WorldWideScience

Sample records for dose-rate radiation exposure

  1. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  2. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures.

  3. The evaluation the magnitude radiation exposure dose rate in digital radiography room design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanto, Agung; Setia Budi, Wahyu; Hardiman, Gagoek

    2017-12-01

    This study discusses the dose rate in digital radiography room, buit according to meet the provisions of KEMENKES No.1014 / Menkes / SK / XI / 2008 and Regulation of BAPETEN No. 8 / 2011. The provisions primary concern of radiation safety, not comfort, by considering the space design. There are five aspects to consider in designing the space: functionality, comfort, security, movement activities and aesthetics. However provisions only met three aspects of the design, which are a function, security and movement activity. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate digital radiography room in terms of its ability to control external radiation exposure to be safe and comfortable The dose rate is measured by the range of primary and secondary radiation in the observation points by using Surveymeter. All data are obtained by the preliminary survey prior to the study. Furthermore, the review of digital radiography room is done based on architectural design theory. The dose rate for recommended improvement room is recalculated using the same method as the actual room with the help of computer modeling. The result of dose rate calculation at the inner and outer part of digital radiography observation room shows that in-room dose for a week at each measuring point exceeds the allowable dose limit both for staff and public. During a week of observation, the outdoor dose at some measuring points exceeds the dose limit set by the KEMENKES No.1014 / Menkes / SK / XI / 2008 and Regulation BEPETEN No 8/2011. Meanwhile, the result of dose rate calculation in the inner and outer part of the improved digital radiography room can meet the applicable regulations better.

  4. Set of programs for determining exposure and dose rates from selected sources of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hep, J.; Kralovcova, E.; Smutny, V.; Valenta, V.

    1982-01-01

    The programs are described for the determination of exposure and dose rate of gamma radiation from point, surface, linear and volume sources with and without shielding. The computation is conducted using the classical method taking into consideration the buildup factor. For the computation of the buildup factor in heterogeneous shielding the Broder and Kitazuma formulas are used. Kitazuma's alpha coefficients were calculated recurrently using a new semi-empirical method. Taylor's approximation was used for the calculation of the buildup factor in a single layer

  5. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  6. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  7. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  8. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  9. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the LD 50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD 50 s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  10. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L 50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD 50 s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  11. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  12. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  13. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  14. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D.; Jones, J.; Gonda, S.; Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G.; Kirchin, V.; Rachael, C.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  15. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation are calculated for 240 radionuclides of potential importance in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors for photons and electrons are calculated for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. Dose-rate conversion factors for photons only are calculated for 22 body organs. (author)

  16. Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone: Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kanglun; Doherty, Alison H.; Genik, Paula C.; Gookin, Sara E.; Roteliuk, Danielle M.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Weil, Michael M.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2017-11-01

    During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

  17. Low-dose-rate radiation exposure leads to testicular damage with decreases in DNMT1 and HDAC1 in the murine testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Eun Ji; Son, Tae Gen; Yang, Kwangmo; Heo, Kyu; Kim, Joong Sun; Shin, In Sik

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of continuous low-dose-rate radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) of gamma rays on mice testicles. C57BL/6 mice were divided into sham and radiation groups (n = 8 each), and were exposed to either sham irradiation or 2 Gy for 21 days, 0.2 Gy for 2 days, or 0.02 Gy for 6 h of low-dose-rate irradiation. Testicular weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, and seminiferous epithelial depth were significantly decreased in the mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure. Moreover, the low-dose-rate radiation exposure induced an increase in malondialdehyde levels, and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity in the testis of mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure. The sperm count and motility in the epididymis also decreased in mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure, whereas there was no significant effect on the proportion of abnormal sperm. The expressions of DNA methlytransferases-1 and histone deacetylases 1 in testes irradiated with 2 Gy were significantly decreased compared with the sham group. In conclusion, the damage exerted on the testes and epididymis largely depended on the total dose of low-dose-rate radiation. (author)

  18. Radiation exposure reduction technologies for a Japanese Advanced BWR (Dose Rate Reduction Experience in Shika Unit 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Koji; Ishimaru, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiteru; Morita, Shoichi

    2012-09-01

    Operating experiences of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) have been accumulated in Japan since the first ABWRs Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS unit 6 and 7 came into service. Shika NPS unit 2 (Shika-2) of Hokuriku Electric Power Co. is the fourth ABWR plant in Japan. Since ABWRs have no piping of the reactor recirculation system (RRS), which is the largest source of radiation in conventional BWRs, carbon steel piping of the reactor water cleanup system (RWCU) and residual heat removal system (RHR) are the largest source in ABWRs. Therefore we have focused on reduction methods of radioactive material on carbon steel surface in order to reduce the quantity of occupational exposure in Shika-2. In Shika-2 the following methods have been adopted. Before fuel loading, alkaline pre-filming process was applied to the RWCU piping during plant startup testing. After start of operation, the feed water iron concentration control (or nickel/iron ratio control) method was applied. Furthermore, during shutdown operation the RHR system was operated when the reactor water temperature was dropped to 120 degree C with the use of condenser heat sink cooling operation. These dose rate reduction methods worked well in Shika-2 as expected. The quantity of occupational exposure at the 3 rd outage in Shika-2 was approximately 0.35 person-Sv. On the basis of the results obtained thus far, the occupational dose expected at the outage after deposition amount of radioactivity reaching the equilibrium state has been estimated to be around 0.5 person-Sv. This value is considered to be in low level compared with the worldwide statistics. (authors)

  19. SMART, Radiation Dose Rates on Cask Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SMART calculates radiation dose rate at the center of each cask surface by using characteristic functions for radiation shielding ability and for radiation current back-scattered from cask wall and cask cavity of each cask, once cask-type is specified. 2 - Method of solution: Matrix Calculation

  20. Natural terrestrial radiation exposure in Hong Kong. A survey on environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.C.; Poon, H.T.; Chan, Y.K.; So, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Hong Kong is a metropolitan city located on the southern coast of China with a population of some six million. About 90% of the population is concentrated in heavily built-up residential and commercial areas, which accounts for less than 50% of the total area in the territory. Hong Kong Observatory, 134A Nathan Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. In order to understand the spatial variations in the environmental radiation levels in Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Observatory (HKO) in early 1999 conducted a study of the environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air. The study combined data collected by the HKO radiation monitoring network (RMN) and data from a comprehensive territory-wide radiological survey conducted in January and February 1999. The RMN of ten stations each equipped with a Reuter-Stokes Model RSS-1013 HPIC has been in operation since 1987 to continuously monitor the environmental radiation levels over the territory as part of the emergency monitoring programme for response to nuclear accidents at a nearby nuclear power station. The terrestrial component of the environmental radiation field was estimated by subtracting from the measurements the cosmic contribution, which is determined to be about 39 nGy/h from measurements conducted over two large fresh water reservoirs. The RMN data with the long history was analysed to derive the seasonal variations in the environmental radiation levels. On average the environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air in January and February is 1.03 times of the annual figure. This seasonal correction was applied to the results of the year 1999 survey. As the radiation field in the heavily built-up areas is enhanced by contribution from buildings, in the territory-wide survey measurements were made both in the open field and built-up areas. The territory of Hong Kong was divided into 42 grid boxes of 5 km x 5 km for open field and 61 grid boxes of 2.5 km x 2.5 km for built-up areas according to the population and land use. A

  1. Biological effects of α-radiation exposure by 241Am in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings are determined both by dose rate and 241Am distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermans, Geert; Horemans, Nele; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Saenen, Eline; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Human activity has led to an increasing amount of radionuclides in the environment and subsequently to an increased risk of exposure of the biosphere to ionising radiation. Due to their high linear energy transfer, α-emitters form a threat to biota when absorbed or integrated in living tissue. Among these, 241 Am is of major concern due to high affinity for organic matter and high specific activity. This study examines the dose-dependent biological effects of α-radiation delivered by 241 Am at the morphological, physiological and molecular level in 14-day old seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana after hydroponic exposure for 4 or 7 days. Our results show that 241 Am has high transfer to the roots but low translocation to the shoots. In the roots, we observed a transcriptional response of reactive oxygen species scavenging and DNA repair pathways. At the physiological and morphological level this resulted in a response which evolved from redox balance control and stable biomass at low dose rates to growth reduction, reduced transfer and redox balance decline at higher dose rates. This situation was also reflected in the shoots where, despite the absence of a transcriptional response, the control of photosynthesis performance and redox balance declined with increasing dose rate. The data further suggest that the effects in both organs were initiated in the roots, where the highest dose rates occurred, ultimately affecting photosynthesis performance and carbon assimilation. Though further detailed study of nutrient balance and 241 Am localisation is necessary, it is clear that radionuclide uptake and distribution is a major parameter in the global exposure effects on plant performance and health. - Highlights: • Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed hydroponically to a range of 241 Am concentrations. • Effects at molecular, morphological and physiological level were observed. • Effects were dependent on both dose rate and 241 Am distribution.

  2. Tritium β-radiation induction of chromosomal damage: a calibration curve for low dose, low dose rate exposures of human cells to tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, D.P.; Gale, K.L.; Lucas, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation exposures from tritium contribute to the occupational radiation exposures associated with CANDU reactors. Tritiated water is of particular interest since it is readily taken up by human cells and its elimination from the body, and, consequently, the radiation exposure of the cells, is spread over a period of days. Occupational exposures to tritiated water result in what are effectively chronic β-radiation exposures. The doses and dose rates ordinarily used in the definition of cellular responses to radiation in vitro, for use in biological dosimetry (the assessment of radiation exposures based on the observed levels of changes in the cells of exposed individuals), are usually much higher than for most occupational exposures and involve radiations other than tritium β-rays. As a result, their use in assessing the effects from tritiated water exposures may not be appropriate. We describe here an in vitro calibration curve for chronic tritium β-radiation induction of reciprocal chromosomal translocations in humn peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) for use in biodosimetry. (author)

  3. The limiting dose rate and its importance in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Sonwani, Swetha; Arul Ananthakumar, A.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of defining a low dose of ionizing radiation still remains unclear. Before attempting to define a low dose, it is more important to define a low-dose rate since effects at low dose-rates are different from those observed at higher dose-rates. Hence, it follows that low dose-rates rather than a low dose is an important criteria to determine radio-biological effects and risk factors i.e. stochastic health effects. Chromosomal aberrations induced by ionizing radiations are well fitted by quadratic model Y= áD + âD 2 + C with the linear coefficient of dose predominating for high LET radiations and low doses of low LET. At higher doses and dose rates of sparsely ionizing radiation, break pairs produced by inter-track action leads to the formation of exchange type aberrations and is dependent on dose rate. Whereas at lower doses and dose rates, intra-track action produces break pairs and resulting aberrations are in direct proportion to absorbed dose and independent of dose rate. The dose rate at which inter-track ceases to be observable and where intra-track action effectively becomes the sole contributor of lesion-pair formation is referred to as limiting dose rate (LDR). Once the LDR is reached further reduction in dose rates will not affect the slope of DR since breaks produced by independent charged particle tracks are widely separated in time to interact with each other for aberration yield. This linear dependency is also noticed for acute exposures at very low doses. Existing reports emphasizes the existence of LDR likely to be e6.3cGyh -1 . However no systematic studies have been conducted so far to determine LDR. In the present investigation DR curves were constructed for the dose rates 0.002 and 0.003 Gy/min and to define LDR at which a coefficient approaches zero. Extrapolation of limiting low dose rate data can be used to predict low dose effects regardless of dose rate and its definition ought to serve as a useful index for studies pertaining

  4. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  5. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  6. Dose and dose rate extrapolation factors for malignant and non-malignant health endpoints after exposure to gamma and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Van; Little, Mark P. [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Murine experiments were conducted at the JANUS reactor in Argonne National Laboratory from 1970 to 1992 to study the effect of acute and protracted radiation dose from gamma rays and fission neutron whole body exposure. The present study reports the reanalysis of the JANUS data on 36,718 mice, of which 16,973 mice were irradiated with neutrons, 13,638 were irradiated with gamma rays, and 6107 were controls. Mice were mostly Mus musculus, but one experiment used Peromyscus leucopus. For both types of radiation exposure, a Cox proportional hazards model was used, using age as timescale, and stratifying on sex and experiment. The optimal model was one with linear and quadratic terms in cumulative lagged dose, with adjustments to both linear and quadratic dose terms for low-dose rate irradiation (<5 mGy/h) and with adjustments to the dose for age at exposure and sex. After gamma ray exposure there is significant non-linearity (generally with upward curvature) for all tumours, lymphoreticular, respiratory, connective tissue and gastrointestinal tumours, also for all non-tumour, other non-tumour, non-malignant pulmonary and non-malignant renal diseases (p < 0.001). Associated with this the low-dose extrapolation factor, measuring the overestimation in low-dose risk resulting from linear extrapolation is significantly elevated for lymphoreticular tumours 1.16 (95% CI 1.06, 1.31), elevated also for a number of non-malignant endpoints, specifically all non-tumour diseases, 1.63 (95% CI 1.43, 2.00), non-malignant pulmonary disease, 1.70 (95% CI 1.17, 2.76) and other non-tumour diseases, 1.47 (95% CI 1.29, 1.82). However, for a rather larger group of malignant endpoints the low-dose extrapolation factor is significantly less than 1 (implying downward curvature), with central estimates generally ranging from 0.2 to 0.8, in particular for tumours of the respiratory system, vasculature, ovary, kidney/urinary bladder and testis. For neutron exposure most endpoints, malignant and

  7. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  8. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinji

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1980-06-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population.

  10. Problems of dose rate in radiation protection regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Some modern problems of Radiation Safety Standards are discussed. It is known that Standards are based on the Linear-Non-Threshold Concept (LNTC) of radiation risk, which is now called by many experts as conservative. It is thought it is necessary to include in the Standards such factor as dose rate or duration of irradiation. Some model of effects of radiation exposure with taking into account the reparation of cell damage is presented. The practical method for assessment of effects of duration of irradiation on detriments is proposed.(author)

  11. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  12. Estimates of Health Detriments and Tissue Weighting Factors for Hong Kong Populations from Low Dose, Low Dose Rate and Low LET Ionising Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    The total health detriments and the tissue weighting factors for the Hong Kong populations from low dose, low dose rate and low LET ionising radiation exposure are obtained according to the methodology recommended in ICRP Publication 60. The probabilities of fatal cancers for the general (ages 0-90) and working (ages 20-64) populations due to lifetime exposure at low dose and low dose rate are 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 3.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively, comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 5.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . The corresponding total health detriments for the general and working populations are 6.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 7.3 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 5.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Tissue weighting factors for the general population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.02 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (bladder and breast), 0.08 (remainder), 0.10 (stomach), 0.11 (bone marrow), 0.15 (colon), 0.19 (lung) and 0.21 (gonads) and for the working population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.03 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (breast), 0.06 (remainder), 0.07 (bladder), 0.08 (colon), 0.14 (bone marrow and stomach), 0.16 (lung) and 0.20 (gonads). (author)

  13. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  14. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  15. Circuit arrangement for indicating radiation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virag, Ernoe; Nyari, Istvan; Simon, Jozsef; Styevko, Mihaly; Krampe, Geza.

    1981-01-01

    The invention presents a dosemeter electronic circuit arrangement indicating hazardous dose rate threshold. If the treshold is reached or exceeded, well distinguished sound and light alarm is turned on immidiately. Moreover, certain critical levels can also be indicated by making the intermittent singalling continuous. (A.L.)

  16. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  17. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  18. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6, and 15 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rad) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rad/day and 25 rad/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 110 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replication. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the 15-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used

  19. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  20. Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs

  1. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  2. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  3. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven ... and geological structures of soil and rocks. (Florou and Kritids 1992, ... Selection of Sampling Points and location of. Field Dosimeters.

  4. Dose Rate of Environmental Gamma Radiation in Java Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Buchori; Dadong Iskandar

    2007-01-01

    The dose rate Monitoring of environmental gamma radiation at some locations in Java Island in the year 2005 / 2006 has been carried out. The dose rate measurement of gamma radiation is carried out by using the peripheral of Portable Gamma of Ray Spectrometer with detector of NaI(Tl), Merck Exploranium, Model GR-130- MINISPEC, while to determine its geographic position is used by the GPS (Global Positioning System), made in German corporation of GPS III Plus type. The division of measurement region was conducted by dividing Java Island become 66 parts with same distance, except in Jepara area that will built PLTN (Nuclear Energy Power), distance between measurement points is more closed. The results of dose rate measurement are in 66 locations in Java Island the range of (19.24 ± 4.05) nSv/hour until (150.78 ± 12.26) nSv/hour with mean (51.93 ± 36.53) nSv/h. The lowest dose rate was in location of Garut, while highest dose rate was in Ujung Lemah Abang, Jepara location. The data can be used for base line data of dose rate of environmental gamma radiation in Indonesia, specially in Java Island. The mean level of gamma radiation in Java monitoring area (0.46 mSv / year) was still lower than worldwide average effective dose rate of terrestrial gamma rays 0.5 mSv / year (report of UNSCEAR, 2000). (author)

  5. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  6. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  7. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakama, Minoru; Imura, Hiroyoshi; Akou, Natsuki; Takeuchi, Emi; Morihiro, Yukinori

    2004-01-01

    Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture has been carried out using a portable NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter and a CsI(Tl) pocket type one. To our knowledge, previous several surveys in Tokushima, for example by Abe et al. (1982) and Yoshino et al. (1991), have remained to report the environmental radiation dose rates merely about the major cities, that is Tokushima City and others along the Pacific. Up to now, there have been few efforts to survey the environmental radiation dose rates about mountain valleys in Tokushima. In this work, it is remarkable that we have for the first time made surveys of environmental radiation dose rates on the 6 routes across the Sanuki mountains and inside the pier of Onaruto Bridge, 'Naruto Uzu-no-michi', in the northern area of Tokushima. In the course of present surveys, the maximum value of the environmental radiation dose rates was 0.117±0.020 μGy/h at Higetouge in Sanuki City, and then it was found that the radiation dose rates across the Sanuki mountains tend to increase slightly with approaching Kagawa area from Tokushima one. Considering geological formation around the northern side of Sanuki mountains, there are mainly geological layers of granodiorite containing in the substantial amount of naturally occurring radionuclides, 40 K, U-series, and Th-series, than other geological rocks and it was found that the terrestrial gamma-rays have effect on the environmental radiation dose rates according to the geological formation. (author)

  8. Dose-rate effects on mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the life cycle and on cell survival was studied for a range of different dose rates. Log phase, plateau phase and synchronized cultures of different mammalian cells were used. Cell cycle redistribution during the radiation exposure was found to be a very important factor in determining the overall dose-rate effect for log phase and synchronized cells. In fact, cell cycle redistribution during the exposure, in some instances, resulted in a lower dose rate being more effective in cell killing per unit dose than a higher dose rate. For plateau phase cultures, where cell cycle times are greatly lengthened, the effects of redistribution in regard to cell killing was virtually eliminated. Both fed and unfed plateau phase cultures exhibited a dose-rate effect, but it was found that below dose rates of 154 rad/h there is no further loss in effectiveness

  9. Damage to the testes of a marine fish, the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), induced by chronic exposure to low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Although most authorised disposals of liquid radioactive waste are to the sea, effects of chronic radiation exposure on reproductive endpoints in a marine fish have not so far been investigated. For this reason we have carried out a series of experiments into effects of chronic radiation exposure on plaice, a commercially important marine food species which spends much of its life in contact with sea bed sediments where exposure from radioactive contaminants have been shown to be highest

  10. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  11. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  12. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  13. Calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are presented for the calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radioactive decay. A dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the dose-equivalent rate per unit radionuclide concentration. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each radiation type and exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors are derived for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. In addition, photon dose-rate conversion factors are estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations are based on the assumption that the exposure medium is infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. The dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water then follow from the requirement that all of the energy emitted in the radioactive decay is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated at a reference location above a smooth, infinite plane using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air

  14. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  15. Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Dose Rate of West Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, A.; Ramli, A. T.; Saridan Wan Hassan, W. M.; Idris, H. N.; Basri, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    A study of terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) dose rate was conducted in west of Sarawak, covering Kuching, Samarahan, Serian, Sri Aman, and Betong divisions to construct a baseline TGR dose rate level data of the areas. The total area covered was 20,259.2 km2, where in-situ measurements of TGR dose rate were taken using NaI(Tl) scintillation detector Ludlum 19 micro R meter NaI(Tl) approximately 1 meter above ground level. Twenty-nine soil samples were taken across the 5 divisions covering 26 pairings of 9 geological formations and 7 soil types. A hyperpure Germanium detector was then used to find the samples' 238U, 232Th, and 40K radionuclides concentrations producing a correction factor Cf = 0.544. A total of239 measured data were corrected with Cf resulting in a mean Dm of 47 ± 1 nGy h-1, with a range between 5 nGy h-1 - 103 nGy h-1. A multiple regression analysis was conducted between geological means and soil types means against the corrected TGR dose rate Dm, generating Dg,s= 0.847Dg+ 0.637Ds- 22.313 prediction model with a normalized Beta equation of Dg,s= 0.605Dg+ 0.395Ds. The model has an 84.6% acceptance of Whitney- Mann test null hypothesis when tested against the corrected TGR dose rates.

  16. Relationships betwen mitotic delay and the dose rate of X radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, P.N.; Rha, C.K.; Evans, H.H.; Beer, J.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure of cells to radiation delivered at a continuous low dose rate, cell proliferation may be sustained with the cells exhibiting a constant doubling time that is independent of the total dose. The doubling time or mitotic delay under these conditions has been shown to depend on the dose rate in HeLa, V79 and P388F cells. Reanalysis of the data for these particular cell lines shows that there is a threshold dose rate for mitotic delay, and that above the threshold there is a linear relationship between the length of mitotic delay and the logarithm of the dose rate which is referred to as the dose-rate response. We have observed the same relationships for L5178Y (LY)-R and LY-S cells exposed to low-dose-rate radiation. The threshold dose rates for LY-R, LY-S and P388F cells are similar (0.01-0.02 Gy/h) and are much lower than for V79 and HeLa cells. The slope of the dose-rate response curve is the greatest for HeLa cells, followed in order by LY-S, V79 and P388F cells, and finally by LY-R cells. The slopes for HeLa and LY-R cells differ by a factor of 35. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  18. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for the determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields and the method has been used for the establishment of beta calibration fields. The paper describes important details of the method and presents results from the measurements of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E max values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value of the dose rate. (Author)

  19. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  20. Effect of dose rate and exposure time on the stimulation effect of tube growth of Pinus sylvestris pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelles, L.; Fendrik, I.; Technische Univ. Hannover

    1975-01-01

    The stimulating effect of ionizing radiation in respect to dose rate and exposure time was studied using the tube growth of Pinus silvestris pollen. Stimulation was registered with a small dose (50 rad) supplied at low dose rates (0.5; 1.0; 3.0 and 5.0 rad/sec) and with higher doses (300; 800 and 1,400 rad) supplied at higher dose rates (10; 40 and 50 rad/sec). This suggests that only the exposure time is of importance for radiation-induced stimulation provided that the exposure time does not exceed 100 sec. (orig.) [de

  1. Quantitative analysis of biological responses to low dose-rate γ-radiation, including dose, irradiation time, and dose-rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Because biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose, it is necessary to include dose, dose-rate and irradiation time simultaneously to predict the risk of low dose-rate irradiation. In this study, we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, irradiation time and dose-rate, using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells. For evaluation of chromosome breakage we assessed micronuclei induced by radiation. U2OS cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were exposed to gamma-ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60 Co. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide, and the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was determined by fluorescent microscopy. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [3H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. Dose-rate in the irradiation room was measured with photoluminescence dosimeter. While irradiation time less than 24 h did not affect dose-response curves for both biological responses, they were remarkably attenuated as exposure time increased to more than 7 days. These biological responses were dependent on dose-rate rather than dose when cells were irradiated for 30 days. Moreover, percentage of micronucleus-forming cells cultured continuously for more than 60 days at the constant dose-rate, was gradually decreased in spite of the total dose accumulation. These results suggest that biological responses at low dose-rate, are remarkably affected by exposure time, that they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in the case of long-term irradiation, and that cells are getting resistant to radiation after the continuous irradiation for 2 months. It is necessary to include effect of irradiation time and dose-rate sufficiently to evaluate risk

  2. Cancer incidence among a cohort of subjects exposed to low-dose rate chronic radiation exposure in utero and after birth in the techa riverbank villages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostroumova, E.V.; Akleyev, A.V.; Akleyev, A.V.; Hall, P.

    2003-01-01

    As a result of releases of liquid radioactive waste by the Mayak Production Association (PA) into the Techa River since 1949 till 1956 the population of the Riverside villages was exposed to a protracted effect of combined (external and internal) radiation. The 1-st-generation offspring of exposed residents born on 01.01.1950 and later were exposed both in utero and after birth. In all, 46 cancer cases, including 4 cases of leukemia, were registered among the study cohort members numbering 7,890 subjects born in the Techa Riverside villages in the Chelyabinsk province over the period since 1950 till 1998. No significant differences were noted in cancer incidence rates between men and women. Cancer incidence in the offspring's cohort was by 30-35% higher compared with the unexposed population of the USSR and Russia, the differences, however, are statistically insignificant. No influence of the parents total gonadal dose on cancer development in offspring was observed. The positive dose-effect dependence of cancer incidence on both antenatal and postnatal exposure was traced

  3. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanusi, M.S.M.; Ramli, A.T.; Gabdo, H.T.; Garba, N.N.; Heryanshah, A.; Wagiran, H.; Said, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h −1 to 500 nGy h −1 . The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h −1 . This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h −1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  4. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  5. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  6. Consequences of the exposure at low dose rates-contribution of animal experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    1990-01-01

    The exposure of laboratory animals to the various types of radiations will induce cancers in relation with the tissue absorbed doses. The shape of the dose-effet relationship is most variable. It is important to distinguish which tumours are comparable to human tumours. Those showing more analogies answer but seldom to the classical lineo-quadratic relationship; however, a strong attenuation of induction is demonstrated at low dose rates. Quasi-threshold relationships are seen after the exposure of some tissues to high-LET radiations. These observations question the validity of generalizing the radiobiologists' dual action theory, setting the origin of the dose-effect relationship in the induction of events within the DNA molecule. There is an alternative in the cellular collaboration events; it assumes that the effectiveness per dose unit decreases constantly as an inverse function of the dose rate [fr

  7. 106Ru and 125I radiation dose rate gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Swistowski, E.; Do Hoang Cuong

    2002-01-01

    Pulse count rate from plastic scintillator is a measure of the dose rate. Low dead time of measured channel and digital processing of measuring head signal with compensation of dead time enables correct registration of very high pulse count rate. The radiation source is set with an accuracy not worse than 0.1 mm in relation to the scintillator, and the movement of the source in horizontal and vertical direction is done with the accuracy of 0.01 mm. Additionally the gauge permits to measure the source activity and to check the uniform distribution of the radioactive material on the source surface. Random error due to pulse count rate fluctuation is negligible. The error due to instability of PTM gain is approx. 1,5% for 106 Ru and 5% for 125 I. (author)

  8. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  9. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  10. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  11. Radiation-induced attenuation in polarization maintaining fibers: low dose rate response, stress, and materials effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Hickey, S.J.; Brambani, L.A.; Onstott, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The loss induced in polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers by low dose rate <0.01 Gy/h, where 1 Gy = 100 rads(Si) radiation exposure has been found to vary from <0.4 to ∼6 dB/km-10 Gy, depending on the wavelength of measurement and the fiber. Correlations have been established between low dose rate response and the ''permanent'' induced loss determined by fitting the recovery of the induced loss following high dose rate exposure to nth-order kinetics. Using this technique, both 0.85- and 1.3-μm PM fibers have been found which show virtually no permanent incremental loss and would therefore appear to be resistant to low dose rate radiation environments. The asymmetric stress inherent in PM fibers has been shown to reduce the permanent induced loss, while the recovery of the radiation-induced attenuation was found to be enhanced in fibers with Ge-F-doped silica clads

  12. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  13. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...... sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value...

