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, Alexei L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: Kavita.Mishra@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian; Daftari, Inder K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Nguyen, Jacqueline M.; Cole, Tia B. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an in-depth temporal analysis of visual acuity (VA) outcomes after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in a large, uniformly treated cohort of uveal melanoma (UM) patients, to determine trends in VA evolution depending on pretreatment and temporally defined posttreatment VA measurements; and to investigate the relevance of specific patient, tumor and dose-volume parameters to posttreatment vision loss. Methods and Materials: Uveal melanoma patients receiving PBRT were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Included patients (n=645) received 56 GyE in 4 fractions, had pretreatment best corrected VA (BCVA) in the affected eye of count fingers (CF) or better, with posttreatment VA assessment at specified post-PBRT time point(s). Patients were grouped according to the pretreatment BCVA into favorable (≥20/40) or unfavorable (20/50-20/400) and poor (CF) strata. Temporal analysis of BCVA changes was described, and univariate and forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors for VA loss. Results: Median VA follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-213 months). At 60-month follow up, among evaluable treated eyes with favorable pretreatment BCVA, 45% retained BCVA ≥20/40, whereas among evaluable treated eyes with initially unfavorable/poor BCVA, 21% had vision ≥20/100. Among those with a favorable initial BCVA, attaining BCVA of ≥20/40 at any posttreatment time point was associated with subsequent maintenance of excellent BCVA. Multivariate analysis identified volume of the macula receiving 28GyE (P<.0001) and optic nerve (P=.0004) as independent dose-volume histogram predictors of 48-month post-PBRT vision loss among initially favorable treated eyes. Conclusions: Approximately half of PBRT-treated UM eyes with excellent pretreatment BCVA assessed at 5 years after treatment will retain excellent long-term vision. 28GyE macula and optic nerve dose-volume histogram parameters allow for

  13. SU-G-BRC-08: Evaluation of Dose Mass Histogram as a More Representative Dose Description Method Than Dose Volume Histogram in Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Eldib, A; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, M [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) is widely used for plan evaluation in radiation treatment. The concept of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) is expected to provide a more representative description as it accounts for heterogeneity in tissue density. This study is intended to assess the difference between DVH and DMH for evaluating treatment planning quality. Methods: 12 lung cancer treatment plans were exported from the treatment planning system. DVHs for the planning target volume (PTV), the normal lung and other structures of interest were calculated. DMHs were calculated in a similar way as DVHs expect that the voxel density converted from the CT number was used in tallying the dose histogram bins. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated based on voxel volume and mass, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in relation to the EUD was calculated for the normal lung to provide quantitative comparison of DVHs and DMHs for evaluating the radiobiological effect. Results: Large differences were observed between DVHs and DMHs for lungs and PTVs. For PTVs with dense tumor cores, DMHs are higher than DVHs due to larger mass weighing in the high dose conformal core regions. For the normal lungs, DMHs can either be higher or lower than DVHs depending on the target location within the lung. When the target is close to the lower lung, DMHs show higher values than DVHs because the lower lung has higher density than the central portion or the upper lung. DMHs are lower than DVHs for targets in the upper lung. The calculated NTCPs showed a large range of difference between DVHs and DMHs. Conclusion: The heterogeneity of lung can be well considered using DMH for evaluating target coverage and normal lung pneumonitis. Further studies are warranted to quantify the benefits of DMH over DVH for plan quality evaluation.

  14. Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, Linda

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.

  15. BEDVH--A method for evaluating biologically effective dose volume histograms: Application to eye plaque brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Huber, Kathryn E.; Mignano, John E.; Duker, Jay S.; Laver, Nora V.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A method is introduced to examine the influence of implant duration T, radionuclide, and radiobiological parameters on the biologically effective dose (BED) throughout the entire volume of regions of interest for episcleral brachytherapy using available radionuclides. This method is employed to evaluate a particular eye plaque brachytherapy implant in a radiobiological context. Methods: A reference eye geometry and 16 mm COMS eye plaque loaded with 103 Pd, 125 I, or 131 Cs sources were examined with dose distributions accounting for plaque heterogeneities. For a standardized 7 day implant, doses to 90% of the tumor volume ( TUMOR D 90 ) and 10% of the organ at risk volumes ( OAR D 10 ) were calculated. The BED equation from Dale and Jones and published α/β and μ parameters were incorporated with dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various T values such as T = 7 days (i.e., TUMOR 7 BED 10 and OAR 7 BED 10 ). By calculating BED throughout the volumes, biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs) were developed for tumor and OARs. Influence of T, radionuclide choice, and radiobiological parameters on TUMOR BEDVH and OAR BEDVH were examined. The nominal dose was scaled for shorter implants to achieve biological equivalence. Results: TUMOR D 90 values were 102, 112, and 110 Gy for 103 Pd, 125 I, and 131 Cs, respectively. Corresponding TUMOR 7 BED 10 values were 124, 140, and 138 Gy, respectively. As T decreased from 7 to 0.01 days, the isobiologically effective prescription dose decreased by a factor of three. As expected, TUMOR 7 BEDVH did not significantly change as a function of radionuclide half-life but varied by 10% due to radionuclide dose distribution. Variations in reported radiobiological parameters caused TUMOR 7 BED 10 to deviate by up to 46%. Over the range of OAR α/β values, OAR 7 BED 10 varied by up to 41%, 3.1%, and 1.4% for the lens, optic nerve, and lacrimal gland, respectively. Conclusions: BEDVH permits evaluation of the

  16. Absolute and relative dose-surface and dose-volume histograms of the bladder: which one is the most representative for the actual treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogeman, Mischa S; Peeters, Stephanie T H; Bois, Josien de; Lebesque, Joos V

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify to what extent relative and absolute bladder dose-volume and dose-surface histograms of the planning CT scan were representative for the actual treatment. We used data of 17 patients, who each received 11 repeat CT scans and a planning CT scan. The repeat CT scans were matched on the planning CT scan by the bony anatomy. Clinical treatment plans were used to evaluate the impact of bladder filling changes on the four histogram types. The impact was quantified by calculating for this patient group the correlation coefficient between the planning histogram and the treatment histogram. We found that the absolute dose-surface histogram was the most representative one for the actual treatment

  17. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% ± 14% vs. 22% ± 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received ≥90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB

  18. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  19. Postimplantation Analysis Enables Improvement of Dose-Volume Histograms and Reduction of Toxicity for Permanent Seed Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, Peter; Postrach, Johanna; Kahmann, Frank; Henkel, Thomas; Graf, Reinhold; Cho, Chie Hee; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate how postimplantation analysis is useful for improving permanent seed implantation and reducing toxicity. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 197 questionnaires completed by patients after permanent seed implantation (monotherapy between 1999 and 2003). For 70% of these patients, a computed tomography was available to perform postimplantation analysis. The index doses and volumes of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were determined and categorized with respect to the date of implantation. Differences in symptom scores relative to pretherapeutic status were analyzed with regard to follow-up times and DVH descriptors. Acute and subacute toxicities in a control group of 117 patients from an earlier study (June 1999 to September 2001) by Wust et al. (2004) were compared with a matched subgroup from this study equaling 110 patients treated between October 2001 and August 2003. Results: Improved performance, identifying a characteristic time dependency of DVH parameters (after implantation) and toxicity scores, was demonstrated. Although coverage (volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose of the prostate) increased slightly, high-dose regions decreased with the growing experience of the users. Improvement in the DVH and a reduction of toxicities were found in the patient group implanted in the later period. A decline in symptoms with follow-up time counteracts this gain of experience and must be considered. Urinary and sexual discomfort was enhanced by dose heterogeneities (e.g., dose covering 10% of the prostate volume, volume covered by 200% of prescription dose). In contrast, rectal toxicities correlated with exposed rectal volumes, especially the rectal volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The typical side effects occurring after permanent seed implantation can be reduced by improving the dose distributions. An improvement in dose distributions and a reduction of toxicities were identified with elapsed time between

  20. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with max ]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D max ) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D 2 ) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON

  1. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  2. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Clinical Factors Associated With Pleural Effusion After Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Murata, Kazutoshi; Satoh, Yumi; Higuchi, Keiko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical factors as predictors of pleural effusion in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-three esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT from January 2001 to March 2007 were reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the following criteria: pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, available computed tomography scan for treatment planning, 6-month follow-up after CRT, and radiation dose ≥50 Gy. Exclusion criteria were lung metastasis, malignant pleural effusion, and surgery. Mean heart dose, mean total lung dose, and percentages of heart or total lung volume receiving ≥10-60 Gy (Heart-V 10 to V 60 and Lung-V 10 to V 60 , respectively) were analyzed in relation to pleural effusion. Results: The median follow-up time was 26.9 months (range, 6.7-70.2) after CRT. Of the 43 patients, 15 (35%) developed pleural effusion. By univariate analysis, mean heart dose, Heart-V 10 to V 60 , and Lung-V 50 to V 60 were significantly associated with pleural effusion. Poor performance status, primary tumor of the distal esophagus, and age ≥65 years were significantly related with pleural effusion. Multivariate analysis identified Heart-V 50 as the strongest predictive factor for pleural effusion (p = 0.01). Patients with Heart-V 50 50 50 ≥40% had 6%, 44%, and 64% of pleural effusion, respectively (p 50 is a useful parameter for assessing the risk of pleural effusion and should be reduced to avoid pleural effusion.

  3. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Chiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Isono, Masaru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  4. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; Schelfhout, J; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  5. The role of three dimensional functional lung imaging in radiation treatment planning: the functional dose-volume histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Spencer, David P.; Sherouse, George W.; Bentel, Gunilla; Clough, Robert; Vann, Karen; Jaszczak, Ronald; Coleman, R. Edward; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: During thoracic irradiation (XRT), treatment fields are usually designed to minimize the volume of nontumor-containing lung included. Generally, functional heterogeneities within the lung are not considered. The three dimensional (3D) functional information provided by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scans might be useful in designing beams that minimize incidental irradiation of functioning lung tissue. We herein review the pretreatment SPECT scans in 86 patients (56 with lung cancer) to determine which are likely to benefit from this technology. Methods and Materials: Prior to thoracic XRT, SPECT lung perfusion scans were obtained following the intravenous injection of ∼4 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled macro-aggregated albumin. The presence of areas of decreased perfusion, their location relative to the tumor, and the potential clinical usefulness of their recognition, were scored. Patients were grouped and compared (two-tailed chi-square) based on clinical factors. Conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and functional DVHs (DV F Hs) are calculated based on the dose distribution throughout the computed tomography (CT)-defined lung and SPECT-defined perfused lung, respectively. Results: Among 56 lung cancer patients, decreases in perfusion were observed at the tumor, adjacent to the tumor, and separate from the tumor in 94%, 74%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Perfusion defects adjacent to the tumor were often large with centrally placed tumors. Hypoperfusion in regions separate from the tumor were statistically most common in patients with relatively poor pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Considering all SPECT defects adjacent to and separate from the tumor, corresponding CT abnormalities were seen in only ∼50% and 20% of patients, respectively, and were generally not as impressive. Following XRT, hypoperfusion at and separate from the tumor persisted, while defects adjacent to the

  6. Comparison of dose-volume histograms for Tomo therapy, linear accelerator-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Choi, Seong-Kwan; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Jong-Woong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Evaluation of DVH from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy was conducted for tumor therapy. → The doses of GTV and CTV were compared using DVHs from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy. → The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used, while the doses of critical organ were low. → They said that Tomo therapy satisfied the goal of radiation therapy more than the others. - Abstract: Evaluation of dose-volume histograms from three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and Tomo therapy was conducted. These three modalities are among the diverse treatment systems available for tumor therapy. Three patients who received tumor therapy for a malignant oligodendroglioma in the cranium, nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the cervical neck, and prostate cancer in the pelvis were selected as study subjects. Therapy plans were made for the three patients before dose-volume histograms were obtained. The doses of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were compared using the dose-volume histograms obtained from the LINAC-based 3D CRT, IMRT planning station (Varian Eclipse-Varian, version 8.1), and Tomo therapy planning station. In addition, the doses of critical organs in the cranium, cervix, and pelvis that should be protected were compared. The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used compared to 3D CRT and the LINAC-based IMRT, while the doses of critical organ tissues that required protection were low. These results demonstrated that Tomo therapy satisfied the ultimate goal of radiation therapy more than the other therapies.

  7. High-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients does not increase postoperative pulmonary complications: Correlation with dose-volume histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurmuzlu, Meysan; Ovrebo, Kjell; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Viste, Asgaut; Smaaland, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of high-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of lungs with incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and to identify predictive clinical factors of pulmonary complications. Methods: Data of 65 patients were collected retrospectively. Thirty-five patients underwent transthoracic esophagectomy (TTE) alone and 30 received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, concomitant with radiotherapy, median dose 66 Gy, and followed by TTE. From the DVH for each lung alone and for both lungs together as one organ we generated total lung volume, mean radiotherapy dose, relative and absolute volumes receiving more than a threshold dose, and relative and absolute volumes receiving less than a threshold dose. Postoperative pulmonary complications were defined as pneumonia or respiratory failure. Results: Sixty percent of the patients in the TTE alone group had postoperative pulmonary complications versus 63% in the CRT + TTE group. Postoperative mortality was 8.6% and 16.7% in the respective patient groups (p = NS). None of the DVH parameters was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Squamous cell carcinoma was an adverse factor related to increased postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusion: High-dose preoperative CRT was not associated with increased postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients.

  8. Method of predicting the mean lung dose based on a patient's anatomy and dose-volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka, Anna, E-mail: a.zawadzka@zfm.coi.pl [Medical Physics Department, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Warsaw (Poland); Nesteruk, Marta [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Brzozowska, Beata [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Kukołowicz, Paweł F. [Medical Physics Department, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a method to predict the minimum achievable mean lung dose (MLD) and corresponding dosimetric parameters for organs-at-risk (OAR) based on individual patient anatomy. For each patient, the dose for 36 equidistant individual multileaf collimator shaped fields in the treatment planning system (TPS) was calculated. Based on these dose matrices, the MLD for each patient was predicted by the homemade DosePredictor software in which the solution of linear equations was implemented. The software prediction results were validated based on 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans previously prepared for 16 patients with stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For each patient, dosimetric parameters derived from plans and the results calculated by DosePredictor were compared. The MLD, the maximum dose to the spinal cord (D{sub max} {sub cord}) and the mean esophageal dose (MED) were analyzed. There was a strong correlation between the MLD calculated by the DosePredictor and those obtained in treatment plans regardless of the technique used. The correlation coefficient was 0.96 for both 3D-CRT and VMAT techniques. In a similar manner, MED correlations of 0.98 and 0.96 were obtained for 3D-CRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The maximum dose to the spinal cord was not predicted very well. The correlation coefficient was 0.30 and 0.61 for 3D-CRT and VMAT, respectively. The presented method allows us to predict the minimum MLD and corresponding dosimetric parameters to OARs without the necessity of plan preparation. The method can serve as a guide during the treatment planning process, for example, as initial constraints in VMAT optimization. It allows the probability of lung pneumonitis to be predicted.

  9. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  10. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p ≥ 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy 3 (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy 3 ] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy 3 ) and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were also significant and clinically useful for estimating the risk of rib fracture after hypofractionated PBT

  11. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Ayae [Proton Medical Research Center and Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)], e-mail: ayaek@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [and others

    2013-04-15

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p {>=} 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy{sub 3} (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy{sub 3}] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy{sub 3}) and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were also significant and clinically useful for estimating

  12. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  13. The analysis of correlation between changes of myocardial enzymes level in serum before and after radiation and dose-volume histogram parameters of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiuping; Li Hongjun; Li Baosheng; Wang Dongqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the changes of myocardial enzyme level in serum before and after radiotherapy and dose - volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart. Methods: A total of 102 patients with 68 cases of lung cancer and 34 cases of esophageal cancer were recruited. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with the radiation beams passing through the heart. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isozyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (α-HBDH) were determined in the serum before and after radiotherapy. All the enzyme levels before and after radiotherapy were compared through paired t-test. Independent sample t-test was conducted between sub-groups. And the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart were calculated (the volume percentage of heart receiving dose equal to or exceeding x Gy (V x ). The correlation between myocardial enzyme level and DVH parameters was analyzed through Pearson method. Results: Serum AST, CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH levels increased significantly after radiotherapy (19.42: 27.89, 14.72:19.57, 178.80 : 217.57, 140.32 : 176.25, t =-3.39 - -6.92, all P=0.000). In Group IMRT, significant correlations between the increase of myocardial enzyme concentration and DVH parameters of the heart are found, AST with V 20 , V 25 , V 30 of heart ( r=0.302 - 0.431, P =0.039 - 0.003), CK with V 30 of heart (r=0.345, P=0.013), and CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH with V 25 , V 30 (r=0.465 -0.376, P=0.001-0.005). In Group CRT, there are significant correlations between changes of CK-MB, LDH level and V 30 of heart (r =0.330, 0.274, P=0.014, 0.033), α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 , and V 35 of heart (r=0.270-0.331, P=0.046-0.014). When the irradiation dose was more than 50 Gy, significant correlations were found between the concentration changes of AST, LDH, α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 of heart (r=0

  14. Parotid gland tumors: A comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Tyerech, Sangeeta K.; Boselli, Lucia R.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: The CT-scans of a representative parotid patient were used. The field size was 9 x 11 cm, the separation was 15.5 cm, and the prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and dose-volume histogram (DVH), nine treatment techniques were compared. [1] unilateral 6 MV photons [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons [4] an ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting) [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥ 30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and < 5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1], [8] and [9] contributed to ≥ 50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed electron-photon beams [8] and [9] are not recommended treatment techniques for unilateral parotid irradiation because of high doses delivered to the

  15. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  16. Association of anorectal dose-volume histograms and impaired fecal continence after 3D conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Schwab, Michael; Ness-Dourdoumas, Rhea; Sailer, Marco; Flentje, Michael; Koelbl, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The late toxicity of fecal incontinence after pelvic radiotherapy is now frequently recognized but the etiology poorly understood. We therefore investigated associations between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the rectum and the anal canal with fecal continence as measured by an established 10-item questionnaire. Methods and materials: Forty-four patients treated for carcinoma of the prostate with 58-72 Gy of 3D conformal radiotherapy between 1995 and 1999 who completed the questionnaire formed the study population. Total continence scores of treated patients obtained 1.5 years (median) after radiotherapy were compared to a control group of 30 patients before radiotherapy. Median, mean, minimum and maximum doses as well as the volume (% and ml) treated to 40, 50, 60 and 70 Gy were determined separately for anal canal and rectum. DVH parameters were correlated with total continence score (Spearman rank test) and patients grouped according to observed continence were compared regarding DVH values (Mann-Whitney U-test). Results: Median fecal continence scores were significantly worse in the irradiated than in the control group (31 vs. 35 of a maximum 36 points). In treated patients, 59%/27%/14% were classified as fully continent, slightly incontinent and severely incontinent. Continence was similar in the 58-to-62-Gy, 66-Gy and 68-to-72-Gy dose groups. No DVH parameter was significantly correlated with total continence score, but severely incontinent patients had a significantly higher minimum dose to the anal canal than fully continent/slightly incontinent, accompanied by portals extending significantly further inferiorly with respect to the ischial tuberosities. Conclusions: Excluding the inferior part of the anal canal from the treated volume in 3D conformal therapy for carcinoma of the prostate appears to be a promising strategy to prevent radiation-induced fecal incontinence

  17. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K; Chen, X; Wang, J; Lu, S; Chen, Y; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) and 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.

  18. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Chen, X; Wang, J; Lu, S; Chen, Y; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) and 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.

  19. Impact of intra-arterial administration of boron compounds on dose-volume histograms in boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head-and-neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kato, Ituro; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imahori, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head-and-neck tumors treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and to determine the advantage of the intra-arterial (IA) route over the intravenous (IV) route as a drug delivery system for BNCT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen BNCTs for 12 patients with recurrent head-and-neck tumors were included in the present study. Eight irradiations were done after IV administration of boronophenylalanine and seven after IA administration. The maximal, mean, and minimal doses given to the gross tumor volume were assessed using a BNCT planning system. Results: The results are reported as median values with the interquartile range. In the IA group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 68.7 Gy-Eq (range, 38.8-79.9), 45.0 Gy-Eq (range, 25.1-51.0), and 13.8 Gy-Eq (range, 4.8-25.3), respectively. In the IV group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 24.2 Gy-Eq (range, 21.5-29.9), 16.4 Gy-Eq (range, 14.5-20.2), and 7.8 Gy-Eq (range, 6.8-9.5), respectively. Within 1-3 months after BNCT, the responses were assessed. Of the 6 patients in the IV group, 2 had a partial response, 3 no change, and 1 had progressive disease. Of 4 patients in the IA group, 1 achieved a complete response and 3 a partial response. Conclusion: Intra-arterial administration of boronophenylalanine is a promising drug delivery system for head-and-neck BNCT

  20. HEp-2 Cell Classification Using Shape Index Histograms With Donut-Shaped Spatial Pooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic classification of indirect immunoflourescence images of HEp-2 cells into different staining pattern classes. Our method is based on a new texture measure called shape index histograms that captures second-order image structure at multiple scales. Moreover, we...... datasets. Our results show that shape index histograms are superior to other popular texture descriptors for HEp-2 cell classification. Moreover, when comparing to other automated systems for HEp-2 cell classification we show that shape index histograms are very competitive; especially considering...

  1. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  2. Does prostate brachytherapy treat the seminal vesicles? A dose-volume histogram analysis of seminal vesicles in patients undergoing combined PD-103 prostate implantation and external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Gaildon, Mohamoud; Stone, Nelson N.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Combined brachytherapy of the prostate and external beam irradiation (EBRT) of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) is becoming a popular treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the SV in patients undergoing this treatment was performed to determine the dose distribution to the SV and the adequacy of this treatment in patients with potential SV involvement. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five consecutive patients were treated with a Pd-103 implant of the prostate alone and 45 Gy of EBRT to the prostate and SV. Attempts were not made to implant the SV but seeds were routinely placed at the junction of the prostate and SV. All patients underwent CT-based post implant dosimetric analysis 1 month after implantation. As part of this analysis, DVH were generated for the prostate and total SV volume (SVT). In addition, the SV was divided into 6-mm-thick volumes identified as SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 starting from the junction of the prostate and SV and extending distally. DVH were also generated for these structures. Delivered dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the organ on DVH). Results: The median volumes in cc of the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 34.33, 9.75, 2.7, 3.48, 2.92, 3.18, and 1.96 respectively. The SVT contained from 0-9 seeds (median 2). There was little dose delivered to the SVT and SV volumes from the implanted prostate. The median D90 values for the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 8615 cGy, 675 cGy, 3100 cGy, 1329 cGy, 553 cGy, 246 cGy, and 67 cGy, respectively. The dose delivered to the prostate covered small percentages of SV. The percents of SV volumes covered by the prostate D90 were 11, 35, 3.3, 0, 0, and 0 for SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5, respectively. Conclusions: DVH analysis of the SV reveals that dose generated from an implanted prostate contributes little to the SV. Those patients at high risk for SV involvement may be under treated

  3. Biological-effective versus conventional dose volume histograms correlated with late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a matched pair analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeske John C

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the dose-volume histograms (DVH's for the rectum and bladder constructed using biological-effective dose (BED-DVH's better correlate with late gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer than conventional DVH's (C-DVH's. Methods The charts of 190 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were reviewed. Six patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GI toxicity, and similarly 6 patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GU toxicity. Average late C-DVH's and BED-DVH's of the bladder and rectum were computed for these patients as well as for matched-pair control patients. For each matched pair the following measures of normalized difference in the DVH's were computed: (a δAUC = (Area Under Curve [AUC] in grade 3 patient – AUC in grade 0 patient/(AUC in grade 0 patient and (b δV60 = (Percent volume receiving = 60 Gy [V60] in grade 3 patient – V60 in grade 0 patient/(V60 in grade 0 patient. Results As expected, the grade 3 curve is to the right of and above the grade 0 curve for all four sets of average DVH's – suggesting that both the C-DVH and the BED-DVH can be used for predicting late toxicity. δAUC was higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 0.27 vs 0.23 (p = 0.036 for the rectum and 0.24 vs 0.20 (p = 0.065 for the bladder. δV60 was also higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 2.73 vs 1.49 for the rectum (p = 0.021 and 1.64 vs 0.71 (p = 0.021 for the bladder. Conclusions When considering well-established dosimetric endpoints used in evaluating treatment plans, BED-DVH's for the rectum and bladder correlate better with late toxicity than C-DVH's and should be considered when attempting to minimize late GI and GU toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  4. Parotid gland tumors: a comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3-D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, R.; Tyerech, S.K.; Boselli, L.R.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients previously treated postoperatively for parotid gland tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Average field size was 9 x 11 cm, average separation was 15.5 cm, and the average prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3-D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and DVH, nine treatment techniques were compared using a representative patient. The treatment techniques investigated were: [1] unilateral 6 MV photons. [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons. [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons. [4] a ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons and a 45-degree wedge. [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons. [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting). [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and <5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1] and [8] contributed to ≥50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed

  5. Real-time beam monitoring for error detection in IMRT plans and impact on dose-volume histograms. A multi-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrazzo, Livia; Arilli, Chiara; Casati, Marta [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen-Friedrichshafen (Germany); Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Fedeli, Luca; Calusi, Silvia [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Talamonti, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Simontacchi, Gabriele [Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    This study aimed to test the sensitivity of a transmission detector for online dose monitoring of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for detecting small delivery errors. Furthermore, the correlation of changes in detector output induced by small delivery errors with other metrics commonly employed to quantify the deviations between calculated and delivered dose distributions was investigated. Transmission detector measurements were performed at three institutions. Seven types of errors were induced in nine clinical step-and-shoot (S and S) IMRT plans by modifying the number of monitor units (MU) and introducing small deviations in leaf positions. Signal reproducibility was investigated for short- and long-term stability. Calculated dose distributions were compared in terms of γ passing rates and dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g., D{sub mean}, D{sub x%}, V{sub x%}). The correlation between detector signal variations, γ passing rates, and DVH parameters was investigated. Both short- and long-term reproducibility was within 1%. Dose variations down to 1 MU (∇signal 1.1 ± 0.4%) as well as changes in field size and positions down to 1 mm (∇signal 2.6 ± 1.0%) were detected, thus indicating high error-detection sensitivity. A moderate correlation of detector signal was observed with γ passing rates (R{sup 2} = 0.57-0.70), while a good correlation was observed with DVH metrics (R{sup 2} = 0.75-0.98). The detector is capable of detecting small delivery errors in MU and leaf positions, and is thus a highly sensitive dose monitoring device for S and S IMRT for clinical practice. The results of this study indicate a good correlation of detector signal with DVH metrics; therefore, clinical action levels can be defined based on the presented data. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Sensitivitaet bezueglich der Fehlererkennung eines Transmissionsdetektors fuer die Online-Dosisueberwachung von intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT

  6. SU-F-T-348: The Impact of Model Library Population On RapidPlan Based Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) Prediction for Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Volumetric-Modulated Radiotherapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K; Zhou, L; Chen, Z; Peng, J; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients were enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.

  7. SU-F-T-348: The Impact of Model Library Population On RapidPlan Based Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) Prediction for Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Volumetric-Modulated Radiotherapy (VMAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Zhou, L; Chen, Z; Peng, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients were enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.

  8. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungun, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Fu, A; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Boyd, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  9. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungun, B; Fu, A; Xing, L; Boyd, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  10. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate dose distribution within uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]) and tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]) and the resulting clinical outcome based on systematic three-dimensional treatment planning with dose-volume adaptation. Dose-volume assessment and adaptation in organs at risk and its impact on side effects were investigated in parallel. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with either locally confined endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) or adenocarcinoma of uterus and ovaries after bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n = 1) were included. Heyman packing was performed with mean 11 Norman-Simon applicators (3-18). Three-dimensional treatment planning based on computed tomography (n = 29) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 18) was done in all patients with contouring of CTV, GTV, and organs at risk. Dose-volume adaptation was achieved by dwell location and time variation (intensity modulation). Twelve patients treated with curative intent received five to seven fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (7 Gy per fraction) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction and α/β of 10 Gy) to the CTV. Four patients had additional external beam radiotherapy (range, 10-40 Gy). One patient had salvage brachytherapy and 3 patients were treated with palliative intent. A dose-volume histogram analysis was performed in all patients. On average, 68% of the CTV and 92% of the GTV were encompassed by the 60 Gy reference volume. Median minimum dose to 90% of CTV and GTV (D90) was 35.3 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. Results: All patients treated with curative intent had complete remission (12/12). After a median follow-up of 47 months, 5 patients are alive without tumor. Seven patients died without tumor from intercurrent disease after median 22 months. The patient with salvage treatment had a second local recurrence after 27 months and died of endometrial carcinoma after 57 months. In patients treated with palliative intent

  11. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shusharina, N; Choi, N; Bortfeld, T; Liao, Z; Mohan, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the difference in cumulative 18F-FDG uptake histogram of lung treated with either IMRT or PSPT is associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with inoperable stage II and III NSCLC. Methods: We analyzed 24 patients from a prospective randomized trial to compare IMRT (n=12) with vs. PSPT (n=12) for inoperable NSCLC. All patients underwent PET-CT imaging between 35 and 88 days post-therapy. Post-treatment PET-CT was aligned with planning 4D CT to establish a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between post-treatment PET and planning dose images. 18F-FDG uptake as a function of radiation dose to normal lung was obtained for each patient. Distribution of the standard uptake value (SUV) was analyzed using a volume histogram method. The image quantitative characteristics and DVH measures were correlated with clinical symptoms of pneumonitis. Results: Patients with RP were present in both groups: 5 in the IMRT and 6 in the PSPT. The analysis of cumulative SUV histograms showed significantly higher relative volumes of the normal lung having higher SUV uptake in the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (VSUV=2: 10% for IMRT vs 16% for proton RT and VSUV=1: 10% for IMRT vs 23% for proton RT). In addition, the SUV histograms for symptomatic cases in PSPT patients exhibited a significantly longer tail at the highest SUV. The absolute volume of the lung receiving the dose >70 Gy was larger in the PSPT patients. Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake – radiation dose response correlates with RP in both groups of patients by means of the linear regression slope. SUV is higher for the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Higher uptake after PSPT patients is explained by larger volumes of the lung receiving high radiation dose.

  13. Comparisons of dose-volume histograms for proton-beam versus 3-D conformal X-ray therapy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changlu; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakae, Takeji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were reviewed to determine if there is an advantage of the two modalities when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 24 stage I NSCLC patients who underwent proton-beam therapy (PBT) from June 2003 to May 2007 were included in this study. Based on the same clinical target volumes (CTVs), treatment planning was made to cover CTV within 90% isodose lines. Each patient was evaluated by two sets of DVHs, one for PBT and the other for three-dimensional conformal X-ray therapy (3D-CRT). For all patients, the 95% isodose line covered 86.4% of the CTV for PBT, and 43.2% for 3D-CRT. PBT was associated with significantly lower mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, total lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord than 3D-CRT. PBT offered reduced radiation doses to the lung when evaluated in terms of percentage lung volumes receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ), and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) when compared to 3D-CRT. PBT is advantageous over 3D-CRT in reducing doses to the lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord in treating stage I NSCLC. (orig.)

  14. Use of benchmark dose-volume histograms for selection of the optimal technique between three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chunhui; Yang, Claus Chunli; Narayan, Samir; Stern, Robin L.; Perks, Julian; Goldberg, Zelanna; Ryu, Janice; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate our own benchmark dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum for both conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate quantitatively the benefits of using IMRT vs. 3D-CRT in treating localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer, our policy was to plan each patient with both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This study included 31 patients with T1b to T2c localized prostate cancer, for whom we completed double-planning using both 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. The target volumes included prostate, either with or without proximal seminal vesicles. Bladder and rectum DVH data were summarized to obtain an average DVH for each technique and then compared using two-tailed paired t test analysis. Results: For 3D-CRT our bladder doses were as follows: mean 28.8 Gy, v60 16.4%, v70 10.9%; rectal doses were: mean 39.3 Gy, v60 21.8%, v70 13.6%. IMRT plans resulted in similar mean dose values: bladder 26.4 Gy, rectum 34.9 Gy, but lower values of v70 for the bladder (7.8%) and rectum (9.3%). These benchmark DVHs have resulted in a critical evaluation of our 3D-CRT techniques over time. Conclusion: Our institution has developed benchmark DVHs for bladder and rectum based on our clinical experience with 3D-CRT and IMRT. We use these standards as well as differences in individual cases to make decisions on whether patients may benefit from IMRT treatment rather than 3D-CRT

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy for uterine cervical cancer: comparison of outcomes, complications, and dose-volume histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yamashita, Michiko; Unno, Hikari; Kinose, Yasuto; Kozasa, Katsumi; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer, compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), in terms of tumor control, complications and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Between March 2008 and February 2014, 62 patients were treated with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy and whole-pelvic external beam radiation therapy (RT). Of these patients, 32 (52 %) received 3DCRT and 30 (48 %) received IMRT. The median follow-up periods were 40 months (range 2–74 months). The 3-year overall survival rate (OS), locoregional control rate (LRC) and progression-free survival rate (PFS) were 92, 95 and 92 % in the IMRT group, and 85, 82 and 70 % in the 3DCRT group, respectively. A comparison of OS, LRC and PFS showed no significant differences between IMRT and 3DCRT. The 3-year cumulative incidences of grade 2 or higher chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications were significantly lower with IMRT compared to 3DCRT (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .02) and in patients with V40 of the small bowel loops of ≤340 mL compared to those with >340 mL (3 % vs. 45 %, p < .001). Patients treated with IMRT had a higher incidence of grade 3 acute hematologic complications (p < .05). V40 and V45 of the small bowel loops or bowel bag were predictive for development of both acute and chronic GI complications. Our results suggest that IMRT for adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer is useful for decreasing GI complications without worsening outcomes

  16. Reducing variability in the output of pattern classifiers using histogram shaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Shalini; Kan, Chih-Wen; Markey, Mia K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a novel technique based on histogram shaping to reduce the variability in the output and (sensitivity, specificity) pairs of pattern classifiers with identical ROC curves, but differently distributed outputs. Methods: The authors identify different sources of variability in the output of linear pattern classifiers with identical ROC curves, which also result in classifiers with differently distributed outputs. They theoretically develop a novel technique based on the matching of the histograms of these differently distributed pattern classifier outputs to reduce the variability in their (sensitivity, specificity) pairs at fixed decision thresholds, and to reduce the variability in their actual output values. They empirically demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique by means of analyses on the simulated data and real world mammography data. Results: For the simulated data, with three different known sources of variability, and for the real world mammography data with unknown sources of variability, the proposed classifier output calibration technique significantly reduced the variability in the classifiers' (sensitivity, specificity) pairs at fixed decision thresholds. Furthermore, for classifiers with monotonically or approximately monotonically related output variables, the histogram shaping technique also significantly reduced the variability in their actual output values. Conclusions: Classifier output calibration based on histogram shaping can be successfully employed to reduce the variability in the output values and (sensitivity, specificity) pairs of pattern classifiers with identical ROC curves, but differently distributed outputs.

  17. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to investigate the relation between these observed incidences and parameters derived from the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) of rectum and bladder wall. Patients and Methods: Hundred and thirty patients with T 2-4 G 1-3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer were treated with conformal radiotherapy with the simultaneous boost technique in a dose-escalating protocol; 78 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, 11 patients 74 - 76 Gy and 41 patients 78 Gy, each with a dose of 2 Gy per fraction. DVHs of the rectal wall were used to calculate NTCPs according to the model of Kutcher et al. with the estimated parameter values (n = 0.12, m = 0.15, TD 50 = 80 Gy) according to Burman et al. The median follow-up was 17 months (range 6 - 72 months). The crude and actuarial incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications were determined using the RTOG/EORTC morbidity scoring system (Grade I to IV). Results: Neither for late GI nor for GU complaints, a grade IV complication was observed. GU complaints occurred in 90 patients (69%): 54 patients (42%) only experienced grade I toxicity, 26 patients (20%) had grade II toxicity, and 10 patients (8%) had grade III complications, of which 8 patients (6%) developed a urethral (7 pts) or ureteric stenosis (1 pt). The actuarial incidence of grade III GU complications was 10% at 2 years. Since bladder wall DVHs are unreliable and most grade III complications were not related to the bladder, the grade II and/or III complications were analyzed in terms of the total prescribed dose only, but no correlation could be demonstrated. GI complications occurred in 71 patients (55%): 59 patients (45%) developed a grade I complication, 11 a grade II complication and only 1 patient required laser treatment twice and blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding (grade III). The actuarial incidence of GI

  18. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Miyakubo, Mai; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose–volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy × five times in 3 days or 7 Gy × three, 10.5 Gy × two, or 9 Gy × two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED 3 at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED 3–5% and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED 3–5% was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.

  19. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram shape analysis for monitoring early response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Li; Wang, Huanhuan; Liu, Song; Yan, Jing; Liu, Baorui; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-22

    To explore the role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram shape related parameters in early assessment of treatment response during the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) course of advanced cervical cancers. This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-two patients with advanced cervical squamous cell carcinomas underwent diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (b values, 0 and 800 s/mm 2 ) before CCRT, at the end of 2nd and 4th week during CCRT and immediately after CCRT completion. Whole lesion ADC histogram analysis generated several histogram shape related parameters including skewness, kurtosis, s-sD av , width, standard deviation, as well as first-order entropy and second-order entropies. The averaged ADC histograms of 32 patients were generated to visually observe dynamic changes of the histogram shape following CCRT. All parameters except width and standard deviation showed significant changes during CCRT (all P histogram also changed obviously following CCRT. ADC histogram shape analysis held the potential in monitoring early tumor response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing CCRT.

  20. Reliability of dose volume constraint inference from clinical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, C M; Møller, D S; Hoffmann, L

    2017-01-01

    Dose volume histogram points (DVHPs) frequently serve as dose constraints in radiotherapy treatment planning. An experiment was designed to investigate the reliability of DVHP inference from clinical data for multiple cohort sizes and complication incidence rates. The experimental background...... was radiation pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer and the DVHP inference method was based on logistic regression. From 102 NSCLC real-life dose distributions and a postulated DVHP model, an 'ideal' cohort was generated where the most predictive model was equal to the postulated model. A bootstrap...

  1. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  2. The equivalent Histograms in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizarro Trigo, F.; Teijeira Garcia, M.; Zaballos Carrera, S.

    2013-01-01

    Is frequently abused of The tolerances established for organ at risk [1] in diagrams of standard fractionation (2Gy/session, 5 sessions per week) when applied to Dose-Volume histograms non-standard schema. The purpose of this work is to establish when this abuse may be more important and realize a transformation of fractionation non-standard of histograms dosis-volumen. Is exposed a case that can be useful to make clinical decisions. (Author)

  3. Investigating Student Understanding of Histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Gabrosek, John G.; Curtiss, Phyllis; Malone, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Histograms are adept at revealing the distribution of data values, especially the shape of the distribution and any outlier values. They are included in introductory statistics texts, research methods texts, and in the popular press, yet students often have difficulty interpreting the information conveyed by a histogram. This research identifies…

  4. SU-F-T-378: Evaluation of Dose-Volume Variability and Parameters Between Prostate IMRT and VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jiang, R [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study compared the rectal dose-volume consistency, equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: For forty prostate IMRT and fifty VMAT patients treated using the same dose prescription (78 Gy/39 fraction) and dose-volume criteria in inverse planning optimization, the rectal EUD and NTCP were calculated for each patient. The rectal dose-volume consistency, showing the variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) among patients, was defined and calculated based on the deviation between the mean and corresponding rectal DVH. Results: From both the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans, the rectal EUD and NTCP were found decreasing with the rectal volume. The decrease rates for the IMRT plans (EUD = 0.47 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 3.94 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}) were higher than those for the VMAT (EUD = 0.28 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 2.61 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}). In addition, the dependences of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency were found very similar between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. This shows that both delivery techniques have similar variations of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency. Conclusion: Dependences of the dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were compared between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. It is concluded that both rectal EUD and NTCP decreased with an increase of the rectal volume. The variation rates of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the rectal volume were higher for the IMRT plans than VMAT. However, variations of the rectal dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were found not significant for both delivery techniques.

  5. Reliability of dose volume constraint inference from clinical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C. M.; Møller, D. S.; Hoffmann, L.; Knap, M. M.; Alber, M.

    2017-04-01

    Dose volume histogram points (DVHPs) frequently serve as dose constraints in radiotherapy treatment planning. An experiment was designed to investigate the reliability of DVHP inference from clinical data for multiple cohort sizes and complication incidence rates. The experimental background was radiation pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer and the DVHP inference method was based on logistic regression. From 102 NSCLC real-life dose distributions and a postulated DVHP model, an ‘ideal’ cohort was generated where the most predictive model was equal to the postulated model. A bootstrap and a Cohort Replication Monte Carlo (CoRepMC) approach were applied to create 1000 equally sized populations each. The cohorts were then analyzed to establish inference frequency distributions. This was applied to nine scenarios for cohort sizes of 102 (1), 500 (2) to 2000 (3) patients (by sampling with replacement) and three postulated DVHP models. The Bootstrap was repeated for a ‘non-ideal’ cohort, where the most predictive model did not coincide with the postulated model. The Bootstrap produced chaotic results for all models of cohort size 1 for both the ideal and non-ideal cohorts. For cohort size 2 and 3, the distributions for all populations were more concentrated around the postulated DVHP. For the CoRepMC, the inference frequency increased with cohort size and incidence rate. Correct inference rates  >85 % were only achieved by cohorts with more than 500 patients. Both Bootstrap and CoRepMC indicate that inference of the correct or approximate DVHP for typical cohort sizes is highly uncertain. CoRepMC results were less spurious than Bootstrap results, demonstrating the large influence that randomness in dose-response has on the statistical analysis.

  6. Clinical implementation of dose-volume histogram predictions for organs-at-risk in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K L; Appenzoller, L M; Tan, J; Michalski, J M; Thorstad, W L; Mutic, S

    2014-01-01

    True quality control (QC) of the planning process requires quantitative assessments of treatment plan quality itself, and QC in IMRT has been stymied by intra-patient anatomical variability and inherently complex three-dimensional dose distributions. In this work we describe the development of an automated system to reduce clinical IMRT planning variability and improve plan quality using mathematical models that predict achievable OAR DVHs based on individual patient anatomy. These models rely on the correlation of expected dose to the minimum distance from a voxel to the PTV surface, whereby a three-parameter probability distribution function (PDF) was used to model iso-distance OAR subvolume dose distributions. DVH models were obtained by fitting the evolution of the PDF with distance. Initial validation on clinical cohorts of 40 prostate and 24 head-and-neck plans demonstrated highly accurate model-based predictions for achievable DVHs in rectum, bladder, and parotid glands. By quantifying the integrated difference between candidate DVHs and predicted DVHs, the models correctly identified plans with under-spared OARs, validated by replanning all cases and correlating any realized improvements against the predicted gains. Clinical implementation of these predictive models was demonstrated in the PINNACLE treatment planning system by use of existing margin expansion utilities and the scripting functionality inherent to the system. To maintain independence from specific planning software, a system was developed in MATLAB to directly process DICOM-RT data. Both model training and patient-specific analyses were demonstrated with significant computational accelerations from parallelization.