  14. Dose rate effects of low-LET ionizing radiation on fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Nguyen T.K. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin B.; Mothersill, Carmel E. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Department of Biology, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2017-11-15

    Radiobiological responses of a highly clonogenic fish cell line, eelB, to low-LET ionizing radiation and effects of dose rates were studied. In acute exposure to 0.1-12 Gy of gamma rays, eelB's cell survival curve displayed a linear-quadratic (LQ) relationship. In the LQ model, α, β, and α/β ratio were 0.0024, 0.037, and 0.065, respectively; for the first time that these values were reported for fish cells. In the multi-target model, n, D{sub o}, and D{sub q} values were determined to be 4.42, 2.16, and 3.21 Gy, respectively, and were the smallest among fish cell lines being examined to date. The mitochondrial potential response to gamma radiation in eelB cells was at least biphasic: mitochondria hyperpolarized 2 h and then depolarized 5 h post-irradiation. Upon receiving gamma rays with a total dose of 5 Gy, dose rates (ranging between 83 and 1366 mGy/min) had different effects on the clonogenic survival but not the mitochondrial potential. The clonogenic survival was significantly higher at the lowest dose rate of 83 mGy/min than at the other higher dose rates. Upon continuous irradiation with beta particles from tritium at 0.5, 5, 50, and 500 mGy/day for 7 days, mitochondria significantly depolarized at the three higher dose rates. Clearly, dose rates had differential effects on the clonogenic survival of and mitochondrial membrane potential in fish cells. (orig.)

  15. Dose rate from the square volume radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The expression for determining the dose rate from a three-dimensional square flat-parallel source of any dimensions is obtained. A simplified method for integrating the resultant expression is proposed. A comparison of the calculation results with the results by the Monte Carlo method has shown them to coincide within 6-8%. Since buildings and structures consist of rectangular elements, the method is recommended for practical calculations of dose rates in residential buildings

  16. Recommended de minimis radiation dose rates for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    A de minimis dose or dose rate as used in this report represents a level of risk which is generally accepted as being of no significance to an individual, or in the case of a population, of no significance to society. The doses corresponding to these levels of risk are based on current scientific knowledge. Dose rates recommended in this report are as follows: a de minimis individual dose rate of 10 μSv a -1 , based on a risk level that would generally be regarded as negligible in comparison with other risks; and a de minimis collective dose rate of 1 person-Sv a -1 , based on an imperceptible increase above the normal incidences of cancer and genetic defects in the exposed population. The concept of de minimis is to be distinguished from 'exempt from regulation' (below regulatory concern). The latter involves broader social and economic factors which encompass but are not limited to the purely risk-based factors addressed by the de minimis dose. De minimis is one of the factors that determine the exemption of sources or practices that may result in doses below or above the de minimis level. Although these de minimis dose rates should be considered in developing criteria and guidelines for deriving quantities and concentrations of radioactive substances that may be exempted from regulation, this document is only concerned with establishing de minimis dose rates, not with exempting sources and practices

  17. Dose rate effect on material aging due to radiation. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Shin-ichi (Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan)); Hayakawa, Chikara; Takeya, Chikashi

    1982-12-01

    Although many reports have been presented on the radiation aging of the organic materials for electric cables, those have been based on the experiments carried out at high dose rate near 1 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h, assuming that aging effect depends on only radiation dose. Therefore, to investigate the aging behaviour in low dose rate range is an important subject to predict their practical life time. In this report, the results of having investigated the aging behaviour of six types of materials are described, (polyethylene for general insulation purpose, chemically cross-linked polyethylene, fire-retardant chemically cross-linked polyethylene, fire-retardant ethylene-propylene rubber, fire-retardant chloro-sulfonated polyethylene for sheaths, and fire-retardant, low hydrochloric acid, special heat-resistant vinyl for insulation purpose or chloroclean). They were irradiated with /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray at the dose from 5 x 10/sup 3/ to 1 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h, and their deterioration was tested for the items of elongation, tensile strength, resistivity, dielectric tangent and gel fraction. The aging mechanism and dose rate effect were also considered. The dose rate effect appeared or did not appear depending on the types of materials and also their properties. The materials that showed the dose rate effect included the typical ones whose characteristics degraded with the decreasing dose rate, and the peculiar ones whose deterioration of characteristics did not appear constantly. Aging mechanism may vary in the case of high dose rate and low dose rate. Also, if the life time at respective dose rate in relatively higher dose rate region is clarified, the life time in low dose rate region may possibly be predicted.

  18. The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Mak, Tytus D.; Chen, Congju; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Brenner, David J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics has been shown to have utility in assessing responses to exposure by ionizing radiation (IR) in easily accessible biofluids such as urine. Most studies to date from our laboratory and others have employed γ-irradiation at relatively high dose rates (HDR), but many environmental exposure scenarios will probably be at relatively low dose rates (LDR). There are well-documented differences in the biologic responses to LDR compared to HDR, so an important question is to assess LDR effects at the metabolomics level. Our study took advantage of a modern mass spectrometry approach in exploring the effects of dose rate on the urinary excretion levels of metabolites 2 days after IR in mice. A wide variety of statistical tools were employed to further focus on metabolites, which showed responses to LDR IR exposure (0.00309 Gy/min) distinguishable from those of HDR. From a total of 709 detected spectral features, more than 100 were determined to be statistically significant when comparing urine from mice irradiated with 1.1 or 4.45 Gy to that of sham-irradiated mice 2 days post-exposure. The results of this study show that LDR and HDR exposures perturb many of the same pathways such as TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, which also have been implicated in our previous IR studies. However, it is important to note that dose rate did affect the levels of particular metabolites. Differences in urinary excretion levels of such metabolites could potentially be used to assess an individual's exposure in a radiobiological event and thus would have utility for both triage and injury assessment. (orig.)

  19. Effect of radiation doses rate on SOS response induction in irradiated Escherichia coli Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuetara Lugo, Elizabeth B.; Fuentes Lorenzo, Jorge L.; Almeida Varela, Eliseo; Prieto Miranda, Enrique F.; Sanchez Lamar, Angel; Llagostera Casal, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the effect of radiation dose rate on the induction of SOS response in Escherichia coli cells. We measured the induction of sul A reporter gene in PQ-37 (SOS Chromotest) cells. Lead devises were built with different diameter and these were used for diminishing the dose rate of PX- -30M irradiator. Our results show that radiation doses rate significantly modifies the induction of SOS response. Induction factor increases proportionally to doses rate in Escherichia coli cells defective to nucleotide excision repair (uvrA), but not in wild type cells. We conclude that the dose rate affects the level of induction of SOS response

  20. An energy-independent dose rate meter for beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzelmann, M.; Keller, M.

    1986-01-01

    An easy to handle dose rate meter has been developed at the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre with a small probe for the energy-independent determination of the dose rate in mixed radiation fields. The dose rate meter contains a small ionisation chamber with a volume of 15.5 cm 3 . The window of the ionisation chamber consists of an aluminised plastic foil of 7 mg.cm -2 . The dose rate meter is suitable for determining the dose rate in skin. With a supplementary depth dose cap, the dose rate can be determined in tissue at a depth of 1 cm. The dose rate meter is energy-independent within +-20% for 147 Pm, 204 Tl and 90 Sr/ 90 Y beta radiation and for gamma radiation in the energy range above 35 keV. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced cell mutations as a function of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review of the data in the literature is presented and forms the background of the experimental data given by the author obtained with exponential long-term cultures of V79 hamster cells exposed over a period of up to 35 days to different dose rates of gamma radiation. The experimental results show that at a dose rate of 40 mGy/hour the number of induced mutations is reduced, - which is in agreement with literature data - , but a dose rate of less than 30 mGy/hour makes the induced mutations leap to a value clearly higher than those induced by acute irradiation. As in addition to the mutations recombination is a significant factor of the radiation risk, experiments with a heterozygotic yeast strain have been made, as there is to date no reliable mammalian cell system available for this kind of research. Long-term radiation exposure of the yeast cells over a period of six weeks drastically increased the rate of recombinations, to a value higher by a factor of about 4 than that induced by acute irradiation. (orig.) [de

  2. Development of an EDV-supported decision instrument for site pre-selection of nuclear power plants. EDV-supported instrument for calculation of the space distribution of the collective dose rate and area contamination. Vol. 1. Radiation exposure through air- and water paths under authorized operating conditions and during incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruessermann, K; Eschhaus, M; Kreymborg, A; Muenster, M; Schommer, N

    1980-01-01

    The collective dose rate and the area contamination form a basis for site criteria going beyond the individual considerations of distribution of the population, hydrology, meteorology etc. The possibilities of radio-ecological models on the radiation exposure through air- and water paths during operation and incidents are described by example of Biblis, Muelheim-Kaerlich and Esensham. Comparative evaluations were effected for Fessenheim.

  3. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  4. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, Anita [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)]. E-mail: krokosz@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Koziczak, Renata [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Gonciarz, Marta [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2006-01-15

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min{sup -1} in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  5. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect

  6. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  7. Radiation dosemeters and ambient dose rate measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maushart, R.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturers have got the feeling that the PTB only reluctantly accepts complex dosimetric systems or systems with modern digital and microprocessor technology. Especially the fact that the PTB demands a restriction to a defined system configuration which must not be changed after design approval is felt to be a severe handicap. The rigid frame of design qualification forces manufacturers to adopt a two-tier development line, at least for ambient dose rate measuring systems, and frequently it is not necessarily the 'nature' system, i.e. equipment with modern technology, that is sent in to the PTB for testing. The way of solving the problem could be that PTB more readily accepts less familiar technologies, for instance by more frequently approving equipment at least preliminarily or for a restricted period of time, in order to collect experience. Another way could be to grant licence for system components, especially detectors. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  9. THIDA: code system for calculation of the exposure dose rate around a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiromasa; Igarashi, Masahito.

    1978-12-01

    A code system THIDA has been developed for calculation of the exposure dose rates around a fusion device. It consists of the following: one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport codes; induced activity calculation code; activation chain, activation cross section, radionuclide gamma-ray energy/intensity and gamma-ray group constant files; and gamma ray flux to exposure dose rate conversion coefficients. (author)

  10. Measurement of exposure dose rate by TLD in 60Co garden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Chengfang; Li Pinfang; Wu Maoliang; Zhao Quan

    1987-01-01

    The use of TLD method to measure exposure dose rate in 60 Co garden is described. As compared with chemical dosimetry, the relative deviation of measurement would not exceed 10%. The good repeatability has been proved by comparing the measurements of different times and distances with correction of decay law and 1/1 2 law. Besides, the distribution of exposure dose rate was influenced by scattering of the living plants

  11. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damkaer, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm -2 sub([DNA]) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm -2 sub([DNA]). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation. (orig.)

  12. Dose-rate and humidity effects upon the gamma-radiation response of nylon-based radiachromic film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.; Eschweiler, H.; Proksch, E.

    1979-10-01

    At dose-rates typical for 60 Co gamma irradiation sources, the radiation response of hexahydroxyethyl pararosaniline cyanide/ 50μm nylon radiachromic films is dependent upon dose-rate as well as upon the moisture content of the films, or the relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere, respectively. Under equilibrium moisture conditions, the response measured at 606 nm 24 hours after end of irradiation shows its highest dose-rate dependence at about 32 % r.h. A decrease in dose-rate from 2.8 to 0.039 Gy.s -1 results in a decrease in response by 17%. At higher humidities, the sensitivity of the film as well as the rate dependence decreases and at 86% r.h. no discernible dose-rate effect could be found. At lower humidities than 32% a flat maximum in response follows. At nominal 0% r.h. a second absorption band at 412 nm appears which is converted completely to an additional 606 nm absorption by exposure to a humid atmosphere. After that procedure the resultant response is somewhat lower than but shows almost the same dose-rate dependence as at 32% r.h. or else to eliminate the dose-rate effect by an extrapolation procedure based on the fact that the rate dependence vanishes at zero dose. (author)

  13. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  14. Study on the evaluation method of radiation dose rate around spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    This study aims at developing a simple calculation method which can evaluate radiation dose rate around casks with high accuracy in a short time. The method is based on a concept of the radiation shielding characteristics of cask walls. The concept was introduced to replace for ordinary radiation shielding calculation which requires a long calculation time and a large memory capacity of a computer in the matrix calculation. For the purpose of verifying the accuracy and reliability of the new method, it was applied to the analysis of the dose rate distribution around actual casks, which had been measured. The results of the analysis revealed that the newly proposed method was excellent for the forecast of radiation dose rate distribution around casks in view of the accuracy and calculation time. The short calculation time and high accuracy by the proposed method were attained by dividing the whole procedure of ordinary fine radiation shielding calculation into the calculation of radiation dose rate on a cask surface by the matrix expression of the characteristic function and the calculation of dose rate distribution using the simple analytical expression of dose rate distribution around casks. The effect of the heterogeneous array of spent fuel in different burnup state on dose rate distribution around casks was evaluated by this method. (Kako, I.)

  15. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. (paper)

  16. X-ray equipment for dental diagnostics with a dose-rate controller influencing the exposure voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, K.

    1980-01-01

    If a synoptic picture is taken of teeth or jaw the X-ray tube and the film carrier with the film and a radiation detector are moving around the patient's head. The detector signal is connected to the input of the actual value of the dose-rate controller containing a scanning and stop circuit with a storing time roughly corresponding to the exposure of three teeth. After the shot the actual value of the dose rate is adjusted to the desired value, thus a constant quality of the following pictures being achieved. (RW) [de

  17. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  18. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  19. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  20. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of Kelantan State, Malaysia. Relationship between the geological formation and soil type to radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.; Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) of Kelantan State were measured in situ using a portable [NaI(TI)] micro roentgen (μR) survey meter. The TGRD rates ranged between 44 and 500 nGy h -1 with a mean value of 209 ± 8 nGy h -1 . The distribution of these measurements in various districts of the state shows the statistically the influence of geology and soil types on the dose rate values. The data obtained could be used in formulating safety standard and radiological guidelines. (author)

  1. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  2. Investigations on commercial semiconductor diodes as possible high dose rate radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenhuber, L.; Kindl, P.; Obenaus, B.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations concerning the relevant properties of commercial semiconductor diodes such as their sensitivity and its dependence on accumulated dose, dose rate, energy, temperature and direction have been made in order to obtain their usefullness as radiation detectors. (authors)

  3. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga prefectures, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamia, Kazuyuki; Shimo, Michikuni; Oka, Mitsuaki; Ejiri, Kazutaka; Sugino, Masato; Minato, Susumu; Hosoda, Masahiro; Yamada, Junya; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    We have measured environmental radiation dose rates in several Prefectures, such as Ai chi Prefecture, Gifu Prefecture, and Mie Prefecture, in central Japan. Recently, we measured the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures that are also located in central Japan with a car-borne survey system. At the time of measurement, Kyoto Prefecture (area: 4,613 km 2 ) had a total of 36 districts, and Shiga Prefecture (area: 3,387 km 2 ) a total of 26. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates and secondary cosmic ray dose rates were measured by a 2 inches ψ x 2 inches NaI(Tl) scintillation counter and a handy-type altimeter (GPS eTrex Legend by Gamin), respectively. The following factors were taken into consideration the shielding effect of the car body, the effect of the road pavement, radon progeny borne by precipitation, and increases in tunnels and near the walls. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were estimated to be 51.7 ± 6.0 n Gy/h (district average: 52.4 ± 4.7 n Gy/h), 52.2 ± 10.5 n Gy/h (district average: 51.9 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. Secondary cosmic ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 30.0 ± 0.6 n Gy/h (district average: 29.9 ±0.3 n Gy/h), 30.1 ± 0.3 n Gy/h (district average: 30.0 ± 0.2 n Gy/h), respectively. The environmental radiation dose rates due to the sum dose rates of terrestrial gamma ray and secondary cosmic ray in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 81.7 ± 6.2 n Gy/h (district average: 82.3 ± 4.8 n Gy/h), 82.3 ± 10.6 n Gy/h (district average: 82.0 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. We confirmed that the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures mainly depended on the change of the terrestrial gamma ray dose rates, since the secondary cosmic ray dose rates had little change. Therefore, radiation dose-rate maps of the terrestrial gamma rays as well as maps of the environmental radiation dose-rate were drawn. (author)

  4. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  5. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  6. A photocurrent compensation method of bipolar transistors under high dose rate radiation and its experimental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xuesong; Liu Zhongli; Li Chunji; Yu Fang

    2005-01-01

    Experiment using discrete bipolar transistors has been performed to verify the effect of the photocurrent compensation method. The theory of the dose rate effects of bipolar transistors and the photocurrent compensation method are introduced. The comparison between the response of hardened and unhardened circuits under high dose rate radiation is discussed. The experimental results show instructiveness to the hardness of bipolar integrated circuits under transient radiation. (authors)

  7. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  8. Transperineal high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy in the management of gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, Jun; Hara, Ryuseke; Kozuka, Takuyou; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakajima, Kaori; Shibata, Kouji; Abe, Yoshihisa; Fuse, Masashi; Ito, Masashi [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology

    2003-11-01

    Background: High-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a newly introduced modality, and its role in the management of gynecologic malignancies remains to be studied. Clinical experience in high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy was retrospectively investigated. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with primary and nine with recurrent gynecologic malignancies underwent high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy with/without external-beam irradiation. Fractional dose of the high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy ranged between 4 and 6 Gy with total doses of 15-54 Gy. Interstitial irradiation was performed twice daily with an interval of > 6 h. Results: 2-year local control rate was 75% for primary treatment and 47% for treatment of recurrence (p = 0.46). Maximum tumor size had a statistically significant impact on local control (p < 0.002). Grade 2 and 4 late complications were seen in five patients, and the incidence was significantly higher in patients with a larger volume enclosed by the prescribed fractional dose of high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 2 and 4 complications at 18 months was 78% and 0% with a volume > 100 cm{sup 3} and {<=} 100 cm{sup 3}, respectively (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Although high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a promising modality, it must be applied cautiously to patients with bulky tumors because of the high incidence of serious complications. (orig.)

  9. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  10. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  11. Measurement and monitoring of entrance exposure dose rate in X-ray image intensifier television with dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J [Bezirkskrankenhaus Brandenburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1981-03-01

    For X-ray image intensifier television operation very low entrance dose rates (about 5.2 nA/kg) are stated and demanded, respectively. These required values are often manifold exceeded in practice so that a check seems to be necessary. It is shown and proved how these measurements can be performed with simple, generally available means of measurement in the radiological practice. For ZnCdS-image intensifiers should be considered that about 13 nA/kg for the large entrance size are not to be exceeded; for the CsI type lower values (factor 1.5) are practicable because of the twofold quantum absorption efficiency. Furthermore, some tests for a semiquantitative function check of the automatic dose rate control are proposed.

  12. Dose rate and fractionation: Relative importance in radiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarbell, N.J.; Rosenblatt, M.; Mauch, P.; Hellman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal dose rate and fractionation schedules for total body irradiation (TBI) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are presently unknown. This study compares several fractionation and dose rate schedules that are currently in clinical use. C/sub 3/H/HeJ were given TBI and the bone marrow survival fraction was calculated using the CFU's assay. Irradiation was given as low dose rate (LDR) at 5 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) at 80 cGy/min, in single fraction (SF) and fractionated (FX) regimens. These results indicate no increase in survival for the normal bone marrow stem cells with fractionation either at high or low dose-rates. In fact, fractionation seemed to decrease the bone marrow survival over single fraction radiation

  13. Recovery and permanent radiation damage of plastic scintillators at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicken, B.; Holm, U.; Marckmann, T.; Wick, K.; Rhode, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the radiation stability of plastic scintillators and wavelength shifters for the calorimeter of the ZEUS detector by irradiating them with protons, a 60 Co-source, and depleted uranium. Changes in light yield, absorption length and absorption coefficient have been measured for storage in inert and oxygen atmospheres during and after irradiation. Radiation doses up to 40 kGy with dose rates of 30 up to 2000 Gy/h have been applied. The polystyrene based scintillator SCSN-38 and the wavelength shifters Y-7 and K-27 in PMMA show an additional absorption but a recovery in air to a low permanent damage (at 10 kGy) which is proportional to the applied dose. Series investigations on samples of all production cycles of the ZEUS scintillators with high dose rates show only minor differences in radiation hardness. The recovery is described by a simple oxygen diffusion model for high and medium dose rates down to 30 Gy/h. During long term irradiations at low dose rates (<100 Gy/h) of 3 mm thick SCSN-38 in air the radiation damage recovers to a permanent damage which does not depend on the dose rate. On the other hand the radiation damage at very low dose rates (17 Gy/a) seems to be higher than expected for the accumulated dose

  14. The Effect of Dose Rate on Composite Durability When Exposed to a Simulated Long-Term Lunar Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; O'Rourke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Nutt, Steven; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) requires a safe living and working environment for crew. Composite materials are one type of material being investigated by NASA as a multi-functional structural approach to habitats for long-term use in space or on planetary surfaces with limited magnetic fields and atmosphere. These materials provide high strength with the potential for decreased weight and increased radiation protection of crew and electronics when compared with conventional aluminum structures. However, these materials have not been evaluated in a harsh radiation environment, as would be experienced outside of LEO or on a planetary surface. Thus, NASA has been investigating the durability of select composite materials in a long-term radiation environment. Previously, NASA exposed composite samples to a simulated, accelerated 30-year radiation treatment and tensile stresses similar to those of a habitat pressure vessel. The results showed evidence of potential surface oxidation and enhanced cross-linking of the matrix. As a follow-on study, we performed the same accelerated exposure alongside an exposure with a decreased dose rate. The slower dose ]rate is comparable to a realistic scenario, although still accelerated. Strain measurements were collected during exposure and showed that with a fastdose rate, the strain decreased with time, but with a slow ]dose rate, the strain increased with time. After the radiation exposures, samples were characterized via tensile tests, flexure tests, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of these tests will be discussed.

  15. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  16. Calculation of radiation dose rates from a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation doses from a spent nuclear fuel cask are usually from various phases of operations during handling, shipping, and storage of the casks. Assessment of such doses requires knowledge of external radiation dose rates at various locations surrounding a cask. Under current practices, dose rates from gamma photons are usually estimated by means of point- or line-source approaches incorporating the conventional buildup factors. Although such simplified approaches may at times be easy to use, their accuracy has not been verified. For example, those simplified methods have not taken into account influencing factors such as the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface, and the effects of these factors on the calculated dose rates are largely unknown. Moreover, similar empirical equations for buildup factors currently do not exist for neutrons. The objective of this study is to use a more accurate approach in calculating radiation dose rates for both neutrons and gamma photons from a spent fuel cask. The calculation utilizes the more sophisticated transport method and takes into account the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface. The results of a detailed study of dose rates in the near field (within 20 meters) are presented and, for easy application, the cask centerline dose rates are fitted into empirical equations at cask centerline distances up to 2000 meters from the surface of the cask

  17. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  18. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  19. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  20. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Heliana de; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Custodio, Wilson; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2009-01-01

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 ± 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from 60 Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h -1 - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h - '1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  1. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  2. Dose-rate effects for mammary tumor development in female Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to X and γ radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Myers, D.K.; Jones, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Mammary tumour development was followed in two experiments involving a total of 2229 female Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to various doses of X or γ rays at different dose rates. The data for another 462 rats exposed to tritiated water in one of these experiments were also analyzed. The incidence of adenocarcinomas and fibroadenomas at a given time after exposure increased linearly in proportion to total radiation dose for most groups. However, no significant increase in adenocarcinomas was observed with chronic γ exposures up to 1.1 Gy, and the increase in fibroadenomas observed with chronic gamma exposures at a dose rate of 0.0076 Gy h -1 up to an accumulated dose of 3.3 Gy was small compared to that observed after acute exposures. The incidence of all mammary tumors increased almost linearly with the log of dose rate in the range 0.0076 to 26.3 Gy h -1 for 3 Gy total dose of gamma rays. The effects of X rays appeared to be less influenced by dose rate than were the effects of γ rays. (author)

  3. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzheng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS CMOS image sensor (CIS with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB. The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  4. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-02-08

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  5. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 x 10 -3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing

  6. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  7. Lifetime radiation risks from low-dose rate radionuclides in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    One of the largest, long-term (25-yr) animal studies on the effects of low-dose internal irradiation is almost completed. Some 335 beagles were given continuous exposure to graded 90 Sr [low linear energy transfer (LET)] in their diets (D-dogs) through adulthood. A second group (R-dogs) was given fractionated doses of 225 Ra (high LET) as young adults. A third group of 44 was given a single injection of 90 Sr as adults (S-dogs) to compare single to continuous dosages. All dogs were followed through their lifetimes. Only one of the 848 dogs is still alive. The animals were whole-body counted over their entire life span and were examined frequently for assessment of medical status. There were no acute radiation lethalities. Analyses of the large data base from these dogs have begun and preliminary indications are that 90 Sr, which was tested over a 1500-fold skeletal dose rate range, does not cause significant life shortening at average accumulation skeletal doses of ∼2500 rads (25 Gy) and that a curvilinear dose response curve for life shortening was seen at higher accumulation doses. The data will be discussed in terms of modern epidemiological concepts and quantifications will be related to certain parameters of human risk from acute or chronic radiation exposures

  8. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  9. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andjelković, Marko S; Ristić, Goran S; Jakšić, Aleksandar B

    2015-01-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h −1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose. (paper)

  10. Dose rate effect on the yield of radiation induced response with thermal fading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Rogalev, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the dependences of the accumulation of thermally unstable radiation induced defects on the dose and dose rate is proposed. The model directly takes into account the track nature of the ionizing radiation represented as accumulation processes of defects in tracks averaged over a crystal volume considering various degrees of overlapping in space and time. The accumulation of the defects in the tracks is phenomenologically described. General expressions are obtained that allows radiation yield simulation of defects involving known creation and transformation processes. The cases considered, of linear accumulation (constant increment of the defects in tracks) and accumulation with saturation (complete saturation of the defects in one track), lead to a set of linear dose dependences with saturation, which are routinely used in luminescence and ESR dating. The accumulation, with increase of sensitivity in regions overlapped by two or more tracks, gave a set of dose dependences, from linear-sublinear-linear-saturation, distinctive of quartz up to linear-supralinear-linear-saturation. It is shown that the effect of the dose rate on dose dependences is determined by a dimensionless parameter a=Pτ/D0, where P is the dose rate, τ is the defect lifetime and D0 is the track dose. At a-bar 1 the dose rate influences basically the accumulation of thermally unstable defects. In the reverse case the dose dependences did not seems to be influenced by the dose rate

  11. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kyung Mi

    2012-01-01

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ( 137 Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  12. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ({sup 137}Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  13. Serial measurement of radiation leakage dose rates in safekeeping at the Gammaknife room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Sadaaki; Nozaki, Kenichi; Toyoda, Tatsuya; Wakamatsu, Osamu; Machida, Toru

    2006-01-01

    We report the serial measurement of leakage dose rates in safekeeping at the Gammaknife room during the past 4 years and 9 months by scintillation survey meter. The leakage dose rates at the radiation boundaries were the same as the natural background levels. Leakage dose rates at each shield calculation point from two 90 Sr calibration sources contained in the storehouse were negligible compared with those from 60 Co sources of the Gammaknife. 60 Co sources of the Gammaknife are arranged in 201 pieces at 10 degree interval on the circumference and in five lines within an arc of 35 degrees. Its shield container is made of iron at least 43 cm thick. We got leakage dose rates less than 40% of the calculated values. We think it is caused by the difference of each actual distance and shield thickness because 60 Co sources are usually considered as a point source in the shield calculation. There are shutters opening up and down when patients go in and out to the direction of the couch. The leakage values to this direction were about twice as much as the calculated value. So, we knew the thickness of those shutters was thinner than 43 cm. The half life time of 60 Co source calculated from the serial measurements of leakage dose rates was 4.93 years on average. It is 94% of the physical half life value of 5.27 years. We judged it was acceptable considering the difficulty of measuring low dose rate level with the radiation survey meter. Very strong correlation was observed between the decrease of 60 Co dose rate acquired from one minute measurement at the center of 18 cm diameter polysterene phantom gotten from December 2000 to August 2005 and that of computation based on the physical half life time. Likewise there was strong and more correlation with leakage dose rate in the Gammaknife room. From this, we deduce the leakage dose rate decreases according to the theory of the disintegration of radioactivity with passage of time. Revised radiation related laws took effect

  14. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damkaer, D.M.; Dey, D.B.; Heron, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm/sup -2/sub((DNA)) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm/sup -2/sub((DNA)). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation.

  15. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  16. Use of virtual reality to estimate radiation dose rates in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Couto, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Operators in nuclear plants receive radiation doses during several different operation procedures. A training program capable of simulating these operation scenarios will be useful in several ways, helping the planning of operational procedures so as to reduce the doses received by workers, and to minimize operations' times. It can provide safe virtual operation training, visualization of radiation dose rates, and estimation of doses received by workers. Thus, a virtual reality application, a free game engine, has been adapted to achieve the goals of this project. Simulation results for Argonauta research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear are shown in this paper. A database of dose rate measurements, previously performed by the radiological protection service, has been used to display the dose rate distribution in the region of interest. The application enables the user to walk in the virtual scenario, displaying at all times the dose accumulated by the avatar. (author)

  17. Effect of continuous exposure to very low dose rates of gamma rays on life span and neoplasia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, I.B. III; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Oghiso, Yoichi; Sato, Fumiaki; Matsushita, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Late effects of continuous exposure to ionizing radiation are potential hazards to workers in radiation facilities as well as to the general public. In the recent years, low-dose-rate and low-dose effects have become a serious concern. Using a total of 4,000 mice, we studied the late biological effects of chronic exposure to low-dose-rate radiation on life span and neoplasia. Two thousand male and 2000 female 8-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) B6C3F1 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups, one non-irradiated (control) and three irradiated. The irradiated groups were exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at dose-rates of 21, 1.1 and 0.05 mGy day -1 for approximately 400 days with total doses equivalent to 8000, 400 and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept under SPF conditions until natural death and pathological examination was performed to determine the cause of death. Statistical analyses showed that the life spans of mice of both sexes irradiated with 21 mGy day -1 (P -1 (P 86.7% of all deaths. Compared to the non-irradiated controls, incidences of lethal neoplasms were significantly increased for myeloid leukaemia and hemangiosarcoma in males, soft tissue neoplasms and malignant granulosa cell tumors in females exposed to 21 mGy day -1 . The number of multiple primary neoplasms per mouse was significantly increased in mice irradiated at 21 mGy day -1 . Our results suggest that life shortening in mice continuously exposed to low dose-rate gamma rays is due to early death from a variety of neoplasms and not from increased incidence of specific lethal neoplasms. (author)

  18. ALARA-based strengthening of radiation protection in a high dose rate nuclear power plant: A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    In the first years of operation the dose rates at Goesgen nuclear power plant increased more strongly than expected. Co-60 has been the main radiation contributor from the beginning. As an immediate step, investigations were initiated to find and remove unknown cobalt sources. System modifications and optimization in water chemistry were carried out to reduce material and activity transport within the primary system. As a result the dose rates were stabilized after a couple of years -unfortunately on a high level. To reduce the dose rate levels and the occupational radiation exposure, further long term measures were implemented. System decontamination and source replacement were considered as well as the implementation of enhanced shielding procedures and a more source oriented chemistry. As a result the dose rates have reduced significantly and the occupational radiation exposure has been decreased by more than a factor of 2 over the last two decades. The reduction of the mean individual dose turned out even better and was cut by a factor of 5. On terms of plant and personal safety, Goesgen nuclear power plant decided to improve radiation protection using a smooth step by step action plan and has been very successful with it. Currently the technical possibilities have been developed to a high standard. Further improvements will be selective only. In future the focus will be set to personal behavior and human performance, using enhanced target settings, briefings, debriefings, experience feedback and (international) experience exchange. Nevertheless it will be essential to avoid unnecessary administrative and counterproductive short term hurdles. Strengthening of radiation protection is and will be a long term and continuous process. Goesgen nuclear power plant will continue to introduce further actions one by one. (author)

  19. Survey of the gamma dose rate and locations with extremely abnormal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Matthes, W.

    1985-01-01

    The goals pursued by the investigation on hand were: (a) to get a survey of natural radioactivity in the Fichtelgebirge; (b) to find and describe locally restricted areas of high natural radioactivity (abnormal radiation, hot spots); this will be a starting point (c) for the assessment of possible increased radiation exposure and of the state of health of a restricted number of persons. Furthermore, there are also (d) underground data for the eventual stipulation of maximum permissible values for natural radioactivity. (e) The situation in the Fichtelgebirge shall be compared with that of the monazite sand-stone areas in India. The highest gamma dose rates measured in locally restricted areas were: (1) granite road pavement: 24 μR/h; (2) granite quarries (35 μR/h); (3) caves below granite rock (40 to 70 μR/h); (4) slag brick pavement on market place and main street of Marktredwitz (53.4 μR/h) (part of which removed already); (5) uranium abnormalities on a farmer's field (80-100 μR/h) (0.6 m below the surface: 1.500 μR/h); this may be considered a uranium deposit with a content in uranium of up to 0.3%; (6) over 100 μR/h in front of an uranium ore mine in the uranium prospection drift (rest of the drift in the granite no more than 29.3+-3.3 μR/h). The resulting maximum conceivable radiation exposure is assessed. The question whether there is a necessity for setting tolerance limit values for natural radioactivity is raised again; the magnitude in comparison with limit values for artificial radioactivity in radioactive controlled areas is pointed out. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Modified Exponential (MOE) Models: statistical Models for Risk Estimation of Low dose Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose-rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose-rates, since biological responses to radiation are complex processes that depend both on irradiation time and total dose. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose,dose-rate and irradiation time to estimate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and (3H) thymidine uptake in U2OS, human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological response to gamma radiation. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a florescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and (3h) thymidine was pulsed for 4h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/dose-rate. (Author)

  1. Geological influence on terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the Malaysian State of Johore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, A.T.; Hussein, A.W.M.A.; Lee, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose-rate (TGRD) have been made in Johore, Malaysia. The focus is on determining a relationship between geological type and TGRD levels. Data were compared using the one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), in some instances revealing significant differences between TGRD measurements and the underlying geological structure

  2. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Tien Thinh; Nguyen Hao Quang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  3. Dose-rate effects of ethylene oxide exposure on developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, E; Long, N; Smith, A; Williams, P; Ravi, S; Gill, J; Henessey, R; Skornik, W; Brain, J; Kimmel, C; Kimmel, G; Holmes, L; Ryan, L

    1999-08-01

    In risk assessment, evaluating a health effect at a duration of exposure that is untested involves assuming that equivalent multiples of concentration (C) and duration (T) of exposure have the same effect. The limitations of this approach (attributed to F. Haber, Zur Geschichte des Gaskrieges [On the history of gas warfare], in Funf Vortrage aus den Jahren 1920-1923 [Five lectures from the years 1920-1923], 1924, Springer, Berlin, pp. 76-92), have been noted in several studies. The study presented in this paper was designed to specifically look at dose-rate (C x T) effects, and it forms an ideal case study to implement statistical models and to examine the statistical issues in risk assessment. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice were exposed, on gestational day 7, to ethylene oxide (EtO) via inhalation for 1.5, 3, or 6 h at exposures that result in C x T multiples of 2100 or 2700 ppm-h. EtO was selected because of its short half-life, documented developmental toxicity, and relevance to exposures that occur in occupational settings. Concurrent experiments were run with animals exposed to air for similar periods. Statistical analysis using models developed to assess dose-rate effects revealed significant effects with respect to fetal death and resorptions, malformations, crown-to-rump length, and fetal weight. Animals exposed to short, high exposures of EtO on day 7 of gestation were found to have more adverse effects than animals exposed to the same C x T multiple but at longer, lower exposures. The implication for risk assessment is that applying Haber's Law could potentially lead to an underestimation of risk at a shorter duration of exposure and an overestimation of risk at a longer duration of exposure. Further research, toxicological and statistical, are required to understand the mechanism of the dose-rate effects, and how to incorporate the mechanistic information into the risk assessment decision process.

  4. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  5. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Hlatky, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival rfelationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The Monte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation. (orig.)

  6. Experimental study of radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the BAEC TRIGA Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajijul Hoq, M; Malek Soner, M A; Salam, M A; Haque, M M; Khanom, Salma; Fahad, S M

    2017-12-01

    The 3MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been under operation for about thirty years since its commissioning at 1986. In accordance with the demand of fundamental nuclear research works, the reactor has to operate at different power levels by utilizing a number of experimental facilities. Regarding the enquiry for safety of reactor operating personnel and radiation workers, it is necessary to know the radiation level at different strategic points of the reactor where they are often worked. In the present study, neutron, beta and gamma radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the reactor facility with reactor power level of 2.4MW was measured to estimate the rising level of radiation due to its operational activities. From the obtained results high radiation dose is observed at the measurement position of the piercing beam port which is caused by neutron leakage and accordingly, dose rate at the stated position with different reactor power levels was measured. This study also deals with the gamma dose rate measurements at a fixed position of the reactor pool top surface for different reactor power levels under both Natural Convection Cooling Mode (NCCM) and Forced Convection Cooling Mode (FCCM). Results show that, radiation dose rate is higher for NCCM in compared with FCCM and increasing with the increase of reactor power. Thus, concerning the radiological safety issues for working personnel and the general public, the radiation dose level monitoring and the experimental analysis performed within this paper is so much effective and the result of this work can be utilized for base line data and code verification of the nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Low dose rate radiation favors apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, Albert D.; Rupnow, Brent; Knox, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated promising results in the treatment of chemotherapy refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The radiation associated with this therapy is emitted in a continuous fashion at low dose rates (LDR). Results from studies comparing the relative efficacy of LDR radiation and high dose rate (HDR) radiation on malignant cell killing have been variable. This variability may be due in part to the relative contribution of different mechanisms of cell killing (apoptosis or necrosis) at different dose rates. Materials and Methods: In order to test this hypothesis, the relative efficacy of LDR (16.7 cGy/hr) and HDR radiation (422 cGy/min) were compared using a human B cell lymphoma cell line (PW) and a PW clone (c26) stably transfected to overexpress the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2. The endpoints evaluated included the relative amount of cell killing, the fraction of cell killing attributable to apoptosis versus necrosis, and the impact of Bcl-2 overexpression on both overall cell killing and the fraction of killing attributable to apoptosis. Results: HDR and LDR radiation resulted in similar overall cell killing in the PW wild type cell line. In contrast, killing of clone c26 cells was dose rate dependent. One third less killing was seen following LDR irradiation of c26 cells compared with equivalent doses of HDR radiation. Analysis of the relative mechanisms of killing following LDR irradiation revealed a relative increase in the proportion of killing attributable to apoptosis. Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in PW cells, LDR radiation appears to be highly dependent on apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death. These findings may have implications for the selection of patients for RIT, and for the treatment of tumors that overexpress Bcl-2. They may also help form the basis for future rational design of effective combined modality therapies utilizing RIT

  8. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  10. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  11. Radiation dose rates from adult patients receiving 131I therapy for thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Doherty, M.J.; Kettle, A.G.; Eustance, C.N.P.; Mountford, P.J.; Coakley, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recommendations for restricting the exposure to radiation of members of the public coming into contact with thyrotoxic patients treated with 131 I are currently based on the activity retained by the patient, and not on the doses likely to be received by such individuals. In order to examine whether these current recommendations restrict these doses to less than the current annual limit of 5 mSv, and to identify the implications of a reduction in this limit to 1 mSv, measurements were made of the dose rates at distances of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 60 patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department. These measurements were repeated 1, 3, 6, 8 and 10 days after administration for 30 patients, and the radioactivity in samples of saliva taken on each of these days and secreted in sweat over the first 24 h were also measured. Doses were estimated for administered activities of approximately 200-600 MBq, assuming appropriate values for the times and distances spent near other individuals while travelling, at work, at home and near to young children considered in three age groups. Periods of restriction were derived which would reduce these doses to 5 or 1 mSv. (Author)

  12. The analogy research study on gamma radiation dose rate of radioisotopes 131Ba and 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Youhua; Feng Guangwen

    2013-01-01

    Analogy is a inference method ,according some properties of a class of things to inferring the similar things should also have the similar properties. The analogy of same radionuclides is widely used in radioisotope logging environment impact assessment so far. This paper is to provide fFor future providing a theoretical calculation method and analogy method between different radionuclides in radioisotope logging environment impact assessment. In this paper, using the latest decay scheme, through theoretical modeling, the aim is the the establishment of 131 Ba and 131 I radioisotopes gamma radiation dose rate calculation method, and try to carry out analogy research on gamma radiation dose rate of different radioisotopes with the same activity. The results show that the analogy of different radionuclides is feasible, which provides the new method reference for carrying out such radiation environmental impact assessment in future. (authors)

  13. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Shiroma, M.; Motomura, D.; Fujioka, S.; Kawakami, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Arakawa, K.; Fukahori, K.; Jyunicho, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ohomoto, T.; Kina, S.; Shiroma, Y.; Masuda, N.; Hiraoka, H.; Shingaki, R.; Akata, N.; Zhuo, W.; Tokonami, S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h -1 , respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time. (authors)

  14. Remote Sensing of Radiation Dose Rate by Customizing an Autonomous Robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T; Nakahara, M; Morisato, K; Takashina, T; Kanematsu, H

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of radiation dose was measured by customizing an autonomous cleaning robot 'Roomba' and a scintillation counter. The robot was used as a vehicle carrying the scintillation survey meter, and was additionally equipped with an H8 micro computer to remote-control the vehicle and to send measured data. The data obtained were arranged with position data, and then the distribution map of the radiation dose rate was produced. Manual, programmed and autonomous driving tests were conducted, and all performances were verified. That is, for each operational mode, the measurements both with moving and with discrete moving were tried in and outside of a room. Consequently, it has been confirmed that remote sensing of radiation dose rate is possible by customizing a robot on market.

  15. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examining the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-radiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. It was concluded that oligodendrocytes in irradiated cultures had significantly lower functional capacity than did unirradiated controls. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. At DIC 14, the group irradiated in a single fraction had significantly lower oligodendrocyte counts than any group given split doses; all irradiated cultures had marked depression of MBP synthesis, but to significant differences referable to time interval between doses. At DIC 21, cultures irradiated at intervals of 0 h to 2 h had similar oligodendrocyte counts to one another, but these counts were significantly lower than in cultures irradiated at intervals of 4 h to 6 h; MBP levels remained depressed at DIC 21 for all irradiated cultures. The oligodendrocyte response to dose rate (0.03 to 1.97 Gy/min) was evaluated at DIC 14 and DIC 21. Exposure at 0.03 Gy/min suppressed oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 21 less than did higher dose rates in 5-Gy irradiated cultures

  16. Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene in a wide range of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezaki, J.; Okada, T.; Sakurada, I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene (water content 3.5 x 10 -2 mole/liter) was carried out in a wide range of dose rate between 1.2 x 10 3 and 1.8 x 10 7 rad/sec, and compared with the polymerization of the moderately dried styrene (water content 3.2 x 10 -3 mole/liter). Molecular weight distribution curves of the polymerization products showed that they were generally consisted of four parts, namely, oligomers, radical, cationic, and super polymers. Contributions of the four constituents to the polymerization and the number average degrees of polymerization (DP) of the four kinds of polymers were calculated by the graphical analysis of the curves. The rate of radical polymerization and DP of radical polymers are independent of the water content; the dose rate dependences of the polymerization rate and DP agree with the well known square root and inverse square root laws, respectively, of the radical polymerization of styrene. The rate of ionic polymerization is directly proportional to the dose rate, but it decreases, at a given dose rate, inversely proportional to the water content of styrene. DP of ionic polymer is independent of the dose rate but decreases with increasing water content. The super polymer of DP about 10 4 is not formed in the case of the moderately dried styrene. G values for the initiating radical and ion formation are calculated to be independently of the dose rate and water content, 0.66 and 0.027, respectively. It was suggested that oligomer was formed in the early stage by the interaction of cation with anion and only those cations which had survived underwent polymerization. 10 figures, 4 tables

  17. SSDL quality assurance for environmental dose/dose rate monitoring of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Member states of IAEA have recently approved an expanded Nuclear Safety Programme and two International Conventions have been signed. One concerns early notification of a nuclear accident, and the other concerns assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In the course of the implementation of these conventions an international system will be established by the Agency for the reception and dissemination of data following a nuclear accident. Such data should include the results of radiation measurements obtained by radiation monitoring. These data must be reliable, and comparable. This assures that numerical values of measured quantities obtained at different times, sites and countries, and with different instruments, can be compared in order that the competent authorities may draw conclusions. Such measurements may also have legal consequences. This implies that the instruments used for the measurement should comply with the relevant international specifications, and that the readings of these instruments be traceable to the international measurement system. At a meeting of an expert working group on International Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection held in November 1986, a proposal to produce a technical document on ''The role of SSDLs in the quality assurance programme relating to the use of dose and dose rate meters for personal and environmental measurements'' received high priority, and at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Governors the proposal was approved. Prior to these proposals the SSDL Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in May 1986 also advised the IAEA to promote measures to ensure world wide reliability and traceability of dose measurements in the field of radiation protection. On 26-30 January 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting on ''The role of SSDLs in the dosimetry of unintentional radiation exposures'' was organized by the IAEA. This Advisory Group assisted the Agency in the formulation of a

  18. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE-/- Alzheimer's mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, S. J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula...

  19. Assessment of absorbed dose rate from terrestrial gamma radiation in Red Sea State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalrahman, H. E. K.

    2012-09-01

    This study is primarily conducted to contribute in the overall strategic objective of producing Sudan radiation map which will include natural radiation levels and the resultant absorbed dose rate in air. The part covered by this study is the Red Sea State. Soil samples were collected from locations lie between latitudes 17.03 ° and the 20.18 ° N and longitudes 36.06 ° E during September 2007. Activity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides, 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K in the samples were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry equipped with Nal (Tl) detector. Absorbed dose rates in air a height of 1 from the ground level and the corresponding annual effective doses were calculated from the measured activities using Dose Rate Conversion Factors (DRCFs). On the average, the activity concentrations were 19.22±13.13 Bq kg -1 ( 232 Th), 17.91±15.44 Bq kg -1 ( 226 Ra) and (507.13±161.67) Bq kg -1 for 40 K. The obtained results were found to be within the global values reported in the UNSCEAR publication for normal background areas with the exception of the samples taken from Arbaat area. The absorbed dose rate in air as calculated using UNSCEAR conversion factor averaged 40.93 n Gy h -1 which corresponds to annual effective dose of 50.23 μSvy -1 . The major contribution to the total absorbed dose rate comes from 40 K, which amounts to 53.36%. Using Geographical Information System (GIS), predication maps for activity concentrations levels of the measured radionuclides in the Red Sea state was prepared to show their respective spatial distributions. Similarly, GIS predictive map was produced for annual effective dose.(Author)

  20. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  1. Dose rate effects in the radiation damage of the plastic scintillators of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00314584

    2016-10-07

    We present measurements of the reduction of light output by plastic scintillators irradiated in the CMS detector during the 8 TeV run of the Large Hadron Collider and show that they indicate a strong dose rate effect. The damage for a given dose is larger for lower dose rate exposures. The results agree with previous measurements of dose rate effects, but are stronger due to the very low dose rates probed. We show that the scaling with dose rate is consistent with that expected from diffusion effects.

  2. Radiation safety program in high dose rate brachytherapy facility at INHS Asvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy concerns primarily the use of radioactive sealed sources which are inserted into catheters or applicators and placed directly into tissue either inside or very close to the target volume. The use of radiation in treatment of patients involves both benefits and risks. It has been reported that early radiation workers had developed radiation induced cancers. These incidents lead to continuous work for the improvement of radiation safety of patients and personnel The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy needs appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize the risks to both patients and medical staff. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control, quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program developedfor a high dose rate brachytherapy facility at our centre which may serve as a guideline for other centres intending to install a similar facility.

  3. Manufacture research of the test equipment to measure the dose rate in high radiation medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Luong Tuan; Nguyen Van Sy; Nguyen Xuan Vinh; Dang Quang Bao; Nguyen Thanh Hung; Pham Minh Duc; Nguyen Xuan Truong

    2017-01-01

    Photodiode BPW34 is operated as a low voltage counter tubes. When the radiation rays go into the BPW34,they will create a pairs of electron and hole. If setting the reverse bias in to the BPW34, a pulse is achieved and it can be amplified and processed. The STM32 is the microcontroller family which is developed base on ARM processors. The STM32 incorporated many new features such as ADC, I2C, etc. With the connectional ability to other devices, the STM32 is proving its advantages in the development of equipment.The application of irradiation technology in the economy-society increases widespread as food irradiation, mutant irradiation, etc. Until now the calculation the high dose rate at Hanoi Irradiation Center is identified by the Fricke, ECB dosimeters. The dosimeters must be destroyed in order to serve for dose rate determination. Manufacture research the equipment for dose rate calculation support to determine dose rate directly through the equipment’s signal and this equipment can be used multiple. This equipment can be connected to other devices to control the irradiation process better via signals. (author)

  4. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  5. Bioassay in BALB/c mice exposed to low dose rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Km, Sung Dae; Gong, Eun Ji; Bae, Min Ji; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kim, Joong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of low-dose-rate irradiation in BALB/c mice. Twenty mice of each sex were randomly assigned to four groups of five mice each and were exposed to 0 (sham), 0.02, 0.2, or 2 Gy, equivalents to low-dose-rate irradiation to 3.49 mGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Urine, blood, and blood biochemistry were analyzed, and organ weight was measured. The low-dose-rate irradiation did not induce any toxicologically significant changes in mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food and water consumption, urinalysis, and serum biochemistry. However, the weights of reproductive organs including the testis, ovary, and uterus decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiation at 2 Gy significantly decreased the testis, ovary, and uterus weights, but did not change the weights of other organs. There were no adverse effects on hematology in any irradiated group and only the number of neutrophils increased dose dependently. The low-dose-rate irradiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in mice at dose levels of 2 Gy or less, but the reproductive systems of male and female mice showed toxic effects.

  6. Radiation-thermal degradation of PE and PVC: Mechanism of synergism and dose rate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    Polyethylene insulation and polyvinyl chloride jacketing materials that had been in use in a nuclear application were recently found to be substantially deteriorated. The damage had occurred under conditions where both the total estimated dose (about 2.5 Mrad) and the operating temperatures (about 43°C average) seemed relatively moderate. These results prompted us to initiate a program to study polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene degradation under conditions of combined γ-radiation and elevated temperature environments. A number of interesting aging effects were observed, including 1) a striking synergism between radiation and temperature and 2) strong dose-rate dependent effects which occur over a wide range of dose rates. The aging effects are explained in terms of a chain branching degradation mechanism involving thermally induced breakdown of peroxides which are formed in reactions initiated by the radiation. Evidence for this mechanism is derived from infrared spectra, from sequential radiation-elevated temperature experiments including experiments under inert atmosphere, from activation energy estimates and from a new technique involving treatment of intact samples with PH 3 for chemical reduction of peroxides. The results of our studies raise significant doubts about the utility of earlier compilations which purportedly serve as radiation life expectancy guides by indicating "tolerable radiation doses" for a variety of polymers.

  7. Dose Rate Effect on Grafting by Gamma Radiation of DMAEMA onto Flexible PVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzarini, L.C.G.A.; Araujo, F.D.C.; Martinello, V.C.; Somesari, E.; Manzoli, J.E.; Silveira, C.; Paes, H.A.; Moura, E.