  7. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The dose-volume constraint satisfaction problem for inverse treatment planning with field segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Darek; Xiao, Ying; Censor, Yair; Galvin, James M

    2004-01-01

    The prescribed goals of radiation treatment planning are often expressed in terms of dose-volume constraints. We present a novel formulation of a dose-volume constraint satisfaction search for the discretized radiation therapy model. This approach does not rely on any explicit cost function. Inverse treatment planning uses the aperture-based approach with predefined, according to geometric rules, segmental fields. The solver utilizes the simultaneous version of the cyclic subgradient projection algorithm. This is a deterministic iterative method designed for solving the convex feasibility problems. A prescription is expressed with the set of inequalities imposed on the dose at the voxel resolution. Additional constraint functions control the compliance with selected points of the expected cumulative dose-volume histograms. The performance of this method is tested on prostate and head-and-neck cases. The relationships with other models and algorithms of similar conceptual origin are discussed. The demonstrated advantages of the method are: the equivalence of the algorithmic and prescription parameters, the intuitive setup of free parameters, and the improved speed of the method as compared to similar iterative as well as other techniques. The technique reported here will deliver approximate solutions for inconsistent prescriptions

  9. CHIL - a comprehensive histogramming language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, W.T.; Biggerstaff, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A high level language, CHIL, has been developed for use in processing event-by-event experimental data at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) using PERKIN-ELMER 3230 computers. CHIL has been fully integrated into all software which supports on-line and off-line histogramming and off-line preprocessing. CHIL supports simple gates, free-form-gates (2-D regions of arbitrary shape), condition test and branch statements, bit-tests, loops, calls to up to three user supplied subroutines and histogram generating statements. Any combination of 1, 2, 3 or 4-D histograms (32 megachannels max) may be recorded at 16 or 32 bits/channel. User routines may intercept the data being processed and modify it as desired. The CPU-intensive part of the processing utilizes microcoded routines which enhance performance by about a factor of two

  10. CHILA A comprehensive histogramming language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, W.T.; Biggerstaff, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A high level language, CHIL, has been developed for use in processing event-by-event experimental data at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) using PERKIN-ELMER 3230 computers. CHIL has been fully integrated into all software which supports on-line and off-line histogramming and off-line preprocessing. CHIL supports simple gates, free-form-gates (2-D regions of arbitrary shape), condition test and branch statements, bit-tests, loops, calls to up to three user supplied subroutines and histogram generating statements. Any combination of 1, 2, 3 or 4-D histograms (32 megachannels max) may be recorded at 16 or 32 bits/channel. User routines may intercept the data being processed and modify it as desired. The CPU-intensive part of the processing utilizes microcoded routines which enhance performance by about a factor of two

  11. The Amazing Histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermeulen, H.; DeWreede, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a histogram drawing program which sorts real numbers in up to 30 categories. Entered data are sorted and saved in a text file which is then used to generate the histogram. Complete Applesoft program listings are included. (JN)

  12. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  13. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  14. 3D facial expression recognition based on histograms of surface differential quantities

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin; Morvan, Jean-Marie; Chen, Liming

    2011-01-01

    . To characterize shape information of the local neighborhood of facial landmarks, we calculate the weighted statistical distributions of surface differential quantities, including histogram of mesh gradient (HoG) and histogram of shape index (HoS). Normal cycle

  15. Dose-volume considerations in stereotaxic brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdek, P.V.; Schwade, J.G.; Pisciotta, V.J.; Medina, A.J.; Lewin, A.A.; Abitbol, A.A.; Serago, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Although brain radiation therapy experience suggests that a gain in the therapeutic ratio may be achieved by optimizing the dose-volume relationship, no practical system for quantitative assessment of dose-volume data has been developed. This presentation describes the rationale for using the integral dose function for this purpose and demonstrates that with the use of a conventional treatment planning computer and a series of computed tomographic scans, first-order optimization of the dose-volume function can be accomplished in two steps: first, high-dose volume is minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment technique and tumor margin, and then dosage is maximized by calculating the brain tolerance dose as a function of the irradiated volume

  16. The histogramming tool hparse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikulin, V.; Shabratova, G.

    2005-01-01

    A general-purpose package aimed to simplify the histogramming in the data analysis is described. The proposed dedicated language for writing the histogramming scripts provides an effective and flexible tool for definition of a complicated histogram set. The script is more transparent and much easier to maintain than corresponding C++ code. In the TTree analysis it could be a good complement to the TTreeViewer class: the TTreeViewer is used for choice of the required histogram/cut set, while the hparse enables one to generate a code for systematic analysis

  17. Subtracting and Fitting Histograms using Profile Likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    D'Almeida, F M L

    2008-01-01

    It is known that many interesting signals expected at LHC are of unknown shape and strongly contaminated by background events. These signals will be dif cult to detect during the rst years of LHC operation due to the initial low luminosity. In this work, one presents a method of subtracting histograms based on the pro le likelihood function when the background is previously estimated by Monte Carlo events and one has low statistics. Estimators for the signal in each bin of the histogram difference are calculated so as limits for the signals with 68.3% of Con dence Level in a low statistics case when one has a exponential background and a Gaussian signal. The method can also be used to t histograms when the signal shape is known. Our results show a good performance and avoid the problem of negative values when subtracting histograms.

  18. The equivalent Histograms in clinical practice; Los histogramas equivalentes en la practica clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizarro Trigo, F.; Teijeira Garcia, M.; Zaballos Carrera, S.

    2013-07-01

    Is frequently abused of The tolerances established for organ at risk [1] in diagrams of standard fractionation (2Gy/session, 5 sessions per week) when applied to Dose-Volume histograms non-standard schema. The purpose of this work is to establish when this abuse may be more important and realize a transformation of fractionation non-standard of histograms dosis-volumen. Is exposed a case that can be useful to make clinical decisions. (Author)

  19. Absence of multiple local minima effects in intensity modulated optimization with dose-volume constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants, LLC 130, Forest Hill Drive, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Deasy, Joseph O [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bortfeld, Thomas R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, MA (United States); Solberg, Timothy D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Ammerthalstrasse 8, 85551 Heimstetten (Germany)

    2003-01-21

    This paper reports on the analysis of intensity modulated radiation treatment optimization problems in the presence of non-convex feasible parameter spaces caused by the specification of dose-volume constraints for the organs-at-risk (OARs). The main aim was to determine whether the presence of those non-convex spaces affects the optimization of clinical cases in any significant way. This was done in two phases: (1) Using a carefully designed two-dimensional mathematical phantom that exhibits two controllable minima and with randomly initialized beamlet weights, we developed a methodology for exploring the nature of the convergence characteristics of quadratic cost function optimizations (deterministic or stochastic). The methodology is based on observing the statistical behaviour of the residual cost at the end of optimizations in which the stopping criterion is progressively more demanding and carrying out those optimizations to very small error changes per iteration. (2) Seven clinical cases were then analysed with dose-volume constraints that are stronger than originally used in the clinic. The clinical cases are two prostate cases differently posed, a meningioma case, two head-and-neck cases, a spleen case and a spine case. Of the 14 different sets of optimizations (with and without the specification of maximum doses allowed for the OARs), 12 fail to show any effect due to the existence of non-convex feasible spaces. The remaining two sets of optimizations show evidence of multiple minima in the solutions, but those minima are very close to each other in cost and the resulting treatment plans are practically identical, as measured by the quality of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). We discuss the differences between fluence maps resulting from those similar treatment plans. We provide a possible reason for the observed results and conclude that, although the study is necessarily limited, the annealing characteristics of a simulated annealing method may not be

  20. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  1. Influence of dosing volume on the neurotoxicity of bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolansky, M J; McDaniel, K L; Moser, V C; Crofton, K M

    2007-01-01

    Pyrethroids are pesticides with high insecticidal activity and relatively low potency in mammals. The influence of dosing volume on the neurobehavioral syndrome following oral acute exposure to the Type-I pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in corn oil was evaluated in adult male Long Evans rats. We tested bifenthrin effects at 1 and 5 ml/kg, two commonly used dose volumes in toxicological studies. Two testing times (4 and 7 h) were used in motor activity and functional observational battery (FOB) assessments. Four to eight doses were examined at either dosing condition (up to 20 or 26 mg/kg, at 1 and 5 ml/kg, respectively). Acute oral bifenthrin exposure produced toxic signs typical of Type I pyrethroids, with dose-related increases in fine tremor, decreased motor activity and grip strength, and increased pawing, head shaking, click response, and body temperature. Bifenthrin effects on motor activity and pyrethroid-specific clinical signs were approximately 2-fold more potent at 1 ml/kg than 5 ml/kg. This difference was clearly evident at 4 h and slightly attenuated at 7 h post-dosing. Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling estimated similar 2-fold potency differences in motor activity and pyrethroid-specific FOB data. These findings demonstrate that dose volume, in studies using corn oil as the vehicle influences bifenthrin potency. Further, these data suggest that inconsistent estimates of pyrethroid potency between laboratories are at least partially due to differences in dosing volume.

  2. The Dose-Volume Relationship of Small Bowel Irradiation and Acute Grade 3 Diarrhea During Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Wallace, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has found a highly significant relationship between the irradiated small-bowel volume and development of Grade 3 small-bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer. This study tested the previously defined parameters in a much larger group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 consecutive patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for rectal cancer had treatment planning computed tomographic scans with small-bowel contrast that allowed the small bowel to be outlined with calculation of a small-bowel dose-volume histogram for the initial intended pelvic treatment to 45 Gy. Patients with at least one parameter above the previously determined dose-volume parameters were considered high risk, whereas those with all parameters below these levels were low risk. The grade of diarrhea and presence of liquid stool was determined prospectively. Results: There was a highly significant association with small-bowel dose-volume and Grade 3 diarrhea (p ≤ 0.008). The high-risk and low-risk parameters were predictive with Grade 3 diarrhea in 16 of 51 high-risk patients and in 4 of 45 low-risk patients (p = 0.01). Patients who had undergone irradiation preoperatively had a lower incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea than those treated postoperatively (18% vs. 28%; p = 0.31); however, the predictive ability of the high-risk/low-risk parameters was better for preoperatively (p = 0.03) than for postoperatively treated patients (p = 0.15). Revised risk parameters were derived that improved the overall predictive ability (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The highly significant dose-volume relationship and validity of the high-risk and low-risk parameters were confirmed in a large group of patients. The risk parameters provided better modeling for the preoperative patients than for the postoperative patients

  3. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzi, Simona; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Bianca; Petrongari, Maria G.; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Benassi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD) 0 , and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V 40 = 60%, V 50 = 50%, and V 70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD 0 , and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V 70 . The gEUD and mEUD 0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  4. Machine assisted histogram classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyó, B.; Gaspar, C.; Somogyi, P.

    2010-04-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments under completion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Monitoring the quality of the acquired data is important, because it allows the verification of the detector performance. Anomalies, such as missing values or unexpected distributions can be indicators of a malfunctioning detector, resulting in poor data quality. Spotting faulty or ageing components can be either done visually using instruments, such as the LHCb Histogram Presenter, or with the help of automated tools. In order to assist detector experts in handling the vast monitoring information resulting from the sheer size of the detector, we propose a graph based clustering tool combined with machine learning algorithm and demonstrate its use by processing histograms representing 2D hitmaps events. We prove the concept by detecting ion feedback events in the LHCb experiment's RICH subdetector.

  5. Machine assisted histogram classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyo, B; Somogyi, P [BME-IIT, H-1117 Budapest, Magyar tudosok koerutja 2. (Hungary); Gaspar, C, E-mail: Peter.Somogyi@cern.c [CERN-PH, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments under completion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Monitoring the quality of the acquired data is important, because it allows the verification of the detector performance. Anomalies, such as missing values or unexpected distributions can be indicators of a malfunctioning detector, resulting in poor data quality. Spotting faulty or ageing components can be either done visually using instruments, such as the LHCb Histogram Presenter, or with the help of automated tools. In order to assist detector experts in handling the vast monitoring information resulting from the sheer size of the detector, we propose a graph based clustering tool combined with machine learning algorithm and demonstrate its use by processing histograms representing 2D hitmaps events. We prove the concept by detecting ion feedback events in the LHCb experiment's RICH subdetector.

  6. Incidence of radiation pneumonitis after thoracic irradiation: Dose-volume correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallenkamp, John M.; Miller, Robert C.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Foote, Tyler; Garces, Yolanda I.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric parameters correlated with the risk of clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis (RP) after thoracic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of consecutive patients treated with definitive thoracic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of RP of Grade 2 or greater by the Common Toxicity Criteria. Dose-volume histograms using total lung volume (TL) and TL minus gross tumor volume (TL-G) were created with and without heterogeneity corrections. Mean lung dose (MLD), effective lung volume (V eff ), and percentage of TL or TL-G receiving greater than or equal to 10, 13, 15, 20, and 30 Gy (V10-V30, respectively) were analyzed by logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to estimate RP predictive values. Results: Twelve cases of RP were identified in 92 eligible patients. Mean lung dose, V10, V13, V15, V20, and V eff were significantly correlated to RP. Combinations of MLD, V eff , V20, and V30 lost significance using TL-G and heterogeneity corrections. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined V10 and V13 as the best predictors of RP risk, with a decrease in predictive value above those volumes. Conclusions: Intrathoracic radiotherapy should be planned with caution when using radiotherapy techniques delivering doses of 10 to 15 Gy to large lung volumes

  7. Influence of the contrast agents on dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy treatment planning based on CT-scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahel Heydarheydari

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: The results showed statistical insignificant difference between with and without CA CTs treatment plan in pelvic field for targets and OARs. These results may serve as a reference to justify the use of CECT data sets for 3D-CRT planning of pelvic region cancers using DosiSoft ISOgray system.

  8. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  9. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  10. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  11. Multiple local minima in IMRT optimization based on dose-volume criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    Multiple local minima traps are known to exist in dose-volume and dose-response objective functions. Nevertheless, their presence and consequences are not considered impediments in finding satisfactory solutions in routine optimization of IMRT plans using gradient methods. However, there is often a concern that a significantly superior solution may exist unbeknownst to the planner and that the optimization process may not be able to reach it. We have investigated the soundness of the assumption that the presence of multiple minima traps can be ignored. To find local minima, we start the optimization process a large number of times with random initial intensities. We investigated whether the occurrence of local minima depends upon the choice of the objective function parameters and the number of variables and whether their existence is an impediment in finding a satisfactory solution. To learn about the behavior of multiple minima, we first used a symmetric cubic phantom containing a cubic target and an organ-at-risk surrounding it to optimize the beam weights of two pairs of parallel-opposed beams using a gradient technique. The phantom studies also served to test our software. Objective function parameters were chosen to ensure that multiple minima would exist. Data for 500 plans, optimized with random initial beam weights, were analyzed. The search process did succeed in finding the local minima and showed that the number of minima depends on the parameters of the objective functions. It was also found that the consequences of local minima depended on the number of beams. We further searched for the multiple minima in intensity-modulated treatment plans for a head-and-neck case and a lung case. In addition to the treatment plan scores and the dose-volume histograms, we examined the dose distributions and intensity patterns. We did not find any evidence that multiple local minima affect the outcome of optimization using gradient techniques in any clinically

  12. Histogram Estimators of Bivariate Densities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Husemann, Joyce A

    1986-01-01

    One-dimensional fixed-interval histogram estimators of univariate probability density functions are less efficient than the analogous variable-interval estimators which are constructed from intervals...

  13. COLOUR IMAGE ENHANCEMENT BASED ON HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kanika Kapoor and Shaveta Arora

    2015-01-01

    Histogram equalization is a nonlinear technique for adjusting the contrast of an image using its histogram. It increases the brightness of a gray scale image which is different from the mean brightness of the original image. There are various types of Histogram equalization techniques like Histogram Equalization, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization, Brightness Preserving Bi Histogram Equalization, Dualistic Sub Image Histogram Equalization, Minimum Mean Brightness Error Bi Histog...

  14. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  15. Dose-volume complication analysis for visual pathway structures of patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Mary Kaye; Sandler, Howard M.; Cornblath, Wayne T.; Marsh, Lon H.; Hazuka, Mark B.; Roa, Wilson H.; Fraass, Benedict A.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to relate dose and volume information to complication data for visual pathway structures in patients with advanced paranasal sinus tumors. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions for chiasm, optic nerve, and retina were calculated and analyzed for 20 patients with advanced paranasal sinus malignant tumors. 3D treatment planning with beam's eye view capability was used to design beam and block arrangements, striving to spare the contralateral orbit (to lessen the chance of unilateral blindness) and frequently the ipsilateral orbit (to help prevent bilateral blindness). Point doses, dose-volume histogram analysis, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Published tolerance doses that indicate significant risk of complications were used as guidelines for analysis of the 3D dose distributions. Results: Point doses, percent volume exceeding a specified published tolerance dose, and NTCP calculations are given in detail for patients with complications versus patients without complications. Two optic nerves receiving maximum doses below the published tolerance dose sustained damage (mild vision loss). Three patients (of 13) without optic nerve sparing and/or chiasm sparing had moderate or severe vision loss. Complication data, including individual patient analysis to estimate overall risk for loss of vision, are given. Conclusion: 3D treatment planning techniques were used successfully to provide bilateral sparing of the globe for most patients. It was more difficult to spare the optic nerves, especially on the ipsilateral side, when prescription dose exceeded the normal tissue tolerance doses. NTCP calculations may be useful in assessing complication risk better than point dose tolerance criteria for the chiasm, optic nerve, and retina. It is important to assess the overall risk of blindness for the patient in addition to the risk for individual visual pathway

  16. Systematic review of dose-volume parameters in the prediction of esophagitis in thoracic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Jim; Rodrigues, George; Yaremko, Brian; Lock, Michael; D'Souza, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: With dose escalation and increasing use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy, radiation esophagitis (RE) remains a common treatment-limiting acute side effect in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. The advent of 3DCT planning has enabled investigators to study esophageal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters as predictors of RE. The purpose of this study was to assess published dosimetric parameters and toxicity data systematically in order to define reproducible predictors of RE, both for potential clinical use, and to provide recommendations for future research in the field. Materials and methods: We performed a systematic literature review of published studies addressing RE in the treatment of lung cancer and thymoma. Our search strategy included a variety of electronic medical databases, textbooks and bibliographies. Both prospective and retrospective clinical studies were included. Information relating to the relationship among measured dosimetric parameters, patient demographics, tumor characteristics, chemotherapy and RE was extracted and analyzed. Results: Eighteen published studies were suitable for analysis. Eleven of these assessed acute RE, while the remainder assessed both acute and chronic RE together. Heterogeneity of esophageal contouring practices, individual differences in information reporting and variability of RE outcome definitions were assessed. Well-described clinical and logistic modeling directly related V 35Gy , V 60Gy and SA 55Gy to clinically significant RE. Conclusions: Several reproducible dosimetric parameters exist in the literature, and these may be potentially relevant in the prediction of RE in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignancies. Further clarification of the predictive relationship between such standardized dosimetric parameters and observed RE outcomes is essential to develop efficient radiation treatment planning in locally advanced NSCLC in the modern concurrent chemotherapy and image-guided IMRT era.

  17. The Histogram-Area Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratzer, William; Carpenter, James E.

    2008-01-01

    This article demonstrates an alternative approach to the construction of histograms--one based on the notion of using area to represent relative density in intervals of unequal length. The resulting histograms illustrate the connection between the area of the rectangles associated with particular outcomes and the relative frequency (probability)…

  18. Reproducibility of brain ADC histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Buchem, M.A. van; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Schaap, J.A.; Hoogenraad, F.G.C.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.M.; Tofts, P.S.; Cessie, S. le

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of differences in acquisition technique on whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters, as well as to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in 7 healthy subjects with b-values 0-800, 0-1000, and 0-1500 s/mm 2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DWI with b-values 0-1000 s/mm 2 . All sequences were repeated with and without repositioning. The peak location, peak height, and mean ADC of the ADC histograms and mean ADC of a region of interest (ROI) in the white matter were compared using paired-sample t tests. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using paired-sample t tests, and repeatability coefficients were reported. With increasing maximum b-values, ADC histograms shifted to lower values, with an increase in peak height (p<0.01). With FLAIR DWI, the ADC histogram shifted to lower values with a significantly higher, narrower peak (p<0.01), although the ROI mean ADC showed no significant differences. For scan-rescan reproducibility, no significant differences were observed. Different DWI pulse sequences give rise to different ADC histograms. With a given pulse sequence, however, ADC histogram analysis is a robust and reproducible technique. Using FLAIR DWI, the partial-voluming effect of cerebrospinal fluid, and thus its confounding effect on histogram analyses, can be reduced

  19. The dose-volume relationship of acute small bowel toxicity from concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Frazier, Robert C.; Yan Di; Huang, Raywin R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Robertson, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A direct relationship between the volume of small bowel irradiated and the degree of acute small bowel toxicity experienced during concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma is well recognized but poorly quantified. This study uses three-dimensional treatment-planning tools to more precisely quantify this dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Forty patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation for rectal carcinoma had treatment-planning CT scans with small bowel contrast. A median isocentric dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered using a posterior-anterior and opposed lateral field arrangement. Bowel exclusion techniques were routinely used, including prone treatment position on a vacuum bag cradle to allow anterior displacement of the abdominal contents and bladder distension. Individual loops of small bowel were contoured on each slice of the planning CT scan, and a small bowel dose-volume histogram was generated for the initial pelvis field receiving 45 Gy. The volume of small bowel receiving each dose between 5 and 40 Gy was recorded at 5-Gy intervals. Results: Ten patients (25%) experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity. A highly statistically significant association between the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity and the volume of small bowel irradiated was found at each dose level. Specific dose-volume threshold levels were found, below which no Grade 3+ toxicity occurred and above which 50-60% of patients developed Grade 3+ toxicity. The volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V 15 ) was strongly associated with the degree of toxicity. Univariate analysis of patient and treatment-related factors revealed no other significant predictors of severe toxicity. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists for the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity in patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy

  20. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-21

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  1. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  2. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    actual CT data. The slopes of regression lines for the left and right lung are 0.6%/mm and 0.5%/mm, respectively which is statistically different with the p value of 0.01. A maximum heart PIV of >3.0% is observed in 80% of the patients. The heart PIV is inversely correlated with gantry angle and weakly correlated with CLD. Conclusions: The CT-simulator provides accurate volumetric information of the heart and lungs in the treatment fields. The lung PIV is directly correlated to the CLD (0.6%/mm and 0.5%/mm for the left and right lungs). Left and right lungs have different volumes and hence, different regression lines are recommended. An additional 12% lung volume could be irradiated in the supraclavicular field. Heart volume is not correlated with the CLD. The heart PIV is associated to the beam angle. Heart volume may not be accurately visualized in a tangential radiograph; however, this can be easily seen in a DRR with contour delineation and can be minimized with proper beam parameters iteratively with a virtual simulator. Lung and heart PIV along with dose volume histograms (DVH) are essential in reducing pulmonary and cardiac complications

  3. Complexity of possibly gapped histogram and analysis of histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushing, Hsieh; Roy, Tania

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that gaps and distributional patterns embedded within real-valued measurements are inseparable biological and mechanistic information contents of the system. Such patterns are discovered through data-driven possibly gapped histogram, which further leads to the geometry-based analysis of histogram (ANOHT). Constructing a possibly gapped histogram is a complex problem of statistical mechanics due to the ensemble of candidate histograms being captured by a two-layer Ising model. This construction is also a distinctive problem of Information Theory from the perspective of data compression via uniformity. By defining a Hamiltonian (or energy) as a sum of total coding lengths of boundaries and total decoding errors within bins, this issue of computing the minimum energy macroscopic states is surprisingly resolved by applying the hierarchical clustering algorithm. Thus, a possibly gapped histogram corresponds to a macro-state. And then the first phase of ANOHT is developed for simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments, while the second phase of ANOHT is developed based on classical empirical process theory for a tree-geometry that can check the authenticity of branches of the treatment tree. The well-known Iris data are used to illustrate our technical developments. Also, a large baseball pitching dataset and a heavily right-censored divorce data are analysed to showcase the existential gaps and utilities of ANOHT.

  4. Complexity of possibly gapped histogram and analysis of histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushing, Hsieh; Roy, Tania

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that gaps and distributional patterns embedded within real-valued measurements are inseparable biological and mechanistic information contents of the system. Such patterns are discovered through data-driven possibly gapped histogram, which further leads to the geometry-based analysis of histogram (ANOHT). Constructing a possibly gapped histogram is a complex problem of statistical mechanics due to the ensemble of candidate histograms being captured by a two-layer Ising model. This construction is also a distinctive problem of Information Theory from the perspective of data compression via uniformity. By defining a Hamiltonian (or energy) as a sum of total coding lengths of boundaries and total decoding errors within bins, this issue of computing the minimum energy macroscopic states is surprisingly resolved by applying the hierarchical clustering algorithm. Thus, a possibly gapped histogram corresponds to a macro-state. And then the first phase of ANOHT is developed for simultaneous comparison of multiple treatments, while the second phase of ANOHT is developed based on classical empirical process theory for a tree-geometry that can check the authenticity of branches of the treatment tree. The well-known Iris data are used to illustrate our technical developments. Also, a large baseball pitching dataset and a heavily right-censored divorce data are analysed to showcase the existential gaps and utilities of ANOHT.

  5. BED-Volume histograms calculation for routine clinical dosimetry in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galelli, M.; Feroldi, P.

    1995-01-01

    The consideration of volumes is essential in Brachytherapy clinical dosimetry (I.C.R.U). Indeed, several indices, all based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), have been designed in order to evaluate: before the therapy the volumetric quality of different possible implant geometries; during the therapy the consistency of the real and the previsional implants. Radiobiological evaluations, considering the dose deposition temporal pattern of treatment, can be usefully added to dosimetric calculations, to compare different treatment schedules. The Linear-Quadratic model is the most used: radiobiological modelisation and Biologically Effective Dose (BED) is principal related dosimetric quantity. Therefore, the consideration of BED-volume histogram (BED-VHs) is a straightforward extension of DVHs. In practice, BED-VHs can help relative comparisons and optimisations in treatment planning when combined to dose-volume histograms. Since 1994 the dosimetric calculations for all the gynecological brachytherapy treatments are performed considering also DVHs and BED-VHs. In this presentation we show the methods of BEDVHs calculation, together with some typical results

  6. Dose volume relationships for intraoperatively irradiated saphenous nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Gillette, S.M.; Thames, H.D.; Childs, G.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and to limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation. Electrophysiologic procedures were done prior to irradiation and annually following irradiation. The procedures included electromyography of the pelvic limb and paralumbar muscles supplied by the L1 to S1 spinal nerves to determine presence and degree of motor unit disease. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the proximal and distal sciatic nerves were determined. Sensory nerve conduction velocities of the saphenous nerve were also determined. Evoked lumbosacral and thoraco-lumbar spinal cord potentials were evaluated following stimulation of the left sciatic nerve. In addition to electrophysiologic studies, neurologic examinations were done prior to treatment and at six month intervals for the three year observation period. At the three year time period, dogs were euthanatized, sections of peripheral nerve taken, routinely processed, stained with Masson's trichrome and evaluated histomorphometrically using point count techniques. Results: Twenty-two dogs were euthanatized prior to the three year observation period due to peripheral nerve damage

  7. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; Brambilla, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Medical Physics; Pia, F. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Otolaryngology; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Medical Sciences; Krengli, M. [University Hospital ' Maggiore della Carita' , Novara (Italy). Radiotherapy; University of ' Piemonte Orientale' , Novara (Italy). Dept. of Translational Medicine and BRMA

    2013-03-15

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose {>=} 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles {>=} 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  8. Dysphagia after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Correlation of dose-volume parameters of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deantonio, L.; Masini, L.; Brambilla, M.; Pia, F.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara; Krengli, M.; University of 'Piemonte Orientale', Novara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a complication of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). We analysed frequency and severity of swallowing dysfunction and correlated these findings with dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles. Methods: A total of 50 patients treated by radical RT were enrolled. DVHs of constrictor muscles were correlated with acute and late dysphagia and with the items of three quality of life questionnaires. Results: Mean dose to superior and middle constrictor muscles (SCM, MCM), partial volume of SCM and MCM receiving a dose ≥ 50 Gy dose to the whole constrictor muscles ≥ 60 Gy and tumour location were associated to late dysphagia at univariate analysis. Mean dose to the MCM was the only statistically significant predictor of late dysphagia at the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: The study shows a significant relationship between long-term dysphagia and mean doses to SCM, MCM, whole constrictor muscles, and oropharyngeal tumour. This finding suggests a potential advantage in reducing the RT dose to swallowing structures to avoid severe dysphagia. (orig.)

  9. Multispectral histogram normalization contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soha, J. M.; Schwartz, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    A multispectral histogram normalization or decorrelation enhancement which achieves effective color composites by removing interband correlation is described. The enhancement procedure employs either linear or nonlinear transformations to equalize principal component variances. An additional rotation to any set of orthogonal coordinates is thus possible, while full histogram utilization is maintained by avoiding the reintroduction of correlation. For the three-dimensional case, the enhancement procedure may be implemented with a lookup table. An application of the enhancement to Landsat multispectral scanning imagery is presented.

  10. Live histograms in moving windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1989-01-01

    Application of computer graphics for specific hardware testing is discussed. The hardware is position sensitive detector (multiwire proportional chamber) which is used in high energy physics experiments, and real-out electronics for it. Testing program is described (XPERT), which utilises multi-window user interface. Data are represented as histograms in windows. The windows on the screen may be moved, reordered, their sizes may be changed. Histograms may be put to any window, and hardcopy may be made. Some program internals are discussed. The computer environment is quite simple: MS-DOS IBM PC/XT, 256 KB RAM, CGA, 5.25'' FD, Epson MX. 4 refs.; 7 figs

  11. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A 1 ) was set in the range of 0.0–12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of γ index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within ± 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean ± standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 ± 1.20% (range, 100.59–103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A 1 = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A 1 = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  12. Quantitative dose-volume response analysis of changes in parotid gland function after radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesink, Judith M.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Hordijk, Gerrit Jan; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation tolerance of the parotid glands as a function of dose and volume irradiated. Methods and Materials: One hundred eight patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various malignancies in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Stimulated parotid flow rate was measured before radiotherapy and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from CT-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow rate 50 (the dose to the whole organ leading to a complication probability of 50%) was found to be 31, 35, and 39 Gy at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year postradiotherapy, respectively. The volume dependency parameter n was around 1, which means that the mean parotid dose correlates best with the observed complications. There was no steep dose-response curve (m=0.45 at 1 year postradiotherapy). Conclusions: This study on dose/volume/parotid gland function relationships revealed a linear correlation between postradiotherapy flow ratio and parotid gland dose and a strong volume dependency. No threshold dose was found. Recovery of parotid gland function was shown at 6 months and 1 year after radiotherapy. In radiation planning, attempts should be made to achieve a mean parotid gland dose at least below 39 Gy (leading to a complication probability of 50%)

  13. Neutron stars as X-ray burst sources. II. Burst energy histograms and why they burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baan, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    In this work we explore some of the implications of a model for X-ray burst sources where bursts are caused by Kruskal-Schwarzschild instabilities at the magnetopause of an accreting and rotating neutron star. A number of simplifying assumptions are made in order to test the model using observed burst-energy histograms for the rapid burster MXB 1730--335. The predicted histograms have a correct general shape, but it appears that other effects are important as well, and that mode competition, for instance, may suppress the histograms at high burst energies. An explanation is ventured for the enhancement in the histogram at the highest burst energies, which produces the bimodal shape in high accretion rate histograms. Quantitative criteria are given for deciding when accreting neutron stars are steady sources or burst sources, and these criteria are tested using the X-ray pulsars

  14. Defect detection based on extreme edge of defective region histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhir Wakaf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic thresholding has been used by many applications in image processing and pattern recognition systems. Specific attention was given during inspection for quality control purposes in various industries like steel processing and textile manufacturing. Automatic thresholding problem has been addressed well by the commonly used Otsu method, which provides suitable results for thresholding images based on a histogram of bimodal distribution. However, the Otsu method fails when the histogram is unimodal or close to unimodal. Defects have different shapes and sizes, ranging from very small to large. The gray-level distributions of the image histogram can vary between unimodal and multimodal. Furthermore, Otsu-revised methods, like the valley-emphasis method and the background histogram mode extents, which overcome the drawbacks of the Otsu method, require preprocessing steps and fail to use the general threshold for multimodal defects. This study proposes a new automatic thresholding algorithm based on the acquisition of the defective region histogram and the selection of its extreme edge as the threshold value to segment all defective objects in the foreground from the image background. To evaluate the proposed defect-detection method, common standard images for experimentation were used. Experimental results of the proposed method show that the proposed method outperforms the current methods in terms of defect detection.

  15. Histogram deconvolution - An aid to automated classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that N-dimensional histograms are convolved by the addition of noise in the picture domain. Three methods are described which provide the ability to deconvolve such noise-affected histograms. The purpose of the deconvolution is to provide automated classifiers with a higher quality N-dimensional histogram from which to obtain classification statistics.

  16. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  17. LHCb: Machine assisted histogram classification

    CERN Multimedia

    Somogyi, P; Gaspar, C

    2009-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments under completion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Monitoring the quality of the acquired data is important, because it allows the verification of the detector performance. Anomalies, such as missing values or unexpected distributions can be indicators of a malfunctioning detector, resulting in poor data quality. Spotting faulty components can be either done visually using instruments such as the LHCb Histogram Presenter, or by automated tools. In order to assist detector experts in handling the vast monitoring information resulting from the sheer size of the detector, a graph-theoretic based clustering tool, combined with machine learning algorithms is proposed and demonstrated by processing histograms representing 2D event hitmaps. The concept is proven by detecting ion feedback events in the LHCb RICH subdetector.

  18. Visualizing Contour Trees within Histograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Many of the topological features of the isosurfaces of a scalar volume field can be compactly represented by its contour tree. Unfortunately, the contour trees of most real-world volume data sets are too complex to be visualized by dot-and-line diagrams. Therefore, we propose a new visualization...... that is suitable for large contour trees and efficiently conveys the topological structure of the most important isosurface components. This visualization is integrated into a histogram of the volume data; thus, it offers strictly more information than a traditional histogram. We present algorithms...... to automatically compute the graph layout and to calculate appropriate approximations of the contour tree and the surface area of the relevant isosurface components. The benefits of this new visualization are demonstrated with the help of several publicly available volume data sets....

  19. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  20. Finding dose-volume constraints to reduce late rectal toxicity following 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Carlo; Mazzetta, Chiara; Cattani, Federica; Tosi, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Simona; Fodor, Andrei; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The rectum is known to display a dose-volume effect following high-dose 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The aim of the study is to search for significant dose-volume combinations with the specific treatment technique and patient set-up currently used in our institution. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of 135 patients with stage T1b-T3b prostate cancer treated consecutively with 3D-CRT between 1996 and 2000 to a total dose of 76 Gy. The median follow-up was 28 months (range 12-62). All late rectal complications were scored using RTOG criteria. Time to late toxicity was assessed using the Kaplan-Meyer method. The association between variables at baseline and ≥2 rectal toxicity was tested using χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. Results: Late rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was observed in 24 of the 135 patients (17.8%). A 'grey area' of increased risk has been identified. Average DVHs of the bleeding and non-bleeding patients were generated. The area under the percent volume DVH for the rectum of the bleeding patients was significantly higher than that of patients without late rectal toxicity. On multivariate analysis the correlation between the high risk DVHs and late rectal bleeding was confirmed. Conclusions: The present analysis confirms the role of the rectal DVH as a tool to discriminate patients undergoing high-dose 3D-CRT into a low and a high risk of developing late rectal bleeding. Based on our own results and taking into account the data published in the literature, we have been able to establish new dose-volume constraints for treatment planning: if possible, the percentage of rectal volume exposed to 40, 50, 60, 72 and 76 Gy should be limited to 60, 50, 25, 15 and 5%, respectively

  1. Single-dose volume regulation algorithm for a gas-compensated intrathecal infusion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Kim, Kwang Gi; Sung, Mun Hyun; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Dae Hyun; Jo, Yung Ho

    2011-01-01

    The internal pressures of medication reservoirs of gas-compensated intrathecal medication infusion pumps decrease when medication is discharged, and these discharge-induced pressure drops can decrease the volume of medication discharged. To prevent these reductions, the volumes discharged must be adjusted to maintain the required dosage levels. In this study, the authors developed an automatic control algorithm for an intrathecal infusion pump developed by the Korean National Cancer Center that regulates single-dose volumes. The proposed algorithm estimates the amount of medication remaining and adjusts control parameters automatically to maintain single-dose volumes at predetermined levels. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm can regulate mean single-dose volumes with a variation of 98%. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Calculation of rectal dose surface histograms in the presence of time varying deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C.; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, S.; Forman, Jeffrey D.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose volume (DVH) and dose surface histograms (DSH) of the bladder and rectum are usually calculated from a single treatment planning scan. These DVHs and DSHs will eventually be correlated with complications to determine parameters for normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). However, from day to day, the size and shape of the rectum and bladder may vary. The purpose of this study is to compare a more accurate estimate of the time integrated DVHs and DSHs of the rectum (in the presence of daily variations in rectal shape) to initial DVHs/DSHs. Methods: 10 patients were scanned once per week during the course of fractionated radiotherapy, typically accumulating a total of six scans. The rectum and bladder were contoured on each of the studies. The model used to assess effects of rectal contour deformation is as follows: the contour on a given axial slice (see figure) is boxed within a rectangle. A line drawn parallel to the AP axis through the rectangle equally partitions the box. Starting at the intersection of the vertical line and the rectal contour, points on the contour are marked off representing the same rectal dose point, even in the presence of distortion. Corresponding numbered points are used to sample the dose matrix and create a composite DSH. The model assumes uniform stretching of the rectal contour for any given axial cut, and no twist of the structure or vertical displacement. A similar model is developed for the bladder with spherical symmetry. Results: Normalized DSHs (nDSH) for each CT scan were calculated as well as the time averaged nDSH over all scans. These were compared with the nDSH from the initial planning scan. Individual nDSHs differed by 8% surface area irradiated at the 80% dose level, to as much as 20% surface area in the 70-100% dose range. DSH variations are due to position and shape changes in the rectum during different CT scans. The spatial distribution of dose is highly variable, and depends on the field

  3. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  4. Clinical Utility of Blood Cell Histogram Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E T Arun; Bhagya, S; Majeed, Abdul

    2017-09-01

    An automated haematology analyser provides blood cell histograms by plotting the sizes of different blood cells on X-axis and their relative number on Y-axis. Histogram interpretation needs careful analysis of Red Blood Cell (RBC), White Blood Cell (WBC) and platelet distribution curves. Histogram analysis is often a neglected part of the automated haemogram which if interpreted well, has significant potential to provide diagnostically relevant information even before higher level investigations are ordered.

  5. System for histogram entry, retrieval, and plotting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, M.; Gallup, J.M.; Shlaer, S.; Spencer, N.

    1977-10-01

    This manual describes the systems for producing histograms and dot plots that were designed for use in connection with the Q general-purpose data-acquisition system. These systems allow for the creation of histograms; the entry, retrieval, and plotting of data in the form of histograms; and the dynamic display of scatter plots as data are acquired. Although the systems are designed for use with Q, they can also be used as a part of other applications. 3 figures

  6. Information granules in image histogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieclawek, Wojciech

    2018-04-01

    A concept of granular computing employed in intensity-based image enhancement is discussed. First, a weighted granular computing idea is introduced. Then, the implementation of this term in the image processing area is presented. Finally, multidimensional granular histogram analysis is introduced. The proposed approach is dedicated to digital images, especially to medical images acquired by Computed Tomography (CT). As the histogram equalization approach, this method is based on image histogram analysis. Yet, unlike the histogram equalization technique, it works on a selected range of the pixel intensity and is controlled by two parameters. Performance is tested on anonymous clinical CT series. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Algorithms for adaptive histogram equalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, S.M.; Austin, J.D.; Cromartie, R.; Geselowitz, A.; Ter Haar Romeny, B.; Zimmerman, J.B.; Zuiderveld, K.

    1986-01-01

    Adaptive histogram equalization (ahe) is a contrast enhancement method designed to be broadly applicable and having demonstrated effectiveness [Zimmerman, 1985]. However, slow speed and the overenhancement of noise it produces in relatively homogeneous regions are two problems. The authors summarize algorithms designed to overcome these and other concerns. These algorithms include interpolated ahe, to speed up the method on general purpose computers; a version of interpolated ahe designed to run in a few seconds on feedback processors; a version of full ahe designed to run in under one second on custom VLSI hardware; and clipped ahe, designed to overcome the problem of overenhancement of noise contrast. The authors conclude that clipped ahe should become a method of choice in medical imaging and probably also in other areas of digital imaging, and that clipped ahe can be made adequately fast to be routinely applied in the normal display sequence

  8. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, ≥3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week 3 and V10 Gy/week 3 . At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week (≥64 vs. 3 ) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is 3 . These data warrant prospective validation.

  9. WORKER, a program for histogram manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolger, J.E.; Ellinger, H.; Moore, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    A set of programs is provided which may link to any user-written program, permitting dynamic creation of histograms as well as display, manipulation and transfer of histogrammed data. With wide flexibility, constants within the user's code may be set or monitored at any time during execution. (Auth.)

  10. Interpreting Histograms. As Easy as It Seems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Histograms are widely used, but recent studies have shown that they are not as easy to interpret as it might seem. In this article, we report on three studies on the interpretation of histograms in which we investigated, namely, (1) whether the misinterpretation by university students can be considered to be the result of heuristic reasoning, (2)…

  11. Spline smoothing of histograms by linear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    An algorithm for an approximating function to the frequency distribution is obtained from a sample of size n. To obtain the approximating function a histogram is made from the data. Next, Euclidean space approximations to the graph of the histogram using central B-splines as basis elements are obtained by linear programming. The approximating function has area one and is nonnegative.

  12. Introducing the Jacobian-volume-histogram of deforming organs: application to parotid shrinkage evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo; Liberini, Simone; Faggiano, Elena; Rizzo, Giovanna; Dell'Oca, Italo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of elastic registration between images taken during radiotherapy is a measure of inter-fraction local deformation. The histogram of the Jacobian values (Jac) within an organ was introduced (JVH-Jacobian-volume-histogram) and first applied in quantifying parotid shrinkage. MVCTs of 32 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy for head-neck cancers were collected. Parotid deformation was evaluated through elastic registration between MVCTs taken at the first and last fractions. Jac was calculated for each voxel of all parotids, and integral JVHs were calculated for each parotid; the correlation between the JVH and the planning dose-volume histogram (DVH) was investigated. On average, 82% (±17%) of the voxels shrinks (Jac 50% (Jac < 0.5). The best correlation between the DVH and the JVH was found between V10 and V15, and Jac < 0.4-0.6 (p < 0.01). The best constraint predicting a higher number of largely compressing voxels (Jac0.5<7.5%, median value) was V15 ≥ 75% (OR: 7.6, p = 0.002). Jac and the JVH are promising tools for scoring/modelling toxicity and for evaluating organ/contour variations with potential applications in adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based technique were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0.1 overestimated the bladder ICRU point dose up to 43% for conventional-techniques.Bladder-D2 provided a good estimation of ICRU bladder point-doses(within 3.6%) for conventional-techniques. This correlation is not observed for MGO plans perhaps due to steering of isodose line, leading to unpredictable dwell-weighting. Conclusion: MRI based HDR-planning provides accurate delineation of tumor volumes and normal structures, and optimized tumor-coverage can be achieved with acceptable normal-tissue doses. This study showed that for conventional techniques D0.1 rectum dose and D2 bladder dose are good representation of ICRU-reference-point doses.

  14. Should the bladder be full or empty during gynecologic brachytherapy applications? A bladder dose volume histogram analysis and implications for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Lewandowski, Loretta A.; Higgins, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic radiation cystitis is an uncommon but debilitating late complication of definitive external beam (EB) and brachytherapy (BT) for cervix cancer. During BT an indwelling catheter is usually placed in the bladder, collapsing it closer to the BT sources. We have devised a method to deliver BT with a full bladder. The difference in bladder dose in the full and empty state were analyzed during definitive EBT and BT for cervix cancer. Methods: The technique of Lyman and Wolbarst (1) were used to evaluate the bladder complication probability for a representative cervix cancer patient undergoing EBT and BT. DVHs were generated from CT scans obtained with a full and empty bladder. Three possible dose prescriptions were analyzed. Results: The DVH for the full and empty situations are shown. With the bladder full, the volume of bladder predicted to receive ≥ 80 Gy was approximately 10% for all dose schemes evaluated, whereas with the bladder empty, up to 50% of the bladder volume received ≥ 80 Gy. Conclusions: A distended bladder improves the DVH. A technique for performing full bladder LDR brachytherapy will be discussed

  15. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95.2% in water phantoms without RBE enhancement (planned BED). About 10% increase in the source output is required to raise BED PTV V100 to 95%. As a conclusion, the composite effect of dose reduction in the target due to heterogeneities and RBE enhancement results in a net effect of 5.3% target BED coverage loss for electronic brachytherapy. Therefore, it is suggested that about 10% increase in the source output may be necessary to achieve sufficient target coverage higher than 95%.