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous tubing, blood bags and catheters stays in contact with blood and body fluids. They are normally made by flexible PVC. The contact of PVC with this fluid is not possible for long periods and there is the necessity of addition of non-thrombogenic substances into blood. This work shows the radiation grafting process to produce copolymer PVC-g-DMAEMA, a new material that allows a future grafting of Heparin on it, and will have the perspective of avoiding undesirable substances additions to blood or body fluid contact. In this preliminary work, only radiation dose rate effect on grafting was studied

  8. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in bone marrow was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases of the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. However, there were no remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells. (author)

  9. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of CFU-S colonies on day 12, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  10. ESR dating of elephant teeth and radiation dose rate estimation in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taisoo Chong; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Takao; Saisho, Hideo

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in the dentine as well as enamel of elephant tooth fossil has been carried out in order to estimate the internal absorbed dose rate of the specimens, which was estimated to be (39±4) mrad/y on the assumption of early uptake model of radionuclides. The external radiation dose rate in the soil including the contribution from cosmic rays was also estimated to be (175±18) mrad/y with the help of γ-ray spectroscopic techniques of the soil samples in which the specimens were buried. The 60 Co γ-ray equivalent accumulated dose of (2±0.2) x 10 4 rad for the tooth enamel gave ''ESR age'' of (9±2) x 10 4 y, which falls in the geologically estimated range between 3 x 10 4 and 30 x 10 4 y before the present. (author)

  11. Absorbed dose to mice in prolonged irradiation by low-dose rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, Akihiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saitou, Mikio; Kudo, Iwao [and others

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the dose absorbed by mice was evaluated as a preliminary study of the late effects of prolonged continuous irradiation of mice with low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Eight-week-old male and female SPF C3H/HeN mice in three irradiation rooms were exposed to irradiation at 8000, 400, and 20 mGy, respectively, using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-source. Nine racks were arranged in a circle approximately 2.5 m from the source in each room, and 10 cages were arranged on the 4 shelves of each rack. Dose distributions, such as in air at the source level, in the three rooms were estimated by using ionization chambers, and the absorbed dose distributions in the room and relative dose distributions in the cages in relation to the distance of the cage center were examined. The mean abdomen doses of the mice measured by TLD were compared with the absorbed doses in the cages. The absorbed dose distributions showed not only inverse-inverse-square-law behavior with distance from the source, but geometric symmetry in every room. The inherent scattering and absorption in each room are responsible for such behavior and asymmetry. Comparison of relative dose distributions revealed cage positions that are not suitable for experiments with high precision doses, but all positions can be used for prolonged continuous irradiation experiments if the position of the cages is rotated regularly. The mean abdomen doses of the mice were similar in each cage. The mean abdomen doses of the mice and the absorbed doses in a cage were almost the same in all cages. Except for errors concerning the positions of the racks and cages, the uncertainties in the exposure doses were estimated to be about {+-}12% for 8000 mGy group, 17% for 400 mGy group, and 35% for 20 mGy group. (K.H.)

  12. A method for radiobiological investigations in radiation fields with different LET and high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundler, W.

    1976-01-01

    For investigations: 1. Performed in the field of radiobiology with different LET-radiation and a relatively high background dose rate of one component (e.g. investigations with fast and intermediate reactor neutrons) 2. Concerning radiation risk studies within a wide range 3. Of irradiations, covering a long time period (up to 100 days) a test system is necessary which on the one hand makes it possible to analyze the influence of different LET radiation and secondly shows a relative radiation resistant behaviour and allows a simple cell cycle regulation. A survey is given upon the installed device of a simple cell observation method, the biological test system used and the analysis of effects caused by dose, repair and LET. It is possible to analyze the behaviour of the nonsurvival cells and to demonstrate different reactions of the test parameters to the radiation of different LET. (author)

  13. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  14. Different effects of dose rate on radiation-induced mutation frequency in various germ-cell stages of the mouse, and their implications for the analysis of tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The following factors affecting mutation induction by radiation in mice are discussed: dose rate, cell stage, and sex. It is suggested that for cancers of presumed mutational origin, the risk from chronic radiation exposure may be only one-third the risk from acute exposure. This is based only on responses of spermatogonia; other cell types behave quite differently. Specific and general applications are discussed

  15. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Monchaux, G.; Fritsch, P.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection Technique; Pineau, J.F. [ALGADE, Bessines (France); Chameaud, J. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 87 - Razes (France)

    1994-12-31

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 10{sup 6} J.m{sup -3} (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author).

  16. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Monchaux, G.; Fritsch, P.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Chameaud, J.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 10 6 J.m -3 (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author)

  17. Rat skin carcinogenesis as a basis for estimating risks at low doses and dose rates of various types of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Vanderlaan, M.; Strickland, P.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery rate, age dependence and latent period for tumor induction in rat skin were measured for single and split doses of radiation, and the data were analyzed in terms of a general model in an attempt to estimate the expected tumor response for various types of radiation given at low dose rates for long periods of time. The dorsal skin of male rats was exposed to electrons, x rays, or protons in either single or split doses for several doses and the tumor responses were compared during 80 weeks of observation. A two stage model incorporating a reversible or recoverable mode was developed and various parameters in the model, including recovery rate, dose-response coefficients, and indices of age sensitivity, were evaluated experimentally. The measured parameters were then utilized to calculate expected tumor responses for exposure periods extending for duration of life. The calculations indicated that low dose rates could be markedly ( 1 / 100 to 1 / 1000 ) less effective in producing tumors than the same dose given in a short or acute exposure, although the magnitude of the reduction in effectiveness declines as the dose declines

  18. Hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risks to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. There is scant data on somatic and genetic risks at environmental and occupational levels of radiation exposure. The available data on radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis are for high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Risk assessments for low level radiation are obtained using these data, assuming a linear dose-response relationship. During uranium mining the chief source of radiation hazard is inhalation of radon daughters. The correlation between radon daughter exposure and the increased incidence of lung cancer has been well documented. For radiation exposures at and below occupational limits, the associated risk of radiation induced cancers and genetic abnormalities is small and should not lead to a detectable increase over naturally occurring rates

  19. Electron dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure of the skin from uniformly deposited activity on the body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors have been calculated for external exposure of the skin from electrons emitted by sources that are deposited uniformly on the body surface. The dose-rate factors are obtained from electron scaled point kernels developed by Berger. The dose-rate factors are calculated at depths of 4, 8, and 40 mg cm-2 below the body surface as recommended by Whitton, and at a depth of 7 mg cm-2 as recommended in ICRP Publication 26 (ICRP77). The dependence of the dose-rate factors at selected depths on the energy of the emitted electrons is displayed. The dose-rate factors for selected radionuclides of potential importance in radiological assessments are tabulated

  20. Radiation dose rates from commercial PWR and BWR spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.

    1981-10-01

    Data on measurements of gamma dose rates from commercial reactor spent fuel were collected, and documented calculated gamma dose rates were reviewed. As part of this study, the gamma dose rate from spent fuel was estimated, using computational techniques similar to previous investigations into this problem. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates provided a recommended dose rate in air versus distance curve for PWR spent fuel

  1. Features of working in fields with high values of exposure dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    Features of working in fields with the exposure dose rate (EDR) ∼ 1000-7000 R/h are described. Data on the performed operations concerning initial decontamination of the Chernobyl-3 reactor roof during 10.07.86-03.10.86 are presented. It is marked that the methodical recommendations on working in fields with high values of EDR are absent in our country and abroad and it is necessary to develop them on the basis of obtained experience. Moreover, there are no protective means (protective clotting). Main principles of its creation are the protection of critical organ groups and comfort in working. Personnel should be specially trained and get phychologically ready. 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Influence of clouds on the cosmic radiation dose rate on aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio T.; Carlson, Brett V.; Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L.; Cortes-Giraldo, Miguel A.; Quesada, Jose Manuel M.; Palomo, Francisco R.; Pinto, Marcos Luiz de A.

    2014-01-01

    Flight missions were made in Brazilian territory in 2009 and 2011 with the aim of measuring the cosmic radiation dose rate incident on aircraft in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly and to compare it with Monte Carlo simulations. During one of these flights, small fluctuations were observed in the vicinity of the aircraft with formation of Cumulonimbus clouds. Motivated by these observations, in this work, the authors investigated the relationship between the presence of clouds and the neutron flux and dose rate incident on aircraft using computational simulation. The Monte Carlo simulations were made using the MCNPX and Geant4 codes, considering the incident proton flux at the top of the atmosphere and its propagation and neutron production through several vertically arranged slabs, which were modelled according to the ISO specifications. The paper presents first-order calculation about the influence of Cumulonimbus clouds on the flux and dose rate due to cosmic neutrons in the atmosphere, at aircraft flight altitudes. The simulations show variations of the order of 5.5 % in the neutrons flux and 3.6 % of the dose rate due to the presence of the cloud. Such variations can extend up to ∼1.5 km from the edge of the cloud. The spectrum of neutrons within a cloud formation was observed undergo changes due to the neutron absorption and scattering processes with the water content inside the cloud. To accomplish these simulations, it is important to have a proper knowledge of the data libraries and nuclear models to be applied, since the simulation processes are strongly dependent on these factors. These results emphasise the importance of conducting more detailed studies on this topic, since the influence of clouds can change the dose and flux on aircraft overflying such formations, as well as could explain some of the fluctuations in the experimental dose rate data obtained in aircraft flights. Future studies should extend such simulations to different types of

  3. Enhancement of viability of radiosensitive (PBMC and resistant (MDA-MB-231 clones in low-dose-rate cobalt-60 radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lima Falcão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: In the present study, the authors investigated the in vitro behavior of radio-resistant breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 cells line and radiosensitive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, as a function of different radiation doses, dose rates and postirradiation time kinetics, with a view to the interest of clinical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The cells were irradiated with Co-60, at 2 and 10 Gy and two different exposure rates, 339.56 cGy.min–1 and the other corresponding to one fourth of the standard dose rates, present over a 10-year period of cobalt therapy. Post-irradiation sampling was performed at pre-established kinetics of 24, 48 and 72 hours. The optical density response in viability assay was evaluated and a morphological analysis was performed. Results: Radiosensitive PBMC showed decrease in viability at 2 Gy, and a more significant decrease at 10 Gy for both dose rates. MDAMB- 231 cells presented viability decrease only at higher dose and dose rate. The results showed MDA-MB-231 clone expansion at low dose rate after 48–72 hours post-radiation. Conclusion: Low dose rate shows a possible potential clinical impact involving decrease in management of radio-resistant and radiosensitive tumor cell lines in cobalt therapy for breast cancer.

  4. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  5. The influence of geology on terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Pahang state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabdo, H.T.; Ramli, A.T.; Sanusi, M.S.; Garba, N.N.; Saleh, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) rate measurements have been made in Pahang state, Malaysia. Significant variations were found between TGRD measurements and the underlying geological formations. In some cases revealing significant elevations of TGRD. The acid-intrusive geological formation has the highest mean TGRD measurement of 367 nGy/h -1 . This is more than six times the world average value of 59 nGy/h -1 , while the quaternary geological formation has the lowest mean gamma radiation dose rate of 99 nGy h -1 . The annual effective dose equivalent outdoor to the population was 0.216 mSv. The lifetime equivalent dose and relative lifetime cancer risks for an individual living in Pahang state were 81 mSv and 4.7 x 10 -3 respectively. These values are more than two times the world average of 34 mSv and 1.95 x 10 -3 respectively. (author)

  6. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  7. Total dose and dose rate radiation characterization of EPI-CMOS radiation hardened memory and microprocessor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, B.L.; Hermsen, J.M.; Lee, J.C.; Schroeder, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The process, circuit discription, and total dose radiation characteristics are presented for two second generation hardened 4K EPI-CMOS RAMs and a first generation 80C85 microprocessor. Total dose radiation performance is presented to 10M rad-Si and effects of biasing and operating conditions are discussed. The dose rate sensitivity of the 4K RAMs is also presented along with single event upset (SEU) test data

  8. Changes in the Number of Double-Strand DNA Breaks in Chinese Hamster V79 Cells Exposed to γ-Radiation with Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan N. Osipov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparative investigation of the induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs in the Chinese hamster V79 cells by γ-radiation at dose rates of 1, 10 and 400 mGy/min (doses ranged from 0.36 to 4.32 Gy was performed. The acute radiation exposure at a dose rate of 400 mGy/min resulted in the linear dose-dependent increase of the γ-H2AX foci formation. The dose-response curve for the acute exposure was well described by a linear function y = 1.22 + 19.7x, where “y” is an average number of γ-H2AX foci per a cell and “x” is the absorbed dose (Gy. The dose rate reduction down to 10 mGy/min lead to a decreased number of γ-H2AX foci, as well as to a change of the dose-response relationship. Thus, the foci number up to 1.44 Gy increased and reached the “plateau” area between 1.44 and 4.32 Gy. There was only a slight increase of the γ-H2AX foci number (up to 7 in cells after the protracted exposure (up to 72 h to ionizing radiation at a dose rate of 1 mGy/min. Similar effects of the varying dose rates were obtained when DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. In general, our results show that the reduction of the radiation dose rate resulted in a significant decrease of DSBs per cell per an absorbed dose.

  9. Radiation Dose-rate Reduction Pattern in Well-differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treated with I-131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahbaz Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Arif, Muhammad; Durr-e-Sabih; Rahim, Muhammad Kashif; Ahmad, Israr

    2015-07-01

    To determine the patterns of dose rate reduction in single and multiple radioiodine (I-131) therapies in cases of well differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Analytical series. Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Physics, Multan Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy (MINAR), Multan, Pakistan, from December 2006 to December 2013. Ninety three patients (167 therapies) with well differentiated thyroid cancer treated with different doses of I-131 as an in-patient were inducted. Fifty four patients were given only single I-131 therapy dose ranging from 70 mCi (2590 MBq) to 150 mCi (5550 MBq). Thirty nine patients were treated with multiple I-131 radioisotope therapy doses ranging from 80 mCi (2960 MBq) to 250 mCi (9250 MBq). T-test was applied on the sample data showed statistically significant difference between the two groups with p-value (p < 0.01) less than 0.05 taken as significant. There were 68 females and 25 males with an age range of 15 to 80 years. Mean age of the patients were 36 years. Among the 93 cases of first time Radio Active Iodine (RAI) therapy, 59 cases (63%) were discharged after 48 hours. Among 39 patients who received RAI therapy second time or more, most were discharged earlier after achieving acceptable discharge dose rate i.e 25 µSv/hour; 2 out of 39 (5%) were discharged after 48 hours. In 58% patients, given single I-131 therapy dose, majority of these were discharged after 48 hours without any major complications. For well differentiated thyroid cancer patients, rapid dose rate reduction is seen in patients receiving second or subsequent radioiodine (RAI) therapy, as compared to first time receiving RAI therapy.

  10. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry

  11. Determination of radiation dose rates and urinary activity of patients received Sodium Iodide-131 for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiki, D.; Shahhosseini, S.; Dadashzadeh, S.; Eftekhari, M.; Tayebi, H.; Moosazadeh-Rashti, G.

    2004-01-01

    Sodium Iodide-131 is administrated for treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. Iodine-131 has multiple routs of excretion (urine, saliva, sweat, milk, feces, exhalation) from the body. Patients receiving Sodium Iodide-131 therapy exposes other persons and the environment to unwanted radiation and contamination. The major sources of radiation dose from administration of Iodine-131 is external radiation , also there is a potential for exposure via contamination.Precautions are necessary to limit the radiation dose to family members, nursing staff and members of public and waste treatment workers to less than 1mSv. Patients received Sodium Iodide-131 may come into close contact with other persons. In order to derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured from the anterior mid-trunk of 29 patients in the upright position with 15 minutes post-dose administration at 3 meters and just before they left the nuclear medicine department at 0.5, 1, and 3 meters. We have also measured urinary iodide excretion in 29 patients to estimate Sodium Iodide-131 urinary excretion pattern in iranian patients. Based on results, the maximum cumulative dose to nursing staff was on third day (leaving day) still less than recommended dose bye ICRP. The cumulative dose family members will be more but regarding the time and distance in close contact it will be also less than recommended dose by ICRP.Radiation dose rate was decreased significantly on third day. The urinary excretion patterns in all patients were similar. The urinary excretion rate-time curve in all patients showed multiple peaks due to retention and redistribution of Iodine-131 or enterohepatic cycle of radioiodinated thyroid hormones, which didn't allow calculation of urinary excretion rate constant. The results also showed that 67 hours post administration of Sodium Iodide-131 about 70% of radiopharmaceutical was excreted through urine, 28% physically decayed or eliminated through other biological

  12. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  13. Global radiation damage at 300 and 260 K with dose rates approaching 1 MGy s{sup −1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Mulichak, Anne M.; Keefe, Lisa J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Approximately half of global radiation damage to thaumatin crystals can be outrun at 260 K if data are collected in less than 1 s. Global radiation damage to 19 thaumatin crystals has been measured using dose rates from 3 to 680 kGy s{sup −1}. At room temperature damage per unit dose appears to be roughly independent of dose rate, suggesting that the timescales for important damage processes are less than ∼1 s. However, at T = 260 K approximately half of the global damage manifested at dose rates of ∼10 kGy s{sup −1} can be outrun by collecting data at 680 kGy s{sup −1}. Appreciable sample-to-sample variability in global radiation sensitivity at fixed dose rate is observed. This variability cannot be accounted for by errors in dose calculation, crystal slippage or the size of the data sets in the assay.

  14. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  15. Radiation dose rate map interpolation in nuclear plants using neural networks and virtual reality techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Antonio Carlos A., E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, P.O. Box 68550, 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio Marcio N.A., E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, P.O. Box 68550, 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil); Freitas, Victor Goncalves G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, P.O. Box 68550, 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    This paper reports the most recent development results of a simulation tool for assessment of radiation dose exposition by nuclear plant's personnel, using artificial intelligence and virtual reality technologies. The main purpose of this tool is to support training of nuclear plants' personnel, to optimize working tasks for minimisation of received dose. A finer grid of measurement points was considered within the nuclear plant's room, for different power operating conditions. Further, an intelligent system was developed, based on neural networks, to interpolate dose rate values among measured points. The intelligent dose prediction system is thus able to improve the simulation of dose received by personnel. This work describes the improvements implemented in this simulation tool.

  16. Radiation dose rate map interpolation in nuclear plants using neural networks and virtual reality techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio Marcio N.A.; Freitas, Victor Goncalves G.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the most recent development results of a simulation tool for assessment of radiation dose exposition by nuclear plant's personnel, using artificial intelligence and virtual reality technologies. The main purpose of this tool is to support training of nuclear plants' personnel, to optimize working tasks for minimisation of received dose. A finer grid of measurement points was considered within the nuclear plant's room, for different power operating conditions. Further, an intelligent system was developed, based on neural networks, to interpolate dose rate values among measured points. The intelligent dose prediction system is thus able to improve the simulation of dose received by personnel. This work describes the improvements implemented in this simulation tool.

  17. Relationship between increased radiation dose rate in air and rainfall, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Osamu

    1985-01-01

    The influence of snow on dose rate in air (DRA) was analyzed. Attenuatin ratio of DRA due to snow depends on the amount of water per surface area. When snow reaches one m, DRA does not seem to be influenced by radioactivity from the ground, but seems to be only influenced by natural radioactivity of buildings. A method was examined to estimate background radiation doses during the snow season with counting rates of peak areas of 1.765 MeV for Bi-214 and 2.614 MeV for Tl-208. In serial measurements of environmental gamma rays, the method of measuring spectra is far superior to other methods in view of the collection of much more information. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. High-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy: the nuts and bolts of starting a program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moningi, Shalini; Armour, Elwood P.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Efron, Jonathan E.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Kumar, Rachit; Le, Yi; Kien Ng, Sook; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Zellars, Richard C.; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Ahuja, Nita

    2014-01-01

    High-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) has historically provided effective local control (LC) for patients with unresectable and recurrent tumors. However, IORT is limited to only a few specialized institutions and it can be difficult to initiate an HDR-IORT program. Herein, we provide a brief overview on how to initiate and implement an HDR-IORT program for a selected group of patients with gastrointestinal and pelvic solid tumors using a multidisciplinary approach. Proper administration of HDR-IORT requires institutional support and a joint effort among physics staff, oncologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses. In order to determine the true efficacy of IORT for various malignancies, collaboration among institutions with established IORT programs is needed. PMID:24790628

  19. Real time monitoring automation of dose rate absorbed in air due to environmental gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Carrazana Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Manzano de Armas, Jose F.; Alonso Abad, Dolores; Prendes Alonso, Miguel; Tomas Zerquera, Juan; Caveda Ramos, Celia A.; Kalber, Olof; Fabelo Bonet, Orlando; Montalvan Estrada, Adelmo; Cartas Aguila, Hector; Leyva Fernandez, Julio C.

    2005-01-01

    The Center of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) as the head institution of the National Radiological Environmental Surveillance Network (RNVRA) has strengthened its detection and response capacity for a radiological emergency situation. The measurements of gamma dose rate at the main point of the RNVRA are obtained in real time and the CPHR receives the data coming from those points in a short time. To achieve the operability of the RNVRA it was necessary to complete the existent monitoring facilities using 4 automatic gamma probes, implementing in this way a real time measurement system. The software, GenitronProbe for obtaining the data automatically from the probe, Data Mail , for sending the data via e-mail, and Gamma Red , for receiving and processing the data in the head institution ,were developed

  20. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  1. Chronic action of gamma-radiation on growing cell population of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyuzikov, N.A.; Petin, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data on the processes of division and death of haploid and diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae of wild type and of their radiosensitive mutants exposed under optimal for reproduction conditions to chronic gamma-radiation at various dose rates are presented. It is shown that the dependence of the integral division/death process in time was exponential for all the studied strains. With dose rate increasing, the duration of the lag period and the probability of cell inactivation increased, while the multiplication rate decreased. These processes, for equal dose rates, were more expressed for the radiosensitive mutants

  2. Radiation graft copolymerization of styrene with m/e and styrene with acrylic acid at highthyl methacryl dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, R.Eh.; Kabanov, B.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    Comparative investigation of radiation graft copolymerization of styrene with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and styrene with acrylic acid (AA) is carried out at considerably differing radiation dose rates. The monomer mixture was grafted to PE low density films at dose rates of 0.16, 0.25 Gy/s (1 MeV electron acceleration). The value of graft was 3-6 and 5-10%, respectively, for the styrene-MMA and styrene-AA systems. An essential difference in the dependences of the formed copolymer composition on initial monomer mixture composition is noticed. Difference in composition of graft polymers prepared at different dose rates is less for the systems with AA, than for systems with MMA. It is shown that at high dose rates in difference with low ones not only radical graft copolymerization of the styrene mixture with AA takes place, but a contribution of the graft styrene polymerization according to cation mechanism as well

  3. Breast cancer incidence following low-dose rate environmental exposure: Techa River Cohort, 1956–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumova, E; Preston, D L; Ron, E; Krestinina, L; Davis, F G; Kossenko, M; Akleyev, A

    2008-01-01

    In the 1950s, the Mayak nuclear weapons facility in Russia discharged liquid radioactive wastes into the Techa River causing exposure of riverside residents to protracted low-to-moderate doses of radiation. Almost 10 000 women received estimated doses to the stomach of up to 0.47 Gray (Gy) (mean dose=0.04 Gy) from external γ-exposure and 137Cs incorporation. We have been following this population for cancer incidence and mortality and as in the general Russian population, we found a significant temporal trend of breast cancer incidence. A significant linear radiation dose–response relationship was observed (P=0.01) with an estimated excess relative risk per Gray (ERR/Gy) of 5.00 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80, 12.76). We estimated that approximately 12% of the 109 observed cases could be attributed to radiation. PMID:19002173

  4. Analysis and radiation dose rate measurement of the Al-1050 capsule on the rabbit system facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani; Sutrisno; H, Saleh; Rohidi; M, Kawkab

    2000-01-01

    Aluminium is a kind of light metal with density of 2.7 gram /cm exp 3,regarding to the aluminium is characteristic such as easy to fabricated,has a good corrosion resistant and radiation heat resistant, therefore aluminum is selected to be used as a material for sample irradiation capsule with high neutron fluency. Analysis using neutron activation method and capsule irradiation by using high neutron fluency and dose radiation rate measurement was done. The analysis result show that impurities in the Al-1050 capsule are Fe, Cu, Mg, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The capsule irradiated at 15 MW during 6 Hours with neutron fluency of 2,8 x 10 exp 17 n/cm exp 2. The radiation doses rate after 24 hours decay is 220 mrad/h at 0-meter distance and 60 mrad/h at 1-meter distance. Respectively. From the analysis results and measurement show that the Al-1050 capsule has no high neutron absorption element and available to get continuing irradiation at 15 MW as far as 6 hours. Due to the personal safety, therefore the capsule handling could be carried out in the hot cell

  5. Modeling for Dose Rate Calculation of the External Exposure to Gamma Emitters in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, K. A.; El-Mongy, S. A.; El-Tahawy, M. S.; Mohsen, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the model proposed and developed in Ph.D thesis of the first author of this work, the dose rate conversion factors (absorbed dose rate in air per specific activity of soil in nGy.hr - 1 per Bq.kg - 1) are calculated 1 m above the ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. This new and simple dose rate calculation software was used for calculation of the dose rate in air 1 m above the ground. Then the results were compared with those obtained by five different groups. Although the developed model is extremely simple, the obtained results of calculations, based on this model, show excellent agreement with those obtained by the above-mentioned models specially that one adopted by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  6. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.; Johnson, O.S.; LaBauve, P.M.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Vigil, E.A.

    1977-02-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD 50 - 30 in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day

  7. Distributed optical fibre temperature measurements in a low dose rate radiation environment based on Rayleigh backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, A.; Gussarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Liokumovich, L. B.; Kotov, O. I.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Deschoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2012-04-01

    On-line monitoring of environmental conditions in nuclear facilities is becoming a more and more important problem. Standard electronic sensors are not the ideal solution due to radiation sensitivity and difficulties in installation of multiple sensors. In contrast, radiation-hard optical fibres can sustain very high radiation doses and also naturally offer multi-point or distributed monitoring of external perturbations. Multiple local electro-mechanical sensors can be replaced by just one measuring fibre. At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world 1. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of major NPP components can threaten plant safety and also plant life. Among those elements, cables are vital components of I&C systems in NPPs. To ensure their safe operation and predict remaining life, environmental monitoring is necessary. In particular, temperature and radiation dose are considered to be the two most important parameters. The aim of this paper is to assess experimentally the feasibility of optical fibre temperature measurements in a low doserate radiation environment, using a commercially available reflectometer based on Rayleigh backscattering. Four different fibres were installed in the Sub-Pile Room of the BR2 Material testing nuclear reactor in Mol, Belgium. This place is man-accessible during the reactor shut-down, allowing easy fibre installation. When the reactor operates, the dose-rates in the room are in a range 0.005-5 Gy/h with temperatures of 40-60 °C, depending on the location. Such a surrounding is not much different to some "hot" environments in NPPs, where I&C cables are located.

  8. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  9. Influence of radiation dose and dose-rate on modification of barley seed radiosensitivity by post-treatment with caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Influence of radiation doses (100, 150 and 200 Gy) and dose-rates (1.27-0.023 Gy/Sec) on the modification of oxic and anoxic radiation damage by caffeine at different concentrations has been investigated using metabolizing barley seeds as test system. As the radiation dose increases from 100 to 200 Gy, the magnitude of oxic and anoxic damages increase at all the dose-rates. Caffeine is able to afford partial radioprotection against the oxic damage, at the same time potentiating the anoxic damage. However, caffeine effect against the oxic and anoxic components of damage depend largely upon the dose of radiation applied and also on the dose-rate used. The possible mechanism of action of caffeine in bringing about the differential modification of oxic and anoxic damages has been discussed. 19 refs., 2 tables. (author)

  10. Development of 'Dose Rate Meter' android app for radiation detection using camera of smartphones and tablet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Aatef; Sharma, M.K.; Kulkarni, M.S.; Romal, Jis; Gupta, A.; Chaudhury, P.

    2018-01-01

    An android app 'Dose Rate Meter' for gamma radiation field measurement over wide range using smart phone has been developed. The android app implements the cluster counting and high delta algorithm. The high delta algorithm processes multiple images captured by the camera. It is more sensitive at lower dose rates but it saturates at higher dose rates of the order of 1Gy/h and its response starts decreasing. Since, this algorithm analyses a number of images to compute the dose rate, it takes few minutes to process on a typical smart phone with 1 GB RAM, dual core processor and a clock in the range of 1GHz. However, the cluster count algorithm computes the results in a few seconds only as it operates on a single image but it can be used to measure dose rate only in the range of 5 mGy/h and above. Therefore, we have implemented the two algorithms in such a way that initially, the control goes to the cluster count algorithm and in case the dose rate is below 5mGy/h, it has provision to invoke the high delta algorithm, thereby covering a dose rate measurement range from μGy/h to Gy/h

  11. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring: mobile gamma dose rate measurements along Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route and Hyderabad city roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divkar, J.K.; Padmanabhan, N.; Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Pujari, R.N.; Dogra, Santosh; Sharma, D.N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental Radiation monitoring based on gamma dose rate logging on a mobile platform integrated with real time position from a Global Positioning System is an effective tool to acquire dose rate profile and generate radiological map of any geographical region. The microcontroller based dose rate data acquisition system capable of storing the acquired data and transferring to an attached laptop/PC and providing a graphical illustration of relative variations in gamma background can also be used for quick assessment of environmental radiological impact assessment. This paper describes the methodology and results of the environmental gamma dose rate monitoring surveys carried out: (i) on Mumbai-Hyderabad rail route with the systems installed in the trains guard's room and (ii) Hyderabad city roads with systems installed in a monitoring van. The results indicate significant difference in the gamma background measured along the rail route between Mumbai-Hyderabad and in the radiological map generated after the Hyderabad city survey. (author)

  13. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  14. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, S., E-mail: dewjisa@ornl.gov; Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hertel, N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 and Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0745 (United States); Sherbini, S.; Saba, M. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  15. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, S.; Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K.; Hertel, N.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ( 131 I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered 131 I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with 131 I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the 131 I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of 131 I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after 131 I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ specific activities of 131 I

  16. Results of radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer using high dose rate remote after loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, radiotherapy with high dose rate remote after loading system (HDR-RALS) for intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard treatment for more than 30 years. This report showed the usefulness of HDR-RALS for uterine cervical cancer. From 1980 through 1999, 442 patients with uterine cervical cancers (stage I: 66, stage II: 161, stage III: 165, stage IV: 50) were treated. Radiotherapy was performed both external teletherapy and HDR-RALS. Overall survival rate at 5 years was 60.2%. The 5-year actuarial incidence of all complications was 16.4%. The 5-year actuarial incidence of all complications in cases treated with the sum doses of whole pelvic irradiation (without central shield) and RALS up to 49 Gy, 50 to 59 Gy or larger doses were 7.5%, 11.0% and 25.2%, respectively. Radiation therapy using HDR-RALS was very effective. While the dose of whole pelvic irradiation was increased, the actuarial incidence of all complications was increased. (author)

  17. Enhanced low dose rate radiation effect test on typical bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Minbo; Chen Wei; Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Huang Shaoyan; Sheng Jiangkun; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun

    2014-01-01

    Two types of bipolar transistors and nine types bipolar integrated circuit were selected in the irradiation experiment at different "6"0Co γ dose rate. The base current of bipolar transistor and input bias current of amplifier and comparator was measured, low dose enhance factor of test device was obtained. The results show that bipolar device have enhanced low dose rate sensitivity, enhancement factor of bipolar integrated circuit was bigger than that of transistor, and enhanced low dose rate sensitivity greatly varied with different structure and process of bipolar device. (authors)

  18. High-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy for local advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Mychalczak, B.; Enker, W.; Anderson, L.; Cohen, A.E.; Minsky, B.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to improve the local control for advanced and recurrent cancers of the rectum, we have integrated high-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) into the treatment program. Between 11/92 and 10/95, 47 patients (pts) were treated. There were 26 males and 21 females whose ages ranged from 30-80 (median = 62) years. There were 19 pts with primary unresectable rectal cancer, and 28 pts who were treated for recurrent rectal cancer. Histology was adenocarcinoma - 45 pts, squamous cancer - 2 pts. The range of follow-up is 1-34 months (median = 14 months). The majority of primary unresectable pts received pre-operative radiation therapy (4500-5040 cGy) with chemotherapy (5-FU with Leucovorin) 4-6 weeks later, they underwent resection + HDR-IORT (1200 cGy). For the 28 pts with recurrent cancer, the majority received surgery and HDR-IORT alone because they had received prior RT. For the pts with primary unresectable disease, actuarial 2-year local control was 77%, actuarial distant metastasis-free survival was 71%, disease free survival was 66%, and overall survival was 84%. For those pts with recurrent disease, actuarial 2-year local control rate was 65%, distant metastasis-free survival was 65%, disease free survival was 47%, and overall survival was 61%. Complications occurred in 36%. There were no cases where the anatomical distribution of disease, or technical limitations prevented the adequate delivery of HDR-IORT. We conclude that this technique was most versatile, and enabled all appropriate pts to receive IORT. The preliminary data in terms of local control are encouraging, even for the poor prognostic sub-group of pts with recurrent cancer

  19. Petrography, Gamma Radiation Measurements and Dose Rate, Northeastern Um Ara Area, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghazy, N.M.

    2016-01-01

    The northern part of Um Ara alkali feldspar micro granite has subjected to extensive post-magmatic metasomatic reworking resulting in development of amazonitized and albitized zones, reflecting K- and Na metasomatism leading to gross enrichment in U and Th towards the more evolved phases (e.g., albitized zones). Spectrometric survey data indicate that eU in Dokhan volcanics has the range of 2 to 42 ppm with an average value of 10 ppm and in monzogranites. It varies from 3 to 13 ppm with an average of 7 ppm while in alkali feldspar microgranites eU contents vary from 3 to 282 ppm with an average value of 30 ppm. The (eTh) contents in Dokhan volcanics ranges from 5-51 ppm with an average 18 ppm, in monzogranites their content was in the range of 11 to 47 ppm with an average value of 27 ppm where it ranges from 14 to 83 ppm with an average 46 ppm in alkali feldspar granite. The enhanced uranium content in altered zones was attributed to disseminated and fracture filling uranophane, autonite, in addition to other U and Th bearing minerals (such as columbite, zircon, monazite, xenotime and fluorite). Gamma-radiation dose rate and annual effective dose equivalents in mSv/y, Radium equivalent activity, external (H e x) and internal hazard index (H i n) and gamma activity index (Iγ) for all investigated samples were calculated to assess the potential radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the studied granites. Alkali feldspar granite activities would suggest that caution must be taken when using granites as building materials because they have radioactivity above the proposed acceptable level.

  20. Spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter for precise measurement of environmental radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-05-01

    A spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter filled with 1 atm. nitrogen gas was arranged aiming at precise measurement of dose rate due to environmental gamma rays and cosmic rays. Ionization current-dose rate conversion factor for this ionization chamber was derived from careful consideration taking into account the attenuation by chamber wall, ionization current due to alpha particles and so on. Experiments at calibrated gamma ray fields and intercomparison with NaI(Tl) scintillation detector were also performed, which confirmed this ionization chamber using the conversion factor can measure the dose rate with an error of only a few percent. This ionization chamber will be used for measurement of environmental gamma ray and cosmic ray dose rate. (author)

  1. Estimates of Radiation Dose Rates Near Large Diameter Sludge Containers in T Plant

    CERN Document Server

    Himes, D A

    2002-01-01

    Dose rates in T Plant canyon during the handling and storage of large diameter storage containers of K Basin sludge were estimated. A number of different geometries were considered from which most operational situations of interest can be constructed.

  2. The effects of radiation dose-rate and quality on the induction of dominant lethals in mouse spermatids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Beechey, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    Hybrid male mice were given 3 Gy (300 rad) doses of X- or γ-irradiation at dose-rates of either 0.6 or 0.002 Gy/min for each radiation. Germ-cells treated as spermatids were tested for dominant lethality. Effects on spermatogonia were evaluated by studying testis-weight, sperm-count and sperm abnormalities. The rate of induction of dominant lethal mutations was 2.1 times as high after acute X-irradiation as after protracted γ-irradiation. Most of this difference resulted from the change in radiation quality, since the relative effectiveness of X- versus γ-irradiation was 1.9 at low and 1.6 at high dose rates. For each radiation, however, fewer dominant lethals were induced at low dose-rates than at high (low/high ratios of 0.8 and 0.9 respectively) although differences did not reach a significant level. There were no statistically significant effects of dose rate on testis-weight of sperm-count in the X-ray series, but there were significantly less severe effects on both with protraction of the γ-irradiation. Evidence for effects of radiation quality on these characters was conflicting. Frequencies of abnormal spermatozoa were markedly increased 7 weeks after irradiation but there were no consistent effects of radiation intensity or quality. (orig.)

  3. Influence of Parotid from Various Dose Rate in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Joo Wan; Jeong, Yun Ju; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Choi, Ji Hun; Seok, Jin Yong

    2010-01-01

    There are various beam parameter in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to investigate how various dose rate affect the parotid in treatment plan of IMRT. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who have undergone IMRT. CT images were scanned 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The parameters for planning used 6 MV energy and 8 beams under the same dose volume constraint. The variation of dose rates were used 300, 400, 500 MU/min. The mean dose of both parotid was accessed from the calculated planning among the 10 patients. The mean dose of parotid was verificated by 2D diode array (Mapcheck from Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, Florida). Also, Total monitor unit (MU) and beam-on time was analysed. Results: According to the dose rate, the mean dose of parotid was increased by 0.8%, 2.0% each, when dose rate was changed from 300 MU/min to 400, 500 MU/min, moreover Total MU was increased by 5.4% and 10.6% each. There was also a dose upward trend in the dose measurement of parotid by 2D diode array. However, beam - on time difference of 1-2 minutes was no significant in the dose rate increases. From this study, when the dose rates increase, there was a significant increase of Total MU and the parotid dose accordingly, however the shortened treatment time was not significant. Hence, it is considered that there is a significant decrease of late side effect in parotid radiation therapy, if the precise dose rate in IMRT is used.

  4. Influence of dose, dose rate, and radiation quality on radiation carcinogenesis and life shortening in RFM and BALB/C mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Storer, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects produced by 137 Cs gamma rays delivered at a high (45 rads/min) or intermediate (8.2 rads/day) dose rate and the effect of fission neutrons at a high (25 rads/min) and low (1 rad/day) rate in a population of nearly 30,000 RFM and 11,000 BALB/c mice have been studied. Gamma ray doses ranged from 10 to 400 rads with the RFM's and from 50-400 rads with the BALB/c's, while neutron doses ranged from 5 to 200 rads with both strains. The present paper will present an overview of these data and the general findings while subsequent publications will present detailed analyses of each aspect. A variety of neoplasms were sensitive to induction after radiation exposure, including tumors of both reticular tissue origin (leukemia, lymphoma, etc.) and solid tumors. For the RFM, thymic lymphomas were the dominant reticular tissue neoplasm while the majority of solid tumors were either lung adenomas or fit into the broad category of endocrine related tumors, including ovarian, pituitary, harderian, and uterine tumors. The BALB/c was much less sensitive to induction of reticular tissue neoplasms. The tumors that were most sensitive to induction included malignant lung carcinomas, mammary adenocarcinomas and ovarian tumors. In general for both life shortening and tumor induction after gamma ray exposures, when the low to intermediate dose range was sufficiently defined, linearity could be rejected and a dose squared or linear-dose squared relationship adequately fit the data. For neutron exposures, on the other hand, linear relationships were the general finding. The RBE for neutrons varied with tumor type and total dose level. For gamma ray irradiation, the intermediate dose rate resulted in a decreased effectiveness in all cases, while for neutron exposures the dose rate relationships were more complex

  5. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  6. Activation of the JET vacuum vessel: a comparison of calculated with measured gamma-radiation fluxes and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.; Avery, A.; Verschuur, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    The gamma-radiation dose-rates inside the JET vacuum vessel due to induced radioactivity were measured at intervals throughout the 1986 period of operation, and the decay gamma energy spectrum was measured during the subsequent lengthy shutdown. The dose-rates were found to be in good agreement with values calculated using the neutron yield records compiled from the time-resolved neutron yield monitor responses for individual discharges. This result provides strong support for the reliability of the neutron yield monitor calibration. (author)

  7. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in

  8. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Mcnaughton, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr- versus 0.3 mSv yr-). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr- threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr- air pathway

  9. Study of radon progeny distribution and radiation dose rate in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The absorbed dose rate in air of airborne gamma-ray and the concentration of radon progeny in surface air have been observed continuously in Maizuru, Japan. When data observed on fine days were plotted, with dose rate as ordinate and contraction as abscissa, these points traced with a lapse of time illustrated an anticlockwise looping for each day. This result suggests that the variation of absorbed dose rate lags behind that of concentration of radon progeny; this is due to the delay time incurred as the concentration level gradually varies from ground surface to upper air. Radon progeny concentrations in precipitation and in surface air have been observed there in order to study the relationship between the two concentrations and the influence of precipitation patterns on the concentration in precipitation. Results obtained from analysis of the observed data suggest that radon progeny in precipitation originate mainly from scavenging within the cloud (rainout) and not from that below the cloud (washout). (author)

  10. A study on measurement on artificial radiation dose rate using the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidachi, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Konno, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    We examined accuracy and stability of estimated artificial dose contribution which is distinguished from natural background gamma-ray dose rate using Response Matrix method. Irradiation experiments using artificial gamma-ray sources indicated that there was a linear relationship between observed dose rate and estimated artificial dose contribution, when irradiated artificial gamma-ray dose rate was higher than about 2 nGy/h. Statistical and time-series analyses of long term data made it clear that estimated artificial contribution showed almost constant values under no artificial influence from the nuclear power plants. However, variations of estimated artificial dose contribution were infrequently observed due to of rainfall, detector maintenance operation and occurrence of calibration error. Some considerations on the factors to these variations were made. (author)

  11. Relative effect of radiation dose rate on hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic lethality of total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; McNeill, J.; Karolis, C.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Travis, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine the influence of dose rate on the toxicity of total-body irrdiation (TBI) with and without syngeneic bone-marrow rescue in mice. The results showed a much greater dose-rate dependence for death from nonhemopoietic toxicity than from bone-marrow ablation, with the ratio of LD 50 's increasing from 1.73 at 25 cGy/min to 2.80 at 1 cGy/min. At the higher dose rates, dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity resulted from late organ injury, affecting the lungs, kidneys, and liver. At 1 cGy/min the major dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity was acute gastrointestinal injury. The implications of these results in the context of TBI in preparation for bone-marrow transplantation are discussed. 15 refs., 4 figs

  12. Dose-rate evidence for two kinds of radiation damage in stationary-phase mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Roesch, W.C.; Nelson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Survival based on colony formation was measured for starved plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to 250 kVp X rays at dose rates of 0.0031, 0.025, 0.18, 0.31, and 1.00 Gy/min. A large dose-rate effect was demonstrated. Delayed plating experiments and dose response experiments following a conditioning dose, both using a dose rate of 1.00 Gy/min and plating delays of up to 48 hr, were also used to investigate the alternative repair hypotheses. There is clearly a greater change in survival in dose-rate experiments than in the other experiments. Thus the authors believe that a process which depends on the square of the concentration of initial damage, and which alters the effect of initial damage on cell survival is being observed. They have applied the damage accumulation model to separate the single-event damage from this concentration-dependent form and estimate the repair rate for the latter type to be 70 min for their CHO cells

  13. Time- and dose rate-related effects of internal 177Lu exposure on gene expression in mouse kidney tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüler, Emil; Rudqvist, Nils; Parris, Toshima Z.; Langen, Britta; Spetz, Johan; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs in some radionuclide therapy regimens. However, the biological impact of internal exposure from radionuclides is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dose rate and time after i.v. injection of 177 LuCl 3 on changes in transcriptional patterns in mouse kidney tissue. Methods: To investigate the effect of dose rate, female Balb/c nude mice were i.v. injected with 11, 5.6, 1.6, 0.8, 0.30, and 0 MBq of 177 LuCl 3 , and killed at 3, 6, 24, 48, 168, and 24 hours after injection, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of time after onset of exposure was analysed using mice injected with 0.26, 2.4, and 8.2 MBq of 177 LuCl 3 , and killed at 45, 90, and 140 days after injection. Global transcription patterns of irradiated kidney cortex and medulla were assessed and enriched biological processes were determined from the regulated gene sets using Gene Ontology terms. Results: The average dose rates investigated were 1.6, 0.84, 0.23, 0.11 and 0.028 mGy/min, with an absorbed dose of 0.3 Gy. At 45, 90 and 140 days, the absorbed doses were estimated to 0.3, 3, and 10 Gy. In general, the number of differentially regulated transcripts increased with time after injection, and decreased with absorbed dose for both kidney cortex and medulla. Differentially regulated transcripts were predominantly involved in metabolic and stress response-related processes dependent on dose rate, as well as transcripts associated with metabolic and cellular integrity at later time points. Conclusion: The observed transcriptional response in kidney tissue was diverse due to difference in absorbed dose, dose rate and time after exposure. Nevertheless, several transcripts were significantly regulated in all groups despite differences in exposure parameters, which may indicate potential biomarkers for exposure of kidney tissue

  14. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynaldo, S. R. [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology, Posgraduate Course in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: sirr@cdtn.br [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and -0.3% for the {sup 85}Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  15. Shutdown dose rates at ITER equatorial ports considering radiation cross-talk from torus cryopump lower port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Rafael, E-mail: rjuarez@ind.uned.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pampin, Raul [F4E, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Levesy, Bruno [ITER Organization, 13115 Route de Vinon sur Verdon, St Paul Lez Durance (France); Moro, Fabio [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Suarez, Alejandro [ITER Organization, 13115 Route de Vinon sur Verdon, St Paul Lez Durance (France); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Shutdown dose rates for planned maintenance purposes is an active research field in ITER. In this work the radiation (neutron and gamma) cross-talk between ports in the most conservative case foreseen in ITER is investigated: the presence of a torus cryopump lower port, mostly empty for pumping efficiency reasons. There will be six of those ports: #4, #6, #10, #12, #16 and #18. The equatorial ports placed above them will receive a significant amount of additional radiation affecting the shutdown dose rates during in situ maintenance activities inside the cryostat, and particularly in the port interspace area. In this study a general situation to all the equatorial ports placed above torus cryopump lower ports is considered: a generic diagnostics equatorial port placed above the torus cryopump lower port (LP#4). In terms of shutdown dose rates at equatorial port interspace after 10{sup 6} s of cooling time, 405 μSv/h has been obtained, of which 160 μSv/h (40%) are exclusively due to radiation cross-talk from a torus cryopump lower port. Equatorial port activation due to only “local neutrons” contributes 166 μSv/h at port interspace, showing that radiation cross-talk from such a lower port is a phenomenon comparable in magnitude to the neutron leakage though the equatorial port plug.

  16. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaldo, S. R.; Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 85 Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the 90 Sr/ 90 Y and -0.3% for the 85 Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  17. Radiation chemistry of water at low dose rates with emphasis on the energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in absorbed dose water calorimetry. In order to accurately relate the temperature change to the absorbed dose, the energy balance of the overall chemistry of the system must be known. The radiolytic products and their yields are affected by dose rate, dose and added solutes. The yields of the radiolytic products have been calculated using a computer program developed at Atomic Energy of Canada. The chemical energy balance was determined as a function of dose for various dose rates and initial concentrations of hydrogen (H 2 ), oxygen (O 2 ), and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In solutions containing H 2 O 2 or O 2 and H 2 the chemical reactions were exothermic; in other cases they were endothermic. Approach to equilibrium and equilbrium conditions are discussed

  18. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  19. Critical commentary on dose-rate evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, E.J.; Malenfant, R.E.; Plassmann, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki present a unique problem in dosimetry: the effects of radiation exposure may be inferred although the exposure itself is unknown. Experience with a replica of Little Boy demonstrates the difficulties of measuring dose rates, the problems of comparing measurements with calculations, and the inadequacy of the conventional standards that are used to calibrate dosimeters

  20. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  1. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose rate in a didactic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Phelipe Amaral Ferreira; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed in order to create a new didactic experiment in the X-ray apparatus of PHYWE, where the saturation current was obtained through a free air ionization chamber. The values of saturation currents were obtained in two ways. Initially, the anodic DDP was kept constant and the anodic current was varied. In the second way, the anodic current was kept constant while the anodic DDP was varied. Therefore, we were able to evaluate the dependence of the absolved dose rate in relation to the DDP and the tube current. (author)

  2. Radiation-chemical discussion on inverse dose-rate effect observed in radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results of inverse dose-rate effect, so-called Kada Effects, which was published by Takakura and her coworkers on radiation-induced strand breaks of plasmid DNA in aerated aqueous solution, have been kinetically analyzed and discussed on the basis of radiation chemistry. the kinetic analysis indicates that there are two possible mechanisms; 1) equilibrium mixture of O 2 - and HO 2 is responsible for strand breaks of DNA, and 2) peroxyl radical produced from citrate is effective for the strand breaks. However, the detailed kinetic analysis revealed that the latter is improbable because unimolecular decay of the peroxyl radical must be assumed to be negligible for its participation despite fast decay of analogous organic peroxyl radicals. The analysis has also given 9.93±0.10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per nucleotide unit, which corresponds to 7.62 x 10 4 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 per DNA molecule, as the rate constant for the reaction of the equilibrium mixture with plasmid pBR 322 DNA. Furthermore the probability that the reaction of the mixture with a nucleotide unit of DNA leads to strand breaks was obtained to be 3.36 x 10 -3 for gamma-irradiated system and 1.98 x 10 -3 for beta-irradiated system, respectively. (author)

  3. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  4. Environmental gamma dose rate monitoring along Mumbai-Pune route using environmental radiation monitor with navigational aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, N.; Kale, M.S.; Raman, N.; Krishnamachari, G.; Harikumar, M.; Sharma, D.N.; Mehta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous environmental radiation monitor with navigational aid (ERMNA) for mapping natural gamma radiation background on country wide scale by deployment in railway coaches, has been designed. The system makes use of Indian railway network which is one of the widest network of railways in the world covering nearly complete length and breadth of the country. The system uses an energy compensated (within ± 30%) GN detectors for measurement of environmental dose rate due to natural background, a global positioning system (GPS) for on-line acquisition of positional co-ordinates (longitude and latitude) and an 8085 based data acquisition and processing unit. This system is deployed in guard's cabin of a train. The dose rate data tagged with positional co-ordinates and collected by the system during train journey is down loaded into a Lap Top PC for storage, analysis and graphical representation. The system has been used for background monitoring between Mumbai and Pune. The dose rates recorded over a period of three months ranging from November 1996 to February 1997 along the route show no change in the values which vary from 4 μr/h to 6 μR/h along the route. It drops down to <3 μR/h within tunnels en route. (author)

  5. A case of central type early stage lung cancer receiving 60Co high dose-rate postoperative endobronchial radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Syouji; Kodama, Ken; Kurokawa, Eiji; Doi, Osamu; Terasawa, Toshio; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Tateishi, Ryuhei

    1985-01-01

    Right middle-lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed for a case of central type early stage lung cancer. Tumor extended very closely to the line of incision margin of the resected specimen, appearing as carcinoma in situ. To inprove curativity, postoperative radiation therapy was performed with 60 Co high dose-rate endobronchial radiation by a remote afterloading system. A total dose of 40Gy was administered to the target area without any severe side effects. The patient is healthy and has no evidence of metastasis. This procedure is considered to be an effective treatment for postoperative lung cancer with possible residual malignancy. (author)

  6. SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y [DCH Reg. Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue by reducing the location uncertainty of a moving target, we proposed an ultra-high dose rate system and evaluated. Methods: High energy electrons generated with a linear accelerator were injected into a storage ring to be accumulated. The number of the electrons in the ring was determined based on the prescribed radiation dose. The dose was delivered within a millisecond, when an online imaging system found that the target was in the position that was consistent with that in a treatment plan. In such a short time period, the displacement of the target was negligible. The margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced that was evaluated by comparing of volumes between CTV and ITV in 14 cases of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. A design of the ultra-high dose rate system was evaluated based clinical needs and the recent developments of low energy (a few MeV) electron storage ring. Results: This design of ultra-high dose rate system was feasible based on the techniques currently available. The reduction of a target volume was significant by reducing the margin that accounted the motion of the target. ∼50% volume reduction of the internal target volume (ITV) could be achieved in lung SBRT treatments. Conclusion: With this innovation of ultra-high dose rate system, the margin of target is able to be significantly reduced. It will reduce treatment time of gating and allow precisely specified gating window to improve the accuracy of dose delivering.

  7. Scintillation detectors, applications in ambient dose rate measurement of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harja, C.