  16. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95.2% in water phantoms without RBE enhancement (planned BED). About 10% increase in the source output is required to raise BED PTV V{sub 100} to 95%. As a conclusion, the composite effect of dose reduction in the target due to heterogeneities and RBE enhancement results in a net effect of 5.3% target BED coverage loss for electronic brachytherapy. Therefore, it is suggested that about 10% increase in the source output may be necessary to achieve sufficient target coverage higher than 95%.

  17. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95.2% in water phantoms without RBE enhancement (planned BED). About 10% increase in the source output is required to raise BED PTV V 100 to 95%. As a conclusion, the composite effect of dose reduction in the target due to heterogeneities and RBE enhancement results in a net effect of 5.3% target BED coverage loss for electronic brachytherapy. Therefore, it is suggested that about 10% increase in the source output may be necessary to achieve sufficient target coverage higher than 95%.

  18. Bi-Histogram Equalization with Brightnes Preservation Using Contras Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    A. Anitha Rani; Gowthami Rajagopal; A. Jagadeswaran

    2014-01-01

    Contrast enhancement is an important factor in the image preprocesing step. One of the widely acepted contrast enhancement method is the histogram equalization. Although histogram equalization achieves comparatively beter performance on almost al types of image, global histogram equalization sometimes produces excesive visual deterioration. A new extension of bi- histogram equalization caled Bi-Histogram Equalization with Neighborhod Metric (BHENM). First, large histogram bins that cause w...

  19. Comparison of different contouring definitions of the rectum as organ at risk (OAR) and dose-volume parameters predicting rectal inflammation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer: which definition to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Mirko; Brannath, Werner; Brückner, Matthias; Wagner, Dirk; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Temme, Nils; Hermann, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this retrospective planning study was to find a contouring definition for the rectum as an organ at risk (OAR) in curative three-dimensional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer (PCa) with a predictive correlation between the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and rectal toxicity. In a pre-study, the planning CT scans of 23 patients with PCa receiving definitive EBRT were analyzed. The rectum was contoured according to 13 different definitions, and the dose distribution was correlated with the respective rectal volumes by generating DVH curves. Three definitions were identified to represent the most distinct differences in the shapes of the DVH curves: one anatomical definition recommended by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and two functional definitions based on the target volume. In the main study, the correlation between different relative DVH parameters derived from these three contouring definitions and the occurrence of rectal toxicity during and after EBRT was studied in two consecutive collectives. The first cohort consisted of 97 patients receiving primary curative EBRT and the second cohort consisted of 66 patients treated for biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Rectal toxicity was investigated by clinical investigation and scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Candidate parameters were the volume of the rectum, mean dose, maximal dose, volume receiving at least 60 Gy (V 60 ), area under the DVH curve up to 25 Gy and area under the DVH curve up to 75 Gy in dependence of each chosen rectum definition. Multivariable logistic regression considered other clinical factors such as pelvine lymphatics vs local target volume, diabetes, prior rectal surgery, anticoagulation or haemorrhoids too. In Cohort 1 (primary EBRT), the mean rectal volumes for definitions "RTOG", planning target volume "(PTV)-based" and "PTV-linked" were 100 cm 3 [standard deviation (SD) 43 cm 3 ], 60

  20. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  1. Regionally adaptive histogram equalization of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrier, R.H.; Johnson, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in digital chest radiography have resulted in the acquisition of high-quality digital images of the human chest. With these advances, there arises a genuine need for image processing algorithms, specific to chest images. The author has implemented the technique of histogram equalization, noting the problems encountered when it is adapted to chest images. These problems have been successfully solved with a regionally adaptive histogram equalization method. Histograms are calculated locally and then modified according to both the mean pixel value of a given region and certain characteristics of the cumulative distribution function. The method allows certain regions of the chest radiograph to be enhanced differentially

  2. Color Histogram Diffusion for Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taemin

    2011-01-01

    Various color histogram equalization (CHE) methods have been proposed to extend grayscale histogram equalization (GHE) for color images. In this paper a new method called histogram diffusion that extends the GHE method to arbitrary dimensions is proposed. Ranges in a histogram are specified as overlapping bars of uniform heights and variable widths which are proportional to their frequencies. This diagram is called the vistogram. As an alternative approach to GHE, the squared error of the vistogram from the uniform distribution is minimized. Each bar in the vistogram is approximated by a Gaussian function. Gaussian particles in the vistoram diffuse as a nonlinear autonomous system of ordinary differential equations. CHE results of color images showed that the approach is effective.

  3. Adaptive histogram equalization and its variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizer, S.M.; Amburn, E.P.; Austin, J.D.; Cromartie, R.; Geselowitz, A.; Greer, Trey; Haar Romenij, ter B.M.; Zimmerman, J.B.; Zuiderveld, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adaptive histogram equalization (ahe) is a contrast enhancement method designed to be broadly applicable and having demonstrated effectiveness. However, slow speed and the overenhancement of noise it produces in relatively homogeneous regions are two problems. We report algorithms designed to

  4. The Online Histogram Presenter for the ATLAS experiment: A modular system for histogram visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotti, Andrea; Adragna, Paolo; Vitillo, Roberto A

    2010-01-01

    The Online Histogram Presenter (OHP) is the ATLAS tool to display histograms produced by the online monitoring system. In spite of the name, the Online Histogram Presenter is much more than just a histogram display. To cope with the large amount of data, the application has been designed to minimise the network traffic; sophisticated caching, hashing and filtering algorithms reduce memory and CPU usage. The system uses Qt and ROOT for histogram visualisation and manipulation. In addition, histogram visualisation can be extensively customised through configuration files. Finally, its very modular architecture features a lightweight plug-in system, allowing extensions to accommodate specific user needs. After an architectural overview of the application, the paper is going to present in detail the solutions adopted to increase the performance and a description of the plug-in system.

  5. The Online Histogram Presenter for the ATLAS experiment: A modular system for histogram visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotti, Andrea [CERN, CH-1211 Genve 23 Switzerland (Switzerland); Adragna, Paolo [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4RP UK (United Kingdom); Vitillo, Roberto A, E-mail: andrea.dotti@cern.c [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Ed. C Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    The Online Histogram Presenter (OHP) is the ATLAS tool to display histograms produced by the online monitoring system. In spite of the name, the Online Histogram Presenter is much more than just a histogram display. To cope with the large amount of data, the application has been designed to minimise the network traffic; sophisticated caching, hashing and filtering algorithms reduce memory and CPU usage. The system uses Qt and ROOT for histogram visualisation and manipulation. In addition, histogram visualisation can be extensively customised through configuration files. Finally, its very modular architecture features a lightweight plug-in system, allowing extensions to accommodate specific user needs. After an architectural overview of the application, the paper is going to present in detail the solutions adopted to increase the performance and a description of the plug-in system.

  6. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper) using Excel - 4: Histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Victor

    2018-02-01

    Plotting data into graphs is a crucial step in data analysis as part of an initial descriptive statistics exercise since it gives the researcher an overview of the shape and nature of the data. Outlier values may also be identified, and these may be incorrect data, or true and important outliers. This paper explains how to access Microsoft Excel's Analysis Toolpak and provides some pointers for the utilisation of the histogram tool within the Toolpak. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Mechanistic simulation of normal-tissue damage in radiotherapy-implications for dose-volume analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowska, Eva; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A radiobiologically based 3D model of normal tissue has been developed in which complications are generated when 'irradiated'. The aim is to provide insight into the connection between dose-distribution characteristics, different organ architectures and complication rates beyond that obtainable with simple DVH-based analytical NTCP models. In this model the organ consists of a large number of functional subunits (FSUs), populated by stem cells which are killed according to the LQ model. A complication is triggered if the density of FSUs in any 'critical functioning volume' (CFV) falls below some threshold. The (fractional) CFV determines the organ architecture and can be varied continuously from small (series-like behaviour) to large (parallel-like). A key feature of the model is its ability to account for the spatial dependence of dose distributions. Simulations were carried out to investigate correlations between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of 'complications' using different pseudo-clinical dose distributions. Correlations between dose-volume parameters and outcome depended on characteristics of the dose distributions and on organ architecture. As anticipated, the mean dose and V 20 correlated most strongly with outcome for a parallel organ, and the maximum dose for a serial organ. Interestingly better correlation was obtained between the 3D computer model and the LKB model with dose distributions typical for serial organs than with those typical for parallel organs. This work links the results of dose-volume analyses to dataset characteristics typical for serial and parallel organs and it may help investigators interpret the results from clinical studies.

  8. Histogram based analysis of lung perfusion of children after congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, Nora; Weis, Meike; Zahn, Katrin; Schaible, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Schad, Lothar R; Zöllner, Frank G

    2018-05-01

    To investigate a histogram based approach to characterize the distribution of perfusion in the whole left and right lung by descriptive statistics and to show how histograms could be used to visually explore perfusion defects in two year old children after Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) repair. 28 children (age of 24.2±1.7months; all left sided hernia; 9 after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy) underwent quantitative DCE-MRI of the lung. Segmentations of left and right lung were manually drawn to mask the calculated pulmonary blood flow maps and then to derive histograms for each lung side. Individual and group wise analysis of histograms of left and right lung was performed. Ipsilateral and contralateral lung show significant difference in shape and descriptive statistics derived from the histogram (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, phistogram derived parameters. Histogram analysis can be a valuable tool to characterize and visualize whole lung perfusion of children after CDH repair. It allows for several possibilities to analyze the data, either describing the perfusion differences between the right and left lung but also to explore and visualize localized perfusion patterns in the 3D lung volume. Subgroup analysis will be possible given sufficient sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  10. The Research of Histogram Enhancement Technique Based on Matlab Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Histogram enhancement technique has been widely applied as a typical pattern in digital image processing. The paper is based on Matlab software, through the two ways of histogram equalization and histogram specification technologies to deal with the darker images, using two methods of partial equilibrium and mapping histogram to transform the original histograms, thereby enhanced the image information. The results show that these two kinds of techniques both can significantly improve the image quality and enhance the image feature.

  11. Tools for the analysis of dose optimization: I. Effect-volume histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, M.; Nuesslin, F.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of dose optimization algorithms, predominantly for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), computer software has progressed beyond the point of being merely a tool at the hands of an expert and has become an active, independent mediator of the dosimetric conflicts between treatment goals and risks. To understand and control the internal decision finding as well as to provide means to influence it, a tool for the analysis of the dose distribution is presented which reveals the decision-making process performed by the algorithm. The internal trade-offs between partial volumes receiving high or low doses are driven by functions which attribute a weight to each volume element. The statistics of the distribution of these weights is cast into an effect-volume histogram (EVH) in analogy to dose-volume histograms. The analysis of the EVH reveals which traits of the optimum dose distribution result from the defined objectives, and which are a random consequence of under- or misspecification of treatment goals. The EVH can further assist in the process of finding suitable objectives and balancing conflicting objectives. If biologically inspired objectives are used, the EVH shows the distribution of local dose effect relative to the prescribed level. (author)

  12. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  -0.79 to  -0.85 and  -0.82 to  -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise

  13. ACTION RECOGNITION USING SALIENT NEIGHBORING HISTOGRAMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Combining spatio-temporal interest points with Bag-of-Words models achieves state-of-the-art performance in action recognition. However, existing methods based on “bag-ofwords” models either are too local to capture the variance in space/time or fail to solve the ambiguity problem in spatial...... and temporal dimensions. Instead, we propose a salient vocabulary construction algorithm to select visual words from a global point of view, and form compact descriptors to represent discriminative histograms in the neighborhoods. Those salient neighboring histograms are then trained to model different actions...

  14. A comparison of dose-volume constraints derived using peak and longitudinal definitions of late rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R.; Andreyev, Jervoise; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Accurate reporting of complications following radiotherapy is an important part of the feedback loop to improve radiotherapy techniques. The definition of toxicity is normally regarded as the maximum or peak (P) grade of toxicity reported over the follow-up period. An alternative definition (integrated longitudinal toxicity (ILT)) is proposed which takes into account both the severity and the duration of the complication. Methods and materials: In this work, both definitions of toxicity were used to derive dose-volume constraints for six specific endpoints of late rectal toxicity from a cohort of patients who received prostate radiotherapy in the MRC RT01 trial. The dose-volume constraints were derived using ROC analysis for 30, 40, 50, 60, 65 and 70 Gy. Results: Statistically significant dose-volume constraints were not derived for all dose levels tested for each endpoint and toxicity definition. However, where both definitions produced constraints, there was generally good agreement. Variation in the derived dose-volume constraints was observed to be larger between endpoints than between the two definitions of toxicity. For one endpoint (stool frequency (LENT/SOM)) statistically significant dose-volume constraints were only derived using ILT. Conclusions: The longitudinal definition of toxicity (ILT) produced results consistent with those derived using peak toxicity and in some cases provided additional information which was not seen by analysing peak toxicity alone.

  15. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  16. 3D facial expression recognition based on histograms of surface differential quantities

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2011-01-01

    3D face models accurately capture facial surfaces, making it possible for precise description of facial activities. In this paper, we present a novel mesh-based method for 3D facial expression recognition using two local shape descriptors. To characterize shape information of the local neighborhood of facial landmarks, we calculate the weighted statistical distributions of surface differential quantities, including histogram of mesh gradient (HoG) and histogram of shape index (HoS). Normal cycle theory based curvature estimation method is employed on 3D face models along with the common cubic fitting curvature estimation method for the purpose of comparison. Based on the basic fact that different expressions involve different local shape deformations, the SVM classifier with both linear and RBF kernels outperforms the state of the art results on the subset of the BU-3DFE database with the same experimental setting. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Relationship between dose-volume parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Shibata, Toru [Kagawa University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kagawa (Japan); Go, Tetsuhiko; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Yokomise, Hiroyasu [Kagawa University, Department of General Thoracic, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This study evaluated the relationship between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) followed by surgery for lung cancer. We also examined a new DVH parameter, because the unresected lung should be more spared than the later resected lung. Data from 43 non-small cell lung cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. The DVH parameters of the lung were calculated from the total bilateral lung volume minus (1) the gross tumor volume (DVHg) or (2) the later resected lung volume (DVHr). Radiation pneumonitis (RP) and fistula, including bronchopleural and pulmonary fistula, were graded as the pulmonary complications. Factors affecting the incidences of grade 2 or higher RP (≥G2 RP) and fistula were analyzed. Sixteen patients (37 %) experienced ≥G2 RP and a V20 value of the total lung minus the later resected lung (V20r) ≥ 12 % was a significant factor affecting the incidence of ≥G2 RP (p = 0.032). Six patients (14 %) developed a fistula and a V35 value of the total lung minus the gross tumor (V35g) ≥ 19 % and a V40g ≥ 16 % were significant factors affecting the incidence of fistula (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively). These DVH parameters may be related to the incidences of ≥G2 RP and fistula. (orig.) [German] In dieser Studie wurde die Beziehung zwischen Dosis-Volumen-Histogramm-(DVH-)Parametern und pulmonalen Komplikationen nach neoadjuvanter Radiochemotherapie (NARCT) und nachfolgender Operation beim Lungenkarzinom untersucht. Zudem wurde ein neuer DVH-Parameter untersucht, da das nichtresezierte Lungengewebe mehr geschont werden sollte als reseziertes Gewebe. Daten von 43 Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Die DVH-Parameter der Lunge wurden aus dem gesamten beidseitigen Lungenvolumen minus (1) das makroskopische Tumorvolumen (DVHg) oder (2) das resezierte Lungenvolumen (DVHr) ermittelt. Strahlenpneumonitis (RP) und Fisteln

  18. A comparison of automatic histogram constructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, P.L.; Gather, U.; Nordman, D.J.; Weinert, H.

    2009-01-01

    Even for a well-trained statistician the construction of a histogram for a given real-valued data set is a difficult problem. It is even more difficult to construct a fully automatic procedure which specifies the number and widths of the bins in a satisfactory manner for a wide range of data sets.

  19. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (≥50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30≤80%, V40≤65%, V50≤55%, V60≤40%, V65≤30%, V70≤15%, and V75≤3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  20. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D 2cc of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  1. A dose-volume analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-aided high-dose-rate image-based interstitial brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D(2cc) of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient contrast enhancement through log-power histogram modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, T.; Toet, A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple power-logarithm histogram modification operator is proposed to enhance digital image contrast. First a logarithm operator reduces the effect of spikes and transforms the image histogram into a smoothed one that approximates a uniform histogram while retaining the relative size ordering of

  3. Expression robust 3D face recognition via mesh-based histograms of multiple order surface differential quantities

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a mesh-based approach for 3D face recognition using a novel local shape descriptor and a SIFT-like matching process. Both maximum and minimum curvatures estimated in the 3D Gaussian scale space are employed to detect salient points. To comprehensively characterize 3D facial surfaces and their variations, we calculate weighted statistical distributions of multiple order surface differential quantities, including histogram of mesh gradient (HoG), histogram of shape index (HoS) and histogram of gradient of shape index (HoGS) within a local neighborhood of each salient point. The subsequent matching step then robustly associates corresponding points of two facial surfaces, leading to much more matched points between different scans of a same person than the ones of different persons. Experimental results on the Bosphorus dataset highlight the effectiveness of the proposed method and its robustness to facial expression variations. © 2011 IEEE.

  4. Gamma histograms for radiotherapy plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Lewis, D. Geraint

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The technique known as the 'γ evaluation method' incorporates pass-fail criteria for both distance-to-agreement and dose difference analysis of 3D dose distributions and provides a numerical index (γ) as a measure of the agreement between two datasets. As the γ evaluation index is being adopted in more centres as part of treatment plan verification procedures for 2D and 3D dose maps, the development of methods capable of encapsulating the information provided by this technique is recommended. Patients and methods: In this work the concept of γ index was extended to create gamma histograms (GH) in order to provide a measure of the agreement between two datasets in two or three dimensions. Gamma area histogram (GAH) and gamma volume histogram (GVH) graphs were produced using one or more 2D γ maps generated for each slice of the irradiated volume. GHs were calculated for IMRT plans, evaluating the 3D dose distribution from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) compared to a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation used as reference dataset. Results: The extent of local anatomical inhomogenities in the plans under consideration was strongly correlated with the level of difference between reference and evaluated calculations. GHs provided an immediate visual representation of the proportion of the treated volume that fulfilled the γ criterion and offered a concise method for comparative numerical evaluation of dose distributions. Conclusions: We have introduced the concept of GHs and investigated its applications to the evaluation and verification of IMRT plans. The gamma histogram concept set out in this paper can provide a valuable technique for quantitative comparison of dose distributions and could be applied as a tool for the quality assurance of treatment planning systems

  5. Robust histogram-based image retrieval

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Höschl, Cyril; Flusser, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2016), s. 72-81 ISSN 0167-8655 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Image retrieval * Noisy image * Histogram * Convolution * Moments * Invariants Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 1.995, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/ZOI/hoschl-0452147.pdf

  6. Dose-Volume Analysis of Radiation Nephropathy in Children: Preliminary Report of the Risk Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelling, Tobias; Ernst, Iris; Pape, Hildegard; Martini, Carmen; Ruebe, Christian; Timmermann, Beate; Fischedick, Karin; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Willich, Normann

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize kidney function in children and adolescents who had undergone radiation treatment that included parts of the kidney. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving radiotherapy during childhood or adolescence were prospectively registered in Germany's Registry for the Evaluation of Side Effects after Radiation in Childhood and Adolescence (RiSK). Detailed information was recorded regarding radiation doses at the organs at risk since 2001 all over Germany. Toxicity evaluation was performed according to standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: Up to May 2009, 1086 patients from 62 centers were recruited, including 126 patients (median age, 10.2 years) who underwent radiotherapy to parts of the kidneys. Maximal late toxicity (median follow-up 28.5 months in 74 patients) was characterized as Grade 0 (n = 65), 1 (n = 7) or 2 (n = 2). All patients with late effects had received potentially nephrotoxic chemotherapy. A statistically significant difference between patients with and without Grade 1 toxicity, revealing higher exposed kidney volumes in patients with toxicity, was seen for the kidney volume exposed to 20 Gy (V20; p = 0.031) and 30 Gy (V30; p = 0.003). Conclusions: Preliminary data indicate that radiation-induced kidney function impairment is rare in current pediatric multimodal treatment approaches. In the future, RiSK will be able to provide further detailed data regarding dose-volume effect relationships of radiation-associated side effects in pediatric oncology patients.

  7. Unstable Periodic Orbit Analysis of Histograms of Chaotic Time Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoldi, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Using the Lorenz equations, we have investigated whether unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) associated with a strange attractor may predict the occurrence of the robust sharp peaks in histograms of some experimental chaotic time series. Histograms with sharp peaks occur for the Lorenz parameter value r=60.0 but not for r=28.0 , and the sharp peaks for r=60.0 do not correspond to a histogram derived from any single UPO. However, we show that histograms derived from the time series of a non-Axiom-A chaotic system can be accurately predicted by an escape-time weighting of UPO histograms. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Chi-square tests for comparing weighted histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagunashvili, N.D.

    2010-01-01

    Weighted histograms in Monte Carlo simulations are often used for the estimation of probability density functions. They are obtained as a result of random experiments with random events that have weights. In this paper, the bin contents of a weighted histogram are considered as a sum of random variables with a random number of terms. Generalizations of the classical chi-square test for comparing weighted histograms are proposed. Numerical examples illustrate an application of the tests for the histograms with different statistics of events and different weighted functions. The proposed tests can be used for the comparison of experimental data histograms with simulated data histograms as well as for the two simulated data histograms.

  9. Differential diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus by MRI mean diffusivity histogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivkovic, M; Liu, B; Ahmed, F; Moore, D; Huang, C; Raj, A; Kovanlikaya, I; Heier, L; Relkin, N

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus is challenging because the clinical symptoms and radiographic appearance of NPH often overlap those of other conditions, including age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. We hypothesized that radiologic differences between NPH and AD/PD can be characterized by a robust and objective MR imaging DTI technique that does not require intersubject image registration or operator-defined regions of interest, thus avoiding many pitfalls common in DTI methods. We collected 3T DTI data from 15 patients with probable NPH and 25 controls with AD, PD, or dementia with Lewy bodies. We developed a parametric model for the shape of intracranial mean diffusivity histograms that separates brain and ventricular components from a third component composed mostly of partial volume voxels. To accurately fit the shape of the third component, we constructed a parametric function named the generalized Voss-Dyke function. We then examined the use of the fitting parameters for the differential diagnosis of NPH from AD, PD, and DLB. Using parameters for the MD histogram shape, we distinguished clinically probable NPH from the 3 other disorders with 86% sensitivity and 96% specificity. The technique yielded 86% sensitivity and 88% specificity when differentiating NPH from AD only. An adequate parametric model for the shape of intracranial MD histograms can distinguish NPH from AD, PD, or DLB with high sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  11. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  12. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: Dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ⩾12months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), masseter (MM), buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving⩾69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  14. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Martin A.; Foo, Kerwyn; Haworth, Annette; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Kennedy, Angel; Joseph, David J.; Denham, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  15. optBINS: Optimal Binning for histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2018-03-01

    optBINS (optimal binning) determines the optimal number of bins in a uniform bin-width histogram by deriving the posterior probability for the number of bins in a piecewise-constant density model after assigning a multinomial likelihood and a non-informative prior. The maximum of the posterior probability occurs at a point where the prior probability and the the joint likelihood are balanced. The interplay between these opposing factors effectively implements Occam's razor by selecting the most simple model that best describes the data.

  16. Boundary condition histograms for modulated phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benakli, M.; Gabay, M.; Saslow, W.M.

    1997-11-01

    Boundary conditions strongly affect the results of numerical computations for finite size inhomogeneous or incommensurate structures. We present a method which allows to deal with this problem, both for ground state and for critical properties: it combines fluctuating boundary conditions and specific histogram techniques. Our approach concerns classical as well as quantum systems. In particular, current-current correlation functions, which probe large scale coherence of the states, can be accurately evaluated. We illustrate our method on a frustrated two dimensional XY model. (author)

  17. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord: incidence and dose-volume relationship of symptomatic and asymptomatic late effects following high dose irradiation of paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Munzenrider, John E.; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Adams, Judy; Hug, Eugen B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low grade chordomas and chondrosarcomas require high radiation doses for effective, lasting tumor control. Fractionated, 3-D planned, conformal proton radiation therapy has been used for lesions along the base of skull and spine to deliver high target doses, while respecting constraints of critical, normal tissues. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of myelopathy after high dose radiotherapy to the cervical spine and investigated the influence of various treatment parameters, including dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and March 1996, 78 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the cervical spine using combined proton and photon radiation therapy. In general, the tumor dose given was between 64.5 to 79.2 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent). The guidelines for maximum permissible doses to spinal cord were: ≤ 64 CGE to the spinal cord surface and ≤ 53 CGE to the spinal cord center. Dose volume histograms of the spinal cord were analyzed to investigate a possible dose and volume relationship. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 46.6 months (range: 3 - 157 months), 4 of 78 patients (5.1%) developed high-grade (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) late toxicity: 3 patients (3.8%) experienced sensory deficits without motor deficits, none had any limitations of daily activities. One patient (1.2%) developed motor deficit with loss of motor function of one upper extremity. The only patient, who developed permanent motor damage had received additional prior radiation treatment and therefore received a cumulative spinal cord dose higher than the treatment guidelines. No patient treated within the guidelines experienced any motor impairment. Six patients (7.7%) experienced transient Lhermitt's syndrome and 1 patient (1.2%) developed asymptomatic radiographic MR findings only. Time to onset of symptoms of radiographic

  18. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratland, Åse; Dueland, Svein; Hollywood, Donal; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile.

  19. Design and implement of BESIII online histogramming software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Wang Liang; Liu Yingjie; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhu Kejun; Zhao Jingwei

    2007-01-01

    The online histogramming software is an important part of the BESIII DAQ (Data Acquisition) system. This article introduces the main requirements and design of the online histogramming software and presents how to produce, transmit and gather histograms in the distributed environment in the current software implement. The article also illustrate one smart, simple and easy to expand way of setup with xml configure database. (authors)

  20. A monitoring program of the histograms based on ROOT package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yongzhao; Liang Hao; Chen Yixin; Xue Jundong; Yang Tao; Gong Datao; Jin Ge; Yu Xiaoqi

    2002-01-01

    KHBOOK is a histogram monitor and browser based on ROOT package, which reads the histogram file in HBOOK format from Physmon, converts it into ROOT format, and browses the histograms in Repeat and Overlap modes to monitor and trace the quality of the data from DAQ. KHBOOK is a program of small memory, easy maintenance and fast running as well, using mono-behavior classes and a communication class of C ++

  1. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): Concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Limbergen, Erik van; Barillot, Isabelle; Brabandere, Marisol De; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm 3 ; optional 5 and 10 cm 3 . Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm 3 . Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD 2 )-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Poetter R, Van Limbergen E et al

  2. Value-at-risk estimation with fuzzy histograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, R.J.; Kaymak, U.

    2008-01-01

    Value at risk (VaR) is a measure for senior management that summarises the financial risk a company faces into one single number. In this paper, we consider the use of fuzzy histograms for quantifying the value-at-risk of a portfolio. It is shown that the use of fuzzy histograms provides a good

  3. Multiple histogram method and static Monte Carlo sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inda, M.A.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an approach to use multiple-histogram methods in combination with static, biased Monte Carlo simulations. To illustrate this, we computed the force-extension curve of an athermal polymer from multiple histograms constructed in a series of static Rosenbluth Monte Carlo simulations. From

  4. Calibration of 14C Histograms : A Comparison of Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Ad; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.; Hekhuis, Kilian P.V.; Berendsen, Henk J.A.; Plicht, Johannes van der

    1994-01-01

    The interpretation of C-14 histograms is complicated by the non-linearity of the C-14 time scale in terms of Calendar years, which may result in clustering of C-14 ages in certain time intervals unrelated to the (geologic or archaeologic) phenomenon of interest. One can calibrate C-14 histograms for

  5. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bratland, Ase

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Findings Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. Conclusions When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00455351

  6. Dose-volume modeling of salivary function in patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Angel I.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; El Naqa, Issam; Franklin, Gregg E.; Zakarian, Konstantin; Vicic, Milos; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the factors that affect salivary function after head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT), including parotid gland dose-volume effects, potential compensation by less-irradiated gland tissue, and functional recovery over time. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients with head-and-neck tumors were enrolled in a prospective salivary function study. RT was delivered using intensity-modulated RT (n = 45), forward-planning three-dimensional conformal RT (n = 14), or three-dimensional conformal RT with an intensity-modulated RT boost (n = 6). Whole salivary flow was measured before therapy and at 6 months (n = 61) and 12 months (n = 31) after RT. A wide variety of dose-volume models to predict post-RT salivary function were tested. Xerostomia was defined according to the subjective, objective, management, analytic (SOMA) criteria as occurring when posttreatment salivary function was s ] = 0.46, p s = 0.73), stimulated saliva flow at 12 months (R s = 0.54), and quality-of-life score at 6 months (R s = 0.35) after RT. Conclusion: Stimulated parotid salivary gland dose-volume models strongly correlated with both stimulated salivary function and quality-of-life scores at 6 months after RT. The mean stimulated saliva flow rates improved from 6 to 12 months after RT. Salivary function, in each gland, appeared to be lost exponentially at a rate of approximately 5%/1 Gy of mean dose. Additional research is necessary to distinguish among the models for use in treatment planning. The incidence of xerostomia was significantly decreased when the mean dose of at least one parotid gland was kept to <25.8 Gy with conventional fractionation. However, even lower mean doses imply increased late salivary function

  7. DPAK and HPAK: a versatile display and histogramming package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logg, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Cook, A.J.; Cottrell, R.L.A.; Sund, S.

    1979-07-01

    The features of a display and histogram package which requires a minimal number of subroutine calls in order to generate graphic output in many flavors on a variety of devices are described. Default options are preset to values that are generally most wanted, but the default values may be readily changed to the user's needs. The description falls naturally into two parts, namely, the set of routines (DPAK) for displaying data on some device, and the set of routines (HPAK) for generating histograms. HPAK provides a means of allocating memory for histograms, accumulating data into histograms, and subsequently displaying the hisotgrams via calls to the DPAK routines. Histograms and displays of either one or two independent variables can be made

  8. CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Chie, Eui Kyu; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for 192 Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V ref ), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm 3 ) and CTV (24.9 cm 3 ) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm 3 , respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V ref for all patients was 129.6 cm 3 for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm 3 for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V ref in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and

  9. AHIMSA - Ad hoc histogram information measure sensing algorithm for feature selection in the context of histogram inspired clustering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, B. V.

    1976-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for dimensionality reduction in the context of clustering techniques based on histogram analysis. The approach is based on an evaluation of the hills and valleys in the unidimensional histograms along the different features and provides an economical means of assessing the significance of the features in a nonparametric unsupervised data environment. The method has relevance to remote sensing applications.

  10. Landmark Detection in Orbital Images Using Salience Histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Panetta, Julian; Schorghofer, Norbert; Greeley, Ronald; PendletonHoffer, Mary; bunte, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's planetary missions have collected, and continue to collect, massive volumes of orbital imagery. The volume is such that it is difficult to manually review all of the data and determine its significance. As a result, images are indexed and searchable by location and date but generally not by their content. A new automated method analyzes images and identifies "landmarks," or visually salient features such as gullies, craters, dust devil tracks, and the like. This technique uses a statistical measure of salience derived from information theory, so it is not associated with any specific landmark type. It identifies regions that are unusual or that stand out from their surroundings, so the resulting landmarks are context-sensitive areas that can be used to recognize the same area when it is encountered again. A machine learning classifier is used to identify the type of each discovered landmark. Using a specified window size, an intensity histogram is computed for each such window within the larger image (sliding the window across the image). Next, a salience map is computed that specifies, for each pixel, the salience of the window centered at that pixel. The salience map is thresholded to identify landmark contours (polygons) using the upper quartile of salience values. Descriptive attributes are extracted for each landmark polygon: size, perimeter, mean intensity, standard deviation of intensity, and shape features derived from an ellipse fit.

  11. Ultrasonic histogram assessment of early response to concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Ru, Tong; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhu, Li; He, Jian; Liu, Song; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    To monitor early response for locally advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) by ultrasonic histogram. B-mode ultrasound examinations were performed at 4 time points in thirty-four patients during CCRT. Six ultrasonic histogram parameters were used to assess the echogenicity, homogeneity and heterogeneity of tumors. I peak increased rapidly since the first week after therapy initiation, whereas W low , W high and A high changed significantly at the second week. The average ultrasonic histogram progressively moved toward the right and converted into more symmetrical shape. Ultrasonic histogram could be served as a potential marker to monitor early response during CCRT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IMPLEMENTASI METODE HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS CITRA DIGITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Akhlis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiografi dapat digunakan untuk membantu mendiagnosis penyakit dalam bidang medis. Umumnya citra radiograf masih tampak kabur sehingga memerlukan pengolahan untuk menghilangkan atau mengurangi kekaburan tersebut. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mendesain perangkat lunak untuk meningkatkan kualitas citra digital foto Roentgen yaitu dengan meningkatkan kontras citra tersebut. Salah satu metode untuk meningkatkan kontras citra digital adalah dengan menggunakan metode histogram equalization. Metoda tersebut membuat tingkat keabuan citra tersebar merata pada semua tingkat keabuan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa metoda histogram equalization dapat digunakan untuk meningkatkan kontras citra.  Hal ini dapat langsung dilihat pada layar monitor.   Kata kunci: citra radiograf,  histogram equalization

  13. HPLOT: the graphics interface package for the HBOOK histogramming package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, H.

    1978-01-01

    The subroutine package HPLOT described in this report, enables the CERN histogramming package HBOOK to produce high-quality pictures by means of high-resolution devices such as plotters. HPLOT can be implemented on any scientific computing system with a Fortran IV compiler and can be interfaced with any graphics package; spectral routines in addition to the basic ones enable users to embellish their histograms. Examples are also given of the use of HPLOT as a graphics package for plotting simple pictures without histograms. (Auth.)

  14. RGB Color Cube-Based Histogram Specification for Hue-Preserving Color Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Inoue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A large number of color image enhancement methods are based on the methods for grayscale image enhancement in which the main interest is contrast enhancement. However, since colors usually have three attributes, including hue, saturation and intensity of more than only one attribute of grayscale values, the naive application of the methods for grayscale images to color images often results in unsatisfactory consequences. Conventional hue-preserving color image enhancement methods utilize histogram equalization (HE for enhancing the contrast. However, they cannot always enhance the saturation simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a histogram specification (HS method for enhancing the saturation in hue-preserving color image enhancement. The proposed method computes the target histogram for HS on the basis of the geometry of RGB (rad, green and blue color space, whose shape is a cube with a unit side length. Therefore, the proposed method includes no parameters to be set by users. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves higher color saturation than recent parameter-free methods for hue-preserving color image enhancement. As a result, the proposed method can be used for an alternative method of HE in hue-preserving color image enhancement.

  15. Tumor dose-volume response in image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, Renaud; Castelnau-Marchand, Pauline; Escande, Alexandre; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Maroun, Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is a high precision technique that allows dose escalation and adaptation to tumor response. Two monocentric studies reported continuous dose-volume response relationships, however, burdened by large confidence intervals. The aim was to refine these estimations by performing a meta-regression analysis based on published series. Eligibility was limited to series reporting dosimetric parameters according to the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European SocieTy for Radiation Oncology recommendations. The local control rates reported at 2-3 years were confronted to the mean D90 clinical target volume (CTV) in 2-Gy equivalent using the probit model. The impact of each series on the relationships was pondered according to the number of patients reported. An exhaustive literature search retrieved 13 series reporting on 1299 patients. D90 high-risk CTV ranged from 70.9 to 93.1 Gy. The probit model showed a significant correlation between the D90 and the probability of achieving local control (p < 0.0001). The D90 associated to a 90% probability of achieving local control was 81.4 Gy (78.3-83.8 Gy). The planning aim of 90 Gy corresponded to a 95.0% probability (92.8-96.3%). For the intermediate-risk CTV, less data were available, with 873 patients from eight institutions. Reported mean D90 intermediate-risk CTV ranged from 61.7 to 69.1 Gy. A significant dose-volume effect was observed (p = 0.009). The D90 of 60 Gy was associated to a 79.4% (60.2-86.0%) local control probability. Based on published data from a high number of patients, significant dose-volume effect relationships were confirmed and refined between the D90 of both CTV and the probability of achieving local control. Further studies based on individual data are required to develop nomograms including nondosimetric prognostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of customized beam shaping on normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of parotid gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keus, R.; Boer, R. de; Lebesque, J.; Noach, P.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of customized beam shaping was studied for 5 patients with parotid tumors treated with a paired wedged field technique. For each patient 2 plans were generated. The standard plan had unblocked portals with field sizes defined by the largest target contour found in any CT slice. In the 2nd plan customized beam's view (BEV) designed blocks were added to both beams. The differences in those distributions between the 2 types of plans were evaluated using dose-volume histograms (DVH). As expected, the dose distribution within the target volume showed no difference. However, a considerable sparing of normal tissue was observed for the plans with customized blocks. The volume of un-necessary exposed normal tissue that received more than 90 percent of the prescribed dose, was reduced by a factor of about 4: from 165 to 44 percent on an average, if the volume is expressed as a percentage of the target volume in each patient. In particular, the homolateral mandible showed a mean decrease of 21 percent of integral dose when blocks were used. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were calculated. For a tumor dose of 70 Gy, the average bone necrosis probability was reduced from 8.4 percent (no blocks) to 4.1. percent (blocks). For other normal tissues such as nervous tissue, other soft tissues and bones a substantial reduction of integral dose was found for al patients when individual blocks were used. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Uniform dose compensation using field within a field technique in T-shaped irradiation for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Ryuji; Sugahara, Takeshi; Baba, Yuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2003-01-01

    We devised a uniform compensation method to improve dose distribution using the field within a field technique in T-shaped irradiation for esophageal cancer. Isodose curves and dose volume histograms (DVH) of the esophagus in the treatment volume were examined in ten patients treated for esophageal cancers. For the DVH analysis, the prescription dose was 40 Gy to the center of the treatment volume, and the volume ratio of the esophagus receiving within ±5% of the prescription dose (38-42 Gy) was regarded as an index of dose homogeneity (V±5%). The peak dose in the conventional antero-posterior opposed fields irradiation existed at the clavicular level, and the 90% isodose curve crossing the esophagus almost corresponded to the top level of the aortic arch. When 40 Gy is irradiated, the maximum dose of the esophagus and V±5% were 45.55±0.55 Gy and 59.7±13.2% respectively. The dose distribution of the esophagus became relatively homogeneous when a 10% dose was added using the field within a field technique to the area under the bottom level of the aortic arch, and the maximum dose and V±5% were 42.53±0.94 Gy and 91.7±7.1% respectively. A 10% and more overdose area existed at the clavicular level in the conventional antero-posterior opposed fields irradiation. A relatively homogeneous dose distribution could be obtained using the field within a field technique. (author)

  18. Face recognition algorithm using extended vector quantization histogram features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Lee, Feifei; Wu, Xueqian; Chen, Qiu

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a face recognition algorithm based on a combination of vector quantization (VQ) and Markov stationary features (MSF). The VQ algorithm has been shown to be an effective method for generating features; it extracts a codevector histogram as a facial feature representation for face recognition. Still, the VQ histogram features are unable to convey spatial structural information, which to some extent limits their usefulness in discrimination. To alleviate this limitation of VQ histograms, we utilize Markov stationary features (MSF) to extend the VQ histogram-based features so as to add spatial structural information. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm by achieving recognition results superior to those of several state-of-the-art methods on publicly available face databases.

  19. Histogram Matching Extends Acceptable Signal Strength Range on Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Sigal, Ian A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We minimized the influence of image quality variability, as measured by signal strength (SS), on optical coherence tomography (OCT) thickness measurements using the histogram matching (HM) method. Methods. We scanned 12 eyes from 12 healthy subjects with the Cirrus HD-OCT device to obtain a series of OCT images with a wide range of SS (maximal range, 1–10) at the same visit. For each eye, the histogram of an image with the highest SS (best image quality) was set as the reference. We applied HM to the images with lower SS by shaping the input histogram into the reference histogram. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was automatically measured before and after HM processing (defined as original and HM measurements), and compared to the device output (device measurements). Nonlinear mixed effects models were used to analyze the relationship between RNFL thickness and SS. In addition, the lowest tolerable SSs, which gave the RNFL thickness within the variability margin of manufacturer recommended SS range (6–10), were determined for device, original, and HM measurements. Results. The HM measurements showed less variability across a wide range of image quality than the original and device measurements (slope = 1.17 vs. 4.89 and 1.72 μm/SS, respectively). The lowest tolerable SS was successfully reduced to 4.5 after HM processing. Conclusions. The HM method successfully extended the acceptable SS range on OCT images. This would qualify more OCT images with low SS for clinical assessment, broadening the OCT application to a wider range of subjects. PMID:26066749

  20. A Modified Image Comparison Algorithm Using Histogram Features

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Kostyukova, Natalya S.

    2018-01-01

    This article discuss the problem of color image content comparison. Particularly, methods of image content comparison are analyzed, restrictions of color histogram are described and a modified method of images content comparison is proposed. This method uses the color histograms and considers color locations. Testing and analyzing of based and modified algorithms are performed. The modified method shows 97% average precision for a collection containing about 700 images without loss of the adv...

  1. WE-B-304-02: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Biologically and Not Dose/volume Based

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, J.

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations

  2. Evaluation of different set-up error corrections on dose-volume metrics in prostate IMRT using CBCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Yoshinori; Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different set-up error corrections on dose-volume metrics in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer under different planning target volume (PTV) margin settings using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. A total of 30 consecutive patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer were retrospectively analysed, and 7-14 CBCT datasets were acquired per patient. Interfractional variations in dose-volume metrics were evaluated under six different set-up error corrections, including tattoo, bony anatomy, and four different target matching groups. Set-up errors were incorporated into planning the isocenter position, and dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images. These processes were repeated under two different PTV margin settings. In the on-line bony anatomy matching groups, systematic error (Σ) was 0.3 mm, 1.4 mm, and 0.3 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Σ in three successive off-line target matchings was finally comparable with that in the on-line bony anatomy matching in the AP direction. Although doses to the rectum and bladder wall were reduced for a small PTV margin, averaged reductions in the volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose from planning were within 2.5% under all PTV margin settings for all correction groups, with the exception of the tattoo set-up error correction only (≥ 5.0%). Analysis of variance showed no significant difference between on-line bony anatomy matching and target matching. While variations between the planned and delivered doses were smallest when target matching was applied, the use of bony anatomy matching still ensured the planned doses. (author)

  3. A dose-volume comparison of prostate cancer (PC) radiotherapy (RT) techniques for penile-structures (PNS) - a neglected critical organ in PC RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, Jolanta; Myrianthopoulos, Leon; Nguyen, Ai; Chen, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Three-dimensional conformal RT(3DCRT) is revolutionizing the use of RT in PC. Rectum and bladder, and in some studies femoral heads are included as critical structures (CS) in comparing rival plans in 3DCRT. Although RT-induced impotence is a major complication of conventional RT, with 30-50% incidence, to date no study has included PNS as a CS. This study is an attempt to remedy this deficiency in the 3DCRT planning in PC. Materials and Methods: After immobilization with Aquaplast, computed-tomography (CT) scans were obtained in supine treatment position from top of lumbar-3 vertebra to lesser-trochanter of the femora with 5-8mm slice-thicknesses; IV contrast was used in all patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (GTV), and CSs were outlined, including PNS. Corpora cavernosa and bulbous spongiosum together were identified as PNS. Appropriate margins for CTV and PTV were used; total margin to the block from GTV was 2cm. Tumor-minimum doses were prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained to compare three different techniques: 1. Conventional 4 field box technique (4FC) with equal weighting; 2. Six field (2 laterals and 4 obliques [45 degrees from midline] (6FO), with 50% dose delivery from the laterals; and 3. Four equally weighted, non-axial fields [2 laterals and 2 inferior anterior obliques at 45 degree couch and gantry rotations] (4FN). Results: A total of 12 patients are included in the study. The mean and range of percentage volume of PNS receiving more than 30, 60, and 90% of the prescribed dose are shown in the table below: Box plots, such as the example shown above, were used to compare techniques overall. The 6-field coplanar technique treated the least PNS volume beyond a given dose, followed by 4FC and 4FN techniques. The order of least to maximum percent of PNS treated in most individual patients also followed the same trend. In the majority, 6FO and 4FN delivered relatively comparable doses to

  4. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  5. Interactive dose shaping - efficient strategies for CPU-based real-time treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, P; Kamerling, C P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is based on the traditional concept of iterative optimization using an objective function specified by dose volume histogram constraints for pre-segmented VOIs. This indirect approach suffers from unavoidable shortcomings: i) The control of local dose features is limited to segmented VOIs. ii) Any objective function is a mathematical measure of the plan quality, i.e., is not able to define the clinically optimal treatment plan. iii) Adapting an existing plan to changed patient anatomy as detected by IGRT procedures is difficult. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce the method of Interactive Dose Shaping (IDS) as a new paradigm for IMRT treatment planning. IDS allows for a direct and interactive manipulation of local dose features in real-time. The key element driving the IDS process is a two-step Dose Modification and Recovery (DMR) strategy: A local dose modification is initiated by the user which translates into modified fluence patterns. This also affects existing desired dose features elsewhere which is compensated by a heuristic recovery process. The IDS paradigm was implemented together with a CPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation and a 3D GUI for dose manipulation and visualization. A local dose feature can be implemented via the DMR strategy within 1-2 seconds. By imposing a series of local dose features, equal plan qualities could be achieved compared to conventional planning for prostate and head and neck cases within 1-2 minutes. The idea of Interactive Dose Shaping for treatment planning has been introduced and first applications of this concept have been realized.

  6. Steganalytic methods for the detection of histogram shifting data-hiding schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Lerch Hostalot, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, some steganalytic techniques designed to detect the existence of hidden messages using histogram shifting methods are presented. Firstly, some techniques to identify specific methods of histogram shifting, based on visible marks on the histogram or abnormal statistical distributions are suggested. Then, we present a general technique capable of detecting all histogram shifting techniques analyzed. This technique is based on the effect of histogram shifting methods on the "volat...

  7. Discrimination of paediatric brain tumours using apparent diffusion coefficient histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, Jonathan G.; Clark, Christopher A.; Saunders, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    To determine if histograms of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) can be used to differentiate paediatric brain tumours. Imaging of histologically confirmed tumours with pre-operative ADC maps were reviewed (54 cases, 32 male, mean age 6.1 years; range 0.1-15.8 years) comprising 6 groups. Whole tumour ADC histograms were calculated; normalised for volume. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to differentiate tumour types using histogram metrics, initially for all groups and then for specific subsets. All 6 groups (5 dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumours, 22 primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET), 5 ependymomas, 7 choroid plexus papillomas, 4 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) and 9 juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas (JPA)) were compared. 74% (40/54) were correctly classified using logistic regression of ADC histogram parameters. In the analysis of posterior fossa tumours, 80% of ependymomas, 100% of astrocytomas and 94% of PNET-medulloblastoma were classified correctly. All PNETs were discriminated from ATRTs (22 PNET and 4 supratentorial ATRTs) (100%). ADC histograms are useful in differentiating paediatric brain tumours, in particular, the common posterior fossa tumours of childhood. PNETs were differentiated from supratentorial ATRTs, in all cases, which has important implications in terms of clinical management. (orig.)

  8. Dose-volume based ranking of incident beam direction and its utility in facilitating IMRT beam placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is computationally intensive, and various single beam ranking techniques have been proposed to reduce the search space. Up to this point, none of the existing ranking techniques considers the clinically important dose-volume effects of the involved structures, which may lead to clinically irrelevant angular ranking. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically sensible angular ranking model with incorporation of dose-volume effects and to show its utility for IMRT beam placement. Methods and Materials: The general consideration in constructing this angular ranking function is that a beamlet/beam is preferable if it can deliver a higher dose to the target without exceeding the tolerance of the sensitive structures located on the path of the beamlet/beam. In the previously proposed dose-based approach, the beamlets are treated independently and, to compute the maximally deliverable dose to the target volume, the intensity of each beamlet is pushed to its maximum intensity without considering the values of other beamlets. When volumetric structures are involved, the complication arises from the fact that there are numerous dose distributions corresponding to the same dose-volume tolerance. In this situation, the beamlets are not independent and an optimization algorithm is required to find the intensity profile that delivers the maximum target dose while satisfying the volumetric constraints. In this study, the behavior of a volumetric organ was modeled by using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A constrained sequential quadratic programming algorithm (CFSQP) was used to find the beam profile that delivers the maximum dose to the target volume without violating the EUD constraint or constraints. To assess the utility of the proposed technique, we planned a head-and-neck and abdominal case with and without the guidance of the angular ranking information. The qualities of the

  9. SU-E-T-72: A Retrospective Correlation Analysis On Dose-Volume Control Points and Treatment Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, A; Nohadani, O [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Refaat, T; Bacchus, I; Cutright, D; Sathiaseelan, V; Mittal, B [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify correlation between dose-volume control points and treatment outcomes. Specifically, two outcomes are analyzed: occurrence of radiation induced dysphagia and target complications. The results inform the treatment planning process when competing dose-volume criteria requires relaxations. Methods: 32 patients, treated with whole-field sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy during 2009–2010 period, are considered for this study. Acute dysphagia that is categorized into 3 grades is observed on all patients. 3 patients are observed in grade 1, 17 patients in grade 2, and 12 patients in grade 3. Ordinal logistic regression is employed to establish correlations between grades of dysphagia and dose to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Particularly, minimum (Dmin), mean (Dmean), and maximum (Dmax) dose control points are analyzed. Additionally, target complication, which includes local-regional recurrence and/or distant metastasis, is observed on 4 patients. Binary logistic regression is used to quantify correlation between target complication and four dose control points. Namely, ICRU recommended dose control points, D2, D50, D95, and D98 are analyzed. Results: For correlation with dysphagia, Dmin on cervico-thoracic esophagus is statistically significant (p-value = 0.005). Additionally, Dmean on cervico-thoracic esophagus is also significant in association with dysphagia (p-value = 0.012). However, no correlation was observed between Dmax and dysphagia (p-value = 0.263). For target complications, D50 on the target is a statistically significant dose control point (p-value = 0.032). No correlations were observed between treatment complications and D2 (p-value = 0.866), D95 (p-value = 0.750), and D98 (p-value = 0.710) on the target. Conclusion: Significant correlations are observed between radiation induced dysphagia and Dmean (and Dmin) to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Additionally, correlation between target complications and median dose to target

  10. SU-E-T-72: A Retrospective Correlation Analysis On Dose-Volume Control Points and Treatment Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A; Nohadani, O; Refaat, T; Bacchus, I; Cutright, D; Sathiaseelan, V; Mittal, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify correlation between dose-volume control points and treatment outcomes. Specifically, two outcomes are analyzed: occurrence of radiation induced dysphagia and target complications. The results inform the treatment planning process when competing dose-volume criteria requires relaxations. Methods: 32 patients, treated with whole-field sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy during 2009–2010 period, are considered for this study. Acute dysphagia that is categorized into 3 grades is observed on all patients. 3 patients are observed in grade 1, 17 patients in grade 2, and 12 patients in grade 3. Ordinal logistic regression is employed to establish correlations between grades of dysphagia and dose to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Particularly, minimum (Dmin), mean (Dmean), and maximum (Dmax) dose control points are analyzed. Additionally, target complication, which includes local-regional recurrence and/or distant metastasis, is observed on 4 patients. Binary logistic regression is used to quantify correlation between target complication and four dose control points. Namely, ICRU recommended dose control points, D2, D50, D95, and D98 are analyzed. Results: For correlation with dysphagia, Dmin on cervico-thoracic esophagus is statistically significant (p-value = 0.005). Additionally, Dmean on cervico-thoracic esophagus is also significant in association with dysphagia (p-value = 0.012). However, no correlation was observed between Dmax and dysphagia (p-value = 0.263). For target complications, D50 on the target is a statistically significant dose control point (p-value = 0.032). No correlations were observed between treatment complications and D2 (p-value = 0.866), D95 (p-value = 0.750), and D98 (p-value = 0.710) on the target. Conclusion: Significant correlations are observed between radiation induced dysphagia and Dmean (and Dmin) to cervico-thoracic esophagus. Additionally, correlation between target complications and median dose to target

  11. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method

  12. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2004-07-23

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  13. Finding significantly connected voxels based on histograms of connection strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasenburg, Niklas; Pedersen, Morten Vester; Darkner, Sune

    2016-01-01

    We explore a new approach for structural connectivity based segmentations of subcortical brain regions. Connectivity based segmentations are usually based on fibre connections from a seed region to predefined target regions. We present a method for finding significantly connected voxels based...... on the distribution of connection strengths. Paths from seed voxels to all voxels in a target region are obtained from a shortest-path tractography. For each seed voxel we approximate the distribution with a histogram of path scores. We hypothesise that the majority of estimated connections are false-positives...... and that their connection strength is distributed differently from true-positive connections. Therefore, an empirical null-distribution is defined for each target region as the average normalized histogram over all voxels in the seed region. Single histograms are then tested against the corresponding null...

  14. 3D Model Retrieval Based on Vector Quantisation Index Histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z M; Luo, H; Pan, J S

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to retrieval 3D mesh models using vector quantisation index histograms. Firstly, points are sampled uniformly on mesh surface. Secondly, to a point five features representing global and local properties are extracted. Thus feature vectors of points are obtained. Third, we select several models from each class, and employ their feature vectors as a training set. After training using LBG algorithm, a public codebook is constructed. Next, codeword index histograms of the query model and those in database are computed. The last step is to compute the distance between histograms of the query and those of the models in database. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our method

  15. PENGARUH HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION UNTUK PERBAIKAN KUALITAS CITRA DIGITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisilia Daeng Bakka Mau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini membahas penggunaan metode histogram equalization yang akan digunakan untuk perbaikan kualitas citra. Perbaikan kualitas citra (image enhancement merupakan salah satu proses awal dalam peningkatan mutu citra. Peningkatan mutu citra diperlukan karena seringkali citra yang dijadikan objek pembahasan mempunyai kualitas yang buruk, misalnya citra mengalami derau, kabur, citra terlalu gelap atau terang, citra kurang tajam dan sebagainya. Perbaikan kualitas citra adalah proses memperjelas dan mempertajam ciri atau fitur tertentu dari citra agar citra lebih mudah dipersepsi maupun dianalisa secara lebih teliti. Hasil penelitian ini membuktikan bahwa penggunaan metode histogram equalization dapat digunakan untuk meningkatkan kontras citra dan dapat meningkatkan kualitas citra, sehingga informasi yang ada pada citra lebih jelas terlihat. Kata kunci: perbaikan kualitas citra, histogram equalization, citra digital

  16. VHDL implementation on histogram with ADC CAMAC module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby Santhi, R.; Satyanarayana, V.V.V.; Ajith Kumar, B.P.

    2007-01-01

    Modern nuclear spectroscopy systems the data acquisition and analysis in experimental science have been undergoing major changes because of faster speed and higher resolution. The CAMAC module which is described here is FPGA based 8K x 24 bit Histogram Memory integrated with ADC on a single board has been designed and fabricated. This module accepts input from Spectroscopy Amplifier for Pulse Height Analysis and offers all features single spectra for a few selected parameters. These on line histograms are to monitor the progress of the experiments during on line experiments

  17. Integral Histogram with Random Projection for Pedestrian Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hua Liu

    Full Text Available In this paper, we give a systematic study to report several deep insights into the HOG, one of the most widely used features in the modern computer vision and image processing applications. We first show that, its magnitudes of gradient can be randomly projected with random matrix. To handle over-fitting, an integral histogram based on the differences of randomly selected blocks is proposed. The experiments show that both the random projection and integral histogram outperform the HOG feature obviously. Finally, the two ideas are combined into a new descriptor termed IHRP, which outperforms the HOG feature with less dimensions and higher speed.

  18. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  19. Methodological issues in radiation dose-volume outcome analyses: Summary of a joint AAPM/NIH workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Herbert, Donald; Yan, Di; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Langer, Mark; Sapareto, Steve

    2002-01-01

    This report represents a summary of presentations at a joint workshop of the National Institutes of Health and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Current methodological issues in dose-volume modeling are addressed here from several different perspectives. Areas of emphasis include (a) basic modeling issues including the equivalent uniform dose framework and the bootstrap method, (b) issues in the valid use of statistics, including the need for meta-analysis, (c) issues in dealing with organ deformation and its effects on treatment response, (d) evidence for volume effects for rectal complications, (e) the use of volume effect data in liver and lung as a basis for dose escalation studies, and (f) implications of uncertainties in volume effect knowledge on optimized treatment planning. Taken together, these approaches to studying volume effects describe many implications for the development and use of this information in radiation oncology practice. Areas of significant interest for further research include the meta-analysis of clinical data; interinstitutional pooled data analyses of volume effects; analyses of the uncertainties in outcome prediction models, minimal parameter number outcome models for ranking treatment plans (e.g., equivalent uniform dose); incorporation of the effect of motion in the outcome prediction; dose-escalation/isorisk protocols based on outcome models; the use of functional imaging to study radio-response; and the need for further small animal tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability studies

  20. SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, B; Liu, B; Li, Y; Guo, B; Xu, X; Wei, R; Zhou, F [Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment plan optimization in multi-Co60 source focused radiotherapy with multiple isocenters is challenging, because dose distribution is normalized to maximum dose during optimization and evaluation. The objective functions are traditionally defined based on relative dosimetric distribution. This study presents an alternative absolute dose-volume constraint (ADC) based deterministic optimization framework (ADC-DOF). Methods: The initial isocenters are placed on the eroded target surface. Collimator size is chosen based on the area of 2D contour on corresponding axial slice. The isocenter spacing is determined by adjacent collimator sizes. The weights are optimized by minimizing the deviation from ADCs using the steepest descent technique. An iterative procedure is developed to reduce the number of isocenters, where the isocenter with lowest weight is removed without affecting plan quality. The ADC-DOF is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) using the same arbitrary shaped target (254cc), with a 15mm margin ring structure representing normal tissues. Results: For ADC-DOF, the ADCs imposed on target and ring are (D100>10Gy, D50,10, 0<12Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy) and (D40<10Gy). The resulting D100, 50, 10, 0 and D40 are (9.9Gy, 12.0Gy, 14.1Gy and 16.2Gy) and (10.2Gy). The objectives of GA are to maximize 50% isodose target coverage (TC) while minimize the dose delivered to the ring structure, which results in 97% TC and 47.2% average dose in ring structure. For ADC-DOF (GA) techniques, 20 out of 38 (10 out of 12) initial isocenters are used in the final plan, and the computation time is 8.7s (412.2s) on an i5 computer. Conclusion: We have developed a new optimization technique using ADC and deterministic optimization. Compared with GA, ADC-DOF uses more isocenters but is faster and more robust, and achieves a better conformity. For future work, we will focus on developing a more effective mechanism for initial isocenter determination.

  1. Fuzzy Logic-Based Histogram Equalization for Image Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magudeeswaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy logic-based histogram equalization (FHE is proposed for image contrast enhancement. The FHE consists of two stages. First, fuzzy histogram is computed based on fuzzy set theory to handle the inexactness of gray level values in a better way compared to classical crisp histograms. In the second stage, the fuzzy histogram is divided into two subhistograms based on the median value of the original image and then equalizes them independently to preserve image brightness. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of proposed FHE algorithm are evaluated using two well-known parameters like average information contents (AIC and natural image quality evaluator (NIQE index for various images. From the qualitative and quantitative measures, it is interesting to see that this proposed method provides optimum results by giving better contrast enhancement and preserving the local information of the original image. Experimental result shows that the proposed method can effectively and significantly eliminate washed-out appearance and adverse artifacts induced by several existing methods. The proposed method has been tested using several images and gives better visual quality as compared to the conventional methods.

  2. Hybrid Histogram Descriptor: A Fusion Feature Representation for Image Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qinghe; Hao, Qiaohong; Chen, Yuqi; Yi, Yugen; Wei, Ying; Dai, Jiangyan

    2018-06-15

    Currently, visual sensors are becoming increasingly affordable and fashionable, acceleratingly the increasing number of image data. Image retrieval has attracted increasing interest due to space exploration, industrial, and biomedical applications. Nevertheless, designing effective feature representation is acknowledged as a hard yet fundamental issue. This paper presents a fusion feature representation called a hybrid histogram descriptor (HHD) for image retrieval. The proposed descriptor comprises two histograms jointly: a perceptually uniform histogram which is extracted by exploiting the color and edge orientation information in perceptually uniform regions; and a motif co-occurrence histogram which is acquired by calculating the probability of a pair of motif patterns. To evaluate the performance, we benchmarked the proposed descriptor on RSSCN7, AID, Outex-00013, Outex-00014 and ETHZ-53 datasets. Experimental results suggest that the proposed descriptor is more effective and robust than ten recent fusion-based descriptors under the content-based image retrieval framework. The computational complexity was also analyzed to give an in-depth evaluation. Furthermore, compared with the state-of-the-art convolutional neural network (CNN)-based descriptors, the proposed descriptor also achieves comparable performance, but does not require any training process.

  3. Histogram equalization with Bayesian estimation for noise robust speech recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2018-02-01

    The histogram equalization approach is an efficient feature normalization technique for noise robust automatic speech recognition. However, it suffers from performance degradation when some fundamental conditions are not satisfied in the test environment. To remedy these limitations of the original histogram equalization methods, class-based histogram equalization approach has been proposed. Although this approach showed substantial performance improvement under noise environments, it still suffers from performance degradation due to the overfitting problem when test data are insufficient. To address this issue, the proposed histogram equalization technique employs the Bayesian estimation method in the test cumulative distribution function estimation. It was reported in a previous study conducted on the Aurora-4 task that the proposed approach provided substantial performance gains in speech recognition systems based on the acoustic modeling of the Gaussian mixture model-hidden Markov model. In this work, the proposed approach was examined in speech recognition systems with deep neural network-hidden Markov model (DNN-HMM), the current mainstream speech recognition approach where it also showed meaningful performance improvement over the conventional maximum likelihood estimation-based method. The fusion of the proposed features with the mel-frequency cepstral coefficients provided additional performance gains in DNN-HMM systems, which otherwise suffer from performance degradation in the clean test condition.

  4. Improved LSB matching steganography with histogram characters reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihong; Liu, Wenyao

    2008-03-01

    This letter bases on the researches of LSB (least significant bit, i.e. the last bit of a binary pixel value) matching steganographic method and the steganalytic method which aims at histograms of cover images, and proposes a modification to LSB matching. In the LSB matching, if the LSB of the next cover pixel matches the next bit of secret data, do nothing; otherwise, choose to add or subtract one from the cover pixel value at random. In our improved method, a steganographic information table is defined and records the changes which embedded secrete bits introduce in. Through the table, the next LSB which has the same pixel value will be judged to add or subtract one dynamically in order to ensure the histogram's change of cover image is minimized. Therefore, the modified method allows embedding the same payload as the LSB matching but with improved steganographic security and less vulnerability to attacks compared with LSB matching. The experimental results of the new method show that the histograms maintain their attributes, such as peak values and alternative trends, in an acceptable degree and have better performance than LSB matching in the respects of histogram distortion and resistance against existing steganalysis.

  5. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Ost, Piet; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Colman, Roos; Sadeghi, Simin; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  6. Correlation of Acute and Late Brainstem Toxicities With Dose-Volume Data for Pediatric Patients With Posterior Fossa Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Ronica H., E-mail: rhazari@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Ganju, Rohit G.; Schreibmann, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Jegadeesh, Naresh; Cassidy, Richard; Deng, Claudia; Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced brainstem toxicity after treatment of pediatric posterior fossa malignancies is incompletely understood, especially in the era of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The rates of, and predictive factors for, brainstem toxicity after photon RT for posterior fossa tumors were examined. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval, 60 pediatric patients treated at our institution for nonmetastatic infratentorial ependymoma and medulloblastoma with IMRT were included in the present analysis. Dosimetric variables, including the mean and maximum dose to the brainstem, the dose to 10% to 90% of the brainstem (in 10% increments), and the volume of the brainstem receiving 40, 45, 50, and 55 Gy were recorded for each patient. Acute (onset within 3 months) and late (>3 months of RT completion) RT-induced brainstem toxicities with clinical and radiographic correlates were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: Patients aged 1.4 to 21.8 years underwent IMRT or volumetric arc therapy postoperatively to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. At a median clinical follow-up period of 2.8 years, 14 patients had developed symptomatic brainstem toxicity (crude incidence 23.3%). No correlation was found between the dosimetric variables examined and brainstem toxicity. Vascular injury or ischemia showed a strong trend toward predicting brainstem toxicity (P=.054). Patients with grade 3 to 5 brainstem toxicity had undergone treatment to significant volumes of the posterior fossa. Conclusion: The results of the present series demonstrate a low, but not negligible, risk of brainstem radiation necrosis for pediatric patients with posterior fossa malignancies treated with IMRT. No specific dose-volume correlations were identified; however, modern treatment volumes might help limit the incidence of severe toxicity. Additional work investigating inherent biologic sensitivity might also provide

  7. Spinal cord tolerance to single-session uniform irradiation in pigs: Implications for a dose-volume effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was performed to test the hypothesis that spinal cord radiosensitivity is significantly modified by uniform versus laterally non-uniform dose distributions. Materials and methods: A uniform dose distribution was delivered to a 4.5–7.0 cm length of cervical spinal cord in 22 mature Yucatan minipigs for comparison with a companion study in which a laterally non-uniform dose was given [1]. Pigs were allocated into four dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 17.5 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 7), 19.5 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 6), 22.0 ± 0.1 Gy (n = 5), and 24.1 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 4). The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait within one year. Spinal cord sections were stained with a Luxol fast blue/periodic acid Schiff combination. Results: Dose–response curves for uniform versus non-uniform spinal cord irradiation were nearly identical with ED 50 ’s (95% confidence interval) of 20.2 Gy (19.1–25.8) and 20.0 Gy (18.3–21.7), respectively. No neurologic change was observed for either dose distribution when the maximum spinal cord dose was ⩽17.8 Gy while all animals experienced deficits at doses ⩾21.8 Gy. Conclusion: No dose-volume effect was observed in pigs for the dose distributions studied and the endpoint of motor neurologic deficit; however, partial spinal cord irradiation resulted in less debilitating neurologic morbidity and histopathology

  8. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ahmed E.; Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. (orig.)

  9. ADC histogram analysis for adrenal tumor histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient in differentiating adrenal adenoma from pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanodan, Tomokazu; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Kumagae, Yuichi; Shindo, Toshikazu; Nakajo, Masatoyo; Takumi, Koji; Nakajo, Masanori; Hakamada, Hiroto; Umanodan, Aya; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis in diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiating adrenal adenoma from pheochromocytoma. We retrospectively evaluated 52 adrenal tumors (39 adenomas and 13 pheochromocytomas) in 47 patients (21 men, 26 women; mean age, 59.3 years; range, 16-86 years) who underwent DW 3.0T MRI. Histogram parameters of ADC (b-values of 0 and 200 [ADC 200 ], 0 and 400 [ADC 400 ], and 0 and 800 s/mm 2 [ADC 800 ])-mean, variance, coefficient of variation (CV), kurtosis, skewness, and entropy-were compared between adrenal adenomas and pheochromocytomas, using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for the histogram parameters were generated to differentiate adrenal adenomas from pheochromocytomas. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using a threshold criterion that would maximize the average of sensitivity and specificity. Variance and CV of ADC 800 were significantly higher in pheochromocytomas than in adrenal adenomas (P histogram parameters for diagnosing adrenal adenomas (ADC 200 , 0.82; ADC 400 , 0.87; and ADC 800 , 0.92), with sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 84.6% (cutoff, ≤2.82) with ADC 200 ; sensitivity of 89.7% and specificity of 84.6% (cutoff, ≤2.77) with ADC 400 ; and sensitivity of 94.9% and specificity of 92.3% (cutoff, ≤2.67) with ADC 800 . ADC histogram analysis of DW MRI can help differentiate adrenal adenoma from pheochromocytoma. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1195-1203. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California - Los Angeles School of Medicine, 200 Medical Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Dose volume histograms (DVHs) are common tools in radiation therapy treatment planning to characterize plan quality. As statistical metrics, DVHs provide a compact summary of the underlying plan at the cost of losing spatial information: the same or similar dose-volume histograms can arise from substantially different spatial dose maps. This is exactly the reason why physicians and physicists scrutinize dose maps even after they satisfy all DVH endpoints numerically. However, up to this point, little has been done to control spatial phenomena, such as the spatial distribution of hot spots, which has significant clinical implications. To this end, the authors propose a novel objective function that enables a more direct tradeoff between target coverage, organ-sparing, and planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity, and presents our findings from four prostate cases, a pancreas case, and a head-and-neck case to illustrate the advantages and general applicability of our method.Methods: In designing the energy minimization objective (E{sub tot}{sup sparse}), the authors utilized the following robust cost functions: (1) an asymmetric linear well function to allow differential penalties for underdose, relaxation of prescription dose, and overdose in the PTV; (2) a two-piece linear function to heavily penalize high dose and mildly penalize low and intermediate dose in organs-at risk (OARs); and (3) a total variation energy, i.e., the L{sub 1} norm applied to the first-order approximation of the dose gradient in the PTV. By minimizing a weighted sum of these robust costs, general conformity to dose prescription and dose-gradient prescription is achieved while encouraging prescription violations to follow a Laplace distribution. In contrast, conventional quadratic objectives are associated with a Gaussian distribution of violations, which is less forgiving to large violations of prescription than the Laplace distribution. As a result, the proposed objective E{sub tot

  11. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dose volume histograms (DVHs) are common tools in radiation therapy treatment planning to characterize plan quality. As statistical metrics, DVHs provide a compact summary of the underlying plan at the cost of losing spatial information: the same or similar dose-volume histograms can arise from substantially different spatial dose maps. This is exactly the reason why physicians and physicists scrutinize dose maps even after they satisfy all DVH endpoints numerically. However, up to this point, little has been done to control spatial phenomena, such as the spatial distribution of hot spots, which has significant clinical implications. To this end, the authors propose a novel objective function that enables a more direct tradeoff between target coverage, organ-sparing, and planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity, and presents our findings from four prostate cases, a pancreas case, and a head-and-neck case to illustrate the advantages and general applicability of our method.Methods: In designing the energy minimization objective (E tot sparse ), the authors utilized the following robust cost functions: (1) an asymmetric linear well function to allow differential penalties for underdose, relaxation of prescription dose, and overdose in the PTV; (2) a two-piece linear function to heavily penalize high dose and mildly penalize low and intermediate dose in organs-at risk (OARs); and (3) a total variation energy, i.e., the L 1 norm applied to the first-order approximation of the dose gradient in the PTV. By minimizing a weighted sum of these robust costs, general conformity to dose prescription and dose-gradient prescription is achieved while encouraging prescription violations to follow a Laplace distribution. In contrast, conventional quadratic objectives are associated with a Gaussian distribution of violations, which is less forgiving to large violations of prescription than the Laplace distribution. As a result, the proposed objective E tot sparse improves

  12. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, George A; Ruan, Dan

    2013-07-01

    Dose volume histograms (DVHs) are common tools in radiation therapy treatment planning to characterize plan quality. As statistical metrics, DVHs provide a compact summary of the underlying plan at the cost of losing spatial information: the same or similar dose-volume histograms can arise from substantially different spatial dose maps. This is exactly the reason why physicians and physicists scrutinize dose maps even after they satisfy all DVH endpoints numerically. However, up to this point, little has been done to control spatial phenomena, such as the spatial distribution of hot spots, which has significant clinical implications. To this end, the authors propose a novel objective function that enables a more direct tradeoff between target coverage, organ-sparing, and planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity, and presents our findings from four prostate cases, a pancreas case, and a head-and-neck case to illustrate the advantages and general applicability of our method. In designing the energy minimization objective (E tot (sparse)), the authors utilized the following robust cost functions: (1) an asymmetric linear well function to allow differential penalties for underdose, relaxation of prescription dose, and overdose in the PTV; (2) a two-piece linear function to heavily penalize high dose and mildly penalize low and intermediate dose in organs-at risk (OARs); and (3) a total variation energy, i.e., the L1 norm applied to the first-order approximation of the dose gradient in the PTV. By minimizing a weighted sum of these robust costs, general conformity to dose prescription and dose-gradient prescription is achieved while encouraging prescription violations to follow a Laplace distribution. In contrast, conventional quadratic objectives are associated with a Gaussian distribution of violations, which is less forgiving to large violations of prescription than the Laplace distribution. As a result, the proposed objective E tot (sparse) improves tradeoff between

  13. Association of oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics, neutropenia and acute radiation oesophagitis in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, Sarah; Duffy, Mary; Bressel, Mathias; McInnes, Belinda; Russell, Christine; Sevitt, Tim; Ball, David

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between oesophageal radiation dose volume metrics and dysphagia in patients having chemoradiation (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is well established. There is also some evidence that neutropenia is a factor contributing to the severity of oesophagitis. We retrospectively analysed acute radiation oesophagitis (ARO) rates and severity in patients with NSCLC who received concurrent chemotherapy and high dose radiation therapy (CRT). We investigated if there was an association between grade of ARO, neutropenia and radiation dose volume metrics. Patients with NSCLC having concurrent CRT who had RT dose and toxicity data available were eligible. Exclusion criteria included previous thoracic RT, treatment interruptions and non-standard dose regimens. RT dosimetrics included maximum and mean oesophageal dose, oesophagus dose volume and length data. Fifty four patients were eligible for analysis. 42 (78 %) patients received 60 Gy. Forty four (81 %) patients received carboplatin based chemotherapy. Forty eight (89 %) patients experienced ARO ≥ grade 1 (95 % CI: 78 % to 95 %). ARO grade was associated with mean dose (r s = 0.27, p = 0.049), V20 (r s = 0.31, p = 0.024) and whole oesophageal circumference receiving 20 Gy (r s = 0.32 p = 0.019). In patients who received these doses, V20 (n = 51, r s = 0.36, p = 0.011), V35 (n = 43, r s = 0.34, p = 0.027) and V60 (n = 25, r s = 0.59, P = 0.002) were associated with RO grade. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients with ARO ≥ grade 2 also had ≥ grade 2 acute neutropenia compared with 5 of 29 (17 %) patients with RO grade 0 or 1 (p = 0.035). In addition to oesophageal dose-volume metrics, neutropenia may also be a risk factor for higher grades of ARO

  14. Comparison of dose length, area, and volume histograms as quantifiers of urethral dose in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Dorsey, Anthony T.; Hagedorn, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the magnitude of the differences between urethral dose-volume, dose-area, and dose-length histograms (DVH, DAH, and DLH, respectively, or DgH generically). Methods and Materials: Six consecutive iodine-125 ( 125 I) patients and 6 consecutive palladium-103 ( 103 Pd) patients implanted via a modified uniform planning approach were evaluated with day 0 computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. The urethra was identified by the presence of a urinary catheter and was hand drawn on the CT images with a mean radius of 3.3 ± 0.7 mm. A 0.1-mm calculation matrix was employed for the urethral volume and surface analysis, and urethral dose points were placed at the centroid of the urethra on each 5-mm CT slice. Results: Although individual patient DLHs were step-like, due to the sparseness of the data points, the composite urethral DLH, DAH, and DVHs were qualitatively similar. The DAH curve delivered more radiation than the other two curves at all doses greater than 90% of the prescribed minimum peripheral dose (mPD) to the prostate. In addition, the DVH curve was consistently higher than the DLH curve at most points throughout that range. Differences between the DgH curves were analyzed by integrating the difference curves between 0 and 200% of the mPD. The area-length, area-volume, and volume-length difference curves integrated in the ratio of 3:2:1. The differences were most pronounced near the inflection point of the DgH curves with mean A 125 , V 125 , and L 125 values of 36.6%, 31.4%, and 23.0%, respectively, of the urethra. Quantifiers of urethral hot spots such as D 10 , defined as the minimal dose delivered to the hottest 10% of the urethra, followed the same ranking: area analysis indicated the highest dose and length analysis, the lowest dose. D 10 was 148% and 136% of mPD for area and length evaluations, respectively. Comparing the two isotopes in terms of the amount of urethra receiving a given dose, 103 Pd implants were significantly

  15. Histogram analysis for smartphone-based rapid hematocrit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Uddin M.; Kim, Sang C.; Shim, Joon S.

    2017-01-01

    A novel and rapid analysis technique using histogram has been proposed for the colorimetric quantification of blood hematocrits. A smartphone-based “Histogram” app for the detection of hematocrits has been developed integrating the smartphone embedded camera with a microfluidic chip via a custom-made optical platform. The developed histogram analysis shows its effectiveness in the automatic detection of sample channel including auto-calibration and can analyze the single-channel as well as multi-channel images. Furthermore, the analyzing method is advantageous to the quantification of blood-hematocrit both in the equal and varying optical conditions. The rapid determination of blood hematocrits carries enormous information regarding physiological disorders, and the use of such reproducible, cost-effective, and standard techniques may effectively help with the diagnosis and prevention of a number of human diseases. PMID:28717569

  16. Histogram Equalization to Model Adaptation for Robust Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Youngjoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new model adaptation method based on the histogram equalization technique for providing robustness in noisy environments. The trained acoustic mean models of a speech recognizer are adapted into environmentally matched conditions by using the histogram equalization algorithm on a single utterance basis. For more robust speech recognition in the heavily noisy conditions, trained acoustic covariance models are efficiently adapted by the signal-to-noise ratio-dependent linear interpolation between trained covariance models and utterance-level sample covariance models. Speech recognition experiments on both the digit-based Aurora2 task and the large vocabulary-based task showed that the proposed model adaptation approach provides significant performance improvements compared to the baseline speech recognizer trained on the clean speech data.

  17. Multifractal analysis of three-dimensional histogram from color images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, Julien; Rousseau, David; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Natural images, especially color or multicomponent images, are complex information-carrying signals. To contribute to the characterization of this complexity, we investigate the possibility of multiscale organization in the colorimetric structure of natural images. This is realized by means of a multifractal analysis applied to the three-dimensional histogram from natural color images. The observed behaviors are confronted to those of reference models with known multifractal properties. We use for this purpose synthetic random images with trivial monofractal behavior, and multidimensional multiplicative cascades known for their actual multifractal behavior. The behaviors observed on natural images exhibit similarities with those of the multifractal multiplicative cascades and display the signature of elaborate multiscale organizations stemming from the histograms of natural color images. This type of characterization of colorimetric properties can be helpful to various tasks of digital image processing, as for instance modeling, classification, indexing.

  18. A novel parallel architecture for local histogram equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohannessian, Mesrob I.; Choueiter, Ghinwa F.; Diab, Hassan

    2005-07-01

    Local histogram equalization is an image enhancement algorithm that has found wide application in the pre-processing stage of areas such as computer vision, pattern recognition and medical imaging. The computationally intensive nature of the procedure, however, is a main limitation when real time interactive applications are in question. This work explores the possibility of performing parallel local histogram equalization, using an array of special purpose elementary processors, through an HDL implementation that targets FPGA or ASIC platforms. A novel parallelization scheme is presented and the corresponding architecture is derived. The algorithm is reduced to pixel-level operations. Processing elements are assigned image blocks, to maintain a reasonable performance-cost ratio. To further simplify both processor and memory organizations, a bit-serial access scheme is used. A brief performance assessment is provided to illustrate and quantify the merit of the approach.

  19. Histogram specification as a method of density modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for improving the quality and extending the resolution of Fourier maps is described. The method is based on a histogram analysis of the electron density. The distribution of electron density values in the map is forced to be 'ideal'. The 'ideal' distribution is assumed to be Gaussian. The application of the method to improve the electron density map for the protein Acinetobacter asparaginase, which is a tetrameric enzyme of molecular weight 140000 daltons, is described. (orig.)

  20. Breast density pattern characterization by histogram features and texture descriptors

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro,Pedro Cunha; Franco,Marcelo Lemos Nunes; Thomaz,Ricardo de Lima; Patrocinio,Ana Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Breast cancer is the first leading cause of death for women in Brazil as well as in most countries in the world. Due to the relation between the breast density and the risk of breast cancer, in medical practice, the breast density classification is merely visual and dependent on professional experience, making this task very subjective. The purpose of this paper is to investigate image features based on histograms and Haralick texture descriptors so as to separate mammo...

  1. Motor Oil Classification using Color Histograms and Pattern Recognition Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shiva; Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Habibi, Biuck

    2018-04-20

    Motor oil classification is important for quality control and the identification of oil adulteration. In thiswork, we propose a simple, rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive approach based on image analysis and pattern recognition techniques for the classification of nine different types of motor oils according to their corresponding color histograms. For this, we applied color histogram in different color spaces such as red green blue (RGB), grayscale, and hue saturation intensity (HSI) in order to extract features that can help with the classification procedure. These color histograms and their combinations were used as input for model development and then were statistically evaluated by using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), and support vector machine (SVM) techniques. Here, two common solutions for solving a multiclass classification problem were applied: (1) transformation to binary classification problem using a one-against-all (OAA) approach and (2) extension from binary classifiers to a single globally optimized multilabel classification model. In the OAA strategy, LDA, QDA, and SVM reached up to 97% in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for both the training and test sets. In extension from binary case, despite good performances by the SVM classification model, QDA and LDA provided better results up to 92% for RGB-grayscale-HSI color histograms and up to 93% for the HSI color map, respectively. In order to reduce the numbers of independent variables for modeling, a principle component analysis algorithm was used. Our results suggest that the proposed method is promising for the identification and classification of different types of motor oils.

  2. Independent histogram pursuit for segmentation of skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, D.D.; Butakoff, C.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an unsupervised algorithm, called the Independent Histogram Pursuit (HIP), for segmenting dermatological lesions is proposed. The algorithm estimates a set of linear combinations of image bands that enhance different structures embedded in the image. In particular, the first estima...... to deal with different types of dermatological lesions. The boundary detection precision using k-means segmentation was close to 97%. The proposed algorithm can be easily combined with the majority of classification algorithms....

  3. Color and Contrast Enhancement by Controlled Piecewise Affine Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose-Luis Lisani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (HE. The proposed algorithm performs a piecewise affine transform of the intensity levels of a digital image such that the new cumulative distribution function will be approximately uniform (as with HE, but where the stretching of the range is locally controlled to avoid brutal noise enhancement. We call this algorithm Piecewise Affine Equalization (PAE. Several experiments show that, in general, the new algorithm improves HE results.

  4. Breast density pattern characterization by histogram features and texture descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Cunha Carneiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Breast cancer is the first leading cause of death for women in Brazil as well as in most countries in the world. Due to the relation between the breast density and the risk of breast cancer, in medical practice, the breast density classification is merely visual and dependent on professional experience, making this task very subjective. The purpose of this paper is to investigate image features based on histograms and Haralick texture descriptors so as to separate mammographic images into categories of breast density using an Artificial Neural Network. Methods We used 307 mammographic images from the INbreast digital database, extracting histogram features and texture descriptors of all mammograms and selecting them with the K-means technique. Then, these groups of selected features were used as inputs of an Artificial Neural Network to classify the images automatically into the four categories reported by radiologists. Results An average accuracy of 92.9% was obtained in a few tests using only some of the Haralick texture descriptors. Also, the accuracy rate increased to 98.95% when texture descriptors were mixed with some features based on a histogram. Conclusion Texture descriptors have proven to be better than gray levels features at differentiating the breast densities in mammographic images. From this paper, it was possible to automate the feature selection and the classification with acceptable error rates since the extraction of the features is suitable to the characteristics of the images involving the problem.

  5. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Chiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA, which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods.

  6. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Ting, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE) is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE) is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA), which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods. PMID:27338412

  7. Effects of first-dose volume and exercise on the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations for colonoscopy in Chinese people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Qin, Wei Liu, Songbai Lin, Xiangfeng Li International Medical Services, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Aim: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of bowel preparations with and without the higher first-dose volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution in Chinese people. Methods: A total of 330 participants who had a colonoscopy done in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were randomly and evenly assigned to three groups. Participants in Group A ingested 1 L PEG solution and then ingested 2 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Participants in Group B ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes and then exercised more than 10 minutes after ingesting each liter of PEG solution. Participants in Group C ingested 3 L PEG solution at a rate of 250 mL every 15 minutes. Experienced gastrointestinal endoscopists rated the efficacy of bowel preparations based on the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. A questionnaire regarding participants’ symptoms associated with bowel preparations was administered to evaluate participants’ tolerability. Results: The three groups had insignificant difference in the percentages of participants’ symptoms including dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, bloating, and asthenia. However, the percentages of participants having hunger sensation, sleep disturbance, and anal discomfort were significantly higher in groups with the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution or exercise after drinking PEG solution than without them. The three groups had insignificant difference in the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. Conclusion: Whether to add the higher first-dose volume of PEG solution and exercise after drinking PEG solution or not, all participants achieved a similar quality of bowel preparations. Bowel preparations without the additional first-dose volume of PEG

  8. Non-parametric comparison of histogrammed two-dimensional data distributions using the Energy Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Ivan D; Lopes, Raul H C; Hobson, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    When monitoring complex experiments, comparison is often made between regularly acquired histograms of data and reference histograms which represent the ideal state of the equipment. With the larger HEP experiments now ramping up, there is a need for automation of this task since the volume of comparisons could overwhelm human operators. However, the two-dimensional histogram comparison tools available in ROOT have been noted in the past to exhibit shortcomings. We discuss a newer comparison test for two-dimensional histograms, based on the Energy Test of Aslan and Zech, which provides more conclusive discrimination between histograms of data coming from different distributions than methods provided in a recent ROOT release.

  9. MRI histogram analysis enables objective and continuous classification of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenberg, Christian; Hebelka, Hanna; Brisby, Helena; Lagerstrand, Kerstin Magdalena

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best diagnostic imaging method for low back pain. However, the technique is currently not utilized in its full capacity, often failing to depict painful intervertebral discs (IVDs), potentially due to the rough degeneration classification system used clinically today. MR image histograms, which reflect the IVD heterogeneity, may offer sensitive imaging biomarkers for IVD degeneration classification. This study investigates the feasibility of using histogram analysis as means of objective and continuous grading of IVD degeneration. Forty-nine IVDs in ten low back pain patients (six males, 25-69 years) were examined with MRI (T2-weighted images and T2-maps). Each IVD was semi-automatically segmented on three mid-sagittal slices. Histogram features of the IVD were extracted from the defined regions of interest and correlated to Pfirrmann grade. Both T2-weighted images and T2-maps displayed similar histogram features. Histograms of well-hydrated IVDs displayed two separate peaks, representing annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus. Degenerated IVDs displayed decreased peak separation, where the separation was shown to correlate strongly with Pfirrmann grade (P histogram appearances. Histogram features correlated well with IVD degeneration, suggesting that IVD histogram analysis is a suitable tool for objective and continuous IVD degeneration classification. As histogram analysis revealed IVD heterogeneity, it may be a clinical tool for characterization of regional IVD degeneration effects. To elucidate the usefulness of histogram analysis in patient management, IVD histogram features between asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals needs to be compared.