    1997-01-01

    For the task of developing an ambient dose rate measuring probe, the company MAB decided for a design combining an organic plastic scintillator and a secondary electron multiplier. MAB tested a range of available plastic scintillators suitable for this task, and one proved to be particularly good for the intended purpose. This scintillator is a product of the British company NE Technology Ltd. and was specially developed for dosimetry applications, offering the following advantages: The response within the range from 33 keV to 1.3 MeV (Co-60) is much more constant than with combined-design types; there is no afterglow under conditions of excessive load. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2012-01-01

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  9. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  10. Study on indoor radon concentration and gamma radiation dose rate in different rooms in some dwellings around Bharath Gold Mines Limited, Karnataka State, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umesha Reddy, K.; Jayasheelan, A.; Sannappa, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon contributes significantly to the total radiation exposure caused to human beings. The indoor concentration of radon in different rooms in the same type of dwellings around Bharath Gold Mines Limited (BGML), Karnataka State (12°57' min N and 78°16' min E) were measured by using LR-115 (type-Il) Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs). The maximum indoor radon concentration is observed in the bathroom and minimum in the hall. The maximum average indoor radon concentration is observed in the Champion and minimum in the BEML nagar. The indoor gamma radiation dose rate is also measured in these locations using scintillometer. The geology of this part forms predominantly Hornblende Schist, Granite gneiss, Champion gneiss, Quartzite etc. The indoor radon concentration shows good correlation with the indoor gamma radiation dose. (author)

  11. Are radiosensitivity data derived from natural field conditions consistent with data from controlled exposures? A case study of Chernobyl wildlife chronically exposed to low dose rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier-Laplace, J; Geras'kin, S; Della-Vedova, C; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Hinton, T G; Real, A; Oudalova, A

    2013-07-01

    The discrepancy between laboratory or controlled conditions ecotoxicity tests and field data on wildlife chronically exposed to ionising radiation is presented for the first time. We reviewed the available chronic radiotoxicity data acquired in contaminated fields and used a statistical methodology to support the comparison with knowledge on inter-species variation of sensitivity to controlled external γ irradiation. We focus on the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and effects data on terrestrial wildlife reported in the literature corresponding to chronic dose rate exposure situations (from background ~100 nGy/h up to ~10 mGy/h). When needed, we reconstructed the dose rate to organisms and obtained consistent unbiased data sets necessary to establish the dose rate-effect relationship for a number of different species and endpoints. Then, we compared the range of variation of radiosensitivity of species from the Chernobyl-Exclusion Zone with the statistical distribution established for terrestrial species chronically exposed to purely gamma external irradiation (or chronic Species radioSensitivity Distribution - SSD). We found that the best estimate of the median value (HDR50) of the distribution established for field conditions at Chernobyl (about 100 μGy/h) was eight times lower than the one from controlled experiments (about 850 μGy/h), suggesting that organisms in their natural environmental were more sensitive to radiation. This first comparison highlights the lack of mechanistic understanding and the potential confusion coming from sampling strategies in the field. To confirm the apparent higher sensitive of wildlife in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, we call for more a robust strategy in field, with adequate design to deal with confounding factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of different radiation dose rates on refrigerated mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Gomes, Heliana de Azevedo; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Laboratorios de Pocos de Caldas (COLAB)]. E-mail: polibrito@yahoo.com.br; hgomes@cnen.gov.br; htfukuma@cnen.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    Samples of mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) were irradiated while frozen with doses of 0.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy - 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 0.32 kGy.h{sup -1}. Individual lots of irradiated and non irradiated samples were evaluated for Substances Reactive to Thiobarbituric Acid (TBARS) and total count of psychotropic bacteria, while in refrigerated storage (2 {+-}1 deg C), for 11 days. The values for percentage of recovery for 1,1,3,3-tetraetoxipropane (TEP) and for conversion of the K value for samples irradiated with 3.0 kGy - 4.35 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 0.3 kGy.h{sup -1} and samples non irradiated were, respectively: 80.3 %, 70.3 % and 80.4 % and 9.1, 11.2 and 9.1. The results showed that there was not a difference for the TBARS values when irradiated and non irradiated samples were compared up to the forth day of refrigerated storage. Between the seventh and eleventh day of storage the TBARS values increased gradually when values obtained for non irradiated and those samples irradiated with doses of 3.0 kGy - 0.3 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 4.35 kGy.h{sup -1} were compared. The average values for psychotropic bacteria obtained for samples non irradiated and those irradiated with doses of 3.0 kGy - 0.32 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1}, during the second and eleventh day of frozen storage were respectively 6.68 log (UFC.g{sup -1}), 2.87 log (UFC.g{sup -1}) and 2.66 log (UFC.g{sup -1}). When both variables were evaluated, it was verified that samples irradiated with a dose rate of 0.32 kGy.{sup -1} presented the smallest values of TBARS than those samples irradiated with a dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1}, from the seventh day of refrigerated storage and bacterial count within the legal limits allowed by the regulation, being considered the best dosage rate for processing MDCM, in the conditions of the present study. (author)

  13. Estimation of absorbed radiation dose rates in wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshito; Fuma, Shoichi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Aoki, Masanari; Kubota, Masahide; Furuhata, Yoshiaki; Shigemura, Yusaku; Yamada, Fumio; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Obara, Satoshi; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The dose rates of radiation absorbed by wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident were estimated. The large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus), also called the wood mouse, was the major rodent species captured in the sampling area, although other species of rodents, such as small field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and Japanese grass voles (Microtus montebelli), were also collected. The external exposure of rodents calculated from the activity concentrations of radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in litter and soil samples using the ERICA (Environmental Risk from Ionizing Contaminants: Assessment and Management) tool under the assumption that radionuclides existed as the infinite plane isotropic source was almost the same as those measured directly with glass dosimeters embedded in rodent abdomens. Our findings suggest that the ERICA tool is useful for estimating external dose rates to small animals inhabiting forest floors; however, the estimated dose rates showed large standard deviations. This could be an indication of the inhomogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the sampled litter and soil. There was a 50-fold difference between minimum and maximum whole-body activity concentrations measured in rodents at the time of capture. The radionuclides retained in rodents after capture decreased exponentially over time. Regression equations indicated that the biological half-life of radiocesium after capture was 3.31 d. At the time of capture, the lowest activity concentration was measured in the lung and was approximately half of the highest concentration measured in the mixture of muscle and bone. The average internal absorbed dose rate was markedly smaller than the average external dose rate (sampling area was estimated to be approximately 52 μGy h(-1) (1.2 mGy d(-1)), even 3 years after the accident. This dose rate exceeds 0.1-1 mGy d(-1) derived consideration reference level for Reference rat

  14. Comparison of Radiation Dose Rates with the Flux to Dose Conversion Factors Recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kil, A Reum; Lee, Jo Eun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation shielding has been performed for the design and maintenance of various facilities using radioactive sources such as nuclear fuel, accelerator, and radionuclide. The conversion of flux to dose mainly used in nuclear and radiation fields has been generally made with the dose coefficients presented in ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP- 74), which are produced based on ICRP Publication 60. On the other hand, ICRP Publication 116 (ICRP-116), which adopts the protection system of ICRP Publication 103, has recently been published and provides the dose conversion coefficients calculated with a variety of Monte Carlo codes. The coefficients have more than an update of those in ICRP-74, including new particle types and a greatly expanded energy range. In this study, a shielding evaluation of a specific container for neutron and gamma sources was performed with the MCNP6 code. The dose rates from neutron and gamma-ray sources were calculated using the MCNP6 codes, and these results were based on the flux to dose conversion factors recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116. As a result, the dose rates evaluated with ICRP-74 were generally shown higher than those with ICRP-116. For neutrons, the difference is mainly occurred by the decrease of radiation weighting factors in a part of energy ranges in the ICRP-116 recommendations. For gamma-rays, the ICRP-74 recommendation applied with the kerma approximation leads to overestimated results than the other assessment

  15. Effect Analysis on the Radiation Dose Rate of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors by Atmospheric Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Sun; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chang Ho [Innovative Technology Center for Radiation Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) had been established to evaluate the radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The radiation effects of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the atomic bombs detonated at both cities were analyzed, and two types of radiation transport codes (i.e., MCNP4C and DORT) were employed in their studies. It was specifically investigated for contribution of each type of radiations to total dose. However, it is insufficient to examine the effects by various environmental factors such as weather conditions, because their calculations were only performed under certain condition at the times of the bombings. In addition, the scope of them does not include acute radiation injury of the atomic bomb survivors in spite of important information for investigating hazard of unexpected radiation accident. Therefore, this study analyzed the contribution of primary and secondary effects (i.e., skyshine and groundshine) of neutrons emitted from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. These analyses were performed through a series of radiation transport calculations by using MCNPX 2.6.0 code with variations of atmospheric density. The acute radiation injury by prompt neutrons was also evaluated as a function of distance from the hypocenter, where hypocenter is the point on the ground directly beneath the epicenter which is the burst point of the bomb in air

  16. Radiation treatment of esophageal carcinoma using a high-dose-rate remote afterloader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio

    1984-01-01

    Between May 1980 and March 1983, 31 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with a high-dose-rate remote controlled afterloading unit, as a boost therapy of the intracavitary irradiation following the external irradiation. The data of these patients were analyzed by the regression analysis which is one of the multivariate analyses, and following results were obtained. 1) Factors which affect local control achieved by intracavitary irradiation were the existence of deep ulcer or stenosis after external irradiation, age of the patient, dosage of intracavitary irradiation and tumor length. 2) The local control estimation index was determined by these five factors. Local control estimation index=1.38950-0.01571 x age+0.04517 x tumor length+0.62167 x stenosis* + 0.94811 x deep ulcer*-0.02969 x dosage of intracavitary irradiation. * Existence of stenosis/ulcer was represented by 1, and absence was represented by 0. 3) The local control estimation indices obtained in the above formula were then approved by applying internal samples, and also external samples. Indices of 0.5 or more mean local failure, and those of less than 0.5 mean possible local control. Examination was then made as to the local control estimation indices of another group of 30 patients who had been treated by external irradiation alone between November 1974 and April 1980. Comparison of the indices of the two groups showed the following results. 1) Rate of possible local control by external irradiation alone was 23%. 2) Rate of possible local control was increased up to 62% by using intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. (author)

  17. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  18. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  19. Bystander effects of exposure to low-dose-rate 125I seeds on human lung cancers cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Rongfei; Chen Honghong; Yu Lei; Zhao Meijia; Shao Chunlin; Cheng Wenying

    2007-01-01

    The bystander effects induced by continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seeds radiation on damage of human lung cancer cells were investigated. Human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, which have different sensitivities to high-dose rate (HDR) external irradiation, were exposed directly to 125 I seeds in vitro and co-cultured with unirradiated cells for 24 h. Using cytokinesis-blocking micronucleus method and γ H2AX fluorescence immunoassay, bystander effects induced by 2Gy and 4Gy 125 I seed irradiation on micronucleus formation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of human lung cancer cells were detected and evaluated. The results showed that irradiation with 125 I seeds can induce medium-mediated bystander effects in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, exhibiting that both micronuclei formation and γ H2AX focus formation in bystander cells were increased significantly compared with non-irradiated cells. The extent of DNA damage induced by bystander effects was correlated with accumulated radiation dose and radiosensitive of tumor cells. NCI-H446 cells that were sensitive to HDR γ irradiation were more sensitive to continuous LDR irradiation and bystander effects than A549. However, a comparison between the bystander effects and direct effects elicits the intensity of bystander responses of A549 cells was higher than that of NCI-H446 cells. A dose-related reduction in bystander responses was observed both in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, suggesting that the signaling factors involved in the bystander signaling pathways may decrease with the increase of cell damages. (authors)

  20. Intercomparison exercise on external gamma dose rate under field conditions at the laboratory of natural radiation (Saelices el Chico, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Villanueva, J. L.; Sainz-Fernandez, C.; Fuente-Merino, I.; Saez-Vergara, J. C.; Correa-Garce, E.; Quindos-Poncela, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The last nuclear accident in Fukushima nuclear power plant has increased the necessity for measuring radiation in the environment. Therefore, radiation monitors providing results traceable throughout the country become essential and it is very important to test them under the same environmental conditions. The first intercomparison of natural radioactivity under field conditions was held in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain) in May 2011, including an exercise on environmental dose rate. This article presents the results achieved by 19 instruments belonging to 12 institutions from 7 different countries. The tested detectors are proportional counters, ionisation chambers, Geiger-Mueller and scintillators measuring dose rate in three stations with reference values from 110 to 1800 nGy h -1 All the results were given in terms of air kerma (nGy h -1 ) and the measurements show agreement within 25 % in all the sites. Evaluation criteria based on accuracy and statistical uncertainty were also carried out and 25 % of participants passed the test in all sites. (authors)

  1. Effect of radiation dose rate and cyclophosphamide on pulmonary toxicity after total body irradiation in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, Akmal; Nielsen, Ole S.; El-Badawy, Samy; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is still a major complication after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It is difficult to determine the exact role of radiation in this multifactorial complication, especially because most of the experimental work on lung damage was done using localized lung irradiation and not TBI. We have thus tested the effect of radiation dose rate and combining cyclophosphamide (CTX) with single fraction TBI on lung damage in a mouse model for BMT. Methods and Materials: TBI was given as a single fraction at a high dose rate (HDR, 0.71 Gy/min) or a low dose rate (LDR, 0.08 Gy/min). CTX (250 mg/kg) was given 24 h before TBI. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed 4-6 h after the last treatment. Lung damage was assessed using ventilation rate (VR) and lethality between 28 and 180 days (LD (50(28))-180 ). Results: The LD 50 for lung damage, ± standard error (SE), increased from 12.0 (± 0.2) Gy using single fraction HDR to 15.8 (± 0.6) Gy using LDR. Adding CTX shifted the dose-response curves towards lower doses. The LD 50 values for the combined treatment were 5.3 (± 0.2) and 3.5 (± 0.2) Gy for HDR and LDR, respectively. This indicates that the combined effect of CTX and LDR was more toxic than that of combined CTX and HDR. Lung damage evaluated by VR demonstrated two waves of VR increase. The first wave of VR increase occurred after 6 weeks using TBI only and after 3 weeks in the combined CTX-TBI treatment, irrespective of total dose or dose rate. The second wave of VR elevation resembled the IP that follows localized thoracic irradiation in its time of occurrence. Conclusions: Lung damage following TBI could be spared using LDR. However, CTX markedly enhances TBI-induced lung damage. The combination of CTX and LDR is more toxic to the lungs than combining CTX and HDR

  2. Modeling of transient ionizing radiation effects in bipolar devices at high dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FJELDLY, T.A.; DENG, Y.; SHUR, M.S.; HJALMARSON, HAROLD P.; MUYSHONDT, ARNOLDO

    2000-01-01

    To optimally design circuits for operation at high intensities of ionizing radiation, and to accurately predict their a behavior under radiation, precise device models are needed that include both stationary and dynamic effects of such radiation. Depending on the type and intensity of the ionizing radiation, different degradation mechanisms, such as photoelectric effect, total dose effect, or single even upset might be dominant. In this paper, the authors consider the photoelectric effect associated with the generation of electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor. The effects of low radiation intensity on p-II diodes and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) were described by low-injection theory in the classical paper by Wirth and Rogers. However, in BJTs compatible with modem integrated circuit technology, high-resistivity regions are often used to enhance device performance, either as a substrate or as an epitaxial layer such as the low-doped n-type collector region of the device. Using low-injection theory, the transient response of epitaxial BJTs was discussed by Florian et al., who mainly concentrated on the effects of the Hi-Lo (high doping - low doping) epilayer/substrate junction of the collector, and on geometrical effects of realistic devices. For devices with highly resistive regions, the assumption of low-level injection is often inappropriate, even at moderate radiation intensities, and a more complete theory for high-injection levels was needed. In the dynamic photocurrent model by Enlow and Alexander. p-n junctions exposed to high-intensity radiation were considered. In their work, the variation of the minority carrier lifetime with excess carrier density, and the effects of the ohmic electric field in the quasi-neutral (q-n) regions were included in a simplified manner. Later, Wunsch and Axness presented a more comprehensive model for the transient radiation response of p-n and p-i-n diode geometries. A stationary model for high-level injection in p

  3. Dependence of radiation effects in organic materials on absorbed dose rate; Zavisimost` radiatsionnykh ehffektov v organicheskikh materialakh ot moshchn osti pogloshchennoj dozy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B` riksman, B A; Kras` ko, L B; Milinchuk, V K; Sichkar` , V P

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of experimental data on the dose rate effect on the operational properties of organic polymers is conducted. Methods of radiation effects forecasting under utilization of these materials are compared according to the results of the accelerated testing.

  4. Knowledge on radiation dose-rate for risk communication on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The sense of anxiety on radiation after Fukushima Dai-ichi accident has not disappeared because of the nightmare scenario on radiation cultivated through the Cold War era starting at the atomic bomb dropping at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the present paper, from the viewpoint of establishing the social acceptance of nuclear power plants as well as new reasonable regulation, biological defense in depth (production of anti-oxidants, DNA repair, cell death/apoptosis, and immune defense mechanisms) found in a few decades are presented in comparison with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for the induction of cancer in the range up to 100 mSv (as single or annual doses) applied for the present regulation. (author)

  5. Monitoring of dose rates and radiation flux density in working rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajtor, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    The problems of determining the neutron field characteristics (dose equivalent rate and flux density) in relation to the environmental monitoring by radiation protection services. The measurement devices used for measuring dose equivalent rate and neutron flux density RUS-U8 multi-purpose scintillation radiometer and RUP-1 multi-purpose transportable radiometer as well as measurement technique are described. Recommendations are given for checking measuring devices calibration, registering measurement results [ru

  6. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain

  7. Survival of tumor bearing mice by sequencing of low dose rate (LDR) neutron and photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onomura, C.I.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Cf-252 neutron radiation (NT) has been shown to be effective therapy for bulky, hypoxic human tumor and to produce consistent rapid clearance and 5 year cures. NT has been found to be more or less effective depending upon the schedule in which it is used and upon mixing with photon radiation. In an effort to study this scheduling and photon effect, LSA tumor was irradiated in vivo in a hypoxic, advanced state, in different schedules in combination of NT with Co-60 photons. The LSA lymphoma of C57BL/ym mice represents an accurate system to assess dose-response of tumor cells in vivo. Mean survival time was used as endpoint. A high RBE for LDR Cf-252 NT was observed with a RBE(n) of -- 5.0. The effect was not greatly sensitive to sequence in which photons were used. Comparison studies were also tested relative to LDR Cs-137 photon radiation. The results support the high efficacy of LDR NT for destruction of hypoxic tumor in vivo

  8. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Richard P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  9. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandblom, V; Almén, A; Cederblad, A.; Båth, M; Lundh, C; Mai, T; Rystedt, H

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (H p (10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  11. Mapping radon-prone areas using γ-radiation dose rate and geological information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Talavera, M; Rey, C; Ramos, L; García-Pérez, A

    2013-01-01

    Identifying radon-prone areas is key to policies on the control of this environmental carcinogen. In the current paper, we present the methodology followed to delineate radon-prone areas in Spain. It combines information from indoor radon measurements with γ-radiation and geological maps. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it lessens the requirement for a high density of measurements by making use of commonly available information. It can be applied for an initial definition of radon-prone areas in countries committed to introducing a national radon policy or to improving existing radon maps in low population regions. (paper)

  12. Radiation induced skeletal changes in beagle: dose rates, dose, and age effect analysis from 226Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Williams, J.R.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced skeletal injury (E) and the rate of skeletal injury were studied as a function of time and dose in beagles administered 226 Ra Cl 2 in eight semimonthly iv injections starting at 2, 4, or 14 months of age. Skeletal changes were evaluated with a radiographic x-ray scoring system in 20 skeletal regions; each region was scored on a 0 to 6 scale. Bone changes in six regions of humeri were qualitatively analyzed for comparison with total skeletal changes. Skeletal changes were classified by endosteal or periosteal cortical sclerosis and thickening, fractures, osteolytic lesions, and trabecular coarsening

  13. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates and radiological mapping of Terengganu state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) rates in Terengganu state, Malaysia was carried out from 145 different locations using NaI[Tl] micro roentgen survey meter. The measured TGRD rates ranged from 35 to 340 nGy h -1 with mean value of 150 nGy h -1 . The annual effective dose to population was found to be 0.92 mSv y -1 . The data obtained were used in constructing the gamma isodose map using ArcGis 9.3 which shows the distribution of TGRD rates across the state. (author)

  14. Macroarray analysis of gene expression in hematopoietic tissues from mice continuously irradiated by low dose-rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Nakamura, Shingo; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We found that the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow and spleen from 4 - 8 Gy-irradiated mice decreased about 50%, in spite of no change in the number of peripheral blood cells. To evaluate the effects of chronic irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression in mice hematopoietic cells from bone marrow and spleen, the RNA expressions of more than 500 genes such as cytokine genes and oncogenes were measured on the membranes by the RNA macroarray analysis method at accumulated doses at 4.7 and 8 Gy in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the dose rate of 20 mGy/day. The RNA macroarray analysis in spleens from 8 Gy-irradiated mice showed that the expressions in 16 genes including noggin were more than 1.5 times larger than that of control, while those in 64 genes including shh (sonic hedgehog) and BMP-4 (bone morphogenesis protein 4) were more than 1.5 times smaller than that of control. (author)

  15. A Generalized Approach to Model the Spectra and Radiation Dose Rate of Solar Particle Events on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; McDole, Thoren; Kühl, Patrick; Appel, Jan C.; Matthiä, Daniel; Krauss, Johannes; Köhler, Jan

    2018-01-01

    For future human missions to Mars, it is important to study the surface radiation environment during extreme and elevated conditions. In the long term, it is mainly galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) modulated by solar activity that contribute to the radiation on the surface of Mars, but intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events may induce acute health effects. Such events may enhance the radiation level significantly and should be detected as immediately as possible to prevent severe damage to humans and equipment. However, the energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that in deep space due to the influence of the Martian atmosphere. Depending on the intensity and shape of the original solar particle spectra, as well as particle types, the surface spectra may induce entirely different radiation effects. In order to give immediate and accurate alerts while avoiding unnecessary ones, it is important to model and well understand the atmospheric effect on the incoming SEPs, including both protons and helium ions. In this paper, we have developed a generalized approach to quickly model the surface response of any given incoming proton/helium ion spectra and have applied it to a set of historical large solar events, thus providing insights into the possible variety of surface radiation environments that may be induced during SEP events. Based on the statistical study of more than 30 significant solar events, we have obtained an empirical model for estimating the surface dose rate directly from the intensities of a power-law SEP spectra.

  16. Measurement of radiocesium concentration in trees using cumulative gamma radiation dose rate detection systems - A simple presumption for radiocesium concentration in living woods using glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, T.; Hashida, S.N. [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Yin, Y.G.; Fujimaki, S. [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagao, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium from the severe accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on 11 March 2011 contaminates large areas. After this, a doubt for forest products, especially of mushroom, is indelible at the areas. Pruned woody parts and litters are containing a considerable amount of radiocesium, and generates a problem at incineration and composting. These mean that more attentive survey for each subject is expected; however, the present survey system is highly laborious/expensive and/or non-effective for this purpose. On the other hand, we can see a glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system. This system always utilized to detect a personal cumulative radiation dose, and thus, it is not suitable to separate a radiation from a specific object. However, if we can separate a radiation from a specific object and relate it with the own radiocesium concentration, it would enable us to presume the specific concentration with just an easy monitoring but without a destruction of the target nature and a complicated process including sampling, pre-treatment, and detection. Here, we present the concept of the measurement and results of the trials. First, we set glass-badges (type FS, Chiyoda Technol Corp., Japan) on a part of bough (approximately 10 cm in diameter) of Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) with four different settings: A, a direct setting without any shield; B, a setting with an aluminum shield between bough and the glass-badge; C, a setting with a lead shield between bough and the glass-badge; D, a setting with a lead shield covering the glass-badge to shut the radiation from the surrounding but from bough. The deduction between the amount of each setting should separate a specific radiation of the bough from unlimited radiation from the surrounding. Even if the hourly dose rate is not enough to count the difference, a moderate cumulative dose would clear the difference. In fact, results demonstrated a

  17. A summary of the performance of exposure rate and dose rate instruments contained in instrument evaluation reports NRPB-IE1 to NRPB-IE13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Iles, W.J.

    1979-06-01

    The various radiations encountered in radiological protection cover a wide range of energies and radiation measurements have to be carried out under an equally broad spectrum of environmental conditions. This report is one of a series intended to give information on the performance characteristics of radiological protection instruments, to assist in the selection of appropriate instruments for a given purpose, to interpret the results obtained with such instruments, and, in particular, to know the likely sources and magnitude of errors that might be associated with measurements in the field. The radiation, electrical and environmental characteristics of radiation protection instruments are considered together with those aspects of the construction which make an instrument convenient for routine use. To provide consistent criteria for instrument performance, the range of tests performed on any particular class of instrument, the test methods and the criteria of acceptable performance are based broadly on the appropriate Recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The radiations in the tests are, in general, selected from the range of reference radiations for instrument calibration being drawn up by the International Standards Organisation. Normally, each report deals with the capabilities and limitations of one model of instrument and no direct comparison with other instruments intended for similar purposes is made, since the significance of particular performance characteristics largely depends on the radiations and environmental conditions in which the instrument is to be used. The results quoted here have all been obtained from tests on instruments in routine production, with the appropriate measurements being made by the NRPB. This report provides a concise summary of measurements of the more important performance characteristics of radiation protection dose rate or exposure rate survey instruments which have been assessed by NRPB as part

  18. Fourth IRMF comparison of calibrations of portable gamma-ray dose- rate monitors 2001-2002 Ionising radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, V E

    2002-01-01

    The Ionising Radiations Metrology Forum (IRMF) organised a fourth comparison of calibrations of gamma-ray dose-rate monitors in which fifteen establishments in the UK participated. The exercise involved the circulation of three gamma-ray monitors for calibration in the fields produced using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co. The instruments used were an Electra with MC 20 probe, a Mini-Instruments Mini-rad 1000 and a Siemens electronic personal dosemeter Mk 2 (EPD). The responses relative to 'true' dose equivalent rate were calculated by the individual participants and submitted to the for analysis along with details of the facilities and fields employed. Details of the estimated uncertainties were also reported. The results are compared and demonstrate generally satisfactory agreement between the participating establishments. However, the participants' treatment of uncertainties needs improvement and demonstrates a need for guidance in this area.