  10. Curve Evolution in Subspaces and Exploring the Metameric Class of Histogram of Gradient Orientation based Features using Nonlinear Projection Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatu, Aditya Jayant

    This thesis deals with two unrelated issues, restricting curve evolution to subspaces and computing image patches in the equivalence class of Histogram of Gradient orientation based features using nonlinear projection methods. Curve evolution is a well known method used in various applications like...... tracking interfaces, active contour based segmentation methods and others. It can also be used to study shape spaces, as deforming a shape can be thought of as evolving its boundary curve. During curve evolution a curve traces out a path in the infinite dimensional space of curves. Due to application...... specific requirements like shape priors or a given data model, and due to limitations of the computer, the computed curve evolution forms a path in some finite dimensional subspace of the space of curves. We give methods to restrict the curve evolution to a finite dimensional linear or implicitly defined...

  11. Bin Ratio-Based Histogram Distances and Their Application to Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Xie, Nianhua; Hu, Ruiguang; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Qiang; Yan, Shuicheng; Maybank, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Large variations in image background may cause partial matching and normalization problems for histogram-based representations, i.e., the histograms of the same category may have bins which are significantly different, and normalization may produce large changes in the differences between corresponding bins. In this paper, we deal with this problem by using the ratios between bin values of histograms, rather than bin values' differences which are used in the traditional histogram distances. We propose a bin ratio-based histogram distance (BRD), which is an intra-cross-bin distance, in contrast with previous bin-to-bin distances and cross-bin distances. The BRD is robust to partial matching and histogram normalization, and captures correlations between bins with only a linear computational complexity. We combine the BRD with the ℓ1 histogram distance and the χ(2) histogram distance to generate the ℓ1 BRD and the χ(2) BRD, respectively. These combinations exploit and benefit from the robustness of the BRD under partial matching and the robustness of the ℓ1 and χ(2) distances to small noise. We propose a method for assessing the robustness of histogram distances to partial matching. The BRDs and logistic regression-based histogram fusion are applied to image classification. The experimental results on synthetic data sets show the robustness of the BRDs to partial matching, and the experiments on seven benchmark data sets demonstrate promising results of the BRDs for image classification.

  12. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins

  13. Histogram specification as a method of density modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.W.

    1988-12-01

    A new method for improving the quality and extending the resolution of Fourier maps is described. The method is based on a histogram analysis of the electron density. The distribution of electron density values in the map is forced to be 'ideal'. The 'ideal' distribution is assumed to be Gaussian. The application of the method to improve the electron density map for the protein Acinetobacter asparaginase, which is a tetrameric enzyme of molecular weight 140000 daltons, is described.

  14. Histogram Modification and Wavelet Transform for High Performance Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Shen Juang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a reversible watermarking technique for natural images. According to the similarity of neighbor coefficients’ values in wavelet domain, most differences between two adjacent pixels are close to zero. The histogram is built based on these difference statistics. As more peak points can be used for secret data hiding, the hiding capacity is improved compared with those conventional methods. Moreover, as the differences concentricity around zero is improved, the transparency of the host image can be increased. Experimental results and comparison show that the proposed method has both advantages in hiding capacity and transparency.

  15. High capacity, high speed histogramming data acquisition memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, A.; Boulin, C.

    1996-01-01

    A double width CAMAC DRAM store module was developed for use as a histogramming memory in fast time-resolved synchrotron radiation applications to molecular biology. High speed direct memory modify (3 MHz) is accomplished by using a discrete DRAM controller and fast page mode access. The module can be configured using standard SIMMs to sizes of up to 64M-words. The word width is 16 bit and the module can handle overflows by storing the overflow addresses in a dedicated FIFO. Simultaneous front panel DMM/DMI access and CAMAC readout of the overflow addresses is supported

  16. Text-Independent Speaker Identification Using the Histogram Transform Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zhanyu; Yu, Hong; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel probabilistic method for the task of text-independent speaker identification (SI). In order to capture the dynamic information during SI, we design a super-MFCCs features by cascading three neighboring Mel-frequency Cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) frames together....... These super-MFCC vectors are utilized for probabilistic model training such that the speaker’s characteristics can be sufficiently captured. The probability density function (PDF) of the aforementioned super-MFCCs features is estimated by the recently proposed histogram transform (HT) method. To recedes...

  17. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, Maryam, E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D{sub mean}) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  18. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina

    2016-01-01

    -center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  19. Differentially Private Event Histogram Publication on Sequences over Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Yu Gu; Jia Xu; Fang-Fang Li; Ge Yu

    2017-01-01

    The big data era is coming with strong and ever-growing demands on analyzing personal information and footprints in the cyber world. To enable such analysis without privacy leak risk, differential privacy (DP) has been quickly rising in recent years, as the first practical privacy protection model with rigorous theoretical guarantee. This paper discusses how to publish differentially private histograms on events in time series domain, with sequences of personal events over graphs with events as edges. Such individual-generated sequences commonly appear in formalized industrial workflows, online game logs, and spatial-temporal trajectories. Directly publishing the statistics of sequences may compromise personal privacy. While existing DP mechanisms mainly target at normalized domains with fixed and aligned dimensions, our problem raises new challenges when the sequences could follow arbitrary paths on the graph. To tackle the problem, we reformulate the problem with a three-step framework, which 1) carefully truncates the original sequences, trading off errors introduced by the truncation with those introduced by the noise added to guarantee privacy, 2) decomposes the event graph into path sub-domains based on a group of event pivots, and 3) employs a deeply optimized tree-based histogram construction approach for each sub-domain to benefit with less noise addition. We present a careful analysis on our framework to support thorough optimizations over each step of the framework, and verify the huge improvements of our proposals over state-of-the-art solutions.

  20. Variational Histogram Equalization for Single Color Image Defogging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foggy images taken in the bad weather inevitably suffer from contrast loss and color distortion. Existing defogging methods merely resort to digging out an accurate scene transmission in ignorance of their unpleasing distortion and high complexity. Different from previous works, we propose a simple but powerful method based on histogram equalization and the physical degradation model. By revising two constraints in a variational histogram equalization framework, the intensity component of a fog-free image can be estimated in HSI color space, since the airlight is inferred through a color attenuation prior in advance. To cut down the time consumption, a general variation filter is proposed to obtain a numerical solution from the revised framework. After getting the estimated intensity component, it is easy to infer the saturation component from the physical degradation model in saturation channel. Accordingly, the fog-free image can be restored with the estimated intensity and saturation components. In the end, the proposed method is tested on several foggy images and assessed by two no-reference indexes. Experimental results reveal that our method is relatively superior to three groups of relevant and state-of-the-art defogging methods.

  1. Visual Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chung Ting

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques primarily improve the contrast of an image to lend it a better appearance. One of the popular enhancement methods is histogram equalization (HE because of its simplicity and effectiveness. However, it is rarely applied to consumer electronics products because it can cause excessive contrast enhancement and feature loss problems. These problems make the images processed by HE look unnatural and introduce unwanted artifacts in them. In this study, a visual contrast enhancement algorithm (VCEA based on HE is proposed. VCEA considers the requirements of the human visual perception in order to address the drawbacks of HE. It effectively solves the excessive contrast enhancement problem by adjusting the spaces between two adjacent gray values of the HE histogram. In addition, VCEA reduces the effects of the feature loss problem by using the obtained spaces. Furthermore, VCEA enhances the detailed textures of an image to generate an enhanced image with better visual quality. Experimental results show that images obtained by applying VCEA have higher contrast and are more suited to human visual perception than those processed by HE and other HE-based methods.

  2. Visual Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Histogram Equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chih-Chung; Wu, Bing-Fei; Chung, Meng-Liang; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Wu, Ya-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement techniques primarily improve the contrast of an image to lend it a better appearance. One of the popular enhancement methods is histogram equalization (HE) because of its simplicity and effectiveness. However, it is rarely applied to consumer electronics products because it can cause excessive contrast enhancement and feature loss problems. These problems make the images processed by HE look unnatural and introduce unwanted artifacts in them. In this study, a visual contrast enhancement algorithm (VCEA) based on HE is proposed. VCEA considers the requirements of the human visual perception in order to address the drawbacks of HE. It effectively solves the excessive contrast enhancement problem by adjusting the spaces between two adjacent gray values of the HE histogram. In addition, VCEA reduces the effects of the feature loss problem by using the obtained spaces. Furthermore, VCEA enhances the detailed textures of an image to generate an enhanced image with better visual quality. Experimental results show that images obtained by applying VCEA have higher contrast and are more suited to human visual perception than those processed by HE and other HE-based methods. PMID:26184219

  3. Accelerated weight histogram method for exploring free energy landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, V.; Lidmar, J.; Hess, B. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Swedish e-Science Research Center, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-28

    Calculating free energies is an important and notoriously difficult task for molecular simulations. The rapid increase in computational power has made it possible to probe increasingly complex systems, yet extracting accurate free energies from these simulations remains a major challenge. Fully exploring the free energy landscape of, say, a biological macromolecule typically requires sampling large conformational changes and slow transitions. Often, the only feasible way to study such a system is to simulate it using an enhanced sampling method. The accelerated weight histogram (AWH) method is a new, efficient extended ensemble sampling technique which adaptively biases the simulation to promote exploration of the free energy landscape. The AWH method uses a probability weight histogram which allows for efficient free energy updates and results in an easy discretization procedure. A major advantage of the method is its general formulation, making it a powerful platform for developing further extensions and analyzing its relation to already existing methods. Here, we demonstrate its efficiency and general applicability by calculating the potential of mean force along a reaction coordinate for both a single dimension and multiple dimensions. We make use of a non-uniform, free energy dependent target distribution in reaction coordinate space so that computational efforts are not wasted on physically irrelevant regions. We present numerical results for molecular dynamics simulations of lithium acetate in solution and chignolin, a 10-residue long peptide that folds into a β-hairpin. We further present practical guidelines for setting up and running an AWH simulation.

  4. Image compression using moving average histogram and RBF network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khowaja, S.; Ismaili, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    Modernization and Globalization have made the multimedia technology as one of the fastest growing field in recent times but optimal use of bandwidth and storage has been one of the topics which attract the research community to work on. Considering that images have a lion share in multimedia communication, efficient image compression technique has become the basic need for optimal use of bandwidth and space. This paper proposes a novel method for image compression based on fusion of moving average histogram and RBF (Radial Basis Function). Proposed technique employs the concept of reducing color intensity levels using moving average histogram technique followed by the correction of color intensity levels using RBF networks at reconstruction phase. Existing methods have used low resolution images for the testing purpose but the proposed method has been tested on various image resolutions to have a clear assessment of the said technique. The proposed method have been tested on 35 images with varying resolution and have been compared with the existing algorithms in terms of CR (Compression Ratio), MSE (Mean Square Error), PSNR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio), computational complexity. The outcome shows that the proposed methodology is a better trade off technique in terms of compression ratio, PSNR which determines the quality of the image and computational complexity. (author)

  5. Stochastic Learning of Multi-Instance Dictionary for Earth Mover's Distance based Histogram Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Jihong; Liang, Ru-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Dictionary plays an important role in multi-instance data representation. It maps bags of instances to histograms. Earth mover's distance (EMD) is the most effective histogram distance metric for the application of multi-instance retrieval. However, up to now, there is no existing multi-instance dictionary learning methods designed for EMD based histogram comparison. To fill this gap, we develop the first EMD-optimal dictionary learning method using stochastic optimization method. In the stoc...

  6. Using histograms to introduce randomization in the generation of ensembles of decision trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick; Littau, David

    2005-02-22

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to create a histogram, a module to evaluate a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, a module to select a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method includes the steps of reading the data; creating a histogram; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, selecting a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  7. TOP-DRAWER, Histograms, Scatterplots, Curve-Smoothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaffee, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Description of program or function: TOP DRAWER produces histograms, scatterplots, data points with error bars and plots symbols, and curves passing through data points, with elaborate titles. It also does smoothing and calculates frequency distributions. There is little facility, however, for arithmetic manipulation. Because of its restricted applicability, TOP DRAWER can be controlled by a relatively simple set of commands, and this control is further simplified by the choice of reasonable default values for all parameters. Despite this emphasis on simplicity, TOP DRAWER plots are of exceptional quality and are suitable for publication. Input is normally from card-image records, although a set of subroutines is provided to accommodate FORTRAN calls. The program contains switches which can be set to generate code suitable for execution on IBM, DECX VAX, and PRIME computers

  8. Steam leak detection method in pipeline using histogram analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Oh; Jeon, Hyeong Seop; Son, Ki Sung; Chae, Gyung Sun [Saean Engineering Corp, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Won [Dept. of Information Communications Engineering, Chungnam NationalUnversity, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Leak detection in a pipeline usually involves acoustic emission sensors such as contact type sensors. These contact type sensors pose difficulties for installation and cannot operate in areas having high temperature and radiation. Therefore, recently, many researchers have studied the leak detection phenomenon by using a camera. Leak detection by using a camera has the advantages of long distance monitoring and wide area surveillance. However, the conventional leak detection method by using difference images often mistakes the vibration of a structure for a leak. In this paper, we propose a method for steam leakage detection by using the moving average of difference images and histogram analysis. The proposed method can separate the leakage and the vibration of a structure. The working performance of the proposed method is verified by comparing with experimental results.

  9. Histogram plots and cutoff energies for nuclear discrete levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belgya, T.; Molnar, G.; Fazekas, B.; Oestoer, J.

    1997-05-01

    Discrete level schemes for 1277 nuclei, from 6 Li through 251 Es, extracted from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File were analyzed. Cutoff energies (U max ), indicating the upper limit of level scheme completeness, were deduced from the inspection of histograms of the cumulative number of levels. Parameters of the constant-temperature level density formula (nuclear temperature T and energy shift U 0 ) were obtained by means of the least square fit of the formula to the known levels below cutoff energy. The results are tabulated for all 1277 nuclei allowing for an easy and reliable application of the constant-temperature level density approach. A complete set of cumulative plots of discrete levels is also provided. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  10. TSimpleAnalysis: histogramming many trees in parallel

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    I worked inside the ROOT team of EP-SFT group. My project focuses on writing a ROOT class that has the aim of creating histograms from a TChain. The name of the class is TSimpleAnalysis and it is already integrated in ROOT. The work that I have done was to write the source, the header le of the class and also a python script, that allows to the user to use the class through the command line. This represents a great improvement respect to the usual user code that counts lines and lines of code to do the same thing. (Link for the class: https://root.cern.ch/doc/master/classTSimpleAnalysis.html)

  11. Fast Graph Partitioning Active Contours for Image Segmentation Using Histograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath SumitK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a method to improve the accuracy and speed, as well as significantly reduce the memory requirements, for the recently proposed Graph Partitioning Active Contours (GPACs algorithm for image segmentation in the work of Sumengen and Manjunath (2006. Instead of computing an approximate but still expensive dissimilarity matrix of quadratic size, , for a 2D image of size and regular image tiles of size , we use fixed length histograms and an intensity-based symmetric-centrosymmetric extensor matrix to jointly compute terms associated with the complete dissimilarity matrix. This computationally efficient reformulation of GPAC using a very small memory footprint offers two distinct advantages over the original implementation. It speeds up convergence of the evolving active contour and seamlessly extends performance of GPAC to multidimensional images.

  12. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wazer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were

  13. Risk of Late Urinary Complications Following Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Refining Bladder Dose-Volume Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Elena; Escande, Alexandre; Bockel, Sophie; Khettab, Mohamed; Dumas, Isabelle; Lazarescu, Ioana; Fumagalli, Ingrid; Morice, Philippe; Deutsch, Eric; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus

    2018-06-01

    To study correlations between dose-volume parameters of the whole bladder and bladder trigone and late urinary toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2015 were included. Cumulative dose-volume parameters of the whole bladder and bladder trigone were converted into 2-Gy/fraction equivalents (EQD2, with α/β = 3 Gy); these parameters, as well as clinical factors, were analyzed as predictors of toxicity in patients without local relapse. A total of 297 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The median follow-up period was 4.9 years (95% confidence interval 4.5-5.3 years). In patients without local relapse (n = 251), the Kaplan-Meier estimated grade 2 or higher urinary toxicity rates at 3 years and 5 years were 25.4% and 32.1%, respectively. Minimal dose to the most exposed 2 cm 3 of the whole bladder [Formula: see text] , bladder International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) (B ICRU ) dose, and trigone dose-volume parameters correlated with grade 2 or higher toxicity. At 3 years, the cumulative incidence of grade 2 or higher complications was 22.8% (standard error, 2.9%) for bladder [Formula: see text]   60 Gy EQD2 was significant for grade 2 or higher toxicity (P = .027). The probability of grade 3 or higher toxicities increased with bladder [Formula: see text]  > 80 Gy EQD2 (16.7% vs 1.6%; hazard ratio [HR], 5.77; P = .039), B ICRU dose > 65 Gy EQD2 (4.9% vs 1.3%; HR, 6.36; P = .018), and trigone D 50%  > 60 Gy EQD2 (3.1% vs 1.2%; HR, 6.29; P = .028). Pearson correlation coefficients showed a moderate correlation between bladder [Formula: see text] , B ICRU dose, and bladder trigone D 50% (P < .0001). These data suggest that [Formula: see text]  ≤ 80 Gy EQD2 should be advised for minimizing the risk of severe urinary

  14. Histograms Constructed from the Data of 239-Pu Alpha-Activity Manifest a Tendency for Change in the Similar Way as at the Moments when the Sun, the Moon, Venus, Mars and Mercury Intersect the Celestial Equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharakoz D. P.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, the shape of histograms of the results of measurements obtained in processes of different physical nature had been shown to be determined by cosmophysical factors. Appearance of histograms of a similar shape is repeated periodically: these are the near-a-day, near-27-days and annual periods of increased probability of the similar shapes. There are two distinctly distinguished near-a-day periods: the sidereal-day (1,436 minutes and solar-day (1,440 minutes ones. The annual periods are represented by three sub-periods: the "calendar" (365 average solar days, "tropical" (365 days 5 hours and 48 minutes and "sidereal" (365 days 6 hours and 9 minutes ones. The tropical year period indicates that fact that histogram shape depends on the time elapsed since the spring equinox.The latter dependence is studied in more details in this work. We demonstrate that the appearance of similar histograms is highly probable at the same time count off from the moments of equinoxes, independent from the geographic location where the measurements had been performed: in Pushchino, Moscow Region (54 deg NL, 37 deg EL, and in Novolazarevskaya, Antarctic (70 deg SL, 11 deg EL. The sequence of the changed histogram shapes observed at the spring equinoxes was found to be opposite to that observed at the autumnal equinoxes. As the moments of equinoxes are defined by the cross of the celestial equator by Sun, we also studied that weather is not the same as observed at the moments when the celestial equator was crossed by other celestial bodies - the Moon, Venus, Mars and Mercury. Let us, for simplicity, refer to these moments as a similar term "planetary equinoxes". The regularities observed at these "planetary equinoxes" had been found to be the same as in the case of true solar equinoxes. In this article, we confine ourselves to considering the phenomenological observations only; their theoretical interpretation is supposed to be subject of further studies.

  15. Event Shape Sorting: selecting events with similar evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomášik Boris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present novel method for the organisation of events. The method is based on comparing event-by-event histograms of a chosen quantity Q that is measured for each particle in every event. The events are organised in such a way that those with similar shape of the Q-histograms end-up placed close to each other. We apply the method on histograms of azimuthal angle of the produced hadrons in ultrarelativsitic nuclear collisions. By selecting events with similar azimuthal shape of their hadron distribution one chooses events which are likely that they underwent similar evolution from the initial state to the freeze-out. Such events can more easily be compared to theoretical simulations where all conditions can be controlled. We illustrate the method on data simulated by the AMPT model.

  16. Symbol recognition via statistical integration of pixel-level constraint histograms: a new descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su

    2005-02-01

    A new descriptor for symbol recognition is proposed. 1) A histogram is constructed for every pixel to figure out the distribution of the constraints among the other pixels. 2) All the histograms are statistically integrated to form a feature vector with fixed dimension. The robustness and invariance were experimentally confirmed.

  17. Hand Vein Images Enhancement Based on Local Gray-level Information Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Histogram equalization theory, this paper presents a novel concept of histogram to realize the contrast enhancement of hand vein images, avoiding the lost of topological vein structure or importing the fake vein information. Firstly, we propose the concept of gray-level information histogram, the fundamental characteristic of which is that the amplitudes of the components can objectively reflect the contribution of the gray levels and information to the representation of image information. Then, we propose the histogram equalization method that is composed of an automatic histogram separation module and an intensity transformation module, and the histogram separation module is a combination of the proposed prompt multiple threshold procedure and an optimum peak signal-to-noise (PSNR calculation to separate the histogram into small-scale detail, the use of the intensity transformation module can enhance the vein images with vein topological structure and gray information preservation for each generated sub-histogram. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve extremely good contrast enhancement effect.

  18. Infrared Contrast Enhancement Through Log-Power Histogram Modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Wu, T.

    2015-01-01

    A simple power-logarithm histogram modification operator is proposed to enhance infrared (IR) image contrast. The algorithm combines a logarithm operator that smoothes the input image histogram while retaining the relative ordering of the original bins, with a power operator that restores the

  19. Thresholding using two-dimensional histogram and watershed algorithm in the luggage inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jingyun; Cong Peng; Song Qi

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a new DR image segmentation method based on two-dimensional histogram and watershed algorithm. The authors use watershed algorithm to locate threshold on the vertical projection plane of two-dimensional histogram. This method is applied to the segmentation of DR images produced by luggage inspection system with DR-CT. The advantage of this method is also analyzed. (authors)

  20. Curvature histogram features for retrieval of images of smooth 3D objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, I; Scherbakov, O; Potapov, A; Peterson, M

    2014-01-01

    We consider image features on the base of histograms of oriented gradients (HOG) with addition of contour curvature histogram (HOG-CH), and also compare it with results of known scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) approach in application to retrieval of images of smooth 3D objects.

  1. Cross-interval histogram analysis of neuronal activity on multi-electrode arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellone, P.; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    Cross-neuron-interval histogram (CNIH) analysis has been performed in order to study correlated activity and connectivity between pairs of neurons in a spontaneously active developing cultured network of rat cortical cells. Thirty-eight histograms could be analyzed using two parameters, one for the

  2. Whole-Lesion Histogram Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient for the Assessment of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue; Shi, Hua; Chen, Ying; Liu, Song; Li, Weifeng; Jiang, Zhuoran; Wang, Huanhuan; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Ge, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the application of whole-lesion histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of cervical cancer. A total of 54 women (mean age, 53 years) with cervical cancers underwent 3-T diffusion-weighted imaging with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm prospectively. Whole-lesion histogram analysis of ADC values was performed. Paired sample t test was used to compare differences in ADC histogram parameters between cervical cancers and normal cervical tissues. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to identify the optimal threshold of each parameter. All histogram parameters in this study including ADCmean, ADCmin, ADC10%-ADC90%, mode, skewness, and kurtosis of cervical cancers were significantly lower than those of normal cervical tissues (all P histogram analysis of ADC maps is useful in the assessment of cervical cancer.

  3. GPU accelerated edge-region based level set evolution constrained by 2D gray-scale histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Gao, Xinbo; Wang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Due to its intrinsic nature which allows to easily handle complex shapes and topological changes, the level set method (LSM) has been widely used in image segmentation. Nevertheless, LSM is computationally expensive, which limits its applications in real-time systems. For this purpose, we propose a new level set algorithm, which uses simultaneously edge, region, and 2D histogram information in order to efficiently segment objects of interest in a given scene. The computational complexity of the proposed LSM is greatly reduced by using the highly parallelizable lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a body force to solve the level set equation (LSE). The body force is the link with image data and is defined from the proposed LSE. The proposed LSM is then implemented using an NVIDIA graphics processing units to fully take advantage of the LBM local nature. The new algorithm is effective, robust against noise, independent to the initial contour, fast, and highly parallelizable. The edge and region information enable to detect objects with and without edges, and the 2D histogram information enable the effectiveness of the method in a noisy environment. Experimental results on synthetic and real images demonstrate subjectively and objectively the performance of the proposed method.

  4. Stochastic learning of multi-instance dictionary for earth mover’s distance-based histogram comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Jihong; Liang, Ru-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Dictionary plays an important role in multi-instance data representation. It maps bags of instances to histograms. Earth mover’s distance (EMD) is the most effective histogram distance metric for the application of multi-instance retrieval. However

  5. Histogram-based ionogram displays and their application to autoscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Kenneth J. W.

    2018-03-01

    A simple method is described for displaying and auto scaling the basic ionogram parameters foF2 and h'F2 as well as some additional layer parameters from digital ionograms. The technique employed is based on forming frequency and height histograms in each ionogram. This technique has now been applied specifically to ionograms produced by the IPS5D ionosonde developed and operated by the Australian Space Weather Service (SWS). The SWS ionograms are archived in a cleaned format and readily available from the SWS internet site. However, the method is applicable to any ionosonde which produces ionograms in a digital format at a useful signal-to-noise level. The most novel feature of the technique for autoscaling is its simplicity and the avoidance of the mathematical imaging and line fitting techniques often used. The program arose from the necessity to display many days of ionogram output to allow the location of specific types of ionospheric event such as ionospheric storms, travelling ionospheric disturbances and repetitive ionospheric height changes for further investigation and measurement. Examples and applications of the method are given including the removal of sporadic E and spread F.

  6. Efficient Scalable Median Filtering Using Histogram-Based Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Oded

    2018-05-01

    Median filtering is a smoothing technique for noise removal in images. While there are various implementations of median filtering for a single-core CPU, there are few implementations for accelerators and multi-core systems. Many parallel implementations of median filtering use a sorting algorithm for rearranging the values within a filtering window and taking the median of the sorted value. While using sorting algorithms allows for simple parallel implementations, the cost of the sorting becomes prohibitive as the filtering windows grow. This makes such algorithms, sequential and parallel alike, inefficient. In this work, we introduce the first software parallel median filtering that is non-sorting-based. The new algorithm uses efficient histogram-based operations. These reduce the computational requirements of the new algorithm while also accessing the image fewer times. We show an implementation of our algorithm for both the CPU and NVIDIA's CUDA supported graphics processing unit (GPU). The new algorithm is compared with several other leading CPU and GPU implementations. The CPU implementation has near perfect linear scaling with a speedup on a quad-core system. The GPU implementation is several orders of magnitude faster than the other GPU implementations for mid-size median filters. For small kernels, and , comparison-based approaches are preferable as fewer operations are required. Lastly, the new algorithm is open-source and can be found in the OpenCV library.

  7. Multifractal diffusion entropy analysis: Optimal bin width of probability histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizba, Petr; Korbel, Jan

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of Multifractal Diffusion Entropy Analysis we propose a method for choosing an optimal bin-width in histograms generated from underlying probability distributions of interest. The method presented uses techniques of Rényi’s entropy and the mean squared error analysis to discuss the conditions under which the error in the multifractal spectrum estimation is minimal. We illustrate the utility of our approach by focusing on a scaling behavior of financial time series. In particular, we analyze the S&P500 stock index as sampled at a daily rate in the time period 1950-2013. In order to demonstrate a strength of the method proposed we compare the multifractal δ-spectrum for various bin-widths and show the robustness of the method, especially for large values of q. For such values, other methods in use, e.g., those based on moment estimation, tend to fail for heavy-tailed data or data with long correlations. Connection between the δ-spectrum and Rényi’s q parameter is also discussed and elucidated on a simple example of multiscale time series.

  8. Using the Bootstrap Method for a Statistical Significance Test of Differences between Summary Histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-01-01

    A new method is proposed to compare statistical differences between summary histograms, which are the histograms summed over a large ensemble of individual histograms. It consists of choosing a distance statistic for measuring the difference between summary histograms and using a bootstrap procedure to calculate the statistical significance level. Bootstrapping is an approach to statistical inference that makes few assumptions about the underlying probability distribution that describes the data. Three distance statistics are compared in this study. They are the Euclidean distance, the Jeffries-Matusita distance and the Kuiper distance. The data used in testing the bootstrap method are satellite measurements of cloud systems called cloud objects. Each cloud object is defined as a contiguous region/patch composed of individual footprints or fields of view. A histogram of measured values over footprints is generated for each parameter of each cloud object and then summary histograms are accumulated over all individual histograms in a given cloud-object size category. The results of statistical hypothesis tests using all three distances as test statistics are generally similar, indicating the validity of the proposed method. The Euclidean distance is determined to be most suitable after comparing the statistical tests of several parameters with distinct probability distributions among three cloud-object size categories. Impacts on the statistical significance levels resulting from differences in the total lengths of satellite footprint data between two size categories are also discussed.

  9. Histogram analysis of diffusion measures in clinically isolated syndromes and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Chunshui; Lin Fuchun; Liu Yaou; Duan Yunyun; Lei Hao; Li Kuncheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of our study were to employ diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based histogram analysis to determine the presence of occult damage in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), to compare its severity with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and to determine correlations between DTI histogram measures and clinical and MRI indices in these two diseases. Materials and methods: DTI scans were performed in 19 CIS and 19 RRMS patients and 19 matched healthy volunteers. Histogram analyses of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were performed in normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT), normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and gray matter (NAGM). Correlations were analyzed between these measures and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, T 2 WI lesion volumes (LV) and normalized brain tissue volumes (NBTV) in CIS and RRMS patients. Results: Significant differences were found among CIS, RRMS and control groups in the NBTV and most of the DTI histogram measures of the NABT, NAWM and NAGM. In CIS patients, some DTI histogram measures showed significant correlations with LV and NBTV, but none of them with EDSS. In RRMS patients, however, some DTI histogram measures were significantly correlated with LV, NBTV and EDSS. Conclusion: Occult damage occurs in both NAGM and NAWM in CIS, but the severity is milder than that in RRMS. In CIS and RRMS, the occult damage might be related to both T2 lesion load and brain tissue atrophy. Some DTI histogram measures might be useful for assessing the disease progression in RRMS patients

  10. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Marion; Nägele, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects. PMID:26609526

  11. Histogram analysis of T2*-based pharmacokinetic imaging in cerebral glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Shan; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Hsu, Fei-Ting; Cho, Nai-Yu; Wang, Chao-Ying; Chou, Ming-Chung; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of histogram analysis of the T2*-based permeability parameter volume transfer constant (K trans ) for glioma grading and to explore the diagnostic performance of the histogram analysis of K trans and blood plasma volume (v p ). We recruited 31 and 11 patients with high- and low-grade gliomas, respectively. The histogram parameters of K trans and v p , derived from the first-pass pharmacokinetic modeling based on the T2* dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2* DSC-PW-MRI) from the entire tumor volume, were evaluated for differentiating glioma grades. Histogram parameters of K trans and v p showed significant differences between high- and low-grade gliomas and exhibited significant correlations with tumor grades. The mean K trans derived from the T2* DSC-PW-MRI had the highest sensitivity and specificity for differentiating high-grade gliomas from low-grade gliomas compared with other histogram parameters of K trans and v p . Histogram analysis of T2*-based pharmacokinetic imaging is useful for cerebral glioma grading. The histogram parameters of the entire tumor K trans measurement can provide increased accuracy with additional information regarding microvascular permeability changes for identifying high-grade brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Klose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects.

  13. Quadrant Dynamic with Automatic Plateau Limit Histogram Equalization for Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jagatheeswari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental and important preprocessing stage in image processing is the image contrast enhancement technique. Histogram equalization is an effective contrast enhancement technique. In this paper, a histogram equalization based technique called quadrant dynamic with automatic plateau limit histogram equalization (QDAPLHE is introduced. In this method, a hybrid of dynamic and clipped histogram equalization methods are used to increase the brightness preservation and to reduce the overenhancement. Initially, the proposed QDAPLHE algorithm passes the input image through a median filter to remove the noises present in the image. Then the histogram of the filtered image is divided into four subhistograms while maintaining second separated point as the mean brightness. Then the clipping process is implemented by calculating automatically the plateau limit as the clipped level. The clipped portion of the histogram is modified to reduce the loss of image intensity value. Finally the clipped portion is redistributed uniformly to the entire dynamic range and the conventional histogram equalization is executed in each subhistogram independently. Based on the qualitative and the quantitative analysis, the QDAPLHE method outperforms some existing methods in literature.

  14. An evaluation of an improved method for computing histograms in dynamic tracer studies using positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollinger, J.M.; Snyder, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for computing approximate minimum-mean-square-error estimates of histograms from list-mode data for use in dynamic tracer studies is evaluated. Parameters estimated from these histograms are significantly more accurate than those estimated from histograms computed by a commonly used method

  15. An alternative to γ histograms for ROI-based quantitative dose comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, P

    2009-01-01

    An alternative to gamma (γ) histograms for ROI-based quantitative comparisons of dose distributions using the γ concept is proposed. The method provides minimum values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement such that a pre-set fraction of the region of interest passes the γ test. Compared to standard γ histograms, the method provides more information in terms of pass rate per γ calculation. This is achieved at negligible additional calculation cost and without loss of accuracy. The presented method is proposed as a useful and complementary alternative to standard γ histograms, increasing both the quantity and quality of information for use in acceptance or rejection decisions. (note)

  16. Density-Based 3D Shape Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Francis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel probabilistic framework for the extraction of density-based 3D shape descriptors using kernel density estimation. Our descriptors are derived from the probability density functions (pdf of local surface features characterizing the 3D object geometry. Assuming that the shape of the 3D object is represented as a mesh consisting of triangles with arbitrary size and shape, we provide efficient means to approximate the moments of geometric features on a triangle basis. Our framework produces a number of 3D shape descriptors that prove to be quite discriminative in retrieval applications. We test our descriptors and compare them with several other histogram-based methods on two 3D model databases, Princeton Shape Benchmark and Sculpteur, which are fundamentally different in semantic content and mesh quality. Experimental results show that our methodology not only improves the performance of existing descriptors, but also provides a rigorous framework to advance and to test new ones.

  17. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  18. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Danielle; Fallone, B Gino; Warkentin, Brad; Siegbahn, E Albert; Serduc, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm 2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm 2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm 2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2–49 (mouse) and 2–46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2–87% and 33–96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this

  19. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  20. SU-F-J-217: Accurate Dose Volume Parameters Calculation for Revealing Rectum Dose-Toxicity Effect Using Deformable Registration in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, X; Chen, H; Liao, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of employing deformable registration methods for accurate rectum dose volume parameters calculation and their potentials in revealing rectum dose-toxicity between complication and non-complication cervical cancer patients with brachytherapy treatment. Method and Materials: Data from 60 patients treated with BT including planning images, treatment plans, and follow-up clinical exam were retrospectively collected. Among them, 12 patients complained about hematochezia were further examined with colonoscopy and scored as Grade 1–3 complication (CP). Meanwhile, another 12 non-complication (NCP) patients were selected as a reference group. To seek for potential gains in rectum toxicity prediction when fractional anatomical deformations are account for, the rectum dose volume parameters D0.1/1/2cc of the selected patients were retrospectively computed by three different approaches: the simple “worstcase scenario” (WS) addition method, an intensity-based deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm-Demons, and a more accurate, recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). Statistical significance of the differences between rectum doses of the CP group and the NCP group were tested by a two-tailed t-test and results were considered to be statistically significant if p < 0.05. Results: For the D0.1cc, no statistical differences are found between the CP and NCP group in all three methods. For the D1cc, dose difference is not detected by the WS method, however, statistical differences between the two groups are observed by both Demons and TOP, and more evident in TOP. For the D2cc, the CP and NCP cases are statistically significance of the difference for all three methods but more pronounced with TOP. Conclusion: In this study, we calculated the rectum D0.1/1/2cc by simple WS addition and two DIR methods and seek for gains in rectum toxicity prediction. The results favor the claim that accurate dose

  1. Histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) in CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Y.; Meyer, M.; Lapp, R.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Typical cupping correction methods are pre-processing methods which require either pre-calibration measurements or simulations of standard objects to approximate and correct for beam hardening and scatter. Some of them require the knowledge of spectra, detector characteristics, etc. The aim of this work was to develop a practical histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) method to post-process the reconstructed images. We use a polynomial representation of the raw-data generated by forward projection of the reconstructed images; forward and backprojection are performed on graphics processing units (GPU). The coefficients of the polynomial are optimized using a simplex minimization of the joint entropy of the CT image and its gradient. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and measurements of homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. For the measurements a C-arm flat-detector CT (FD-CT) system with a 30×40 cm2 detector, a kilovoltage on board imager (radiation therapy simulator) and a micro-CT system were used. The algorithm reduced cupping artifacts both in simulations and measurements using a fourth-order polynomial and was in good agreement to the reference. The minimization algorithm required less than 70 iterations to adjust the coefficients only performing a linear combination of basis images, thus executing without time consuming operations. HDCC reduced cupping artifacts without the necessity of pre-calibration or other scan information enabling a retrospective improvement of CT image homogeneity. However, the method can work with other cupping correction algorithms or in a calibration manner, as well.

  2. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Koon-Kiu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw" duplication and deletion rates rdup∗ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGaemOCai3aa0baaSqaaiabbsgaKjabbwha1jabbchaWbqaaiabgEHiQaaaaaa@3283@, rdel∗ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGaemOCai3aa0baaSqaaiabbsga

  3. Inclusion of functional information from perfusion SPECT improves predictive value of dose-volume parameters in lung toxicity outcome after radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Møller, Ditte S

    2015-01-01

    for corresponding standard parameters, but they were not significantly different from each other. CONCLUSION: SPECT-based functional parameters were better to predict the risk of RP compared to standard CT-based dose-volume parameters. Functional parameters may be useful to guide radiotherapy planning in order...

  4. Reliability Study Regarding the Use of Histogram Similarity Methods for Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Gillich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the reliability of three dissimilarity estimators to compare histograms, as support for a frequency-based damage detection method, able to identify structural changes in beam-like structures. First a brief presentation of the own developed damage detection method is made, with focus on damage localization. It consists actually in comparing a histogram derived from measurement results, with a large series of histograms, namely the damage location indexes for all locations along the beam, obtained by calculus. We tested some dissimilarity estimators like the Minkowski-form Distances, the Kullback-Leibler Divergence and the Histogram Intersection and found the Minkowski Distance as the method providing best results. It was tested for numerous locations, using real measurement results and with results artificially debased by noise, proving its reliability.

  5. Image Enhancement via Subimage Histogram Equalization Based on Mean and Variance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward a novel image enhancement method via Mean and Variance based Subimage Histogram Equalization (MVSIHE, which effectively increases the contrast of the input image with brightness and details well preserved compared with some other methods based on histogram equalization (HE. Firstly, the histogram of input image is divided into four segments based on the mean and variance of luminance component, and the histogram bins of each segment are modified and equalized, respectively. Secondly, the result is obtained via the concatenation of the processed subhistograms. Lastly, the normalization method is deployed on intensity levels, and the integration of the processed image with the input image is performed. 100 benchmark images from a public image database named CVG-UGR-Database are used for comparison with other state-of-the-art methods. The experiment results show that the algorithm can not only enhance image information effectively but also well preserve brightness and details of the original image.

  6. Adaptive Histogram Equalization Based Image Forensics Using Statistics of DC DCT Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vulnerability of digital images is growing towards manipulation. This motivated an area of research to deal with digital image forgeries. The certifying origin and content of digital images is an open problem in the multimedia world. One of the ways to find the truth of images is finding the presence of any type of contrast enhancement. In this work, novel and simple machine learning tool is proposed to detect the presence of histogram equalization using statistical parameters of DC Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT coefficients. The statistical parameters of the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM fitted to DC DCT coefficients are used as features for classifying original and histogram equalized images. An SVM classifier has been developed to classify original and histogram equalized image which can detect histogram equalized image with accuracy greater than 95% when false rate is less than 5%.

  7. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references

  8. Histograms of Arecibo World Days Measurements and Linear-H Fits Between 1985 and 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melendez-Alvira, D

    1998-01-01

    This document presents histograms of linear-H model fits to electron density profiles measured with the incoherent scatter radar of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico during the World Days between 1985 and 1995...

  9. Image Enhancement via Subimage Histogram Equalization Based on Mean and Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper puts forward a novel image enhancement method via Mean and Variance based Subimage Histogram Equalization (MVSIHE), which effectively increases the contrast of the input image with brightness and details well preserved compared with some other methods based on histogram equalization (HE). Firstly, the histogram of input image is divided into four segments based on the mean and variance of luminance component, and the histogram bins of each segment are modified and equalized, respectively. Secondly, the result is obtained via the concatenation of the processed subhistograms. Lastly, the normalization method is deployed on intensity levels, and the integration of the processed image with the input image is performed. 100 benchmark images from a public image database named CVG-UGR-Database are used for comparison with other state-of-the-art methods. The experiment results show that the algorithm can not only enhance image information effectively but also well preserve brightness and details of the original image. PMID:29403529

  10. Efficient Human Action and Gait Analysis Using Multiresolution Motion Energy Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chin Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Average Motion Energy (AME image is a good way to describe human motions. However, it has to face the computation efficiency problem with the increasing number of database templates. In this paper, we propose a histogram-based approach to improve the computation efficiency. We convert the human action/gait recognition problem to a histogram matching problem. In order to speed up the recognition process, we adopt a multiresolution structure on the Motion Energy Histogram (MEH. To utilize the multiresolution structure more efficiently, we propose an automated uneven partitioning method which is achieved by utilizing the quadtree decomposition results of MEH. In that case, the computation time is only relevant to the number of partitioned histogram bins, which is much less than the AME method. Two applications, action recognition and gait classification, are conducted in the experiments to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed approach.

  11. Image Enhancement via Subimage Histogram Equalization Based on Mean and Variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Liyun; Guan, Yepeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper puts forward a novel image enhancement method via Mean and Variance based Subimage Histogram Equalization (MVSIHE), which effectively increases the contrast of the input image with brightness and details well preserved compared with some other methods based on histogram equalization (HE). Firstly, the histogram of input image is divided into four segments based on the mean and variance of luminance component, and the histogram bins of each segment are modified and equalized, respectively. Secondly, the result is obtained via the concatenation of the processed subhistograms. Lastly, the normalization method is deployed on intensity levels, and the integration of the processed image with the input image is performed. 100 benchmark images from a public image database named CVG-UGR-Database are used for comparison with other state-of-the-art methods. The experiment results show that the algorithm can not only enhance image information effectively but also well preserve brightness and details of the original image.

  12. The minimum knowledge base for predicting organ-at-risk dose-volume levels and plan-related complications in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao H; D'Souza, Warren D; Meyer, Robert R; Shi Leyuan

    2010-01-01

    IMRT treatment planning requires consideration of two competing objectives: achieving the required amount of radiation for the planning target volume and minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to all other tissues. It is important for planners to understand the tradeoff between competing factors so that the time-consuming human interaction loop (plan-evaluate-modify) can be eliminated. Treatment-plan-surface models have been proposed as a decision support tool to aid treatment planners and clinicians in choosing between rival treatment plans in a multi-plan environment. In this paper, an empirical approach is introduced to determine the minimum number of treatment plans (minimum knowledge base) required to build accurate representations of the IMRT plan surface in order to predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume (DV) levels and complications as a function of input DV constraint settings corresponding to all involved OARs in the plan. We have tested our approach on five head and neck patients and five whole pelvis/prostate patients. Our results suggest that approximately 30 plans were sufficient to predict DV levels with less than 3% relative error in both head and neck and whole pelvis/prostate cases. In addition, approximately 30-60 plans were sufficient to predict saliva flow rate with less than 2% relative error and to classify rectal bleeding with an accuracy of 90%.

  13. ADC histogram analysis of muscle lymphoma - Correlation with histopathology in a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hans-Jonas; Pazaitis, Nikolaos; Surov, Alexey

    2018-06-21

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is able to reflect histopathology architecture. A novel imaging approach, namely histogram analysis, is used to further characterize lesion on MRI. The purpose of this study is to correlate histogram parameters derived from apparent diffusion coefficient- (ADC) maps with histopathology parameters in muscle lymphoma. Eight patients (mean age 64.8 years, range 45-72 years) with histopathologically confirmed muscle lymphoma were retrospectively identified. Cell count, total nucleic and average nucleic areas were estimated using ImageJ. Additionally, Ki67-index was calculated. DWI was obtained on a 1.5T scanner by using the b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2. Histogram analysis was performed as a whole lesion measurement by using a custom-made Matlabbased application. The correlation analysis revealed statistically significant correlation between cell count and ADCmean (p=-0.76, P=0.03) as well with ADCp75 (p=-0.79, P=0.02). Kurtosis and entropy correlated with average nucleic area (p=-0.81, P=0.02, p=0.88, P=0.007, respectively). None of the analyzed ADC parameters correlated with total nucleic area and with Ki67-index. This study identified significant correlations between cellularity and histogram parameters derived from ADC maps in muscle lymphoma. Thus, histogram analysis parameters reflect histopathology in muscle tumors. Advances in knowledge: Whole lesion ADC histogram analysis is able to reflect histopathology parameters in muscle lymphomas.

  14. Histogram-based quantitative evaluation of endobronchial ultrasonography images of peripheral pulmonary lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Kei; Kurimoto, Noriaki; Inoue, Takeo; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography using a guide sheath (EBUS-GS) is an increasingly common bronchoscopic technique, but currently, no methods have been established to quantitatively evaluate EBUS images of peripheral pulmonary lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether histogram data collected from EBUS-GS images can contribute to the diagnosis of lung cancer. Histogram-based analyses focusing on the brightness of EBUS images were retrospectively conducted: 60 patients (38 lung cancer; 22 inflammatory diseases), with clear EBUS images were included. For each patient, a 400-pixel region of interest was selected, typically located at a 3- to 5-mm radius from the probe, from recorded EBUS images during bronchoscopy. Histogram height, width, height/width ratio, standard deviation, kurtosis and skewness were investigated as diagnostic indicators. Median histogram height, width, height/width ratio and standard deviation were significantly different between lung cancer and benign lesions (all p histogram standard deviation. Histogram standard deviation appears to be the most useful characteristic for diagnosing lung cancer using EBUS images. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. DE-STRIPING FOR TDICCD REMOTE SENSING IMAGE BASED ON STATISTICAL FEATURES OF HISTOGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-T. Gao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim to striping noise brought by non-uniform response of remote sensing TDI CCD, a novel de-striping method based on statistical features of image histogram is put forward. By analysing the distribution of histograms,the centroid of histogram is selected to be an eigenvalue representing uniformity of ground objects,histogrammic centroid of whole image and each pixels are calculated first,the differences between them are regard as rough correction coefficients, then in order to avoid the sensitivity caused by single parameter and considering the strong continuity and pertinence of ground objects between two adjacent pixels,correlation coefficient of the histograms is introduces to reflect the similarities between them,fine correction coefficient is obtained by searching around the rough correction coefficient,additionally,in view of the influence of bright cloud on histogram,an automatic cloud detection based on multi-feature including grey level,texture,fractal dimension and edge is used to pre-process image.Two 0-level panchromatic images of SJ-9A satellite with obvious strip noise are processed by proposed method to evaluate the performance, results show that the visual quality of images are improved because the strip noise is entirely removed,we quantitatively analyse the result by calculating the non-uniformity ,which has reached about 1% and is better than histogram matching method.

  16. Improved robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy plan quality and planning efficacy for organ-confined prostate cancer utilizing overlap-volume histogram-driven planning methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Binbin; Pang, Dalong; Lei, Siyuan; Gatti, John; Tong, Michael; McNutt, Todd; Kole, Thomas; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Collins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study is to determine if the overlap-volume histogram (OVH)-driven planning methodology can be adapted to robotic SBRT (CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System) to further minimize the bladder and rectal doses achieved in plans manually-created by clinical planners. Methods and materials: A database containing clinically-delivered, robotic SBRT plans (7.25 Gy/fraction in 36.25 Gy) of 425 patients with localized prostate cancer was used as a cohort to establish an organ’s distance-to-dose model. The OVH-driven planning methodology was refined by adding the PTV volume factor to counter the target’s dose fall-off effect and incorporated into Multiplan to automate SBRT planning. For validation, automated plans (APs) for 12 new patients were generated, and their achieved dose/volume values were compared to the corresponding manually-created, clinically-delivered plans (CPs). A two-sided, Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for statistical comparison with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: PTV’s V(36.25 Gy) was comparable: 95.6% in CPs comparing to 95.1% in APs (p = 0.2). On average, the refined approach lowered V(18.12 Gy) to the bladder and rectum by 8.2% (p < 0.05) and 6.4% (p = 0.14). A physician confirmed APs were clinically acceptable. Conclusions: The improvements in APs could further reduce toxicities observed in SBRT for organ-confined prostate cancer

  17. Interpretation of erythrocyte histograms obtained from automated hematology analyzers in hematologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maleki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Presently, the graphical data of blood cells (histograms and cytograms or/ scattergrams that they are usually available in all modern automated hematology analyzers are an integral a part of automated complete blood count (CBC. To find incorrect results from automated hematology analyzer and establish the samples that require additional analysis, Laboratory employees will use those data for quality control of obtaining results, to assist identification of complex and troublesome cases. Methods: During this descriptive analytic study, in addition to erythrocyte graphs from variety of patients, referring from March 2013 to Feb 2014 to our clinical laboratory, Zagros Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, are given, the papers published in relevant literature as well as available published manuals of automatic blood cell counters were used. articles related to the key words of erythrocyte graphs and relevant literature as well as available published manuals of automatic blood cell counters were searched from valid databases such as Springer Link, google scholar, Pubmed and Sciencedirect. Then, the articles related to erythrogram, erythrocyte histogram and hematology analyzer graphs are involved in diagnosis of hematological disorder were searched and selected for this study. Results: Histograms and different automated CBC parameter become abnormal in various pathologic conditions, and can present important clues for diagnosis and treatment of hematologic and non-hematologic disorders. In several instances, these histograms have characteristic appearances in an exceedingly wide range of pathological conditions. In some hematologic disorders like iron deficiency or megaloblastic anemia, a sequential histogram can clearly show the progressive treatment and management. Conclusion: These graphical data are often accompanied by other automated CBC parameter and microscopic examination of peripheral blood smears (PBS, and can help in monitoring and

  18. Can histogram analysis of MR images predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Maris, Bogdan; Cardobi, Nicolò; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Gobbo, Stefano; Capelli, Paola; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Paiella, Salvatore; Landoni, Luca; Butturini, Giovanni; Regi, Paolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate MRI derived whole-tumour histogram analysis parameters in predicting pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (panNEN) grade and aggressiveness. Pre-operative MR of 42 consecutive patients with panNEN >1 cm were retrospectively analysed. T1-/T2-weighted images and ADC maps were analysed. Histogram-derived parameters were compared to histopathological features using the Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by ROC-AUC analysis; sensitivity and specificity were assessed for each histogram parameter. ADC entropy was significantly higher in G2-3 tumours with ROC-AUC 0.757; sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 % (95 % CI: 61.2-94.5) and 61.1 % (95 % CI: 36.1-81.7). ADC kurtosis was higher in panNENs with vascular involvement, nodal and hepatic metastases (p= .008, .021 and .008; ROC-AUC= 0.820, 0.709 and 0.820); sensitivity and specificity were: 85.7/74.3 % (95 % CI: 42-99.2 /56.4-86.9), 36.8/96.5 % (95 % CI: 17.2-61.4 /76-99.8) and 100/62.8 % (95 % CI: 56.1-100/44.9-78.1). No significant differences between groups were found for other histogram-derived parameters (p >.05). Whole-tumour histogram analysis of ADC maps may be helpful in predicting tumour grade, vascular involvement, nodal and liver metastases in panNENs. ADC entropy and ADC kurtosis are the most accurate parameters for identification of panNENs with malignant behaviour. • Whole-tumour ADC histogram analysis can predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. • ADC entropy and kurtosis are higher in aggressive tumours. • ADC histogram analysis can quantify tumour diffusion heterogeneity. • Non-invasive quantification of tumour heterogeneity can provide adjunctive information for prognostication.

  19. Differences in the dose-volume metrics with heterogeneity correction status and its influence on local control in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibuya, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose-volume metrics under different heterogeneity corrections and the factors associated with local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-three patients who underwent SBRT for pathologically proven stage I NSCLC were reviewed retrospectively. The prescribed dose was 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter (IC) under heterogeneity correction with the Batho power law (BPL). The clinical plans were recalculated with Eclipse (Varian) for the same monitor units under the BPL and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and with no heterogeneity correction (NC). The dose at the IC, dose that covers 95% of the volume (D95), minimum dose (Min), and mean dose (Mean) of the planning target volume (PTV) were compared under each algorithm and between patients with local lesion control (LC) and LR. The IC doses under NC were significantly lower than those under the BPL and AAA. Under the BPL, the mean PTV D95, Min and Mean were 8.0, 9.4 and 7.4% higher than those under the AAA, and 9.6, 9.2 and 4.6% higher than those under NC, respectively. Under the AAA, all dose-volumetric parameters were significantly lower in T1a patients than in those with T1b and T2a. With a median follow-up of 35.9 months, LR occurred in 18 patients. Between the LC and LR groups, no significant differences were observed for any of the metrics. Even after stratification according to T-stage, no significant difference was observed between LC and LR. (author)

  20. DSP+FPGA-based real-time histogram equalization system of infrared image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongsheng; Yang, Nansheng; Pi, Defu; Hua, Min; Shen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruolan

    2001-10-01

    Histogram Modification is a simple but effective method to enhance an infrared image. There are several methods to equalize an infrared image's histogram due to the different characteristics of the different infrared images, such as the traditional HE (Histogram Equalization) method, and the improved HP (Histogram Projection) and PE (Plateau Equalization) method and so on. If to realize these methods in a single system, the system must have a mass of memory and extremely fast speed. In our system, we introduce a DSP + FPGA based real-time procession technology to do these things together. FPGA is used to realize the common part of these methods while DSP is to do the different part. The choice of methods and the parameter can be input by a keyboard or a computer. By this means, the function of the system is powerful while it is easy to operate and maintain. In this article, we give out the diagram of the system and the soft flow chart of the methods. And at the end of it, we give out the infrared image and its histogram before and after the process of HE method.

  1. Particle swarm optimization-based local entropy weighted histogram equalization for infrared image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Qian, Weixian; Ren, Kan; Chen, Qian; Maldague, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    Infrared image enhancement plays a significant role in intelligent urban surveillance systems for smart city applications. Unlike existing methods only exaggerating the global contrast, we propose a particle swam optimization-based local entropy weighted histogram equalization which involves the enhancement of both local details and fore-and background contrast. First of all, a novel local entropy weighted histogram depicting the distribution of detail information is calculated based on a modified hyperbolic tangent function. Then, the histogram is divided into two parts via a threshold maximizing the inter-class variance in order to improve the contrasts of foreground and background, respectively. To avoid over-enhancement and noise amplification, double plateau thresholds of the presented histogram are formulated by means of particle swarm optimization algorithm. Lastly, each sub-image is equalized independently according to the constrained sub-local entropy weighted histogram. Comparative experiments implemented on real infrared images prove that our algorithm outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of both visual and quantized evaluations.

  2. Histogram Curve Matching Approaches for Object-based Image Classification of Land Cover and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toure, Sory I.; Stow, Douglas A.; Weeks, John R.; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    The classification of image-objects is usually done using parametric statistical measures of central tendency and/or dispersion (e.g., mean or standard deviation). The objectives of this study were to analyze digital number histograms of image objects and evaluate classifications measures exploiting characteristic signatures of such histograms. Two histograms matching classifiers were evaluated and compared to the standard nearest neighbor to mean classifier. An ADS40 airborne multispectral image of San Diego, California was used for assessing the utility of curve matching classifiers in a geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach. The classifications were performed with data sets having 0.5 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m spatial resolutions. Results show that histograms are reliable features for characterizing classes. Also, both histogram matching classifiers consistently performed better than the one based on the standard nearest neighbor to mean rule. The highest classification accuracies were produced with images having 2.5 m spatial resolution. PMID:24403648

  3. Histogram Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters in Pediatric Cerebellar Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Matthias W; Narayan, Anand K; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values have been shown to assist in differentiating cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Previous studies have applied only ADC measurements and calculated the mean/median values. Here we investigated the value of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) histogram characteristics of the entire tumor for differentiation of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Presurgical DTI data were analyzed with a region of interest (ROI) approach to include the entire tumor. For each tumor, histogram-derived metrics including the 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and skewness were calculated for fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean (MD), axial (AD), and radial (RD) diffusivity. The histogram metrics were used as primary predictors of interest in a logistic regression model. Statistical significance levels were set at p histogram skewness showed statistically significant differences for MD between low- and high-grade tumors (P = .008). The 25th percentile for MD yields the best results for the presurgical differentiation between pediatric cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The analysis of other DTI metrics does not provide additional diagnostic value. Our study confirms the diagnostic value of the quantitative histogram analysis of DTI data in pediatric neuro-oncology. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  4. Value of MR histogram analyses for prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Qin; Liang, He-Yue; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The objective is to explore the value of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) histogram analyses in predicting microvascular invasion (MVI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Fifty-one patients with histologically confirmed HCC who underwent diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR imaging were included. Histogram analyses were performed and mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles were derived. Quantitative histogram parameters were compared between HCCs with and without MVI. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were generated to compare the diagnostic performance of tumor size, histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and MR enhancement.The mean, 1th, 10th, and 50th percentiles of ADC maps, and the mean, variance. 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles of the portal venous phase (PVP) images were significantly different between the groups with and without MVI (P histogram analyses-in particular for 1th percentile for PVP images-held promise for prediction of MVI of HCC.

  5. Improved Steganographic Method Preserving Pixel-Value Differencing Histogram with Modulus Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hae-Yeoun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We herein advance a secure steganographic algorithm that uses a turnover policy and a novel adjusting process. Although the method of Wang et al. uses Pixel-Value Differencing (PVD and their modulus function provides high capacity and good image quality, the embedding process causes a number of artifacts, such as abnormal increases and fluctuations in the PVD histogram, which may reveal the existence of the hidden message. In order to enhance the security of the algorithm, a turnover policy is used that prevents abnormal increases in the histogram values and a novel adjusting process is devised to remove the fluctuations at the border of the subrange in the PVD histogram. The proposed method therefore eliminates all the weaknesses of the PVD steganographic methods thus far proposed and guarantees secure communication. In the experiments described herein, the proposed algorithm is compared with other PVD steganographic algorithms by using well-known steganalysis techniques, such as RS-analysis, steganalysis for LSB matching, and histogram-based attacks. The results support our contention that the proposed method enhances security by keeping the PVD histogram similar to the cover, while also providing high embedding capacity and good imperceptibility to the naked eye.

  6. Improved Steganographic Method Preserving Pixel-Value Differencing Histogram with Modulus Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Kyu Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein advance a secure steganographic algorithm that uses a turnover policy and a novel adjusting process. Although the method of Wang et al. uses Pixel-Value Differencing (PVD and their modulus function provides high capacity and good image quality, the embedding process causes a number of artifacts, such as abnormal increases and fluctuations in the PVD histogram, which may reveal the existence of the hidden message. In order to enhance the security of the algorithm, a turnover policy is used that prevents abnormal increases in the histogram values and a novel adjusting process is devised to remove the fluctuations at the border of the subrange in the PVD histogram. The proposed method therefore eliminates all the weaknesses of the PVD steganographic methods thus far proposed and guarantees secure communication. In the experiments described herein, the proposed algorithm is compared with other PVD steganographic algorithms by using well-known steganalysis techniques, such as RS-analysis, steganalysis for LSB matching, and histogram-based attacks. The results support our contention that the proposed method enhances security by keeping the PVD histogram similar to the cover, while also providing high embedding capacity and good imperceptibility to the naked eye.

  7. Histogram analysis of noise performance on fractional anisotropy brain MR image with different diffusion gradient numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Lee, Young Joo; Sohn, Chul Ho; Woo, Seung Koo; Suh, Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    We wished to analyze, qualitatively and quantitatively, the noise performance of fractional anisotropy brain images along with the different diffusion gradient numbers by using the histogram method. Diffusion tensor images were acquired using a 3.0 T MR scanner from ten normal volunteers who had no neurological symptoms. The single-shot spin-echo EPI with a Stejskal-Tanner type diffusion gradient scheme was employed for the diffusion tensor measurement. With a b-valuee of 1000 s/mm 2 , the diffusion tensor images were obtained for 6, 11, 23, 35 and 47 diffusion gradient directions. FA images were generated for each DTI scheme. The histograms were then obtained at selected ROIs for the anatomical structures on the FA image. At the same ROI location, the mean FA value and the standard deviation of the mean FA value were calculated. The quality of the FA image was improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased by showing better contrast between the WM and GM. The histogram showed that the variance of FA values was reduced as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. This histogram analysis was in good agreement with the result obtained using quantitative analysis. The image quality of the FA map was significantly improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. The histogram analysis well demonstrated that the improvement in the FA images resulted from the reduction in the variance of the FA values included in the ROI

  8. Infrared face recognition based on LBP histogram and KW feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua

    2014-07-01

    The conventional LBP-based feature as represented by the local binary pattern (LBP) histogram still has room for performance improvements. This paper focuses on the dimension reduction of LBP micro-patterns and proposes an improved infrared face recognition method based on LBP histogram representation. To extract the local robust features in infrared face images, LBP is chosen to get the composition of micro-patterns of sub-blocks. Based on statistical test theory, Kruskal-Wallis (KW) feature selection method is proposed to get the LBP patterns which are suitable for infrared face recognition. The experimental results show combination of LBP and KW features selection improves the performance of infrared face recognition, the proposed method outperforms the traditional methods based on LBP histogram, discrete cosine transform(DCT) or principal component analysis(PCA).

  9. ANALISA PENINGKATAN KUALITAS CITRA BAWAH AIR BERBASIS KOREKSI GAMMA dan HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Hendrawan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Underwater image of water quality in the dark, it depends on the depth of water at the time of image acquisition or image. The results of the image quality is adversely affecting the results matching the image pairs underwater with SIFT algorithm. This research aims to use the method of image preprocessing and Histogram Equalization Gamma Correction that works to improve the quality of images underwater. The results showed 27.76% increase using image preprocessing Gamma Correction and Histogram Equalization compared with no increase in image quality. Results of paired t-test has the null hypothesis is rejected so that there is a significant difference between the application of Gamma Correction Histogram Equalization with and without image enhancement.

  10. A novel JPEG steganography method based on modulus function with histogram analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Banoci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel steganographic method for embedding of secret data in still grayscale JPEG image. In order to provide large capacity of the proposed method while maintaining good visual quality of stego-image, the embedding process is performed in quantized transform coefficients of Discrete Cosine transform (DCT by modifying coefficients according to modulo function, what gives to the steganography system blind extraction predisposition. After-embedding histogram of proposed Modulo Histogram Fitting (MHF method is analyzed to secure steganography system against steganalysis attacks. In addition, AES ciphering was implemented to increase security and improve histogram after-embedding characteristics of proposed steganography system as experimental results show.

  11. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps for differentiating primary CNS lymphomas from tumefactive demyelinating lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan Shan; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Lim, Young Min

    2015-04-01

    This study intended to investigate the usefulness of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for discriminating primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs), especially atypical PCNSLs, from tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs). Forty-seven patients with PCNSLs and 18 with TDLs were enrolled in our study. Hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted images were defined as ROIs after ADC maps were registered to the corresponding T2-weighted image. ADC histograms were calculated from the ROIs containing the entire lesion on every section and on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The ADC histogram parameters were compared among all PCNSLs and TDLs as well as between the subgroup of atypical PCNSLs and TDLs. ROC curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the histogram parameters and to determine the optimum thresholds. The differences between the PCNSLs and TDLs were found in the minimum ADC values (ADCmin) and in the 5th and 10th percentiles (ADC5% and ADC10%) of the cumulative ADC histograms. However, no statistical significance was found in the mean ADC value or in the ADC value concerning the mode, kurtosis, and skewness. The ADCmin, ADC5%, and ADC10% were also lower in atypical PCNSLs than in TDLs. ADCmin was the best indicator for discriminating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs, with a threshold of 556×10(-6) mm2/s (sensitivity, 81.3 %; specificity, 88.9%). Histogram analysis of ADC maps may help to discriminate PCNSLs from TDLs and may be particularly useful in differentiating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs.

  12. Glioma grade assessment by using histogram analysis of diffusion tensor imaging-derived maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakab, Andras; Berenyi, Ervin; Molnar, Peter; Emri, Miklos

    2011-01-01

    Current endeavors in neuro-oncology include morphological validation of imaging methods by histology, including molecular and immunohistochemical techniques. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an up-to-date methodology of intracranial diagnostics that has gained importance in studies of neoplasia. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of discriminant analysis applied to histograms of preoperative diffusion tensor imaging-derived images for the prediction of glioma grade validated by histomorphology. Tumors of 40 consecutive patients included 13 grade II astrocytomas, seven oligoastrocytomas, six grade II oligodendrogliomas, three grade III oligoastrocytomas, and 11 glioblastoma multiformes. Preoperative DTI data comprised: unweighted (B 0 ) images, fractional anisotropy, longitudinal and radial diffusivity maps, directionally averaged diffusion-weighted imaging, and trace images. Sampling consisted of generating histograms for gross tumor volumes; 25 histogram bins per scalar map were calculated. The histogram bins that allowed the most precise determination of low-grade (LG) or high-grade (HG) classification were selected by multivariate discriminant analysis. Accuracy of the model was defined by the success rate of the leave-one-out cross-validation. Statistical descriptors of voxel value distribution did not differ between LG and HG tumors and did not allow classification. The histogram model had 88.5% specificity and 85.7% sensitivity in the separation of LG and HG gliomas; specificity was improved when cases with oligodendroglial components were omitted. Constructing histograms of preoperative radiological images over the tumor volume allows representation of the grade and enables discrimination of LG and HG gliomas which has been confirmed by histopathology. (orig.)

  13. WE-AB-207B-12: Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Dose-Volume Clinical Toxicity and Patient Reported Outcomes in Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, E; Vance, S; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Zhen, S; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Salim, S; Chetty, I; Movsas, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine in a prospective study, the correlation between radiation dose/volume, clinical toxicities and patient-reported, quality of life (QOL) resulting from lung SBRT. Methods: For 106 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving SBRT (12 Gy × 4), symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fatigue and pneumonitis were measured at baseline (before treatment), after treatment and 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Toxicity was graded from zero to five. Dosimetric parameters such as the MLD, D10%, D20%, and lung subvolumes (V10 and V20) were obtained from the treatment plan. Dosimetric parameters and number of patients demonstrating toxicity ≥ grade 2 were tabulated. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlations between MLD and D10, D20, V10 and V20. Results: The percentages of patients with > grade 2 pneumonitis, fatigue, cough, and dyspnea over 3 to 12 months increased from 0.0% to 3.5%, 3.2% to 10.5%, 4.3% to 8.3%, and 10.8% to 18.8%, respectively. Computed dose indices D10%, D20% were 7.9±4.8 Gy and 3.0±2.3 Gy, respectively. MLD ranged from 0.34 Gy up to 9.9 Gy with overall average 3.0±1.7 Gy. The averages of the subvolumes V10 and V20 were respectively 8.9±5.3% and 3.0±2.4%. The linear regression analysis showed that V10 and D10 demonstrated the strongest correlation to MLD; R2= 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. V20, and D20 were also strongly correlated with MLD; R2 = 0.81 and 0.84 respectively. A correlation was also found to exist between MLD > 2 Gy and ≥ grade 2 cough and dyspnea. Subvolume values for 2Gy MLD were 5.3% for V10 and 2% for V20. Conclusion: Dosimetric indices: MLD ≥ 2Gy, D10 ≥ 5Gy and V10 ≥ 5% of the total lung volume were predictive of > grade 2 cough and dyspnea QOL data. The QOL results are a novel component of this work. acknowledgement of the Varian grant support.

  14. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D_m_e_a_n) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  15. Histogram-based normalization technique on human brain magnetic resonance images from different acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Shi, Lin; Luo, Yishan; Yang, Wei; Li, Hongpeng; Liang, Peipeng; Li, Kuncheng; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng

    2015-07-28

    Intensity normalization is an important preprocessing step in brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis. During MR image acquisition, different scanners or parameters would be used for scanning different subjects or the same subject at a different time, which may result in large intensity variations. This intensity variation will greatly undermine the performance of subsequent MRI processing and population analysis, such as image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement. In this work, we proposed a new histogram normalization method to reduce the intensity variation between MRIs obtained from different acquisitions. In our experiment, we scanned each subject twice on two different scanners using different imaging parameters. With noise estimation, the image with lower noise level was determined and treated as the high-quality reference image. Then the histogram of the low-quality image was normalized to the histogram of the high-quality image. The normalization algorithm includes two main steps: (1) intensity scaling (IS), where, for the high-quality reference image, the intensities of the image are first rescaled to a range between the low intensity region (LIR) value and the high intensity region (HIR) value; and (2) histogram normalization (HN),where the histogram of low-quality image as input image is stretched to match the histogram of the reference image, so that the intensity range in the normalized image will also lie between LIR and HIR. We performed three sets of experiments to evaluate the proposed method, i.e., image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement, and compared this with the existing intensity normalization method. It is then possible to validate that our histogram normalization framework can achieve better results in all the experiments. It is also demonstrated that the brain template with normalization preprocessing is of higher quality than the template with no normalization processing. We have proposed

  16. A New Method of Histogram Computation for Efficient Implementation of the HOG Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana-Eugenia Ilas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a new histogram computation method to be used within the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG algorithm. The new method replaces the arctangent with the slope computation and the classical magnitude allocation based on interpolation with a simpler algorithm. The new method allows a more efficient implementation of HOG in general, and particularly in field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs, by considerably reducing the area (thus increasing the level of parallelism, while maintaining very close classification accuracy compared to the original algorithm. Thus, the new method is attractive for many applications, including car detection and classification.

  17. Quick cytogenetic screening of breeding bulls using flow cytometric sperm DNA histogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Szabolcs; Polgár, Péter J; Andersson, Magnus; Kovács, András

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the FXCycle PI/RNase kit for routine DNA analyses in order to detect breeding bulls and/or insemination doses carrying cytogenetic aberrations. In a series of experiments we first established basic DNA histogram parameters of cytogenetically healthy breeding bulls by measuring the intraspecific genome size variation of three animals, then we compared the histogram profiles of bulls carrying cytogenetic defects to the baseline values. With the exception of one case the test was able to identify bulls with cytogenetic defects. Therefore, we conclude that the assay could be incorporated into the laboratory routine where flow cytometry is applied for semen quality control.

  18. A 64 Mbyte VME histogramming memory card for the GA.SP gamma spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavedini, Z.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G.; Vedovato, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a 64 Mbyte VME histogramming memory card designed and built to cover the on-line and off-line data analysis needs of the GA.SP spectrometer (a 40 HpGe gamma detector array in development at LNL). The card combines the standard features of the VME/VSB bus with some special built-in functions: single cycle fast histogramming operations (typical channel increment time of 550 ns including the bus arbitration), fast clear of the whole memory (∼1 second to erase 64 Mbyte) and data broadcasting

  19. Robust Face Recognition by Computing Distances from Multiple Histograms of Oriented Gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaaba, Mahir; Surinta, Olarik; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The Single Sample per Person Problem is a challenging problem for face recognition algorithms. Patch-based methods have obtained some promising results for this problem. In this paper, we propose a new face recognition algorithm that is based on a combination of different histograms of oriented

  20. Using color histogram normalization for recovering chromatic illumination-changed images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, S C; Tseng, C L; Wu, C C

    2001-11-01

    We propose a novel image-recovery method using the covariance matrix of the red-green-blue (R-G-B) color histogram and tensor theories. The image-recovery method is called the color histogram normalization algorithm. It is known that the color histograms of an image taken under varied illuminations are related by a general affine transformation of the R-G-B coordinates when the illumination is changed. We propose a simplified affine model for application with illumination variation. This simplified affine model considers the effects of only three basic forms of distortion: translation, scaling, and rotation. According to this principle, we can estimate the affine transformation matrix necessary to recover images whose color distributions are varied as a result of illumination changes. We compare the normalized color histogram of the standard image with that of the tested image. By performing some operations of simple linear algebra, we can estimate the matrix of the affine transformation between two images under different illuminations. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we divide the experiments into two parts: computer-simulated images and real images corresponding to illumination changes. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is effective for both types of images. We also explain the noise-sensitive skew-rotation estimation that exists in the general affine model and demonstrate that the proposed simplified affine model without the use of skew rotation is better than the general affine model for such applications.

  1. Strain histograms are equal to strain ratios in predicting malignancy in breast tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Jonathan Frederik; Ewertsen, Caroline; Sletting, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether strain histograms are equal to strain ratios in predicting breast tumour malignancy and to see if either could be used to upgrade Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3 tumours for immediate biopsy. Methods: Ninety-nine breast tumours were examined using...

  2. DIF Testing with an Empirical-Histogram Approximation of the Latent Density for Each Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    This research introduces, illustrates, and tests a variation of IRT-LR-DIF, called EH-DIF-2, in which the latent density for each group is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters as an empirical histogram (EH). IRT-LR-DIF is used to evaluate the degree to which items have different measurement properties for one group of people versus…

  3. The application of the distance histogram in microdosimetry for evaluating heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieren, E.B. van; Lingen, A. van; Roos, J.C.; Teule, G.J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneity of radionuclide distributions at a microscopic level is relevant for the dosimetry of short path-length emissions. The present study explores the methodological aspects and the limitations of source target histograms by using computer simulations of radionuclide distributions. Sources were formed by labeled cells, containing 50 decay sites each. Cell nuclei were considered as targets. Within a matrix of 2,500 cells, the authors investigated uniform distributions (MIRD assumption), various cluster sizes, the single labeled cell, and a random distribution. Furthermore, four different intracellular source localizations were studied in a matrix of one cell. The distance histograms for both matrices were combined. For both 125 I and 131 I , absorbed doses in the targets were calculated from multiplication of the distance histograms by the point source absorbed radiation dose distribution. The presented results indicate that the use of distance histograms might be a mathematically convenient approach to microdosimetrical studies. They provide a means to study combinations of source distributions at various levels of magnification for several radionuclides within a reasonable calculation time

  4. Histogram-based automatic thresholding for bruise detection of apples by structured-illumination reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresholding is an important step in the segmentation of image features, and the existing methods are not all effective when the image histogram exhibits a unimodal pattern, which is common in defect detection of fruit. This study was aimed at developing a general automatic thresholding methodology ...

  5. [Clinical application of MRI histogram in evaluation of muscle fatty infiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y M; Du, J; Li, W Z; Wang, Z X; Zhang, W; Xiao, J X; Yuan, Y

    2016-10-18

    To describe a method based on analysis of the histogram of intensity values produced from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying the degree of fatty infiltration. The study included 25 patients with dystrophinopathy. All the subjects underwent muscle MRI test at thigh level. The histogram M values of 250 muscles adjusted for subcutaneous fat, representing the degree of fatty infiltration, were compared with the expert visual reading using the modified Mercuri scale. There was a significant positive correlation between the histogram M values and the scores of visual reading (r=0.854, Phistogram M values was similar to that of visual reading and results in literature. The histogram M values had stronger correlations with the clinical data than the scores of visual reading as follows: the correlations with age (r=0.730, Phistogram M values analysis had better repeatability than visual reading with the interclass correlation coefficient was 0.998 (95% CI: 0.997-0.998, PHistogram M values analysis of MRI with the advantages of repeatability and objectivity can be used to evaluate the degree of muscle fatty infiltration.

  6. Quantitative Evaluation for Differentiating Malignant and Benign Thyroid Nodules Using Histogram Analysis of Grayscale Sonograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Se Jin; Yoo, Jaeheung; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of histogram analysis using grayscale sonograms for differentiation of malignant and benign thyroid nodules. From July 2013 through October 2013, 579 nodules in 563 patients who had undergone ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration were included. For the grayscale histogram analysis, pixel echogenicity values in regions of interest were measured as 0 to 255 (0, black; 255, white) with in-house software. Five parameters (mean, skewness, kurtosis, standard deviation, and entropy) were obtained for each thyroid nodule. With principal component analysis, an index was derived. Diagnostic performance rates for the 5 histogram parameters and the principal component analysis index were calculated. A total of 563 patients were included in the study (mean age ± SD, 50.3 ± 12.3 years;range, 15-79 years). Of the 579 nodules, 431 were benign, and 148 were malignant. Among the 5 parameters and the principal component analysis index, the standard deviation (75.546 ± 14.153 versus 62.761 ± 16.01; P histogram analysis was feasible for differentiating malignant and benign thyroid nodules but did not show better diagnostic performance than subjective analysis performed by radiologists. Further technical advances will be needed to objectify interpretations of thyroid grayscale sonograms. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Whole-tumor MRI histogram analyses of hepatocellular carcinoma: Correlations with Ki-67 labeling index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin-Xing; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Liang, He-Yue; Ding, Ying; Grimm, Robert; Fu, Cai-Xia; Liu, Hui; Yan, Xu; Ji, Yuan; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether whole-tumor histogram-derived parameters for an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could aid in assessing Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In all, 57 patients with HCC who underwent pretreatment MRI with a 3T MR scanner were included retrospectively. Histogram parameters including mean, median, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and percentiles (5 th , 25 th , 75 th , 95 th ) were derived from the ADC map and MR enhancement. Correlations between histogram parameters and Ki-67 LI were evaluated and differences between low Ki-67 (≤10%) and high Ki-67 (>10%) groups were assessed. Mean, median, 5 th , 25 th , 75 th percentiles of ADC, and mean, median, 25 th , 75 th , 95 th percentiles of enhancement of arterial phase (AP) demonstrated significant inverse correlations with Ki-67 LI (rho up to -0.48 for ADC, -0.43 for AP) and showed significant differences between low and high Ki-67 groups (P Histogram-derived parameters of ADC and AP were potentially helpful for predicting Ki-67 LI of HCC. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:383-392. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Flat-histogram methods in quantum Monte Carlo simulations: Application to the t-J model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamantis, Nikolaos G.; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    We discuss that flat-histogram techniques can be appropriately applied in the sampling of quantum Monte Carlo simulation in order to improve the statistical quality of the results at long imaginary time or low excitation energy. Typical imaginary-time correlation functions calculated in quantum Monte Carlo are subject to exponentially growing errors as the range of imaginary time grows and this smears the information on the low energy excitations. We show that we can extract the low energy physics by modifying the Monte Carlo sampling technique to one in which configurations which contribute to making the histogram of certain quantities flat are promoted. We apply the diagrammatic Monte Carlo (diag-MC) method to the motion of a single hole in the t-J model and we show that the implementation of flat-histogram techniques allows us to calculate the Green's function in a wide range of imaginary-time. In addition, we show that applying the flat-histogram technique alleviates the “sign”-problem associated with the simulation of the single-hole Green's function at long imaginary time. (paper)

  9. Whole-lesion apparent diffusion coefficient histogram analysis: significance in T and N staging of gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Zhang, Yujuan; Chen, Ling; Guan, Wenxian; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang

    2017-10-02

    Whole-lesion apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis has been introduced and proved effective in assessment of multiple tumors. However, the application of whole-volume ADC histogram analysis in gastrointestinal tumors has just started and never been reported in T and N staging of gastric cancers. Eighty patients with pathologically confirmed gastric carcinomas underwent diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging before surgery prospectively. Whole-lesion ADC histogram analysis was performed by two radiologists independently. The differences of ADC histogram parameters among different T and N stages were compared with independent-samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of ADC histogram parameters in differentiating particular T or N stages of gastric cancers. There were significant differences of all the ADC histogram parameters for gastric cancers at different T (except ADC min and ADC max ) and N (except ADC max ) stages. Most ADC histogram parameters differed significantly between T1 vs T3, T1 vs T4, T2 vs T4, N0 vs N1, N0 vs N3, and some parameters (ADC 5% , ADC 10% , ADC min ) differed significantly between N0 vs N2, N2 vs N3 (all P histogram parameters held great potential in differentiating different T and N stages of gastric cancers preoperatively.

  10. Stochastic learning of multi-instance dictionary for earth mover’s distance-based histogram comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Jihong

    2016-09-17

    Dictionary plays an important role in multi-instance data representation. It maps bags of instances to histograms. Earth mover’s distance (EMD) is the most effective histogram distance metric for the application of multi-instance retrieval. However, up to now, there is no existing multi-instance dictionary learning methods designed for EMD-based histogram comparison. To fill this gap, we develop the first EMD-optimal dictionary learning method using stochastic optimization method. In the stochastic learning framework, we have one triplet of bags, including one basic bag, one positive bag, and one negative bag. These bags are mapped to histograms using a multi-instance dictionary. We argue that the EMD between the basic histogram and the positive histogram should be smaller than that between the basic histogram and the negative histogram. Base on this condition, we design a hinge loss. By minimizing this hinge loss and some regularization terms of the dictionary, we update the dictionary instances. The experiments over multi-instance retrieval applications shows its effectiveness when compared to other dictionary learning methods over the problems of medical image retrieval and natural language relation classification. © 2016 The Natural Computing Applications Forum

  11. Efficient visibility-driven medical image visualisation via adaptive binned visibility histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Feng, David Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2016-07-01

    'Visibility' is a fundamental optical property that represents the observable, by users, proportion of the voxels in a volume during interactive volume rendering. The manipulation of this 'visibility' improves the volume rendering processes; for instance by ensuring the visibility of regions of interest (ROIs) or by guiding the identification of an optimal rendering view-point. The construction of visibility histograms (VHs), which represent the distribution of all the visibility of all voxels in the rendered volume, enables users to explore the volume with real-time feedback about occlusion patterns among spatially related structures during volume rendering manipulations. Volume rendered medical images have been a primary beneficiary of VH given the need to ensure that specific ROIs are visible relative to the surrounding structures, e.g. the visualisation of tumours that may otherwise be occluded by neighbouring structures. VH construction and its subsequent manipulations, however, are computationally expensive due to the histogram binning of the visibilities. This limits the real-time application of VH to medical images that have large intensity ranges and volume dimensions and require a large number of histogram bins. In this study, we introduce an efficient adaptive binned visibility histogram (AB-VH) in which a smaller number of histogram bins are used to represent the visibility distribution of the full VH. We adaptively bin medical images by using a cluster analysis algorithm that groups the voxels according to their intensity similarities into a smaller subset of bins while preserving the distribution of the intensity range of the original images. We increase efficiency by exploiting the parallel computation and multiple render targets (MRT) extension of the modern graphical processing units (GPUs) and this enables efficient computation of the histogram. We show the application of our method to single-modality computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance

  12. ADC Histogram Analysis of Cervical Cancer Aids Detecting Lymphatic Metastases-a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schob, Stefan; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Pazaitis, Nikolaos; Schramm, Dominik; Bremicker, Kristina; Exner, Marc; Höhn, Anne Kathrin; Garnov, Nikita; Surov, Alexey

    2017-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis has been used to some extent in cervical cancer (CC) to distinguish between low-grade and high-grade tumors. Although this differentiation is undoubtedly helpful, it would be even more crucial in the presurgical setting to determine whether a tumor already gained the potential to metastasize via the lymphatic system. So far, no studies investigated the potential of 3T ADC histogram analysis in CC to differentiate between nodal-positive and nodal-negative entities. Therefore, the principal aim of our study was to investigate the potential of 3T ADC histogram analysis to differentiate between CC with and without lymph node metastasis. The second aim was to elucidate possible differences in ADC histogram parameters between CC with limited vs. advanced tumor stages and well-differentiated vs. undifferentiated lesions. Finally, correlations of p53 expression and Ki-67 index with ADC parameters were analyzed. Eighteen female patients (mean age 55.4 years, range 32-79 years) with histopathologically confirmed cervical squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were prospectively enrolled. Tumor stages, tumor grading, status of metastatic dissemination, Ki67-index, and p53 expression were assessed in these patients. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was obtained in a 3T scanner using the following b values: b0 and b1000 s/mm 2 . Group comparisons using Mann-Whitney U test revealed the following findings: nodal-positive CC had statistically significant lower ADC parameters (ADCmin, ADCmean, median ADC, Mode, p10, p25, p75, and p90) in comparison to nodal-negative CC (all p histogram analysis in 3T DWI. This information is crucial for the gynecological surgeon to identify the optimal treatment strategy for patients suffering from CC. Furthermore, ADCentropy was identified as a potential imaging biomarker for tumor heterogeneity and might be able to indicate further molecular changes like loss of p53 expression

  13. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  14. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram analysis can evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict late xerostomia degree in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Guo, Tingting; Zheng, Huanhuan; Pan, Xia; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Li, Ming; Liu, Song; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-09-19

    We investigated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict xerostomia degrees in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving radiotherapy. The imaging of bilateral parotid glands in NPC patients was conducted 2 weeks before radiotherapy (time point 1), one month after radiotherapy (time point 2), and four months after radiotherapy (time point 3). From time point 1 to 2, parotid volume, skewness, and kurtosis decreased ( P histogram parameters increased (all P histogram parameters. Early mean change rates for bilateral parotid SD and ADC max could predict late xerostomia degrees at seven months after radiotherapy (three months after time point 3) with AUC of 0.781 and 0.818 ( P = 0.014, 0.005, respectively). ADC histogram parameters were reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.830 - 0.999). ADC histogram analysis could be used to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage noninvasively, and predict late xerostomia degrees of NPC patients treated with radiotherapy.

  15. Histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix on gray-scale ultrasound images for diagnosing lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Gyung; Yoo, Jaeheung; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Hong, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hye Sun; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Han, Kyunghwa; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether texture analysis using histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) parameters can help clinicians diagnose lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT) and differentiate LT according to pathologic grade. The background thyroid pathology of 441 patients was classified into no evidence of LT, chronic LT (CLT), and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Histogram and GLCM parameters were extracted from the regions of interest on ultrasound. The diagnostic performances of the parameters for diagnosing and differentiating LT were calculated. Of the histogram and GLCM parameters, the mean on histogram had the highest Az (0.63) and VUS (0.303). As the degrees of LT increased, the mean decreased and the standard deviation and entropy increased. The mean on histogram from gray-scale ultrasound showed the best diagnostic performance as a single parameter in differentiating LT according to pathologic grade as well as in diagnosing LT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incremental Prognostic Value of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram Analysis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Yuan, Ying; Ren, Jiliang; Shi, Yiqian; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-26

    We aimed to investigate the incremental prognostic value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and integrate it into a multivariate prognostic model. A retrospective review of magnetic resonance imaging findings was conducted in patients with pathologically confirmed HNSCC between June 2012 and December 2015. For each tumor, six histogram parameters were derived: the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of ADC (ADC 10 , ADC 50 , and ADC 90 ); mean ADC values (ADC mean ); kurtosis; and skewness. The clinical variables included age, sex, smoking status, tumor volume, and tumor node metastasis stage. The association of these histogram and clinical variables with overall survival (OS) was determined. Further validation of the histogram parameters as independent biomarkers was performed using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models combined with clinical variables, which was compared to the clinical model. Models were assessed with C index and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for the 12- and 36-month OS. Ninety-six patients were eligible for analysis. Median follow-up was 877 days (range, 54-1516 days). A total of 29 patients died during follow-up (30%). Patients with higher ADC values (ADC 10  > 0.958 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC 50  > 1.089 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC 90  > 1.152 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC mean  > 1.047 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and lower kurtosis (≤0.967) were significant predictors of poor OS (P histogram analysis has incremental prognostic value in patients with HNSCC and increases the performance of a multivariable prognostic model in addition to clinical variables. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient with uterine cervical pathologic finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuning; Li, Hui; Chen, Ziqian; Ni, Ping; Zhong, Qun; Huang, Huijuan; Sandrasegaran, Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in characterizing pathologic features of cervical cancer and benign cervical lesions. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Seventy-three patients with cervical cancer (33-69 years old; 35 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB cervical cancer) and 38 patients (38-61 years old) with normal cervix or cervical benign lesions (control group) were enrolled. All patients underwent 3-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm(2). ADC values of the entire tumor in the patient group and the whole cervix volume in the control group were assessed. Mean ADC, median ADC, 25th and 75th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis were calculated. Histogram parameters were compared between different pathologic features, as well as between stage IB cervical cancer and control groups. Mean ADC, median ADC, and 25th percentile of ADC were significantly higher for adenocarcinoma (p = 0.021, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively), and skewness was significantly higher for squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.011). Median ADC was statistically significantly higher for well or moderately differentiated tumors (p = 0.044), and skewness was statistically significantly higher for poorly differentiated tumors (p = 0.004). No statistically significant difference of ADC histogram was observed between lymphovascular space invasion subgroups. All histogram parameters differed significantly between stage IB cervical cancer and control groups (p histogram analysis may help to distinguish early-stage cervical cancer from normal cervix or cervical benign lesions and may be useful for evaluating the different pathologic features of cervical cancer.