  19. Radiation shielding and dose rate evaluation at the interim storage facility for spent fuel from Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciu, Marcela; Mateescu, Silvia; Pantazi, Doina; Penescu, Maria

    2000-01-01

    At present studies necessary to license the Interim Storage Facility for the Spent Fuel (CANDU type) from Cernavoda NPP are developed in our country.The spent fuel from Cernavoda NPP is discharged into Spent Fuel Bay in Service Building of the plant, where it remains several years for cooling. After this period, the bundles of spent fuel are to be transferred to the Interim Storage Facility.The dry interim storage solution seems to be the most appropriate variant for Cernavoda NPP.The design of the Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facility must meet the applicable safety requirements in order to ensure radiological protection of the personnel, public and environment during all phases of the facility achievement. In this paper we intend to present the calculation of radiation shielding at the spent fuel interim storage facility for two technical solutions: - Concrete Monolithic Module and Concrete Storage Cask. In order to quantify the fuel composition after irradiation, the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN 2.1 has been used, taking into account a cooling time of 7 years and 9 years, respectively, for these two variants. The shielding calculations have been performed using the computer codes QAD-5K and MICROSHIELD-4. The evaluations refer only to gamma radiation because the resulting neutron source (from (α,n) reactions and spontaneous fission) is insignificant as compared to the gamma source. The final results consist in the minimum thickness of the shielding and the corresponding external dose rates, ensuring a design average dose rate based on national and international regulations. (authors)

  20. Radiation and Reason Why radiation at modest dose rates is quite harmless and current radiation safety regulations are flawed

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Data on the impact of ionising radiation on life are examined in the light of evolutionary biology. This comparison confirms that fear of nuclear radiation is not justified by science itself; rather it originates in a failure of public trust in nuclear science, a relic of the international politics of the Cold War era. Current ionisation safety regulations appease this fear but without scientific support and they need fundamental reformulation. This should change the reaction to accidents like Fukushima, the cost of nuclear energy and the application of nuclear technology to the supply of food and fresh water. Such a boost to the world economy would require that more citizens study and appreciate the science involved – and then tell others -- not as much fun as the Higgs, perhaps, but no less important! www.radiationandreason.com

  1. A review of data on the effects of low and low dose-rate radiation with special reference to the dose limit problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsudaira, Hiromichi

    1977-01-01

    This is a review of data pertaining to detection and quantification of the effects after exposure to low LET radiations delivered at low and low dose-rate, i.e., at a level of maximum permissible dose for the radiation workers, on experimental materials ranging from plant to rodents and on some human populations. Irradiation at a dose of a few rad is reported to induce mutation or malignant transformation in some selected model systems, with a linear dose-effect relationship. Moreover, the incidence of the chromosome aberrations in spermatocytes is reported to be elevated in the scorpiones (Tityus bahiensis) collected in a region of high natural background radiations (several rem/year). An increase in the incidence of childhood malignancies is reported among children exposed in utero to diagnostic X-rays. Appreciable increase in the incidence of genetic diseases due possibly to chromosome aberrations is also reported among population living in a region of high natural background radiations. Points are raised and discussed as to the interpretation and particularly application of these data to the estimation of somatic and genetic risks of human population from man-made radiations. Recent attempts of risk-benefit analysis with populations subjected to mass X-ray examination of the chest and stomac are referred to. Since we are unaware of the actual injuries due to the exposure even at the level of radiation workers (5 rem/year), it is out of the capacity of a biologist to afford the basis for the decision of limiting the exposure of general population due to the light water reactor operation to 5 mrem/year. (auth.)

  2. Consequences of the exposure at low dose rates-contribution of animal experimentation. Consequences de l'exposition aux faibles debits de dose. Apport de l'experimentation animale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (FR). Direction des Sciences du Vivant)

    1990-01-01

    The exposure of laboratory animals to the various types of radiations will induce cancers in relation with the tissue absorbed doses. The shape of the dose-effet relationship is most variable. It is important to distinguish which tumours are comparable to human tumours. Those showing more analogies answer but seldom to the classical lineo-quadratic relationship; however, a strong attenuation of induction is demonstrated at low dose rates. Quasi-threshold relationships are seen after the exposure of some tissues to high-LET radiations. These observations question the validity of generalizing the radiobiologists' dual action theory, setting the origin of the dose-effect relationship in the induction of events within the DNA molecule. There is an alternative in the cellular collaboration events; it assumes that the effectiveness per dose unit decreases constantly as an inverse function of the dose rate.

  3. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  4. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  5. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  6. Monitoring and control of occupational radiation exposure in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Occupational exposure is the most prominent example for the prolonged exposure to low level ionizing radiation characterized by low doses and dose rates. In this paper the occupational exposure in Switzerland is presented and the regulatory control of this exposure in the framework of the new radiation protection regulations is discussed. (author)

  7. Near-term and late biological effects of acute and low-dose-rate continuous gamma-ray exposure in dogs and monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.

    1979-07-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (inury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with gamma rays at 35 r/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injry remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50%) and monkeys (8%) died from injury incurred during conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response (in terms of lethality) of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what we would expect from a single acute dose. The mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approx. 1400 h). Thus, the hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35-R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater (significant in dogs but not in monkeys) than for their control counterparts. Thus, long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than 4 times the acute LD 50 30 in dogs and approximately 2 times that in monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 Rat/day

  8. Conventional external beam radiation therapy and high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy as a boost for patients older than 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson

    2005-01-01

    The treatment options for patients with non metastatic prostate cancer range from observation, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy to various combination of some to all of them. Objective: we evaluated the impact on biochemical control of disease (bNED), acute and late intestinal (GI) and urological (GU) morbidity for a group of patients older than 70 years presenting initial or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost to conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology from Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: a total of 56 patients older than 70 were treated from March, 1997 to June, 2002. All patients had prior to HDRB a course of RT to a median dose of 45 Gy. HDRB doses ranged from 16 Gy to 20 Gy, given in 4 fractions. Results: the median age of the patients was 74.4 years (range 70-83) and the median follow-up 33 months (range 24 to 60). The 5-year actuarial bNED rate was 77%. Acute GU and GI morbidity G1-2 were seen in 17.8% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Late G1 or G2 GU morbidity was seen in 10.7% of the patients, while late G3 morbidity was observed in 7.1% of the patients, represented by urethral strictures. Conclusion: this group of patients had similar bNED rates when compared to literature, with acceptable morbidity rates. (author)

  9. Mouse fecal microbiome after exposure to high LET radiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space travel is associated with continuous low-dose-rate exposure to high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. Pathophysiological manifestations after low-dose...

  10. A New Approach for the Determination of Dose Rate and Radioactivity for Detected Gamma Nuclides Using an Environmental Radiation Monitor Based on an NaI(Tl) Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Lee, Wanno; Chang, Hyon-Sock; Chung, Kun Ho

    2017-10-01

    To expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, the method using an environmental radiation monitor (ERM) based on a 3' × 3' NaI(Tl) detector was used to perform real-time monitoring of the dose rate and radioactivity for detected gamma nuclides in the ground around an ERM. Full-energy absorption peaks in the energy spectrum for dose rate were first identified to calculate the individual dose rates of Bi, Ac, Tl, and K distributed in the ground through interference correction because of the finite energy resolution of the NaI(Tl) detector used in an ERM. The radioactivity of the four natural radionuclides was then calculated from the in situ calibration factor-that is, the dose rate per unit curie-of the used ERM for the geometry of the ground in infinite half-space, which was theoretically estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. By an intercomparison using a portable HPGe and samples taken from the ground around an ERM, this method to calculate the dose rate and radioactivity of four nuclides using an ERM was experimentally verified and finally applied to remotely monitor them in real-time in the area in which the ERM had been installed.

  11. Radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    The book gives accounts of some social and environmental impacts of the developing radiation industries, including the experiences of affected communities and individuals. Its structure is based on a division which has been made between nuclear and non-nuclear radiation sources, because they create distinctly different problems for environmental protection and so for public health policy. The emissions from electronic and electrical installations - the non-nuclear radiations - are dealt with in Part I. Emissions from radioactive substances - the nuclear radiations - are dealt with in Part II. Part III is for readers who want more detailed information about scientific basis of radiation-related biological changes and their associated health effects. 75 refs., 9 tabs., 7 figs., ills

  12. Operational specification and forecasting advances for Dst, LEO thermospheric densities, and aviation radiation dose and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the magnetosphere, thermosphere, and even troposphere are key regions that are affected. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed and is producing innovative space weather applications. Key operational systems for providing timely information about the effects of space weather on these domains are SET’s Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), and Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) system. MAPS provides a forecast Dst index out to 6 days through the data-driven, redundant data stream Anemomilos algorithm. Anemomilos uses observational proxies for the magnitude, location, and velocity of solar ejecta events. This forecast index is used by satellite operations to characterize upcoming geomagnetic storms, for example. In addition, an ENLIL/Rice Dst prediction out to several days has also been developed and will be described. LAPS is the SET fully redundant operational system providing recent history, current epoch, and forecast solar and geomagnetic indices for use in operational versions of the JB2008 thermospheric density model. The thermospheric densities produced by that system, driven by the LAPS data, are forecast to 72-hours to provide the global mass densities for satellite operators. ARMAS is a project that has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on aircraft to capture the real-time radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The dose and dose-rates are captured on aircraft, downlinked in real-time via the Iridium satellites, processed on the ground, incorporated into the most recent NAIRAS global radiation climatology data runs, and made available to end users via the web and

  13. Physiological and immunological changes following exposure to low versus high-dose ionizing irradiation; comparative analysis with dose rate and cumulative dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesun, Kim; Heewon, Jang; Soungyeon, Song; Shinhye, Oh; Cukcheul, Shin; Meeseon, Jeong; Chasoon, Kim; Kwnaghee, Yang; Seonyoung, Nam; Jiyoung, Kim; Youngwoo, Jin; Changyoung, Cha

    2008-01-01

    Full text: While high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms some reports suggest low-dose of radiation may not be as damaging as previously thought. Despite increasing evidence regarding the protective effect of low-dose radiation, no studies have directly compared the exact dose-response pattern by high- and low-dose of radiation exposed at high-and low-dose rate. This study aims to explore the cellular and molecular changes in mice exposed to low- and high-dose of radiation exposed at low- and high-dose rate. When C57BL/6 mice (Female, 6 weeks) were exposed at high-dose rate, 0.8 Gy/min, no significant change on the level of WBC, RBC, or platelets was observed up to total dose of 0.5 Gy. However, 2 Gy of radiation caused dramatic reduction in the level of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets. This reduction was accompanied by increased DNA damage in hematopoietic environments. The reduction of WBC was mainly due to the reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. CD8+ T cells and NK cells appeared to be relatively resistant to high-dose of radiation. This change was also accompanied by the reduction of T- and B- progenitor cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, no significant changes of the number of CD4+ T, CD8+ T, NK, and B cells were observed in the spleen of mice exposed at low-dose-rate (0.7 m Gy/h or 3.95 mGy/h) for up to 2 Gy, suggesting that low-dose radiation does not alter cellular distribution in the spleen. Nevertheless, mice exposed to low-dose radiation exhibited elevation of VEGF, MCP-1, IL-4, Leptin, IL-3, and Tpo in the peripheral blood and slight increases in MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-2 in the spleen. This suggests that chronic γ-radiation can stimulate immune function without causing damage to the immune components of the body. Taken together, these data indicate hormesis of low-dose radiation, which could be attributed to the stimulation of immune function. Dose rate rather than total

  14. Are radiosensitivity data derived from natural field conditions consistent with data from controlled exposures? A case study of Chernobyl wildlife chronically exposed to low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Geras’kin, S.; Della-Vedova, C.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Hinton, T.G.; Real, A.; Oudalova, A.

    2013-01-01

    The discrepancy between laboratory or controlled conditions ecotoxicity tests and field data on wildlife chronically exposed to ionising radiation is presented for the first time. We reviewed the available chronic radiotoxicity data acquired in contaminated fields and used a statistical methodology to support the comparison with knowledge on inter-species variation of sensitivity to controlled external γ irradiation. We focus on the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and effects data on terrestrial wildlife reported in the literature corresponding to chronic dose rate exposure situations (from background∼100 nGy/h up to ∼10 mGy/h). When needed, we reconstructed the dose rate to organisms and obtained consistent unbiased data sets necessary to establish the dose rate–effect relationship for a number of different species and endpoints. Then, we compared the range of variation of radiosensitivity of species from the Chernobyl-Exclusion Zone with the statistical distribution established for terrestrial species chronically exposed to purely gamma external irradiation (or chronic Species radioSensitivity Distribution – SSD). We found that the best estimate of the median value (HDR 50 ) of the distribution established for field conditions at Chernobyl (about 100 μGy/h) was eight times lower than the one from controlled experiments (about 850 μGy/h), suggesting that organisms in their natural environmental were more sensitive to radiation. This first comparison highlights the lack of mechanistic understanding and the potential confusion coming from sampling strategies in the field. To confirm the apparent higher sensitive of wildlife in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, we call for more a robust strategy in field, with adequate design to deal with confounding factors. -- Highlights: ► Discrepancy between controlled tests and Chernobyl effects data on wildlife was examined. ► We proposed a method to correct the dosimetry used for Chernobyl wildlife. ► Wildlife from the

  15. Area monitoring of ambient dose rates in parts of South-Western Nigeria using a GPS-integrated radiation survey meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeyode, I.C.; Rabiu, J.A.; Alatise, O.O.; Makinde, V.; Akinboro, F.G.; Mustapha, A.O.; Al-Azmi, D.

    2017-01-01

    A radiation monitoring system comprising a Geiger-Muller counter connected to a smart phone via Bluetooth was used for a dose rate survey in some parts of south-western Nigeria. The smart phone has the Geographical Positioning System, which provides the navigation information and saves it along with the dose rate data. A large number of data points was obtained that shows the dose rate distribution within the region. The results show that the ambient dose rates in the region range from 60 to 520 nSv -1 and showed a bias that is attributable to the influence of geology on the ambient radiation dose in the region. The geology influence was demonstrated by superimposing the dose rate plot and the geological map of the area. The potential applications of the device in determining baseline information and in area monitoring, e.g. for lost or abandoned sources, radioactive materials stockpiles, etc., were discussed in the article, particularly against the background of Nigeria's plan to develop its nuclear power program. (authors)

  16. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  17. The Effects of Low Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation on the Shapes of Transients in the LM124 Operational Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Stephen; McMorrow, Dale; Roche, Nicholas; Dusseau, Laurent; Pease, Ron L.

    2008-01-01

    Shapes of single event transients (SETs) in a linear bipolar circuit (LM124) change with exposure to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation. SETs shape changes are a direct consequence of TID-induced degradation of bipolar transistor gain. A reduction in transistor gain causes a reduction in the drive current of the current sources in the circuit, and it is the lower drive current that most affects the shapes of large amplitude SETs.

  18. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 {approx} 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 {approx} 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 {approx} 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 {approx} 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy{sub 10} (range:77 {approx} 94 Gy{sub 10}). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy{sub 3} (range: 122 {approx} 140 Gy{sub 3}) at point A, 109 Gy{sub 3} (range:88{approx} 125 Gy{sub 3}) at the rectum and 111 Gy{sub 3} (range: 91 {approx} 123 Gy{sub 3}) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 {approx} 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8{approx} 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure

  19. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 ∼ 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 ∼ 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 ∼ 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 ∼ 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy 10 (range:77 ∼ 94 Gy 10 ). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy 3 (range: 122 ∼ 140 Gy 3 ) at point A, 109 Gy 3 (range:88∼ 125 Gy 3 ) at the rectum and 111 Gy 3 (range: 91 ∼ 123 Gy 3 ) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 ) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m 2 ) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 ∼ 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8∼ 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure rate was 13% and distant metastatic rate was 3.3%. The crude rate of minor hematologic

  20. 110. PTB seminar: Dose rate measurements of ionizing radiation in the range of natural ambient radiation. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauterbach, U.; Pessara, W.; Woehler-Figgen, S.

    1997-12-01

    Measuring instruments for radiation dose measurement in the range of natural ambient radiation are not subject to legal obligations for calibration and the PTB received numerous requests in the past, asking for measures to be taken in order to ensure reliability of measuring results in this range of radiation. This has induced PTB to organise the seminar, intended to present the current status of measuring technology in this field, reveal problems encountered in practical applications, and discuss suitable ction for quality assurance. The papers of the seminar report the measuring performance and capabilities of the available instruments, results of comparative analyses of measurements, and resulting proposed action for quality assurance. Discussions concluding the sessions are also presented in the processdings volume. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Analysis of radiation dose rate profile in the ambient Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay environment to evaluate radiation hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikas; Anoj Kumar; Meena, T.R.; Vikas Kumar; Patra, R.P.; Patil, S.S.; Murali, S.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Periodic radiological survey and its analysis are useful on a two way approach. First, it will be used to generate baseline dose profile that will be prominently important during any radiological emergency. Secondly, due to some unforeseen human acts if orphan/abandoned radioactive source were present across Bhabha Atomic Research Centre site, the same can be detected and retrieved from the incident location. Periodic radiation survey of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site primarily validate/serve as an indicator of integrity of the various safety measures at the different nuclear fuel cycle facilities and on the prevailing radiological status at the vicinity of the facilities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site. Radiation dose profile as a quality information has been accumulated in the last five years. Analysis of data has led to the conclusion that there has been no increase in hazard over the years though the quantum of radioactivity processed at the various facilities has undergone wide increase and radiation hazard at the site continues to be very negligible. Nuclear fuel cycle activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre do not pose any excess radiation risk at the site

  2. LET and dose rate effect on radiation-induced copolymerization of maleimide with styrene in 2-propanol solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Seiko, E-mail: Nakagawa.Seiko@iri-tokyo.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aoumi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kimura, Atsushi [Environmental Radiation Processing Group, Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    N{sub 2}-saturated 2-propanol solutions containing styrene and maleimide were irradiated by electron, proton, He and C-ion beams. The styrene-maleimide copolymer was produced by radical polymerization induced during irradiation. The effects of the radical distribution, which depends on the LET or dose rate, on the molecular weight and the polymer yield were discussed. - Highlights: > Maleimide with styrene in N{sub 2}-saturated 2-propanol was irradiated by electron and heavy ions. > LET and dose rate effects of radical polymerization induced by irradiation were studied. > Results have shown the relation between radical distribution and efficiency of polymerization.

  3. Radiation dose rate affects the radiosensitization of MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines to X-rays induced by dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshgard, Karim; Kiani, Parvaneh; Haghparast, Abbas; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of radiotherapy is to deliver lethal damage to cancerous tissue while preserving adjacent normal tissues. Radiation absorbed dose of the tumoral cells can increase when high atomic nanoparticles are present in them during irradiation. Also, the dose rate is an important aspect in radiation effects that determines the biological results of a given dose. This in vitro study investigated the dose-rate effect on the induced radiosensitivity by dextran-coated iron oxide in cancer cells. HeLa and MCF-7 cells were cultured in vitro and incubated with different concentrations of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. They were then irradiated with 6 MV photons at dose rates of 43, 185 and 370 cGy/min. The MTT test was used to obtain the cells' survival after 48 h of irradiations. Incubating the cells with the nanoparticles at concentrations of 10, 40 and 80 μg/ml showed no significant cytotoxicity effect. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed more radiosensitivity effect by increasing the dose rate and nanoparticles concentration. Radiosensitization enhancement factors of MCF-7 and HeLa cells at a dose-rate of 370 cGy/min and nanoparticles' concentration of 80 μg/ml were 1.21 ± 0.06 and 1.19 ± 0.04, respectively. Increasing the dose rate of 6 MV photons irradiation in MCF-7 and HeLa cells increases the radiosensitization induced by the dextran-coated iron nanoparticles in these cells.

  4. Design of movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongyu; Cheng Wen; Li Jikai; Huang Hong; Shen Qiming; Zhang Qiang; Liu Zhengshan

    2005-10-01

    Movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor has not only the characteristics of fixed area γ dose rate monitor, but that of portable meter as well. Its main function is to monitor the areas where dose rate would change without orderliness to prevent unplanned radiation exposure accidents from happening. The design way of the monitor, the main indicators description, the working principle and the comprising of software and hardware are briefly introduced. The monitor has the characteristics of simple installation, easy maintenance, little power consumption, wide range, notability of visual and audible alarm and so on. Its design and technique have novelty and advancement. (authors)

  5. Specific-locus mutation frequencies in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia at very low radiation dose rates, and their use in the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to augment the information on the lowest radiation dose rates feasible for scoring transmitted induced mutations detected by the specific-locus method in the mouse. This is the type of information most suitable for estimating genetic hazards of radiation in man. The results also aid in resolving conflicting possibilities about the relationship between mutation frequency and radiation dose at low dose rates

  6. Effect of dose rate, temperature and impurity content on the radiation damage in the electron irradiated NaCl crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Turkin, A.A.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    The dependencies of void formation and radiolytic sodium accumulation on the irradiation dose, dose rate, temperature and impurity content are analyzed within a framework of a theoretical model, which is based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb. The mechanism involves the production of V-F

  7. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R.; Siwarungsun, N.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for γ-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  8. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  9. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro

    2000-01-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  10. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  11. Predicting radiation effects on the development of leukemic stem cells based on studies of leukemias induced by high- and low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important causes of radiation-induced cancers, particularly leukemia, is gene mutations resulting from single and double strand breaks in the DNA. Tanaka et al. (2003) reported life shortening in specific pathogen free male and female B6C3F1 mice continuously exposed to γ rays at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/d for 400 days from 8 weeks of age. Early death due to cancer, mostly malignant lymphomas, was observed in both sexes. A significant increase in the incidence of myeloid leukemia, resulting in early death, was also reported in males. It is expected however, that at 20 mGy/22 h/d, which is equivalent to a dose of 15 μGy/min, DNA strand breaks induced in these cells are repaired soon after they occur. Murine leukemias induced by high-dose-rate radiation were also found in males, and 80% of the mice with leukemia had hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 around the PU.1 gene and they appeared to be derived from DNA strand breaks. Majority of these leukemia showing hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 revealed point mutations in the remaining alleles resulting in PU.1 inactivation, which was reported to be related to leukemogenesis. These point mutations are assumed to be independent of DNA strand breaks that occur immediately after irradiation, as they appear at later time after irradiation. This review discusses the effect of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and also mutagenesis induced independently of DNA strand breaks in hematopoietic cells contributing to the development of the first leukemic stem cell. (author)

  12. Measuring radiation exposure during percutaneous drainages: can shoulder dosemeters be used to estimate finger doses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehmas, Tapio; Tikkanen, Heikki

    1992-01-01

    To assess the need for extra finger dosemeters, radiologists' and assistants' radiation exposure at both shoulders and at the third fingers of both hands were recorded using thermoluminescent dosemeters during 27 interventional drainage procedures. Under couch screening was used. Mean dose rates were calculated by dividing dose by screening time. The radiologists' bilateral finger dose rates did not correlate with each other; nor did dose rates between the left shoulder and the right hand. The radiologists' dose rates at both shoulders, correlated with each other, as did shoulder dose rates with dose rates at the ispilateral hand. The right shoulder dose rates correlated with the left hand dose rates. The assistants' dose rates at places of measurement showed significant correlations with each other. (Author)

  13. New model for assessing dose and dose rate sensitivity of Gamma ray radiation loss in polarization maintaining optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongchen; Liu Hai; Qiao Wenqiang; Xue Huijie; He Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Building a new phenomenological theory model to investigate the relation about the irradiation induced loss with irradiation dose and dose rate. ► The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. ► The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region doped by GeO 2 . - Abstract: The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. A phenomenological theory model is introduced and the influence of irradiation dose and dose rate on the irradiation induced loss is discussed. The phenomenological theoretical results are consistent with the experimental results of the irradiation induced loss for the two types of polarization maintaining optical fibers. The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region dope with GeO 2 . Meanwhile, both of the polarization maintaining optical fiber irradiation induced loss increase with increasing the irradiation dose. In the case of same dose, the high dose rate Gamma ray irradiation induced optical fiber losses are higher than that of the low dose rate.

  14. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 μm diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min -1 . For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min -1 . Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1σ) and 3% (1σ) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility (±1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 o C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also apparent that the optical fibers can be re

  15. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T., E-mail: a.t.abdulrahman@surrey.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia (UiTM), Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Nisbet, A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); Departments of Medical Physics, the Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Edgerton Road, Guildford GU2 7XX, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 {mu}m diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min{sup -1}. For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min{sup -1}. Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1{sigma}) and 3% (1{sigma}) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility ({+-}1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 {sup o}C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also

  16. Nonmonotonous changes of thymus nuclei lipid metabolism upon chronic gamma-radiation of rats at a dose-rate of 3 c Gy/Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagina, T.P.; Kolomijtseva, I.K.; Moiseeva, S.A.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the thymus nuclei lipid metabolism under chronic gamma-radiation in low doses with the dose rate of 3 cGy/day is studied. It is shown, that at the 25 cGy dose rate there takes place activation of exchange in the fatly-acid part of the phospholipid molecule with simultaneous activation of the cholesterol and fatty acids synthesis. The synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids at 50 cGy remains activated, whereas metabolism of the fatty-acid part of the phospholipids molecule is sharply depressed. The identified changes reveal the similarity with the processes, proceeding by the apoptose induction. At the same time the dynamics of the thymocyte nuclei lipid exchange in the process of adaptation to the long radiation effect as nonmonotonous metabolic response to low dose impact is characterized for the first time [ru

  17. Studies on the radicidation of natural food colorants. Effects of electron energy (accelerating voltages) and dose rate of ionizing radiation on functional properties of beet red colorant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashimura, Yutaka; Tada, Mikiro; Furuta, Masakazu

    2003-01-01

    In order to the practical use of radicidation of beet red, natural food colorant with low heat stability and high possibility of microbe contamination, we studied on the energy dependency and dose rate effect for the influence on functional properties of the beet red colorant. For the elucidation of energy dependency, the γ-ray (1.33 MeV) and electron beams with different accelerating voltages (0.75, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 MeV) were used. The dose rate effect was studied under the different dose rate by using γ-ray (0.723, 1.91 and 4.55 kGy/h) and electron beams with accelerating voltage of 10 MeV (1.0 x 10 3 , 2.6 x 10 3 , 7.0 x 10 3 , 7.0 x 10 3 , 2.0 x 10 4 and 5.0 x 10 4 kGy/h). The results obtained in this study showed that regardless of these energy and dose rate, the functional properties of the beet red colorant were little affected by irradiation less than 25 kGy of ionizing radiations. (author)

  18. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-01-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  19. Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Adopted: June 2010 Updated: June 2017 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure and ... radiation and pregnancy can be found on the Health Physics Society " Ask the Experts" Web site. she should ...