  18. Principal component analysis of the CT density histogram to generate parametric response maps of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, N.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Pike, D.; McCormack, D. G.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomography (CT) may be used to characterize emphysema and airways disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One analysis approach - parametric response mapping (PMR) utilizes registered inspiratory and expiratory CT image volumes and CT-density-histogram thresholds, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold values used, or their clinical meaning. Principal-component-analysis (PCA) of the CT density histogram can be exploited to quantify emphysema using data-driven CT-density-histogram thresholds. Thus, the objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration was to develop a PRM approach using PCA-derived thresholds in COPD patients and ex-smokers without airflow limitation. Methods: Fifteen COPD ex-smokers and 5 normal ex-smokers were evaluated. Thoracic CT images were also acquired at full inspiration and full expiration and these images were non-rigidly co-registered. PCA was performed for the CT density histograms, from which the components with the highest eigenvalues greater than one were summed. Since the values of the principal component curve correlate directly with the variability in the sample, the maximum and minimum points on the curve were used as threshold values for the PCA-adjusted PRM technique. Results: A significant correlation was determined between conventional and PCA-adjusted PRM with 3He MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (p<0.001), with CT RA950 (p<0.0001), as well as with 3He MRI ventilation defect percent, a measurement of both small airways disease (p=0.049 and p=0.06, respectively) and emphysema (p=0.02). Conclusions: PRM generated using PCA thresholds of the CT density histogram showed significant correlations with CT and 3He MRI measurements of emphysema, but not airways disease.

  19. Sistem Verifikasi Tanda Tangan Off-Line Berdasar Ciri Histogram Of Oriented Gradient (HOG Dan Histogram Of Curvature (HoC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wahyu Widodo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Tanda tangan dengan sifat uniknya merupakan salah satu dari sekian banyak atribut personal yang diterima secara luas untuk verifikasi indentitas seseorang, alat pembuktian kepemilikan berbagai transaksi atau dokumen di dalam masyarakat. Keberhasilan penggunaan ciri gradien dan curvature dalam bidang-bidang penelitian pengenalan pola dan bahwa tanda tangan dapat dikatakan merupakan hasil tulisan tangan yang tersusun atas beragam garis dan lengkungan (curve yang memiliki arah atau orientasi merupakan alasan bahwa kedua ciri tersebut digunakan sebagai metoda verifikasi tanda tangan offline di penelitian ini. Berbagai implementasi dari pre-processing, ekstraksi dan representasi ciri, dan pembelajaran SVM serta usaha perbaikan yang telah dilakukan dalam penelitian ini menunjukkan hasil bahwa ciri HOG dan HoC mampu dimanfaatkan dalam proses verifikasi tanda tangan secara offline.  Pada basis data GPDS960Signature, HOG dan HoC yang dihitung pada ukuran sel 30 x 30 piksel memberikan dengan nilai %FRR terbaik 26,90 dan %FAR 37,56.  Sedangkan pada basis data FUM-PHSDB, HOG dn HoC yang dihitung pada ukuran 60 x 60 piksel memberikan nilai %FRR terbaik 4 dan %FAR 57. Kata kunci: verifikasi tanda tangan, curvature, orientation, gradient, histogram of curvature (HoC, histogram of oriented gradient (HOG Abstract Signature with unique properties is one of the many personal attributes that are widely accepted to verify a person's identity, proof of ownership transactions instrument or document in the community. The successful use of gradient and curvature feature in the research fields of pattern recognition is the reason that both of these features are used as an offline signature verification method in this study. Various implementations of preprocessing, feature extraction and representation, and SVM learning has been done in the study showed results that HOG and HoC feature can be utilized in the process of offline signature verification.  HOG and

  20. Subtype differentiation of renal tumors using voxel-based histogram analysis of intravoxel incoherent motion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaing, Byron; Sigmund, Eric E; Huang, William C; Babb, James S; Parikh, Nainesh S; Stoffel, David; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if voxel-based histogram analysis of intravoxel incoherent motion imaging (IVIM) parameters can differentiate various subtypes of renal tumors, including benign and malignant lesions. A total of 44 patients with renal tumors who underwent surgery and had histopathology available were included in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved, single-institution prospective study. In addition to routine renal magnetic resonance imaging examination performed on a 1.5-T system, all patients were imaged with axial diffusion-weighted imaging using 8 b values (range, 0-800 s/mm). A biexponential model was fitted to the diffusion signal data using a segmented algorithm to extract the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (fp), tissue diffusivity (Dt), and pseudodiffusivity (Dp) for each voxel. Mean and histogram measures of heterogeneity (standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis) of IVIM parameters were correlated with pathology results of tumor subtype using unequal variance t tests to compare subtypes in terms of each measure. Correction for multiple comparisons was accomplished using the Tukey honestly significant difference procedure. A total of 44 renal tumors including 23 clear cell (ccRCC), 4 papillary (pRCC), 5 chromophobe, and 5 cystic renal cell carcinomas, as well as benign lesions, 4 oncocytomas (Onc) and 3 angiomyolipomas (AMLs), were included in our analysis. Mean IVIM parameters fp and Dt differentiated 8 of 15 pairs of renal tumors. Histogram analysis of IVIM parameters differentiated 9 of 15 subtype pairs. One subtype pair (ccRCC vs pRCC) was differentiated by mean analysis but not by histogram analysis. However, 2 other subtype pairs (AML vs Onc and ccRCC vs Onc) were differentiated by histogram distribution parameters exclusively. The standard deviation of Dt [σ(Dt)] differentiated ccRCC (0.362 ± 0.136 × 10 mm/s) from AML (0.199 ± 0.043 × 10 mm/s) (P = 0

  1. Impact of knee support and shape of tabletop on rectum and prostate position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel; Duppen, Joop C.; Betgen, Anja; Lotz, Heidi; Remeijer, Peter; Fitton, Isabelle; Nowak, Peter; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of different tabletops with or without a knee support on the position of the rectum, prostate, and bulb of the penis; and to evaluate the effect of these patient-positioning devices on treatment planning. Methods and materials: For 10 male volunteers, five MRI scans were made in four different positions: on a flat tabletop with knee support, on a flat tabletop without knee support, on a rounded tabletop with knee support, and on a rounded tabletop without knee support. The fifth scan was in the same position as the first. With image registration, the position differences of the rectum, prostate, and bulb of the penis were measured at several points in a sagittal plane through the central axis of the prostate. A planning target volume was generated from the delineated prostates with a margin of 10 mm in three dimensions. A three-field treatment plan with a prescribed dose of 78 Gy to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point was automatically generated from each planning target volume. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for all rectal walls. Results: The shape of the tabletop did not affect the rectum and prostate position. Addition of a knee support shifted the anterior and posterior rectal walls dorsally. For the anterior rectal wall, the maximum dorsal shift was 9.9 mm (standard error of the mean [SEM] 1.7 mm) at the top of the prostate. For the posterior rectal wall, the maximum dorsal shift was 10.2 mm (SEM 1.5 mm) at the middle of the prostate. Therefore, the rectal filling was pushed caudally when a knee support was added. The knee support caused a rotation of the prostate around the left-right axis at the apex (i.e., a dorsal rotation) by 5.6 deg (SEM 0.8 deg ) and shifts in the caudal and dorsal directions of 2.6 mm (SEM 0.4 cm) and 1.4 mm (SEM 0.6 mm), respectively. The position of the bulb of the penis was not influenced by the use of a knee support or rounded tabletop. The volume of the

  2. Contrast Enhancement Using Brightness Preserving Histogram Equalization Technique for Classification of Date Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer vision technique is becoming popular for quality assessment of many products in food industries. Image enhancement is the first step in analyzing the images in order to obtain detailed information for the determination of quality. In this study, Brightness preserving histogram equalization technique was used to enhance the features of gray scale images to classify three date varieties (Khalas, Fard and Madina. Mean, entropy, kurtosis and skewness features were extracted from the original and enhanced images. Mean and entropy from original images and kurtosis from the enhanced images were selected based on Lukka's feature selection approach. An overall classification efficiency of 93.72% was achieved with just three features. Brightness preserving histogram equalization technique has great potential to improve the classification in various quality attributes of food and agricultural products with minimum features.

  3. Real time object localization based on histogram of s-RGB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudjirahardjo, Panca; Suyono, Hadi; Setyawan, Raden Arief

    2017-09-01

    Object localization is the first task in pattern detection and recognition. This task is very important due to it reduces the searching time to the interest object. In this paper we introduce our novel method of object localization based on color feature. Our novel method is a histogram of s-RGB. This histogram is used in the training phase to determine the color dominant in the initial Region of Interest (ROI). Then this information is used to label the interest object. To reduce noise and localize the interest object, we apply the row and column density function of pixels. The comparison result with some processes, our system gives a best result and takes a short computation time of 26.56 ms, in the video rate of 15 frames per second (fps).

  4. Clarification of the use of chi-square and likelihood functions in fits to histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Cousins, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    We consider the problem of fitting curves to histograms in which the data obey multinomial or Poisson statistics. Techniques commonly used by physicists are examined in light of standard results found in the statistics literature. We review the relationship between multinomial and Poisson distributions, and clarify a sufficient condition for equality of the area under the fitted curve and the number of events on the histogram. Following the statisticians, we use the likelihood ratio test to construct a general Z 2 statistic, Zsub(lambda) 2 , which yields parameter and error estimates identical to those of the method of maximum likelihood. The Zsub(lambda) 2 statistic is further useful for testing goodness-of-fit since the value of its minimum asymptotically obeys a classical chi-square distribution. One should be aware, however, of the potential for statistical bias, especially when the number of events is small. (orig.)

  5. Kernel Learning of Histogram of Local Gabor Phase Patterns for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineng Zhong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new face recognition method, named kernel learning of histogram of local Gabor phase pattern (K-HLGPP, which is based on Daugman’s method for iris recognition and the local XOR pattern (LXP operator. Unlike traditional Gabor usage exploiting the magnitude part in face recognition, we encode the Gabor phase information for face classification by the quadrant bit coding (QBC method. Two schemes are proposed for face recognition. One is based on the nearest-neighbor classifier with chi-square as the similarity measurement, and the other makes kernel discriminant analysis for HLGPP (K-HLGPP using histogram intersection and Gaussian-weighted chi-square kernels. The comparative experiments show that K-HLGPP achieves a higher recognition rate than other well-known face recognition systems on the large-scale standard FERET, FERET200, and CAS-PEAL-R1 databases.

  6. Adaptive local backlight dimming algorithm based on local histogram and image characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Burini, Nino; Korhonen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    -off between power consumption and image quality preservation than the other algorithms representing the state of the art among feature based backlight algorithms. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.......Liquid Crystal Display (LCDs) with Light Emitting Diode (LED) backlight is a very popular display technology, used for instance in television sets, monitors and mobile phones. This paper presents a new backlight dimming algorithm that exploits the characteristics of the target image......, such as the local histograms and the average pixel intensity of each backlight segment, to reduce the power consumption of the backlight and enhance image quality. The local histogram of the pixels within each backlight segment is calculated and, based on this average, an adaptive quantile value is extracted...

  7. An improved contrast enhancement algorithm for infrared images based on adaptive double plateaus histogram equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li; Li, Yiyang

    2018-05-01

    Infrared thermal images can reflect the thermal-radiation distribution of a particular scene. However, the contrast of the infrared images is usually low. Hence, it is generally necessary to enhance the contrast of infrared images in advance to facilitate subsequent recognition and analysis. Based on the adaptive double plateaus histogram equalization, this paper presents an improved contrast enhancement algorithm for infrared thermal images. In the proposed algorithm, the normalized coefficient of variation of the histogram, which characterizes the level of contrast enhancement, is introduced as feedback information to adjust the upper and lower plateau thresholds. The experiments on actual infrared images show that compared to the three typical contrast-enhancement algorithms, the proposed algorithm has better scene adaptability and yields better contrast-enhancement results for infrared images with more dark areas or a higher dynamic range. Hence, it has high application value in contrast enhancement, dynamic range compression, and digital detail enhancement for infrared thermal images.

  8. Multi-stream LSTM-HMM decoding and histogram equalization for noise robust keyword spotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllmer, Martin; Marchi, Erik; Squartini, Stefano; Schuller, Björn

    2011-09-01

    Highly spontaneous, conversational, and potentially emotional and noisy speech is known to be a challenge for today's automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems, which highlights the need for advanced algorithms that improve speech features and models. Histogram Equalization is an efficient method to reduce the mismatch between clean and noisy conditions by normalizing all moments of the probability distribution of the feature vector components. In this article, we propose to combine histogram equalization and multi-condition training for robust keyword detection in noisy speech. To better cope with conversational speaking styles, we show how contextual information can be effectively exploited in a multi-stream ASR framework that dynamically models context-sensitive phoneme estimates generated by a long short-term memory neural network. The proposed techniques are evaluated on the SEMAINE database-a corpus containing emotionally colored conversations with a cognitive system for "Sensitive Artificial Listening".

  9. Locally advanced rectal cancer: post-chemoradiotherapy ADC histogram analysis for predicting a complete response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Gab Chul; Jang, Yun-Jin; Ryeom, Hunkyu; Kim, Hye Jung; Shin, Kyung-Min; Park, Jun Seok; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Kim, See Hyung

    2015-09-01

    The value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for reliable differentiation between pathologic complete response (pCR) and residual tumor is still unclear. Recently, a few studies reported that histogram analysis can be helpful to monitor the therapeutic response in various cancer research. To investigate whether post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis can be helpful to predict a pCR in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Fifty patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled in this retrospective study, non-pCR (n = 41) and pCR (n = 9), respectively. ADC histogram analysis encompassing the whole tumor was performed on two post-CRT ADC600 and ADC1000 (b factors 0, 600 vs. 0, 1000 s/mm(2)) maps. Mean, minimum, maximum, SD, mode, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentile ADCs, skewness, and kurtosis were derived. Diagnostic performance for predicting pCR was evaluated and compared. On both maps, 10th and 25th ADCs showed better diagnostic performance than that using mean ADC. Tenth percentile ADCs revealed the best diagnostic performance on both ADC600 (AZ 0.841, sensitivity 100%, specificity 70.7%) and ADC1000 (AZ 0.821, sensitivity 77.8%, specificity 87.8%) maps. In comparison between 10th percentile and mean ADC, the specificity was significantly improved on both ADC600 (70.7% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.031) and ADC1000 (87.8% vs. 73.2%; P = 0.039) maps. Post-CRT ADC histogram analysis is helpful for predicting pCR in LARC, especially, in improving the specificity, compared with mean ADC. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  10. Treatment and Combination of Data Quality Monitoring Histograms to Perform Data vs. Monte Carlo Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Nolan

    2013-01-01

    In CMS's automated data quality validation infrastructure, it is not currently possible to assess how well Monte Carlo simulations describe data from collisions, if at all. In order to guarantee high quality data, a novel work flow was devised to perform `data vs. Monte Carlo' validation. Support for this comparison was added by allowing distributions from several Monte Carlo samples to be combined, matched to the data and then displayed in a histogram stack, overlaid with the experimental data.

  11. Neutrosophic Similarity Score Based Weighted Histogram for Robust Mean-Shift Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual object tracking is a critical task in computer vision. Challenging things always exist when an object needs to be tracked. For instance, background clutter is one of the most challenging problems. The mean-shift tracker is quite popular because of its efficiency and performance in a range of conditions. However, the challenge of background clutter also disturbs its performance. In this article, we propose a novel weighted histogram based on neutrosophic similarity score to help the mean-shift tracker discriminate the target from the background. Neutrosophic set (NS is a new branch of philosophy for dealing with incomplete, indeterminate, and inconsistent information. In this paper, we utilize the single valued neutrosophic set (SVNS, which is a subclass of NS to improve the mean-shift tracker. First, two kinds of criteria are considered as the object feature similarity and the background feature similarity, and each bin of the weight histogram is represented in the SVNS domain via three membership functions T(Truth, I(indeterminacy, and F(Falsity. Second, the neutrosophic similarity score function is introduced to fuse those two criteria and to build the final weight histogram. Finally, a novel neutrosophic weighted mean-shift tracker is proposed. The proposed tracker is compared with several mean-shift based trackers on a dataset of 61 public sequences. The results revealed that our method outperforms other trackers, especially when confronting background clutter.

  12. Control system of hexacopter using color histogram footprint and convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruliputra, R. N.; Darma, S.

    2017-07-01

    The development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has been growing rapidly in recent years. The use of logic thinking which is implemented into the program algorithms is needed to make a smart system. By using visual input from a camera, UAV is able to fly autonomously by detecting a target. However, some weaknesses arose as usage in the outdoor environment might change the target's color intensity. Color histogram footprint overcomes the problem because it divides color intensity into separate bins that make the detection tolerant to the slight change of color intensity. Template matching compare its detection result with a template of the reference image to determine the target position and use it to position the vehicle in the middle of the target with visual feedback control based on Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller. Color histogram footprint method localizes the target by calculating the back projection of its histogram. It has an average success rate of 77 % from a distance of 1 meter. It can position itself in the middle of the target by using visual feedback control with an average positioning time of 73 seconds. After the hexacopter is in the middle of the target, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) classifies a number contained in the target image to determine a task depending on the classified number, either landing, yawing, or return to launch. The recognition result shows an optimum success rate of 99.2 %.

  13. Sistem Pendeteksi Kualitas Daging Dengan Ekualisasi Histogram Dan Thresholding Berbasis Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggit Sri Herlambang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan daging sapi yang meningkat sering dimanfaatkan oleh penjual daging sapi untuk melakukan kecurangan. Kecurangan yang sering dimanfaatkan biasanya dalam hal kualitas daging sapi. Kualitas daging ditentukan oleh beberapa parameter, termasuk parameter ukuran, tekstur, karakteristik warna, bau daging dan lain - lain. Parameter adalah salah satu faktor penting untuk menentukan kualitas daging. Umumnya dalam menentukan kualitas daging dilakukan dengan menggunakan indra penglihatan. Sehingga cara manual masih bersifat subjektif dalam menilai kualitas daging. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk merancang aplikasi sistem pendeteksi kualitas daging dengan sampel 20 citra daging data uji. Sistem pendeteksi kualitas daging dengan ekualisasi histogram dan thresholding berbasis android ini dibangun dengan menggunakan bahasa pemrograman berbasis Android yang terintegrasi dengan SDK Android, Eclipse dan library OpenCV. Metode yang digunakan menggunakan metode pra-pengolahan ekualisasi histogram dan segmentasi thresholding pengolahan citra. Deteksi kualitas daging dilakukan dengan mencari nilai statistik ekstraksi ciri citra berdasarkan data citra daging dari penelitian. Hasil penelitian ini adalah dapat menentukan nilai statistik mean dan standar deviasi dari hasil citra olahan ekualisasi histogram dan thresholding disertai analisis kualitas citra daging sapi. Pengujian black box dari aplikasi sistem pendeteksi kualitas daging ini menunjukkan bahwa semua fungsi yang terdapat pada aplikasi ini telah berhasil berjalan sesuai fungsinya. Penelitian ini harapannya bisa digunakan untuk membantu penelitian tahap selanjutnya.

  14. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  15. LOR-OSEM: statistical PET reconstruction from raw line-of-response histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J

    2004-01-01

    Iterative statistical reconstruction methods are becoming the standard in positron emission tomography (PET). Conventional maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) and ordered-subsets (OSEM) algorithms act on data which have been pre-processed into corrected, evenly-spaced histograms; however, such pre-processing corrupts the Poisson statistics. Recent advances have incorporated attenuation, scatter and randoms compensation into the iterative reconstruction. The objective of this work was to incorporate the remaining pre-processing steps, including arc correction, to reconstruct directly from raw unevenly-spaced line-of-response (LOR) histograms. This exactly preserves Poisson statistics and full spatial information in a manner closely related to listmode ML, making full use of the ML statistical model. The LOR-OSEM algorithm was implemented using a rotation-based projector which maps directly to the unevenly-spaced LOR grid. Simulation and phantom experiments were performed to characterize resolution, contrast and noise properties for 2D PET. LOR-OSEM provided a beneficial noise-resolution tradeoff, outperforming AW-OSEM by about the same margin that AW-OSEM outperformed pre-corrected OSEM. The relationship between LOR-ML and listmode ML algorithms was explored, and implementation differences are discussed. LOR-OSEM is a viable alternative to AW-OSEM for histogram-based reconstruction with improved spatial resolution and noise properties

  16. Histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Correlation between quantitative parameters and clinical stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Quan; Ma, Gao; Wang, Yan-Jun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-07-18

    To evaluate the correlation between histogram parameters derived from diffusion-kurtosis (DK) imaging and the clinical stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). High T-stage (T3/4) NPC showed significantly higher Kapp-mean (P = 0.018), Kapp-median (P = 0.029) and Kapp-90th (P = 0.003) than low T-stage (T1/2) NPC. High N-stage NPC (N2/3) showed significantly lower Dapp-mean (P = 0.002), Dapp-median (P = 0.002) and Dapp-10th (P Histogram parameters, including mean, median, 10th, 90th percentiles, skewness and kurtosis of Dapp and Kapp were calculated. Patients were divided into low and high T, N and clinical stage based on American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Differences of histogram parameters between low and high T, N and AJCC stages were compared using t test. Multiple receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine and compare the value of significant parameters in predicting high T, N and AJCC stage, respectively. DK imaging-derived parameters correlated well with clinical stage of NPC, therefore could serve as an adjunctive imaging technique for evaluating NPC.

  17. Digital image classification with the help of artificial neural network by simple histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pranab; Banerjee, Nirmalya; Kaur, Rajwant

    2016-01-01

    Visual image classification is a great challenge to the cytopathologist in routine day-to-day work. Artificial neural network (ANN) may be helpful in this matter. In this study, we have tried to classify digital images of malignant and benign cells in effusion cytology smear with the help of simple histogram data and ANN. A total of 404 digital images consisting of 168 benign cells and 236 malignant cells were selected for this study. The simple histogram data was extracted from these digital images and an ANN was constructed with the help of Neurointelligence software [Alyuda Neurointelligence 2.2 (577), Cupertino, California, USA]. The network architecture was 6-3-1. The images were classified as training set (281), validation set (63), and test set (60). The on-line backpropagation training algorithm was used for this study. A total of 10,000 iterations were done to train the ANN system with the speed of 609.81/s. After the adequate training of this ANN model, the system was able to identify all 34 malignant cell images and 24 out of 26 benign cells. The ANN model can be used for the identification of the individual malignant cells with the help of simple histogram data. This study will be helpful in the future to identify malignant cells in unknown situations.

  18. Multipeak Mean Based Optimized Histogram Modification Framework Using Swarm Intelligence for Image Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Babu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach, Multipeak mean based optimized histogram modification framework (MMOHM is introduced for the purpose of enhancing the contrast as well as preserving essential details for any given gray scale and colour images. The basic idea of this technique is the calculation of multiple peaks (local maxima from the original histogram. The mean value of multiple peaks is computed and the input image’s histogram is segmented into two subhistograms based on this multipeak mean (mmean value. Then, a bicriteria optimization problem is formulated and the subhistograms are modified by selecting optimal contrast enhancement parameters. While formulating the enhancement parameters, particle swarm optimization is employed to find optimal values of them. Finally, the union of the modified subhistograms produces a contrast enhanced and details preserved output image. This mechanism enhances the contrast of the input image better than the existing contemporary HE methods. The performance of the proposed method is well supported by the contrast enhancement quantitative metrics such as discrete entropy, natural image quality evaluator, and absolute mean brightness error.

  19. Infrared Small Moving Target Detection via Saliency Histogram and Geometrical Invariability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjie Wan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect both bright and dark small moving targets effectively in infrared (IR video sequences, a saliency histogram and geometrical invariability based method is presented in this paper. First, a saliency map that roughly highlights the salient regions of the original image is obtained by tuning its amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Then, a saliency histogram is constructed by means of averaging the accumulated saliency value of each gray level in the map, through which bins corresponding to bright target and dark target are assigned with large values in the histogram. Next, single-frame detection of candidate targets is accomplished by a binarized segmentation using an adaptive threshold, and their centroid coordinates with sub-pixel accuracy are calculated through a connected components labeling method as well as a gray-weighted criterion. Finally, considering the motion characteristics in consecutive frames, an inter-frame false alarm suppression method based on geometrical invariability is developed to improve the precision rate further. Quantitative analyses demonstrate the detecting precision of this proposed approach can be up to 97% and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves further verify our method outperforms other state-of-the-arts methods in both detection rate and false alarm rate.

  20. Conductance histogram evolution of an EC-MCBJ fabricated Au atomic point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yang; Liu Junyang; Chen Zhaobin; Tian Jinghua; Jin Xi; Liu Bo; Yang Fangzu; Tian Zhongqun [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Li Xiulan; Tao Nongjian [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6206 (United States); Luo Zhongzi; Lu Miao, E-mail: zqtian@xmu.edu.cn [Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Nano Technology Institute, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-07-08

    This work presents a study of Au conductance quantization based on a combined electrochemical deposition and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) method. We describe the microfabrication process and discuss improved features of our microchip structure compared to the previous one. The improved structure prolongs the available life of the microchip and also increases the success rate of the MCBJ experiment. Stepwise changes in the current were observed at the last stage of atomic point contact breakdown and conductance histograms were constructed. The evolution of 1G{sub 0} peak height in conductance histograms was used to investigate the probability of formation of an atomic point contact. It has been shown that the success rate in forming an atomic point contact can be improved by decreasing the stretching speed and the degree that the two electrodes are brought into contact. The repeated breakdown and formation over thousands of cycles led to a distinctive increase of 1G{sub 0} peak height in the conductance histograms, and this increased probability of forming a single atomic point contact is discussed.

  1. Conductance histogram evolution of an EC-MCBJ fabricated Au atomic point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Liu Junyang; Chen Zhaobin; Tian Jinghua; Jin Xi; Liu Bo; Yang Fangzu; Tian Zhongqun; Li Xiulan; Tao Nongjian; Luo Zhongzi; Lu Miao

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a study of Au conductance quantization based on a combined electrochemical deposition and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) method. We describe the microfabrication process and discuss improved features of our microchip structure compared to the previous one. The improved structure prolongs the available life of the microchip and also increases the success rate of the MCBJ experiment. Stepwise changes in the current were observed at the last stage of atomic point contact breakdown and conductance histograms were constructed. The evolution of 1G 0 peak height in conductance histograms was used to investigate the probability of formation of an atomic point contact. It has been shown that the success rate in forming an atomic point contact can be improved by decreasing the stretching speed and the degree that the two electrodes are brought into contact. The repeated breakdown and formation over thousands of cycles led to a distinctive increase of 1G 0 peak height in the conductance histograms, and this increased probability of forming a single atomic point contact is discussed.

  2. Breast lesion characterization using whole-lesion histogram analysis with stretched-exponential diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunling; Wang, Kun; Li, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jine; Ding, Jie; Spuhler, Karl; Duong, Timothy; Liang, Changhong; Huang, Chuan

    2018-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been studied in breast imaging and can provide more information about diffusion, perfusion and other physiological interests than standard pulse sequences. The stretched-exponential model has previously been shown to be more reliable than conventional DWI techniques, but different diagnostic sensitivities were found from study to study. This work investigated the characteristics of whole-lesion histogram parameters derived from the stretched-exponential diffusion model for benign and malignant breast lesions, compared them with conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and further determined which histogram metrics can be best used to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. This was a prospective study. Seventy females were included in the study. Multi-b value DWI was performed on a 1.5T scanner. Histogram parameters of whole lesions for distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), heterogeneity index (α), and ADC were calculated by two radiologists and compared among benign lesions, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive carcinoma confirmed by pathology. Nonparametric tests were performed for comparisons among invasive carcinoma, DCIS, and benign lesions. Comparisons of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to show the ability to discriminate malignant from benign lesions. The majority of histogram parameters (mean/min/max, skewness/kurtosis, 10-90 th percentile values) from DDC, α, and ADC were significantly different among invasive carcinoma, DCIS, and benign lesions. DDC 10% (area under curve [AUC] = 0.931), ADC 10% (AUC = 0.893), and α mean (AUC = 0.787) were found to be the best metrics in differentiating benign from malignant tumors among all histogram parameters derived from ADC and α, respectively. The combination of DDC 10% and α mean , using logistic regression, yielded the highest sensitivity (90.2%) and specificity (95.5%). DDC 10% and α mean derived from

  3. Measuring kinetics of complex single ion channel data using mean-variance histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlak, J B

    1993-07-01

    The measurement of single ion channel kinetics is difficult when those channels exhibit subconductance events. When the kinetics are fast, and when the current magnitudes are small, as is the case for Na+, Ca2+, and some K+ channels, these difficulties can lead to serious errors in the estimation of channel kinetics. I present here a method, based on the construction and analysis of mean-variance histograms, that can overcome these problems. A mean-variance histogram is constructed by calculating the mean current and the current variance within a brief "window" (a set of N consecutive data samples) superimposed on the digitized raw channel data. Systematic movement of this window over the data produces large numbers of mean-variance pairs which can be assembled into a two-dimensional histogram. Defined current levels (open, closed, or sublevel) appear in such plots as low variance regions. The total number of events in such low variance regions is estimated by curve fitting and plotted as a function of window width. This function decreases with the same time constants as the original dwell time probability distribution for each of the regions. The method can therefore be used: 1) to present a qualitative summary of the single channel data from which the signal-to-noise ratio, open channel noise, steadiness of the baseline, and number of conductance levels can be quickly determined; 2) to quantify the dwell time distribution in each of the levels exhibited. In this paper I present the analysis of a Na+ channel recording that had a number of complexities. The signal-to-noise ratio was only about 8 for the main open state, open channel noise, and fast flickers to other states were present, as were a substantial number of subconductance states. "Standard" half-amplitude threshold analysis of these data produce open and closed time histograms that were well fitted by the sum of two exponentials, but with apparently erroneous time constants, whereas the mean

  4. Centroid and full-width at half maximum uncertainties of histogrammed data with an underlying Gaussian distribution -- The moments method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, J.D.; Rana, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of approximating a continuous Gaussian distribution with histogrammed data are studied. The expressions for theoretical uncertainties in centroid and full-width at half maximum (FWHM), as determined by calculation of moments, are derived using the error propagation method for a histogrammed Gaussian distribution. The results are compared with the corresponding pseudo-experimental uncertainties for computer-generated histogrammed Gaussian peaks to demonstrate the effect of binning the data. It is shown that increasing the number of bins in the histogram improves the continuous distribution approximation. For example, a FWHM ≥ 9 and FWHM ≥ 12 bins are needed to reduce the pseudo-experimental standard deviation of FWHM to within ≥5% and ≥1%, respectively, of the theoretical value for a peak containing 10,000 counts. In addition, the uncertainties in the centroid and FWHM as a function of peak area are studied. Finally, Sheppard's correction is applied to partially correct for the binning effect

  5. Whole-tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis to differentiate benign peripheral neurogenic tumors from soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, Masanori; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Hakamada, Hiroto; Yoneyama, Tomohide; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nagano, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-02-22

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analyses have been used to differentiate tumor grades and predict therapeutic responses in various anatomic sites with moderate success. To determine the ability of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a whole-tumor ADC histogram analysis to differentiate benign peripheral neurogenic tumors (BPNTs) from soft tissue sarcomas (STSs). Retrospective study, single institution. In all, 25 BPNTs and 31 STSs. Two-b value DWI (b-values = 0, 1000s/mm 2 ) was at 3.0T. The histogram parameters of whole-tumor for ADC were calculated by two radiologists and compared between BPNTs and STSs. Nonparametric tests were performed for comparisons between BPNTs and STSs. P histogram parameters except kurtosis and entropy differed significantly between BPNTs and STSs. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of the Delta Quadrangle, Utah. Volume 2. Maps, profiles, and histograms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    Results of the interpretation of the gamma-ray spectrometric data in the form of a preferred anomaly map, along with significance-factor profile maps, stacked profiles, and histograms are presented in Volume 2

  7. Potential of MR histogram analyses for prediction of response to chemotherapy in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, He-Yue; Huang, Ya-Qin; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Ying-Ding; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) histogram analyses can help predict response to chemotherapy in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases by using response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST1.1) as the reference standard. Standard MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (b=0, 500 s/mm(2)) was performed before chemotherapy in 53 patients with colorectal hepatic metastases. Histograms were performed for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, arterial, and portal venous phase images; thereafter, mean, percentiles (1st, 10th, 50th, 90th, 99th), skewness, kurtosis, and variance were generated. Quantitative histogram parameters were compared between responders (partial and complete response, n=15) and non-responders (progressive and stable disease, n=38). Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analyses were further analyzed for the significant parameters. The mean, 1st percentile, 10th percentile, 50th percentile, 90th percentile, 99th percentile of the ADC maps were significantly lower in responding group than that in non-responding group (p=0.000-0.002) with area under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.76-0.82. The histogram parameters of arterial and portal venous phase showed no significant difference (p>0.05) between the two groups. Histogram-derived parameters for ADC maps seem to be a promising tool for predicting response to chemotherapy in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases. • ADC histogram analyses can potentially predict chemotherapy response in colorectal liver metastases. • Lower histogram-derived parameters (mean, percentiles) for ADC tend to have good response. • MR enhancement histogram analyses are not reliable to predict response.

  8. Subtype Differentiation of Small (≤ 4 cm) Solid Renal Mass Using Volumetric Histogram Analysis of DWI at 3-T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anqin; Xing, Wei; Li, Haojie; Hu, Yao; Hu, Daoyu; Li, Zhen; Kamel, Ihab R

    2018-05-29

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the utility of volumetric histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) derived from reduced-FOV DWI for small (≤ 4 cm) solid renal mass subtypes at 3-T MRI. This retrospective study included 38 clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), 16 papillary RCCs, 18 chromophobe RCCs, 13 minimal fat angiomyolipomas (AMLs), and seven oncocytomas evaluated with preoperative MRI. Volumetric ADC maps were generated using all slices of the reduced-FOV DW images to obtain histogram parameters, including mean, median, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, and SD ADC values, as well as skewness, kurtosis, and entropy. Comparisons of these parameters were made by one-way ANOVA, t test, and ROC curves analysis. ADC histogram parameters differentiated eight of 10 pairs of renal tumors. Three subtype pairs (clear cell RCC vs papillary RCC, clear cell RCC vs chromophobe RCC, and clear cell RCC vs minimal fat AML) were differentiated by mean ADC. However, five other subtype pairs (clear cell RCC vs oncocytoma, papillary RCC vs minimal fat AML, papillary RCC vs oncocytoma, chromophobe RCC vs minimal fat AML, and chromophobe RCC vs oncocytoma) were differentiated by histogram distribution parameters exclusively (all p histogram parameters yielded the highest AUC (0.851; sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 86.1%). Quantitative volumetric ADC histogram analysis may help differentiate various subtypes of small solid renal tumors, including benign and malignant lesions.

  9. Gliomas: Application of Cumulative Histogram Analysis of Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume on 3 T MRI to Tumor Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Yeom, Jeong A.; Shin, Hwaseon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma grading assumes significant importance in that low- and high-grade gliomas display different prognoses and are treated with dissimilar therapeutic strategies. The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess the usefulness of a cumulative normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histogram for glioma grading based on 3 T MRI. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 63 patients with astrocytic tumors underwent 3 T MRI with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging. Regions of interest containing the entire tumor volume were drawn on every section of the co-registered relative CBV (rCBV) maps and T2-weighted images. The percentile values from the cumulative nCBV histograms and the other histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grades. Cochran’s Q test and the McNemar test were used to compare the diagnostic accuracies of the histogram parameters after the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using the parameter offering the highest diagnostic accuracy, a validation process was performed with an independent test set of nine patients. Results The 99th percentile of the cumulative nCBV histogram (nCBV C99), mean and peak height differed significantly between low- and high-grade gliomas (P = histogram analysis of nCBV using 3 T MRI can be a useful method for preoperative glioma grading. The nCBV C99 value is helpful in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and grade IV from III gliomas. PMID:23704910

  10. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis.

  11. CHOBS: Color Histogram of Block Statistics for Automatic Bleeding Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tonmoy; Fattah, Shaikh Anowarul; Wahid, Khan A

    2018-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is the most advanced technology to visualize whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract in a non-invasive way. But the major disadvantage here, it takes long reviewing time, which is very laborious as continuous manual intervention is necessary. In order to reduce the burden of the clinician, in this paper, an automatic bleeding detection method for WCE video is proposed based on the color histogram of block statistics, namely CHOBS. A single pixel in WCE image may be distorted due to the capsule motion in the GI tract. Instead of considering individual pixel values, a block surrounding to that individual pixel is chosen for extracting local statistical features. By combining local block features of three different color planes of RGB color space, an index value is defined. A color histogram, which is extracted from those index values, provides distinguishable color texture feature. A feature reduction technique utilizing color histogram pattern and principal component analysis is proposed, which can drastically reduce the feature dimension. For bleeding zone detection, blocks are classified using extracted local features that do not incorporate any computational burden for feature extraction. From extensive experimentation on several WCE videos and 2300 images, which are collected from a publicly available database, a very satisfactory bleeding frame and zone detection performance is achieved in comparison to that obtained by some of the existing methods. In the case of bleeding frame detection, the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity obtained from proposed method are 97.85%, 99.47%, and 99.15%, respectively, and in the case of bleeding zone detection, 95.75% of precision is achieved. The proposed method offers not only low feature dimension but also highly satisfactory bleeding detection performance, which even can effectively detect bleeding frame and zone in a continuous WCE video data.

  12. Yet Another Method for Image Segmentation based on Histograms and Heuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia-Nicolai L. Teodorescu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a method for image segmentation that requires little computations, yet providing comparable results to other methods. While the proposed method resembles to the known ones based on histograms, it is still different in the use of the gray level distribution. When to the basic procedure we add several heuristic rules, the method produces results that, in some cases, may outperform the results produced by the known methods. The paper reports preliminary results. More details on the method, improvements, and results will be presented in a future paper.

  13. Content Based Radiographic Images Indexing and Retrieval Using Pattern Orientation Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Lakdashti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR is a method of image searching and retrieval in a  database. In medical applications, CBIR is a tool used by physicians to compare the previous and current  medical images associated with patients pathological conditions. As the volume of pictorial information  stored in medical image databases is in progress, efficient image indexing and retrieval is increasingly  becoming a necessity.  Materials and Methods: This paper presents a new content based radiographic image retrieval approach  based on histogram of pattern orientations, namely pattern orientation histogram (POH. POH represents  the  spatial  distribution  of  five  different  pattern  orientations:  vertical,  horizontal,  diagonal  down/left,  diagonal down/right and non-orientation. In this method, a given image is first divided into image-blocks  and  the  frequency  of  each  type  of  pattern  is  determined  in  each  image-block.  Then,  local  pattern  histograms for each of these image-blocks are computed.   Results: The method was compared to two well known texture-based image retrieval methods: Tamura  and  Edge  Histogram  Descriptors  (EHD  in  MPEG-7  standard.  Experimental  results  based  on  10000  IRMA  radiography  image  dataset,  demonstrate  that  POH  provides  better  precision  and  recall  rates  compared to Tamura and EHD. For some images, the recall and precision rates obtained by POH are,  respectively, 48% and 18% better than the best of the two above mentioned methods.    Discussion and Conclusion: Since we exploit the absolute location of the pattern in the image as well as  its global composition, the proposed matching method can retrieve semantically similar medical images.

  14. Improved dose–volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C; Segars, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator–detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  15. SUPERVISED AUTOMATIC HISTOGRAM CLUSTERING AND WATERSHED SEGMENTATION. APPLICATION TO MICROSCOPIC MEDICAL COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lezoray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach to the segmentation of microscopic color images is addressed, and applied to medical images. The approach combines a clustering method and a region growing method. Each color plane is segmented independently relying on a watershed based clustering of the plane histogram. The marginal segmentation maps intersect in a label concordance map. The latter map is simplified based on the assumption that the color planes are correlated. This produces a simplified label concordance map containing labeled and unlabeled pixels. The formers are used as an image of seeds for a color watershed. This fast and robust segmentation scheme is applied to several types of medical images.

  16. Mobile Visual Search Based on Histogram Matching and Zone Weight Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chuang; Tao, Li; Yang, Fan; Lu, Tao; Jia, Huizhu; Xie, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel image retrieval algorithm for mobile visual search. At first, a short visual codebook is generated based on the descriptor database to represent the statistical information of the dataset. Then, an accurate local descriptor similarity score is computed by merging the tf-idf weighted histogram matching and the weighting strategy in compact descriptors for visual search (CDVS). At last, both the global descriptor matching score and the local descriptor similarity score are summed up to rerank the retrieval results according to the learned zone weights. The results show that the proposed approach outperforms the state-of-the-art image retrieval method in CDVS.

  17. Frontal Face Detection using Haar Wavelet Coefficients and Local Histogram Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Setyawan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Face detection is the main building block on which all automatic systems dealing with human faces is built. For example, a face recognition system must rely on face detection to process an input image and determine which areas contain human faces. These areas then become the input for the face recognition system for further processing. This paper presents a face detection system designed to detect frontal faces. The system uses Haar wavelet coefficients and local histogram correlation as differentiating features. Our proposed system is trained using 100 training images. Our experiments show that the proposed system performed well during testing, achieving a detection rate of 91.5%.

  18. Three-dimensional volumetric gray-scale uterine cervix histogram prediction of days to delivery in full term pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Youn; Kim, Hai-Joong; Hahn, Meong Hi; Jeon, Hye Jin; Cho, Geum Joon; Hong, Sun Chul; Oh, Min Jeong

    2013-09-01

    Our aim was to figure out whether volumetric gray-scale histogram difference between anterior and posterior cervix can indicate the extent of cervical consistency. We collected data of 95 patients who were appropriate for vaginal delivery with 36th to 37th weeks of gestational age from September 2010 to October 2011 in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea University Ansan Hospital. Patients were excluded who had one of the followings: Cesarean section, labor induction, premature rupture of membrane. Thirty-four patients were finally enrolled. The patients underwent evaluation of the cervix through Bishop score, cervical length, cervical volume, three-dimensional (3D) cervical volumetric gray-scale histogram. The interval days from the cervix evaluation to the delivery day were counted. We compared to 3D cervical volumetric gray-scale histogram, Bishop score, cervical length, cervical volume with interval days from the evaluation of the cervix to the delivery. Gray-scale histogram difference between anterior and posterior cervix was significantly correlated to days to delivery. Its correlation coefficient (R) was 0.500 (P = 0.003). The cervical length was significantly related to the days to delivery. The correlation coefficient (R) and P-value between them were 0.421 and 0.013. However, anterior lip histogram, posterior lip histogram, total cervical volume, Bishop score were not associated with days to delivery (P >0.05). By using gray-scale histogram difference between anterior and posterior cervix and cervical length correlated with the days to delivery. These methods can be utilized to better help predict a cervical consistency.

  19. Modeling Early Postnatal Brain Growth and Development with CT: Changes in the Brain Radiodensity Histogram from Birth to 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, K A; Hu, Y; Och, J; Yorks, P J; Fielden, S W

    2018-04-01

    The majority of brain growth and development occur in the first 2 years of life. This study investigated these changes by analysis of the brain radiodensity histogram of head CT scans from the clinical population, 0-2 years of age. One hundred twenty consecutive head CTs with normal findings meeting the inclusion criteria from children from birth to 2 years were retrospectively identified from 3 different CT scan platforms. Histogram analysis was performed on brain-extracted images, and histogram mean, mode, full width at half maximum, skewness, kurtosis, and SD were correlated with subject age. The effects of scan platform were investigated. Normative curves were fitted by polynomial regression analysis. Average total brain volume was 360 cm 3 at birth, 948 cm 3 at 1 year, and 1072 cm 3 at 2 years. Total brain tissue density showed an 11% increase in mean density at 1 year and 19% at 2 years. Brain radiodensity histogram skewness was positive at birth, declining logarithmically in the first 200 days of life. The histogram kurtosis also decreased in the first 200 days to approach a normal distribution. Direct segmentation of CT images showed that changes in brain radiodensity histogram skewness correlated with, and can be explained by, a relative increase in gray matter volume and an increase in gray and white matter tissue density that occurs during this period of brain maturation. Normative metrics of the brain radiodensity histogram derived from routine clinical head CT images can be used to develop a model of normal brain development. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. DNA IMAGE CYTOMETRY IN PROGNOSTICATION OF COLORECTAL CANCER: PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE TECHNIQUE AND INTERPRETATION OF THE HISTOGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset Buhmeida

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of DNA content as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC is highly controversial. Some of these controversies are due to purely technical reasons, e.g. variable practices in interpreting the DNA histograms, which is problematic particularly in advanced cases. In this report, we give a detailed account on various options how these histograms could be optimally interpreted, with the idea of establishing the potential value of DNA image cytometry in prognosis and in selection of proper treatment. Material consists of nuclei isolated from 50 ƒĘm paraffin sections from 160 patients with stage II, III or IV CRC diagnosed, treated and followed-up in our clinic. The nuclei were stained with the Feulgen stain. Nuclear DNA was measured using computer-assisted image cytometry. We applied 4 different approaches to analyse the DNA histograms: 1 appearance of the histogram (ABCDE approach, 2 range of DNA values, 3 peak evaluation, and 4 events present at high DNA values. Intra-observer reproducibility of these four histogram interpretation was 89%, 95%, 96%, and 100%, respectively. We depicted selected histograms to illustrate the four analytical approaches in cases with different stages of CRC, with variable disease outcome. In our analysis, the range of DNA values was the best prognosticator, i.e., the tumours with the widest histograms had the most ominous prognosis. These data implicate that DNA cytometry based on isolated nuclei is valuable in predicting the prognosis of CRC. Different interpretation techniques differed in their reproducibility, but the method showing the best prognostic value also had high reproducibility in our analysis.

  1. Adaptive local thresholding for robust nucleus segmentation utilizing shape priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Srinivas, Chukka

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a novel local thresholding method for foreground detection. First, a Canny edge detection method is used for initial edge detection. Then, tensor voting is applied on the initial edge pixels, using a nonsymmetric tensor field tailored to encode prior information about nucleus size, shape, and intensity spatial distribution. Tensor analysis is then performed to generate the saliency image and, based on that, the refined edge. Next, the image domain is divided into blocks. In each block, at least one foreground and one background pixel are sampled for each refined edge pixel. The saliency weighted foreground histogram and background histogram are then created. These two histograms are used to calculate a threshold by minimizing the background and foreground pixel classification error. The block-wise thresholds are then used to generate the threshold for each pixel via interpolation. Finally, the foreground is obtained by comparing the original image with the threshold image. The effective use of prior information, combined with robust techniques, results in far more reliable foreground detection, which leads to robust nucleus segmentation.

  2. Online Data Monitoring Framework Based on Histogram Packaging in Network Distributed Data Acquisition Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, T; Ishitsuka, M; Kuze, M; Cabarera, A; Sakamoto, Y

    2011-01-01

    O nline monitor frameworkis a new general software framework for online data monitoring, which provides a way to collect information from online systems, including data acquisition, and displays them to shifters far from experimental sites. 'Monitor Server', a core system in this framework gathers the monitoring information from the online subsystems and the information is handled as collections of histograms named H istogram Package . Monitor Server broadcasts the histogram packages to 'Monitor Viewers', graphical user interfaces in the framework. We developed two types of the viewers with different technologies: Java and web browser. We adapted XML based file for the configuration of GUI components on the windows and graphical objects on the canvases. Monitor Viewer creates its GUIs automatically with the configuration files.This monitoring framework has been developed for the Double Chooz reactor neutrino oscillation experiment in France, but can be extended for general application to be used in other experiments. This document reports the structure of the online monitor framework with some examples from the adaption to the Double Chooz experiment.

  3. Radial polar histogram: obstacle avoidance and path planning for robotic cognition and motion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Jen; Keyawa, Nicholas R.; Euler, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate motion control and path planning for a mobile robot, an obstacle avoidance algorithm that provided a desired instantaneous turning radius and velocity was generated. This type of obstacle avoidance algorithm, which has been implemented in California State University Northridge's Intelligent Ground Vehicle (IGV), is known as Radial Polar Histogram (RPH). The RPH algorithm utilizes raw data in the form of a polar histogram that is read from a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a camera. A desired open block is determined from the raw data utilizing a navigational heading and an elliptical approximation. The left and right most radii are determined from the calculated edges of the open block and provide the range of possible radial paths the IGV can travel through. In addition, the calculated obstacle edge positions allow the IGV to recognize complex obstacle arrangements and to slow down accordingly. A radial path optimization function calculates the best radial path between the left and right most radii and is sent to motion control for speed determination. Overall, the RPH algorithm allows the IGV to autonomously travel at average speeds of 3mph while avoiding all obstacles, with a processing time of approximately 10ms.

  4. AN ILLUMINATION INVARIANT FACE RECOGNITION BY ENHANCED CONTRAST LIMITED ADAPTIVE HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Thamizharasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition system is gaining more importance in social networks and surveillance. The face recognition task is complex due to the variations in illumination, expression, occlusion, aging and pose. The illumination variations in image are due to changes in lighting conditions, poor illumination, low contrast or increased brightness. The variations in illumination adversely affect the quality of image and recognition accuracy. The illumination variations in face image have to be pre-processed prior to face recognition. The Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE is an image enhancement technique popular in enhancing medical images. The proposed work is to create illumination invariant face recognition system by enhancing Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization technique. This method is termed as “Enhanced CLAHE”. The efficiency of Enhanced CLAHE is tested using Fuzzy K Nearest Neighbour classifier and fisher face subspace projection method. The face recognition accuracy percentage rate, Equal Error Rate and False Acceptance Rate at 1% are calculated. The performance of CLAHE and Enhanced CLAHE methods is compared. The efficiency of the Enhanced CLAHE method is tested with three public face databases AR, Yale and ORL. The Enhanced CLAHE has very high recognition accuracy percentage rate when compared to CLAHE.

  5. Characterization of Diffusion Metric Map Similarity in Data From a Clinical Data Repository Using Histogram Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Graham C.; Helmer, Karl G.

    2018-01-01

    As the sharing of data is mandated by funding agencies and journals, reuse of data has become more prevalent. It becomes imperative, therefore, to develop methods to characterize the similarity of data. While users can group data based on the acquisition parameters stored in the file headers, these gives no indication whether a file can be combined with other data without increasing the variance in the data set. Methods have been implemented that characterize the signal-to-noise ratio or identify signal drop-outs in the raw image files, but potential users of data often have access to calculated metric maps and these are more difficult to characterize and compare. Here we describe a histogram-distance-based method applied to diffusion metric maps of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity that were generated using data extracted from a repository of clinically-acquired MRI data. We describe the generation of the data set, the pitfalls specific to diffusion MRI data, and the results of the histogram distance analysis. We find that, in general, data from GE scanners are less similar than are data from Siemens scanners. We also find that the distribution of distance metric values is not Gaussian at any selection of the acquisition parameters considered here (field strength, number of gradient directions, b-value, and vendor). PMID:29568257

  6. Predicting the nodal status in gastric cancers: The role of apparent diffusion coefficient histogram characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Zhang, Yujuan; Xia, Jie; Chen, Ling; Guan, Wenxian; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang

    2017-10-01

    To explore the application of histogram analysis in preoperative T and N staging of gastric cancers, with a focus on characteristic parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Eighty-seven patients with gastric cancers underwent diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (b=0, 1000s/mm 2 ), which generated ADC maps. Whole-volume histogram analysis was performed on ADC maps and 7 characteristic parameters were obtained. All those patients underwent surgery and postoperative pathologic T and N stages were determined. Four parameters, including skew, kurtosis, s-sD av and sample number, showed significant differences among gastric cancers at different T and N stages. Most parameters correlated with T and N stages significantly and worked in differentiating gastric cancers at different T or N stages. Especially skew yielded a sensitivity of 0.758, a specificity of 0.810, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.802 for differentiating gastric cancers with and without lymph node metastasis (Phistogram analysis could help assessing preoperative T and N stages of gastric cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Conductance of single-atom platinum contacts: Voltage dependence of the conductance histogram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.K.; Noat, Y.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2003-01-01

    The conductance of a single-atom contact is sensitive to the coupling of this contact atom to the atoms in the leads. Notably for the transition metals this gives rise to a considerable spread in the observed conductance values. The mean conductance value and spread can be obtained from the first...... peak in conductance histograms recorded from a large set of contact-breaking cycles. In contrast to the monovalent metals, this mean value for Pt depends strongly on the applied voltage bias and other experimental conditions and values ranging from about 1 G(0) to 2.5 G(0) (G(0)=2e(2)/h) have been...... reported. We find that at low bias the first peak in the conductance histogram is centered around 1.5 G(0). However, as the bias increases past 300 mV the peak shifts to 1.8 G(0). Here we show that this bias dependence is due to a geometric effect where monatomic chains are replaced by single-atom contacts...

  8. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints from radiotherapy dose–histogram data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M A; Kennedy, A; Joseph, D J; Gulliford, S L; Buettner, F; Foo, K; Haworth, A; Denham, J W

    2014-01-01

    Dose constraints based on histograms provide a convenient and widely-used method for informing and guiding radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods of derivation of such constraints are often poorly described. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints are described and investigated in the context of determination of dose-specific cut-points—values of the free parameter (e.g., percentage volume of the irradiated organ) which best reflect resulting changes in complication incidence. A method based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and one based on a maximally-selected standardized rank sum are described and compared using rectal toxicity data from a prostate radiotherapy trial. Multiple test corrections are applied using a free step-down resampling algorithm, which accounts for the large number of tests undertaken to search for optimal cut-points and the inherent correlation between dose–histogram points. Both methods provide consistent significant cut-point values, with the rank sum method displaying some sensitivity to the underlying data. The ROC method is simple to implement and can utilize a complication atlas, though an advantage of the rank sum method is the ability to incorporate all complication grades without the need for grade dichotomization. (note)

  9. Histogram analysis of greyscale sonograms to differentiate between the subtypes of follicular variant of papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, M-R; Shin, J H; Hahn, S Y; Oh, Y L; Kwak, J Y; Lee, E; Lim, Y

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of histogram analysis using ultrasound (US) to differentiate between the subtypes of follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC). The present study included 151 patients with surgically confirmed FVPTC diagnosed between January 2014 and May 2016. Their preoperative US features were reviewed retrospectively. Histogram parameters (mean, maximum, minimum, range, root mean square, skewness, kurtosis, energy, entropy, and correlation) were obtained for each nodule. The 152 nodules in 151 patients comprised 48 non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTPs; 31.6%), 60 invasive encapsulated FVPTCs (EFVPTCs; 39.5%), and 44 infiltrative FVPTCs (28.9%). The US features differed significantly between the subtypes of FVPTC. Discrimination was achieved between NIFTPs and infiltrative FVPTC, and between invasive EFVPTC and infiltrative FVPTC using histogram parameters; however, the parameters were not significantly different between NIFTP and invasive EFVPTC. It is feasible to use greyscale histogram analysis to differentiate between NIFTP and infiltrative FVPTC, but not between NIFTP and invasive EFVPTC. Histograms can be used as a supplementary tool to differentiate the subtypes of FVPTC. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient for monitoring early response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Li; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Background Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis has been widely used in determining tumor prognosis. Purpose To investigate the dynamic changes of ADC histogram parameters during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with advanced cervical cancers. Material and Methods This prospective study enrolled 32 patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing CCRT who received diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before CCRT, at the end of the second and fourth week during CCRT and one month after CCRT completion. The ADC histogram for the entire tumor volume was generated, and a series of histogram parameters was obtained. Dynamic changes of those parameters in cervical cancers were investigated as early biomarkers for treatment response. Results All histogram parameters except AUC low showed significant changes during CCRT (all P histogram parameters of cervical cancers changed significantly at the early stage of CCRT, indicating their potential in monitoring early tumor response to therapy.

  11. Correlation between surrogates of bladder dosimetry and dose–volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Chietera, Andreina; Perna, Lucia; Gianolini, Stefano; Maggio, Angelo; Botti, Andrea; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Fiorino, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The correlation between bladder dose–wall-histogram (DWH) and dose–volume-histogram (DVH), dose–surface-histogram (DSH), and DVH-5/10 was investigated in a group of 28 patients; bladder walls were drawn on T2-MRI. DVH showed the poorest correlation with DWH; DSH or DVH-5/10 should be preferred in planning; absolute DVH may be used for radical patients, although less robust.

  12. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  13. Condition monitoring of face milling tool using K-star algorithm and histogram features of vibration signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Madhusudana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the fault diagnosis of the face milling tool based on machine learning approach using histogram features and K-star algorithm technique. Vibration signals of the milling tool under healthy and different fault conditions are acquired during machining of steel alloy 42CrMo4. Histogram features are extracted from the acquired signals. The decision tree is used to select the salient features out of all the extracted features and these selected features are used as an input to the classifier. K-star algorithm is used as a classifier and the output of the model is utilised to study and classify the different conditions of the face milling tool. Based on the experimental results, K-star algorithm is provided a better classification accuracy in the range from 94% to 96% with histogram features and is acceptable for fault diagnosis.

  14. Whole-tumour diffusion kurtosis MR imaging histogram analysis of rectal adenocarcinoma: Correlation with clinical pathologic prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanfen; Yang, Xiaotang; Du, Xiaosong; Zhuo, Zhizheng; Xin, Lei; Cheng, Xintao

    2018-04-01

    To investigate potential relationships between diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)-derived parameters using whole-tumour volume histogram analysis and clinicopathological prognostic factors in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. 79 consecutive patients who underwent MRI examination with rectal adenocarcinoma were retrospectively evaluated. Parameters D, K and conventional ADC were measured using whole-tumour volume histogram analysis. Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test, receiver operating characteristic curves and Spearman's correlation were used for statistical analysis. Almost all the percentile metrics of K were correlated positively with nodal involvement, higher histological grades, the presence of lymphangiovascular invasion (LVI) and circumferential margin (CRM) (phistogram analysis, especially K parameters, were associated with important prognostic factors of rectal cancer. • K correlated positively with some important prognostic factors of rectal cancer. • K mean showed higher AUC and specificity for differentiation of nodal involvement. • DKI metrics with whole-tumour volume histogram analysis depicted tumour heterogeneity.

  15. Influence of Sampling Practices on the Appearance of DNA Image Histograms of Prostate Cells in FNAB Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset Buhmeida

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty‐one fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB of the prostate, diagnostically classified as definitely malignant, were studied. The Papanicolaou or H&E stained samples were destained and then stained for DNA with the Feulgen reaction. DNA cytometry was applied after different sampling rules. The histograms varied according to the sampling rule applied. Because free cells between cell groups were easier to measure than cells in the cell groups, two sampling rules were tested in all samples: (i cells in the cell groups were measured, and (ii free cells between cell groups were measured. Abnormal histograms were more common after the sampling rule based on free cells, suggesting that abnormal patterns are best revealed through the free cells in these samples. The conclusions were independent of the applied histogram interpretation method.

  16. Histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging derived maps may distinguish between low and high grade gliomas before surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xi-Xun; Shi, Da-Fa; Ren, Si-Xie; Zhang, Su-Ya; Li, Long; Li, Qing-Chang; Guan, Li-Ming

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the value of histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) maps in the evaluation of glioma grading. A total of 39 glioma patients who underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were classified into low-grade (13 cases) and high-grade (26 cases) glioma groups. Parametric DKI maps were derived, and histogram metrics between low- and high-grade gliomas were analysed. The optimum diagnostic thresholds of the parameters, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity were achieved using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Significant differences were observed not only in 12 metrics of histogram DKI parameters (PHistogram analysis of DKI may be more effective in glioma grading.

  17. Assessment of histological differentiation in gastric cancers using whole-volume histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Chen, Jun; Liu, Song; Shi, Hua; Guan, Wenxian; Ji, Changfeng; Guo, Tingting; Zheng, Huanhuan; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tian

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the efficacy of histogram analysis of the entire tumor volume in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for differentiating between histological grades in gastric cancer. Seventy-eight patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in a retrospective 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. ADC maps were obtained at two different b values (0 and 1000 sec/mm 2 ) for each patient. Tumors were delineated on each slice of the ADC maps, and a histogram for the entire tumor volume was subsequently generated. A series of histogram parameters (eg, skew and kurtosis) were calculated and correlated with the histological grade of the surgical specimen. The diagnostic performance of each parameter for distinguishing poorly from moderately well-differentiated gastric cancers was assessed by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). There were significant differences in the 5 th , 10 th , 25 th , and 50 th percentiles, skew, and kurtosis between poorly and well-differentiated gastric cancers (P histogram parameters, including the 10 th percentile, skew, kurtosis, and max frequency; the correlation coefficients were 0.273, -0.361, -0.339, and -0.370, respectively. Among all the histogram parameters, the max frequency had the largest AUC value, which was 0.675. Histogram analysis of the ADC maps on the basis of the entire tumor volume can be useful in differentiating between histological grades for gastric cancer. 4 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:440-449. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE). Sixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47-80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters' ability to discriminate responders from non-responders. According to mRECIST, 8 patients (50%) were responders and 8 (50%) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1)); p 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1), therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88% (7/8) and specificity of 75% (6/8). Voxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  19. The histogram analysis of diffusion-weighted intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging for differentiating the gleason grade of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wang, Qing; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate histogram analysis of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for discriminating the Gleason grade of prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 48 patients pathologically confirmed as having clinically significant PCa (size > 0.5 cm) underwent preoperative DW-MRI (b of 0-900 s/mm(2)). Data was post-processed by monoexponential and IVIM model for quantitation of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs), perfusion fraction f, diffusivity D and pseudo-diffusivity D*. Histogram analysis was performed by outlining entire-tumour regions of interest (ROIs) from histological-radiological correlation. The ability of imaging indices to differentiate low-grade (LG, Gleason score (GS) ≤6) from intermediate/high-grade (HG, GS > 6) PCa was analysed by ROC regression. Eleven patients had LG tumours (18 foci) and 37 patients had HG tumours (42 foci) on pathology examination. HG tumours had significantly lower ADCs and D in terms of mean, median, 10th and 75th percentiles, combined with higher histogram kurtosis and skewness for ADCs, D and f, than LG PCa (p Histogram D showed relatively higher correlations (ñ = 0.641-0.668 vs. ADCs: 0.544-0.574) with ordinal GS of PCa; and its mean, median and 10th percentile performed better than ADCs did in distinguishing LG from HG PCa. It is feasible to stratify the pathological grade of PCa by IVIM with histogram metrics. D performed better in distinguishing LG from HG tumour than conventional ADCs. • GS had relatively higher correlation with tumour D than ADCs. • Difference of histogram D among two-grade tumours was statistically significant. • D yielded better individual features in demonstrating tumour grade than ADC. • D* and f failed to determine tumour grade of PCa.

  20. Measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient in primary rectal tumors: is there a benefit in performing histogram analyses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijk, Miriam M; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Lahaye, Max J; Ayas, Z; Slenter, Jos M G M; Beets, Geerard L; Bakers, Frans C H; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2017-06-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a potential prognostic imaging marker in rectal cancer. Typically, mean ADC values are used, derived from precise manual whole-volume tumor delineations by experts. The aim was first to explore whether non-precise circular delineation combined with histogram analysis can be a less cumbersome alternative to acquire similar ADC measurements and second to explore whether histogram analyses provide additional prognostic information. Thirty-seven patients who underwent a primary staging MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; b0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1000; 1.5 T) were included. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were drawn on b1000-DWI: (a) precise delineation, manually tracing tumor boundaries (2 expert readers), and (b) non-precise delineation, drawing circular VOIs with a wide margin around the tumor (2 non-experts). Mean ADC and histogram metrics (mean, min, max, median, SD, skewness, kurtosis, 5th-95th percentiles) were derived from the VOIs and delineation time was recorded. Measurements were compared between the two methods and correlated with prognostic outcome parameters. Median delineation time reduced from 47-165 s (precise) to 21-43 s (non-precise). The 45th percentile of the non-precise delineation showed the best correlation with the mean ADC from the precise delineation as the reference standard (ICC 0.71-0.75). None of the mean ADC or histogram parameters showed significant prognostic value; only the total tumor volume (VOI) was significantly larger in patients with positive clinical N stage and mesorectal fascia involvement. When performing non-precise tumor delineation, histogram analysis (in specific 45th ADC percentile) may be used as an alternative to obtain similar ADC values as with precise whole tumor delineation. Histogram analyses are not beneficial to obtain additional prognostic information.

  1. Event shape sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecna, Renata; Tomasik, Boris

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method for sorting events of multiparticle production according to the azimuthal anisotropy of their momentum distribution. Although the method is quite general, we advocate its use in analysis of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions where a large number of hadrons is produced. The advantage of our method is that it can automatically sort out samples of events with histograms that indicate similar distributions of hadrons. It takes into account the whole measured histograms with all orders of anisotropy instead of a specific observable (e.g., v 2 , v 3 , q 2 ). It can be used for more exclusive experimental studies of flow anisotropies which are then more easily compared to theoretical calculations. It may also be useful in the construction of mixed-events background for correlation studies as it allows to select events with similar momentum distribution. (orig.)

  2. Support vector machine for breast cancer classification using diffusion-weighted MRI histogram features: Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidić, Igor; Egnell, Liv; Jerome, Neil P; Teruel, Jose R; Sjøbakk, Torill E; Østlie, Agnes; Fjøsne, Hans E; Bathen, Tone F; Goa, Pål Erik

    2018-05-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is currently one of the fastest developing MRI-based techniques in oncology. Histogram properties from model fitting of DWI are useful features for differentiation of lesions, and classification can potentially be improved by machine learning. To evaluate classification of malignant and benign tumors and breast cancer subtypes using support vector machine (SVM). Prospective. Fifty-one patients with benign (n = 23) and malignant (n = 28) breast tumors (26 ER+, whereof six were HER2+). Patients were imaged with DW-MRI (3T) using twice refocused spin-echo echo-planar imaging with echo time / repetition time (TR/TE) = 9000/86 msec, 90 × 90 matrix size, 2 × 2 mm in-plane resolution, 2.5 mm slice thickness, and 13 b-values. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), relative enhanced diffusivity (RED), and the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusivity (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were calculated. The histogram properties (median, mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis) were used as features in SVM (10-fold cross-validation) for differentiation of lesions and subtyping. Accuracies of the SVM classifications were calculated to find the combination of features with highest prediction accuracy. Mann-Whitney tests were performed for univariate comparisons. For benign versus malignant tumors, univariate analysis found 11 histogram properties to be significant differentiators. Using SVM, the highest accuracy (0.96) was achieved from a single feature (mean of RED), or from three feature combinations of IVIM or ADC. Combining features from all models gave perfect classification. No single feature predicted HER2 status of ER + tumors (univariate or SVM), although high accuracy (0.90) was achieved with SVM combining several features. Importantly, these features had to include higher-order statistics (kurtosis and skewness), indicating the importance to account for heterogeneity. Our

  3. PROCESS PERFORMANCE EVALUATION USING HISTOGRAM AND TAGUCHI TECHNIQUE IN LOCK MANUFACTURING COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagos Berhane

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Process capability analysis is a vital part of an overall quality improvement program. It is a technique that has application in many segments of the product cycle, including product and process design, vendor sourcing, production or manufacturing planning, and manufacturing. Frequently, a process capability study involves observing a quality characteristic of the product. Since this information usually pertains to the product rather than the process, this analysis should strictly speaking be called a product analysis study. A true process capability study in this context would involve collecting data that relates to process parameters so that remedial actions can be identified on a timely basis. The present study attempts to analyze performance of drilling, pressing, and reaming operations carried out for the manufacturing of two major lock components viz. handle and lever plate, at Gaurav International, Aligarh (India. The data collected for depth of hole on handle, central hole diameter, and key hole diameter are used to construct histogram. Next, the information available in frequency distribution table, the process mean, process capability from calculations and specification limits provided by the manufacturing concern are used with Taguchi technique. The data obtained from histogram and Taguchi technique combined are used to evaluate the performance of the manufacturing process. Results of this study indicated that the performance of all the processes used to produce depth of hole on handle, key hole diameter, and central hole diameter are potentially incapable as the process capability indices are found to be 0.54, 0.54 and 0.76 respectively. The number of nonconforming parts expressed in terms of parts per million (ppm that have fallen out of the specification limits are found to be 140000, 26666.66, and 146666.66 for depth of hole on handle, central hole diameter, and key hole diameter respectively. As a result, the total loss incurred

  4. Effects of major geometric variations between intracavitary applications on pear-shaped isodose dimension in cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The basic principal of intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix is based on specific loading rules to achieve a pear-shaped isodose distribution centered around the cervix. Recently, ICRU Report 38 recommends a dose reference volume for reporting. Our previous studies have confirmed that there is considerable variations of geometry between applications. This study is to evaluate the effect of major geometric variations on pear-shaped isodose dimension in manual afterloading low-dose-rate system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred orthogonal films of 50 patients with cancer of the cervix (2 applications/patient) were reviewed for comparative measurements of geometric variations between applications. Major geometric variations were found for 13 patients in lengths of tandem, 7 patients in colpostats separation and 16 patients in vaginal packing. The direct measurement of these geometric variations were compared with the three-dimensional measurement of the pear-shaped isodose enclosed by the point A between the two applications. RESULTS: The geometric variations in the width of colpostats separation and length of tandem were directly related to the width and height of the pear-shaped isodose dimension. The geometric relationship between the colpostats and distal tandem had an important effect on the thickness of the pear-shape. In optimization of poor geometry for rectum or bladder wall, high dose volume centered around the cervix is reduced without changing the overall pear-shaped volume due to changing configuration of the pear-shaped isodose. In our selected patients with two applications, variations in vaginal packing had no direct effect on the width and thickness of the pear-shape due to other variables. CONCLUSION: Major geometric variations between applications greatly affect the dimension of the pear-shaped isodose distribution. Optimization of poor geometry is quite limited without compromising the high-dose volume centered around the

  5. Modular routing interface for simoultaneous list mode and histogramming mode storage of coincident data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Achard van Eschut, J.F.M.; Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica

    1985-01-01

    A routing interface has been developed and built for successive storage of the digital output of four 13-bit ADCs, within 6 μs, into selected parts of two 16K CAMAC histogramming modules and, if an event trigger is applied, simultaneously into four 64-words deep (16-bit) first-in first-out (FIFO) CAMAC modules. In this way it is possible to accumulate on-line single spectra and, at the same time, write coincident data in list mode to magnetic tape under control of a computer. Additional routing interfaces can be used in parallel so that extensive data-collecting systems can be set up to store multi-parameter events. (orig.)

  6. Wavelength-Adaptive Dehazing Using Histogram Merging-Based Classification for UAV Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inhye Yoon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since incoming light to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV platform can be scattered by haze and dust in the atmosphere, the acquired image loses the original color and brightness of the subject. Enhancement of hazy images is an important task in improving the visibility of various UAV images. This paper presents a spatially-adaptive dehazing algorithm that merges color histograms with consideration of the wavelength-dependent atmospheric turbidity. Based on the wavelength-adaptive hazy image acquisition model, the proposed dehazing algorithm consists of three steps: (i image segmentation based on geometric classes; (ii generation of the context-adaptive transmission map; and (iii intensity transformation for enhancing a hazy UAV image. The major contribution of the research is a novel hazy UAV image degradation model by considering the wavelength of light sources. In addition, the proposed transmission map provides a theoretical basis to differentiate visually important regions from others based on the turbidity and merged classification results.

  7. REAL-TIME FACE RECOGNITION BASED ON OPTICAL FLOW AND HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sathish Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is one of the intensive areas of research in computer vision and pattern recognition but many of which are focused on recognition of faces under varying facial expressions and pose variation. A constrained optical flow algorithm discussed in this paper, recognizes facial images involving various expressions based on motion vector computation. In this paper, an optical flow computation algorithm which computes the frames of varying facial gestures, and integrating with synthesized image in a probabilistic environment has been proposed. Also Histogram Equalization technique has been used to overcome the effect of illuminations while capturing the input data using camera devices. It also enhances the contrast of the image for better processing. The experimental results confirm that the proposed face recognition system is more robust and recognizes the facial images under varying expressions and pose variations more accurately.

  8. Underwater Image Enhancement by Adaptive Gray World and Differential Gray-Levels Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WONG, S.-L.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Most underwater images tend to be dominated by a single color cast. This paper presents a solution to remove the color cast and improve the contrast in underwater images. However, after the removal of the color cast using Gray World (GW method, the resultant image is not visually pleasing. Hence, we propose an integrated approach using Adaptive GW (AGW and Differential Gray-Levels Histogram Equalization (DHE that operate in parallel. The AGW is applied to remove the color cast while DHE is used to improve the contrast of the underwater image. The outputs of both chromaticity components of AGW and intensity components of DHE are combined to form the enhanced image. The results of the proposed method are compared with three existing methods using qualitative and quantitative measures. The proposed method increased the visibility of underwater images and in most cases produces better quantitative scores when compared to the three existing methods.

  9. Differentiation of adrenal adenomas from nonadenomas using CT histogram analysis method: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halefoglu, Ahmet Mesrur; Bas, Nagihan; Yasar, Ahmet; Basak, Muzaffer

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of our study was to prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of computed tomography (CT) histogram analysis method in the differentiation of benign and malignant adrenal masses. Materials and Methods: Between March 2007 and June 2008, 94 patients (46 males, 48 females, age range: 30-79 years, mean age: 57.7 years) with 113 adrenal masses (mean diameter: 3.03 cm, range: 1.07-8.02 cm) were prospectively evaluated. These included 66 adenomas, 45 metastases and 2 pheochromocytomas. Histogram analysis method was performed using a circular region of interest (ROI) and mean attenuation, total number of pixels, number of negative pixels and subsequent percentage of negative pixels were detected on both unenhanced and delayed contrast-enhanced CT images for each adrenal mass. A mean attenuation threshold of 10 Hounsfield unit (HU) for unenhanced CT and 5% and 10% negative pixel thresholds for both unenhanced and delayed contrast-enhanced CT were calculated by a consensus of at least two reviewers and the correlation between mean attenuation and percentage of negative pixels was determined. Final diagnoses were based on imaging follow-up of minimum 6 months, biopsy, surgery and adrenal washout study. Results: 51 of 66 adenomas (77.3%) showed attenuation values of ≤10 HU and 15 (22.7%) adenomas showed more than 10 HU on unenhanced CT. All of these adenomas contained negative pixels on unenhanced CT. Eight of 66 (12.1%) adenomas showed a mean attenuation value of ≤10 HU on delayed contrast-enhanced scans and 45 adenomas (68.2%) persisted on containing negative pixels. All metastases had an attenuation value of greater than 10 HU on unenhanced CT images. 21 of 45 (46.6%) metastases contained negative pixels on unenhanced images but only seven metastases (15.5%) had negative pixels on delayed contrast-enhanced images. Two pheochromocytomas had negative pixels on both unenhanced and delayed contrast-enhanced CT images. Increase in the percentage of

  10. Histogram analysis for age change of human lung with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirabe, Ichiju

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate physiological changes of normal lung with aging by computed tomography (CT), the peak position (PP) and full width half maximum (FWHM) of CT-histogram were studied in 77 normal human lung. Above 30 years old, PP tended to be seen in the lower attenuation value with advancing ages, with the result that the follow equation was obtained. CT attenuation value of PP=-0.87 x age -815. The peak position shifted to the range of higher CT attenuation in 30's. FWHM did not change with advancing ages. There were no differences of peak value and FWHM among the upper, middle and lower lung field. In this study, physiological changes of lung were evaluated quantitatively. Furthermore, this study was considered to be useful for diagnosis and treatment in lung diseases. (author)

  11. Wavelength-adaptive dehazing using histogram merging-based classification for UAV images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Inhye; Jeong, Seokhwa; Jeong, Jaeheon; Seo, Doochun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-03-19

    Since incoming light to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform can be scattered by haze and dust in the atmosphere, the acquired image loses the original color and brightness of the subject. Enhancement of hazy images is an important task in improving the visibility of various UAV images. This paper presents a spatially-adaptive dehazing algorithm that merges color histograms with consideration of the wavelength-dependent atmospheric turbidity. Based on the wavelength-adaptive hazy image acquisition model, the proposed dehazing algorithm consists of three steps: (i) image segmentation based on geometric classes; (ii) generation of the context-adaptive transmission map; and (iii) intensity transformation for enhancing a hazy UAV image. The major contribution of the research is a novel hazy UAV image degradation model by considering the wavelength of light sources. In addition, the proposed transmission map provides a theoretical basis to differentiate visually important regions from others based on the turbidity and merged classification results.

  12. A Novel Histogram Region Merging Based Multithreshold Segmentation Algorithm for MR Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multithreshold segmentation algorithm is time-consuming, and the time complexity will increase exponentially with the increase of thresholds. In order to reduce the time complexity, a novel multithreshold segmentation algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, all gray levels are used as thresholds, so the histogram of the original image is divided into 256 small regions, and each region corresponds to one gray level. Then, two adjacent regions are merged in each iteration by a new designed scheme, and a threshold is removed each time. To improve the accuracy of the merger operation, variance and probability are used as energy. No matter how many the thresholds are, the time complexity of the algorithm is stable at O(L. Finally, the experiment is conducted on many MR brain images to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm. Experiment results show that our method can reduce the running time effectively and obtain segmentation results with high accuracy.

  13. Detection of License Plate using Sliding Window, Histogram of Oriented Gradient, and Support Vector Machines Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astawa, INGA; Gusti Ngurah Bagus Caturbawa, I.; Made Sajayasa, I.; Dwi Suta Atmaja, I. Made Ari

    2018-01-01

    The license plate recognition usually used as part of system such as parking system. License plate detection considered as the most important step in the license plate recognition system. We propose methods that can be used to detect the vehicle plate on mobile phone. In this paper, we used Sliding Window, Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) method to license plate detection so it will increase the detection level even though the image is not in a good quality. The image proceed by Sliding Window method in order to find plate position. Feature extraction in every window movement had been done by HOG and SVM method. Good result had shown in this research, which is 96% of accuracy.

  14. Using Relational Histogram Features and Action Labelled Data to Learn Preconditions for Means-End Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fichtl, Severin; Kraft, Dirk; Krüger, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of many complex manipulation ac- tions is contingent on the spatial relationships among pairs of objects, e.g. if an object is “inside” or “on top” of another. Recognising these spatial relationships requires a vision system which can extract appropriate features from the vision input...... that capture and represent the spatial relationships in an easily accessible way. We are interested in learning to predict the success of “means end” actions that manipulate two objects at once, from exploratory actions, and the observed sensorimo- tor contingencies. In this paper, we use relational histogram...... features and illustrate their effect on learning to predict a variety of “means end” actions’ outcomes. The results show that our vision features can make the learning problem significantly easier, leading to increased learning rates and higher maximum performance. This work is in particular important...

  15. Gender Perception From Faces Using Boosted LBPH (Local Binary Patten Histograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. U. Tariq

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic Gender classification from faces has several applications such as surveillance, human computer interaction, targeted advertisement etc. Humans can recognize gender from faces quite accurately but for computer vision it is a difficult task. Many studies have targeted this problem but most of these studies used images of faces taken under constrained conditions. Real-world applications however require to process images from real-world, that have significant variation in lighting and pose, which makes the gender classification task very difficult. We have examined the problem of automatic gender classification from faces on real-world images. Using a face detector faces from images are extracted aligned and represented using Local binary pattern histogram. Discriminative features are selected using Adaboost and the boosted LBP features are used to train a support vector machine that provides a recognition rate of 93.29%.

  16. A histogram-free multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm for the construction of analytical density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Li, Ying Wai [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    We report a new multicanonical Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm to obtain the density of states (DOS) for physical systems with continuous state variables in statistical mechanics. Our algorithm is able to obtain an analytical form for the DOS expressed in a chosen basis set, instead of a numerical array of finite resolution as in previous variants of this class of MC methods such as the multicanonical (MUCA) sampling and Wang-Landau (WL) sampling. This is enabled by storing the visited states directly in a data set and avoiding the explicit collection of a histogram. This practice also has the advantage of avoiding undesirable artificial errors caused by the discretization and binning of continuous state variables. Our results show that this scheme is capable of obtaining converged results with a much reduced number of Monte Carlo steps, leading to a significant speedup over existing algorithms.

  17. FPGA based high-performance multi-channel analyzer with local histogram memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, C.P.; Vaidya, P.P.; Paulson, M.

    2004-01-01

    Modern nuclear spectroscopy systems demand for a Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) with higher resolution, faster speed and other advanced features. The MCA described here is targeted for such demanding applications. The MCA has an in-built local histogram memory and a memory management unit integrated in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip. In addition to the integrated low power digital circuitry, the system utilizes state of the art advanced analog circuits like low power, high speed and high precision comparators, op-amps, ADC and DAC. The operating resolution is selectable from 256 channels to 16384 channels for pulse height analysis. It supports high count rate applications (typically 100 KHz) without significant dead time penalty. It can have an USB bus interface with simple changes. In general, the MCA gives a high performance, compact and low power alternative for portable and battery operated systems as well as for high end laboratory instruments. (author)

  18. A powerful, low-cost histogramming memory for digital radiography with multi-wire proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Locke, C.E.R.; Ferrari, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A powerful, low-cost histogramming memory for digital radiograph with multi-wire proportional counter is described. The memory is based on a commercial video display device coupled to an Apple II microcomputer which, at a total cost of around 2500 pounds gives a system with 512 x 512 pixel resolution and a counting range of 4095 counts per pixel. The system can take data at rates of up to 5000 Hz while providing a live-time display. No hardware modifications are necessary, the comprehensive storage and display facilities being implemented in a combined package of BASIC and ASSEMBLER software. An ACCELERATOR coprocessor card is used to enhance the performance of the system. (author)

  19. Adaptive Kalman filtering for histogram-based appearance learning in infrared imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Vijay; Fan, Guoliang; Havlicek, Joseph P; Fan, Xin; Zhai, Yan; Yeary, Mark B

    2012-11-01

    Targets of interest in video acquired from imaging infrared sensors often exhibit profound appearance variations due to a variety of factors, including complex target maneuvers, ego-motion of the sensor platform, background clutter, etc., making it difficult to maintain a reliable detection process and track lock over extended time periods. Two key issues in overcoming this problem are how to represent the target and how to learn its appearance online. In this paper, we adopt a recent appearance model that estimates the pixel intensity histograms as well as the distribution of local standard deviations in both the foreground and background regions for robust target representation. Appearance learning is then cast as an adaptive Kalman filtering problem where the process and measurement noise variances are both unknown. We formulate this problem using both covariance matching and, for the first time in a visual tracking application, the recent autocovariance least-squares (ALS) method. Although convergence of the ALS algorithm is guaranteed only for the case of globally wide sense stationary process and measurement noises, we demonstrate for the first time that the technique can often be applied with great effectiveness under the much weaker assumption of piecewise stationarity. The performance advantages of the ALS method relative to the classical covariance matching are illustrated by means of simulated stationary and nonstationary systems. Against real data, our results show that the ALS-based algorithm outperforms the covariance matching as well as the traditional histogram similarity-based methods, achieving sub-pixel tracking accuracy against the well-known AMCOM closure sequences and the recent SENSIAC automatic target recognition dataset.

  20. Quantitatively assessed CT imaging measures of pulmonary interstitial pneumonia: Effects of reconstruction algorithms on histogram parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Nogami, Munenobu; Kusaka, Akiko; Murase, Kenya; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed the influences of reconstruction algorithm for quantitative assessments in interstitial pneumonia patients. A total of 25 collagen vascular disease patients (nine male patients and 16 female patients; mean age, 57.2 years; age range 32-77 years) underwent thin-section MDCT examinations, and MDCT data were reconstructed with three kinds of reconstruction algorithm (two high-frequencies [A and B] and one standard [C]). In reconstruction algorithm B, the effect of low- and middle-frequency space was suppressed compared with reconstruction algorithm A. As quantitative CT parameters, kurtosis, skewness, and mean lung density (MLD) were acquired from a frequency histogram of the whole lung parenchyma in each reconstruction algorithm. To determine the difference of quantitative CT parameters affected by reconstruction algorithms, these parameters were compared statistically. To determine the relationships with the disease severity, these parameters were correlated with PFTs. In the results, all the histogram parameters values had significant differences each other (p < 0.0001) and those of reconstruction algorithm C were the highest. All MLDs had fair or moderate correlation with all parameters of PFT (-0.64 < r < -0.45, p < 0.05). Though kurtosis and skewness in high-frequency reconstruction algorithm A had significant correlations with all parameters of PFT (-0.61 < r < -0.45, p < 0.05), there were significant correlations only with diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLco) and total lung capacity (TLC) in reconstruction algorithm C and with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), DLco and TLC in reconstruction algorithm B. In conclusion, reconstruction algorithm has influence to quantitative assessments on chest thin-section MDCT examination in interstitial pneumonia patients.

  1. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units-Radial distribution function histogramming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  2. Quantitatively assessed CT imaging measures of pulmonary interstitial pneumonia: Effects of reconstruction algorithms on histogram parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Kaibara Hospital, 5208-1 Kaibara, Kaibara-cho, Tanba 669-3395 (Japan)], E-mail: hisanobu19760104@yahoo.co.jp; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)], E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, Youichi [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 1-7 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: y.yamazk@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nogami, Munenobu [Division of PET, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 MInamimachi, Minatojima, Chu0-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: aznogami@fbri.org; Kusaka, Akiko [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)], E-mail: a.kusaka@hosp.kobe-u.ac.jp; Murase, Kenya [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 1-7 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)], E-mail: sugimura@med.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2010-04-15

    This study aimed the influences of reconstruction algorithm for quantitative assessments in interstitial pneumonia patients. A total of 25 collagen vascular disease patients (nine male patients and 16 female patients; mean age, 57.2 years; age range 32-77 years) underwent thin-section MDCT examinations, and MDCT data were reconstructed with three kinds of reconstruction algorithm (two high-frequencies [A and B] and one standard [C]). In reconstruction algorithm B, the effect of low- and middle-frequency space was suppressed compared with reconstruction algorithm A. As quantitative CT parameters, kurtosis, skewness, and mean lung density (MLD) were acquired from a frequency histogram of the whole lung parenchyma in each reconstruction algorithm. To determine the difference of quantitative CT parameters affected by reconstruction algorithms, these parameters were compared statistically. To determine the relationships with the disease severity, these parameters were correlated with PFTs. In the results, all the histogram parameters values had significant differences each other (p < 0.0001) and those of reconstruction algorithm C were the highest. All MLDs had fair or moderate correlation with all parameters of PFT (-0.64 < r < -0.45, p < 0.05). Though kurtosis and skewness in high-frequency reconstruction algorithm A had significant correlations with all parameters of PFT (-0.61 < r < -0.45, p < 0.05), there were significant correlations only with diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLco) and total lung capacity (TLC) in reconstruction algorithm C and with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), DLco and TLC in reconstruction algorithm B. In conclusion, reconstruction algorithm has influence to quantitative assessments on chest thin-section MDCT examination in interstitial pneumonia patients.

  3. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide inc