  20. Dose rate, mitotic cycle duration, and sensitivity of cell transitions from G1 → S and G2 → M to protracted gamma radiation in root meristems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.S.; Hof, J.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the relative radiosensitivity of the cell transition points of G1 → S and G2 → M in root meristems of several plant species. Label and mitotic indices and microspectrophotometry were used to measure the proportions of cells in each mitotic cycle stage in root meristems after protracted gamma radiation. The criterion of radiosensitivity was the dose rate needed to produce a tissue with less than 1 percent cells in S and none in M after 3 days of continuous exposure. The results show that DNA is the primary radiation target in proliferative root meristems and that the cycle duration stipulates the time interval of vulnerability. In each species, nonrandom reproducible cell proportions were established with 2C:4C:8C amounts of nuclear DNA after 3 days of exposure. Roots of Helianthus annuus, Crepis capillaris, and Tradescantia clone 02 had 80 percent cells with a 2C amount of DNA and 20 percent had a 4C amount of DNA. In these species the transition point of G1 → S was more radiosensitive than G2 → M. Roots of Pisum sativum and Triticum aestivum had cell proportions at 2C:4C:8C amounts of DNA in frequencies of 0.10 to 0.20:0.40 to 0.60:0.30 to 0.40. In these two species 0.30 to 0.40 cells underwent radiation-induced endoreduplication that resulted from a rapid inhibition of cell transit from G2 → M and a slower impairment of G1 → S. Cells increased from 2C to 4C and from 4C to 8C amounts of DNA during irradiation. The proportions of nuclei with 2C:4C:8C amounts of DNA were dependent in part upon the relative radiosensitivity of the G1 → S and G2 → M control points. The data show the relative radiosensitivity of the transition points from G1 → S and from G2 → M was species specific and unrelated to the cycle duration and mean nuclear DNA content of the plant species

  1. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  2. Influence of dose rate of ionizing radiation on working capacity of the oil-filled electrical equipment for NPP; Vliyanie moshchnosti dozy ioniziruyushchego oblucheniya na rabotosposobnost` maslonapolnennogo ehlektrooborudovaniya dlya AEhS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutnev, A P [and others

    1994-12-31

    Dependence of radiation electric conductivity transformer oil on the gamma radiation absorbed dose rate and on the energy proton flux is investigated. It is ascertained that the electrical reliability of oil and oil-barrier insulation does not depend on the absorbed dose rate up to the maximum achieved values of 200 rad/s.

  3. Genetic effect of low dose rate radiation on human cells immortalized with the hTERT gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fukami, Hiroko; Hayashi, Yuko; Kiyono, Tohru; Ishizaki, Kanji; Tachibana, Akira; Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2003-01-01

    We established immortal human cells by introducing the hTERT gene into skin fibroblast cells obtained from normal (SuSa) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT: AT1OS) individuals of Japanese origin. These immortalized cells showed the same characteristics as the original cells except expanded life span. We irradiated SuSa/T-n and AT1OS/T-n cells with low-dose-rate (LDR; 0.3 mGy/min) irradiation at confluent state in low-serum medium. Then, survival rate and micronucleus frequency of each cell line were analyzed. In SuSa/T-n cells, frequency of HPRT mutation induction was also determined by 6TG selection. In SuSa/T-n cells, survival rate and micronucleus frequency showed higher resistance after irradiation with LDR than high-dose-rate (HDR; 2 Gy/min) irradiation. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in survival and micronucleus induction in AT1OS/T-n cells between HDR and LDR irradiation, suggesting that AT1OS/T-n cells may have some defect in DNA repair activity. In SuSa/T-n cells, the frequency of HPRT mutation after LDR irradiation decreased to approximately one eighth that after HDR irradiation. (author)

  4. The study of hemopoietic cells. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose rate radiation on the hemopoiesis in the spleen of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Dept. of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assays, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of hemopoietic cells (CFU-S colonies and CFU-GM colonies) decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  5. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Sirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the dose dependency of the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H-HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}, and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice were measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  6. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  7. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  8. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  9. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service

  10. Effects of a prolonged irradiation with low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Izumi, Jun; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Kanaiwa-Kudo, Syouko

    2000-07-01

    SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/day. After irradiation, the numbers of CFU-S and CFU-GM in the bone marrow were determined. Number of peripheral blood cells was also counted. The day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earliest stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases in the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. Regardless of the severe decrease in the number of hemopoietic stem cells, no remarkable changes were observed in the number of peripheral blood cells, indicating an enhanced differentiation of the precursor cells. (author)

  11. Radiation camera exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, R.J.; Yarsawich, M.; Wolczek, W.

    1976-01-01

    A system and method for governing the exposure of an image generated by a radiation camera to an image sensing camera is disclosed. The exposure is terminated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined quantity of radiation, defining a radiation density, occurring in a predetermined area. An index is produced which represents the value of that quantity of radiation whose accumulation causes the exposure termination. The value of the predetermined radiation quantity represented by the index is sensed so that the radiation camera image intensity can be calibrated to compensate for changes in exposure amounts due to desired variations in radiation density of the exposure, to maintain the detectability of the image by the image sensing camera notwithstanding such variations. Provision is also made for calibrating the image intensity in accordance with the sensitivity of the image sensing camera, and for locating the index for maintaining its detectability and causing the proper centering of the radiation camera image

  12. Use of BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 in radiation risk assessment: Lifetime total cancer mortality risk estimates at low doses and low dose rates for low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    In November 1986, the Department of Defense (DoD) asked the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) to develop a coordinated Federal position on risk assessment for low levels of ionizing radiation. Since Federal risk assessment activities are based primarily on the scientific data and analyses in authoritative review documents prepared by groups like the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations' Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), DoD proposed that the CIRRPC Science Panel undertake the task of providing coordinated interagency positions on the use of information in the reports of such groups. The practice has been for individual Federal agencies to interpret and decide independently how to use the information provided in such reports. As a result of its deliberations, the Subpanel recommends two nominal risk estimates for lifetime total cancer mortality following whole-body exposure to low levels of low-LET ionizing radiation, one for the general population and one for the working-age population (see Section II). The recommended risk estimates reflect the general agreement of information in BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 for total cancer mortality. The Subpanel's risk estimates and associated statements are intended to meet the needs of the Federal agencies for: (a) values that are current; (b) values that are relevant to the low-dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposures principally encountered in carrying out Federal responsibilities; (c) a statement of the change in the estimates of lifetime total cancer mortality relative to estimates in previous authoritative review documents; and (d) a practical statement on the scientific uncertainty associated with applying the lifetime total cancer mortality values at very low doses

  13. Assessment of natural radiation exposure inside a newly constructed building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, V.K.; Sadasivan, S.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Sundaram, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation exposure to the population. Several building materials used for a newly constructed building complex were analysed for 40 K, 238 U radioactivity by gamma ray spectrometry. The external gamma dose inside the complex was evaluated by using the computer code QAD-CGGP. External dose rate was also measured by using scintillation gamma monitor. Calculated and the measured dose rate values are discussed. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Development of dose rate estimation system for FBR maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga Head Office, International Cooperation and Technology Development Center, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan); Takeuchi, Jun; Yoshikawa, Satoru [Hitachi Engineering Company, Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Urushihara, Hiroshi [Ibaraki Hitachi Information Service Co., Ltd., Omika, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    During maintenance activities on the primary sodium cooling system by an FBR Personnel radiation exposure arises mainly from the presence of radioactive corrosion products (CP). A CP behavior analysis code, PSYCHE, and a radiation shielding calculation code, QAD-CG, have been developed and applied to investigate the possible reduction of radiation exposure of workers. In order to make these evaluation methods more accessible to plant engineers, the user interface of the codes has been improved and an integrated system, including visualization of the calculated gamma-ray radiation dose-rate map, has been developed. The system has been verified by evaluating the distribution of the radiation dose-rate within the Monju primary heat transport system cells from the estimated saturated CP deposition and distribution which would be present following about 20 cycles of full power operation. (author)

  15. Development of dose rate estimation system for FBR maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Takeuchi, Jun; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Urushihara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    During maintenance activities on the primary sodium cooling system by an FBR Personnel radiation exposure arises mainly from the presence of radioactive corrosion products (CP). A CP behavior analysis code, PSYCHE, and a radiation shielding calculation code, QAD-CG, have been developed and applied to investigate the possible reduction of radiation exposure of workers. In order to make these evaluation methods more accessible to plant engineers, the user interface of the codes has been improved and an integrated system, including visualization of the calculated gamma-ray radiation dose-rate map, has been developed. The system has been verified by evaluating the distribution of the radiation dose-rate within the Monju primary heat transport system cells from the estimated saturated CP deposition and distribution which would be present following about 20 cycles of full power operation. (author)

  16. Specific-locus experiments show that female mice exposed near the time of birth to low-LET ionizing radiation exhibit both a low mutational response and a dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.; Lee, S.S.; Kelly, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Raymer, G.D.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Female mice were exposed to 300 R of 73-93 R/min X-radiation either as fetuses at 18.5d post conception (p.c.) or within 9h after birth. Combining the similar results from these 2 groups yielded a specific-locus mutation frequency of 9.4x10 -8 mutation/locus/R, which is statistically significantly higher than the historical-control mutation frequency, but much lower than the rate obtained by irradiating mature and maturing oocytes in adults. Other females, exposed at 18.5 days p.c. to 300 R of 0.79 R/min γ-radiation, yielded a mutation frequency that was statistically significantly lower than the frequency at high dose rates. The low-dose-rate group also had markedly higher fertility. It appears that the doe-rate effect for mutations induced near the time of birth may be more pronounced than that reported for mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A hypothesis sometimes advanced to explain low mutation frequencies recovered from cell populations that experience considerable radiation-induced cell killing is that there is selection against mutant cells. The reason for the relatively low mutational response following acute irradiation in the experiments is unknown; however, the finding of a dose-rate effect in these oocytes in the presence of only minor radiation-induced cell killing (as judged from fertility) makes it seem unlikely that selection was responsible for the low mutational response following acute exposure. Had selection been an important factor, the mutation frequency should have increased when oocyte killing was markedly reduced. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  17. Transition of some type of integrated circuits into latch-up mode under effect of ionizing radiation of large dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevskij, B.E.; Madzharova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    Some types of integrated circuits (IC) are almost short-circuit, i.e. they transit to the latch-up regime under the effect of ionizing radiation pulses of large dose rate. The results of investigation into IC under their transition into the latch-up regime at supply voltage of 10 V are presented. It is shown that IC stably transit to the latch-up regime if the dinistor current becomes at least equal to the photocurrent. At bias reduction from 15 to 6 V the dose rate at which the latch-up arises grows from 2.5x10 9 to 3.5x10 9 rad (Si)/s. Burn-out of supply busbar is the usual type of IC failure at latch-up arising. Measures for IC protection from latch-up are shown. In some IC the latch-up is formed beginning from a certain critical value of dose rate, the so-called ''windows'' of latch-up

  18. Effects of ground surface decontamination on the air radiation dose rate. Results of a decontamination trial at a playground lot in a Fukushima residential area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency decontaminated schools, playgrounds, swimming pools, and houses in nonevacuated, less-contaminated areas in Fukushima for environmental restoration. A small, 150 m 2 playground lot in the residential area was chosen for decontamination demonstration, which used routinely available tools and commodities to carry out the work. The surfaces of playground lot equipment, such as swings, slides, and horizontal iron bars, were completely decontaminated by brushing with water and/or detergent. Side gutters around the playground lot were cleaned by removing the mud and then brushed and washed with a high-pressure water jet (7 MPa). The air dose rate at the playground lot was dominated by radiation from the ground surface and adjacent surroundings, such as apartments and rice fields. Two or three centimeters of the surface soil contaminated with cesium was removed manually with shovels, hoes, and other gardening tools. This significantly reduced the average air dose rate of the entire playground lot from 1.5 μSv/h before decontamination to 0.6 μSv/h. These results showed that ground surface decontamination can contribute measurably to the reduction in air dose rate in relatively small areas in residential areas. (author)

  19. Radiation exposure records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiter, H.P.

    1975-12-01

    Management of individual radiation exposure records begins at employment with the accumulation of data pertinent to the individual and any previous occupational radiation exposure. Appropriate radiation monitorinng badges or devices are issued and accountability established. A computer master file is initiated to include the individual's name, payroll number, social security number, birth date, assigned department, and location. From this base, a radiation exposure history is accumulated to include external ionizing radiation exposure to skin and whole body, contributing neutron exposure, contributing tritium exposure, and extremity exposure. It is used also to schedule bioassay sampling and in-vivo counts and to provide other pertinent information. The file is used as a basis for providing periodic reports to management and monthly exposure summaries to departmental line supervision to assist in planning work so that individual annual exposures are kept as low as practical. Radiation exposure records management also includes documentation of radiation surveys performed by the health physicist to establish working rates and the individual estimating and recording his estimated exposure on a day-to-day basis. Exposure information is also available to contribute to Energy Research and Development Administration statistics and to the National Transuranium Registry

  20. Significance of manipulating tumour hypoxia and radiation dose rate in terms of local tumour response and lung metastatic potential, referring to the response of quiescent cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, S; Matsumoto, Y; Kashino, G; Hirayama, R; Liu, Y; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Suzuki, M; Kinashi, Y; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of manipulating intratumour oxygenation status and radiation dose rate on local tumour response and lung metastases following radiotherapy, referring to the response of quiescent cell populations within irradiated tumours. B16-BL6 melanoma tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. They received γ-ray irradiation at high dose rate (HDR) or reduced dose rate (RDR) following treatment with the acute hypoxia-releasing agent nicotinamide or local hyperthermia at mild temperatures (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumours were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the quiescent (Q) and total (proliferating + Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumour-bearing mice, 17 days after irradiation, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated. Following HDR irradiation, nicotinamide and MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the total and Q-cell populations, respectively. The decrease in sensitivity at RDR irradiation compared with HDR irradiation was slightly inhibited by MTH, especially in Q cells. Without γ-ray irradiation, nicotinamide treatment tended to reduce the number of lung metastases. With γ-rays, in combination with nicotinamide or MTH, especially the former, HDR irradiation decreased the number of metastases more remarkably than RDR irradiation. Manipulating both tumour hypoxia and irradiation dose rate have the potential to influence lung metastasis. The combination with the acute hypoxia-releasing agent nicotinamide may be more promising in HDR than RDR irradiation in terms of reducing the number of lung metastases. PMID:20739345

  1. Radiation exposure management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation exposure management includes administrative control, education and training, monitoring and dose assessments and planning of work and radiation protection. The information and discussion given in the paper are based on experiences in Sweden mainly from nuclear power installations. (Author)

  2. Natural radiation exposure indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.; Cliff, K.D.; Wrixon, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the state of knowledge of indoor natural radiation exposure in the U.K. and the current survey work the N.R.P.B. is carrying out in this field. Discussion is limited in this instance to the improvement in estimation of population exposure and the identification of areas and circumstances in which high exposure occur, rather than the study of properties of a building and methods of building affecting exposure to radiation. (U.K.)

  3. Activity of acid phosphatase in tissues of dogs exposed to γ-radiation at low dose rates and treated with adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichejkina, N.I.; Tikhomirova, M.V.; Romantsev, E.F.; Rogozkin, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the activity of acid phosphatase in the liver, spleen and blood of dogs under various experimental conditions: (a) exposure to γ-rays at low dose rates, (b) preventive and therapeutic application of ATP and (c) administration of ATP to intact animals. It was demonstrated that the activity of acid phosphatase in the liver and spleen was invariable after the first 24 h and decreased after 72 h of observation in each of the experimental variants. Preventive and therapeutic administration of ATP to dogs not substantially influence the activity of acid phosphatase throughout the entire period of observation

  4. The initial investigation of radiation dose rate at X-ray department and patients treating thyroid by I-131 at nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Kinh; Vo Thanh Cuong

    2000-01-01

    Survey meter NSM 150 Fuji with detector Geiger Muller has been used to assess for average annual exposure dose which affect radiographer ≤ 2 mSv per year, the staff involved with Fluoroscopy ≤ 19 mSv per year. Dose rate in waiting area of patient is a range from 0.2 to 0.8 μSv/h. Patients who have been treated by radioiodine, may be only discharged when the remaining activity is 400.2 ±368.8 MBq. Radioactivity of I-131 and Tc-99m in the sewage system of hospital is 0.4x10 -11 Ci/l. (author)

  5. Effect of the gamma radiation dose rate on psychrotrophic bacteria, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Poliana P; Azevedo, Heliana; Cipolli, Kátia M V A B; Fukuma, Henrique T; Mourão, Gerson B; Roque, Cláudio V; Miya, Norma T; Pereira, José L

    2011-03-01

    Frozen samples of mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) with skin were irradiated with gamma radiation doses of 0.0 kGy (control) and 3 kGy at 2 different radiation dose rates: 0.32 kGy/h (3 kGy) and 4.04 kGy/h (3 kGy). Batches of irradiated and control samples were evaluated during 11 d of refrigerated (2 ± 1 °C) storage for the following parameters: total psychrotrophic bacteria count, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), evaluation of objective color (L*, a*, and b*) and a sensory evaluation (irradiated odor, oxidized odor, pink and brown colors). No statistical difference (P > 0.05) was found amongst the TBARS values obtained for the MDCM samples irradiated with dose rates of 0.32 and 4.04 kGy/h. There was a significant increase (P radiation to mechanically deboned chicken meat will provide the food industry with information concerning the definition of the best processing conditions to maximize the sensory and food quality.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of radiation levels and dose rates in irradiation of murine fibroblasts used as a feeder layer in the culture of human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshito, Daniele; Almeida, Tiago L.; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Somessari, Elizabeth S.R.; Silveira, Carlos G. da; Mathor, Monica B.; Altran, Silvana C.; Isaac, Cesar

    2009-01-01

    In 1975, Rheinwald and Green published an effective methodology for obtaining and cultivating human keratinocytes. This methodology consisted of seeding keratinocytes onto a feeder layer composed of lineage 3T3 murine fibroblasts, the proliferation rate of which is then controlled through the action of ionizing radiation. The presence of the feeder layer encourages the development of keratinocyte colonies and their propagation in similar cultures, becoming possible several clinical applications as skin substitutes or wound dressings in situations such as post burn extensive skin loss and other skin disorders. However, good development of these keratinocytes depends on a high quality feeder layer among other factors. In the present work, we evaluated the relationship between radiation levels and dose rates applied to fibroblasts used in construction of feeder layers and the radiation effect on keratinocytes colonies forming efficiency. Results indicate 3T3 lineage murine fibroblasts irradiated with doses varying between 60 and 100 Gy can be used as a feeder layer immediately after irradiation or storage of the irradiated cells in suspension at 4 g C for 24 hours with similar results. The exception is when the irradiation dose rate is 2.75 Gyh -1 ; in this case, results suggested that the fibroblasts should be used immediately after irradiation. (author)

  7. Reference Dose Rates for Fluoroscopy Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geleijns, J.; Broerse, J.J.; Hummel, W.A.; Schalij, M.J.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Teeuwisse, W.; Zoetelief, J.

    1998-01-01

    The wide diversity of fluoroscopy guided interventions which have become available in recent years has improved patient care. They are being performed in increasing numbers, particularly at departments of cardiology and radiology. Some procedures are very complex and require extended fluoroscopy times, i.e. longer than 30 min, and radiation exposure of patient and medical staff is in some cases rather high. The occurrence of radiation-induced skin injuries on patients has shown that radiation protection for fluoroscopy guided interventions should not only be focused on stochastic effects, i.e. tumour induction and hereditary risks, but also on potential deterministic effects. Reference dose levels are introduced by the Council of the European Communities as an instrument to achieve optimisation of radiation protection in radiology. Reference levels in conventional diagnostic radiology are usually expressed as entrance skin dose or dose-area product. It is not possible to define a standard procedure for complex interventions due to the large inter-patient variations with regard to the complexity of specific interventional procedures. Consequently, it is not realistic to establish a reference skin dose or dose-area product for complex fluoroscopy guided interventions. As an alternative, reference values for fluoroscopy guided interventions can be expressed as the entrance dose rates on a homogeneous phantom and on the image intensifier. A protocol has been developed and applied during a nationwide survey of fluoroscopic dose rate during catheter ablations. From this survey reference entrance dose rates of respectively 30 mGy.min -1 on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom with a thickness of 21 cm, and of 0.8 μGy.s -1 on the image intensifier have been derived. (author)

  8. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Beth A.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hayes, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Morris, David E.; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  9. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Yanai, Takanori; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Science, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of prolonged low-dose irradiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors in tissues, gene expression was analyzed in the spleen as a hemopoietic tissue that is well known to be one of the most sensitive tissues to irradiation. SPF C3H/HeN female mice (Clea Japan Inc.) were irradiated under SPF conditions with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 2, 4, 6, and 8 Gy and a dose rate of 20 mGy/day. Non-irradiated mice of the same age were maintained as controls. At the end of the period of irradiation, both groups of mice were sacrificed and dissected to extract total RNA from their tissues. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the Northern hybridization were employed to detect gene expression. RT-PCT showed no marked changes in the gene expression of GM-CSF. IL-6 gene expression was shown to tend to be enhanced by prolonged low-dose irradiation. The results of Northern hybridization showed that IL-6 mRNA was expressed slightly in both groups, and it was too weak to compare the difference in mRNA expression level between the irradiated group and the controls. No mRNA expression of GM-CSF was detected by Northern hybridization. Based on these results, it was concluded that the gene expression levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF were inadequate to detect the chemiluminescence signals without amplification. It was therefore concluded that improvement of detection sensitivity and larger RNA samples would be necessary for further analysis of the gene expression of hemopoietic factors. (K.H.)

  10. Bayesian estimation of dose rate effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Groer, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical method was used to quantify the effectiveness of high dose rate 137 Cs gamma radiation at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice. The Bayesian approach considers both the temporal and dose dependence of radiation carcinogenesis and total mortality. This paper provides the first direct estimation of dose rate effectiveness using Bayesian statistics. This statistical approach provides a quantitative description of the uncertainty of the factor characterising the dose rate in terms of a probability density function. The results show that a fixed dose from 137 Cs gamma radiation delivered at a high dose rate is more effective at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice than the same dose delivered at a low dose rate. (author)

  11. An international intercomparison of passive dosemeters, electronic dosemeters and dose rate meters used for environmental radiation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    during 1994. The intercomparison was organised by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, Germany, and by the Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark. This paper describes the intercomparison experiments performed at the newly established Riso Natural Environmental Radiation...

  12. Exposure to natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.M.R.

    1985-01-01

    A brief report is given of a seminar on the exposure to enhanced natural radiation and its regulatory implications held in 1985 at Maastricht, the Netherlands. The themes of the working sessions included sources of enhanced natural radiation, parameters influencing human exposure, measurement and survey programmes, technical countermeasures, risk and assessment studies, philosophies of dose limitations and national and international policies. (U.K.)

  13. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  14. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  15. Dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Li Yanbo; Kang Shunai; Gong Shouliang; Zhao Wenju

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro in order to reveal the possible mechanism of biological effect and adaptive response induced by low dose radiation. Methods: The experiment was divided into D2 (challenging dose), D1 (inductive dose) + D2 and sham-irradiation groups. EL-4 lymphoma cells were irradiated with D1 (75 mGy, 6.25-200.00 mGy·mm -1 ) and D2(1.5 Gy, 287 mGy·min -1 ), the time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The percentage of apoptosis and each cell cycle phase were measured with flow cytometry. Results: When the dose rates of D1 were 6.25-50.00 mGy·min -1 , the percentages of apoptosis in the D1 + D2 group were significantly lower than those in the D2 group (P 0 /G 1 phase cells decreased significantly (P -1 , D2 is 1.5 Gy (287 mGy·min -1 ), and the time interval between D1 and D2 is 6 h, the adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro could be induced. (authors)

  16. Radiation exposure and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, F.; Scherer, E.

    1985-01-01

    The present volume is devoted to the radiation hazards and the protective measures which can be taken. It describes the current state of knowledge on the changes which exposure to ionizing rays and other forms of physical energy can induce in organs and tissues, in the functional units and systems of the organism. Special attention is paid to general cellular radiation biology and radiation pathology and to general questions of the biological effects of densely ionizing particle radiation, in order to achieve a better all-round understanding of the effects of radiation on the living organism. Aside from the overviews dealing with the effects of radiation on the abdominal organs, urinary tract, lungs, cerebral and nervous tissue, bones, and skin, the discussion continues with the lymphatic system, the bone marrow as a bloodforming organ, and the various phases of reaction in the reproductive organs, including damage and subsequent regeneration. A special section deals with environmental radiation hazards, including exposure to natural radiation and the dangers of working with radioactive substances, and examines radiation catastrophes from the medical point of view. Not only reactor accidents are covered, but also nuclear explosions, with exhaustive discussion of possible damage and treatment. The state of knowledge on chemical protection against radiation is reviewed in detail. Finally, there is thorough treatment of the mechanism of the substances used for protection against radiation damage in man and of experience concerning this subject to date. In the final section of the book the problems of combined radiotherapy are discussed. The improvement in the efficacy of tumor radiotherapy by means of heavy particles is elucidated, and the significance of the efficacy of tumor therapy using electron-affinitive substances is explained. There is also discussion of the simultaneous use of radiation and pharmaceuticals in the treatment of tumors. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men: (specific-locus mutations/dose-rate effect/doubling dose/risk estimation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 X 10 -4 coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calculate a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  18. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body

  19. Automation of the monitoring in real time of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez L, O.; Capote F, E.; Carrazana G, J.A.; Manzano de Armas, J.F.; Alonso A, D.; Prendes A, M.; Zerquera, J.T.; Caveda R, C.A.; Kalberg, O.; Fabelo B, O.; Montalvan E, A.; Cartas A, H.; Leyva F, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations (CPHR) like center rector of the National Net of Environmental Radiological Surveillance (RNVRA), it has strengthened their detection capacity and of answer before a situation of radiological emergency. The measurements of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in the main stations of the Net are obtained in real time and the CPHR receives the data coming from these posts at one time relatively short. To improve the operability of the RNVRA it was necessary to complete the facilities of existent monitoring using 4 automatic measurement stations with probes of gamma detection, implementing in this way a measurement system on real time. On the other hand the software were developed: GenironProbeFech, to obtain the data of the probes, DataMail for the shipment of the same ones by electronic mail and GammaRed that receives and processes the data in the rector center. (Author)

  20. Low-dose/dose-rate γ radiation depresses neural differentiation and alters protein expression profiles in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and C17.2 neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Lindegren, Heléne; Johansson, Lotta; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Forsby, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on cellular development in the nervous system are presently unclear. The focus of the present study was to examine low-dose γ-radiation-induced effects on the differentiation of neuronal cells and on the development of neural stem cells to glial cells. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to (137)Cs γ rays at different stages of retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation, and neurite formation was determined 6 days after exposure. When SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to low-dose-rate γ rays at the onset of differentiation, the number of neurites formed per cell was significantly less after exposure to either 10, 30 or 100 mGy compared to control cells. Exposure to 10 and 30 mGy attenuated differentiation of immature C17.2 mouse-derived neural stem cells to glial cells, as verified by the diminished expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Proteomic analysis of the neuroblastoma cells by 2D-PAGE after 30 mGy irradiation showed that proteins involved in neuronal development were downregulated. Proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation were altered in both cell lines after exposure to 30 mGy; however, the rate of cell proliferation was not affected in the low-dose range. The radiation-induced attenuation of differentiation and the persistent changes in protein expression is indicative of an epigenetic rather than a cytotoxic mechanism.

  1. On the use of quality factors and fluence to dose rate conversion in human radiation exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhaus, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that various combinations of numbers and factors arrive at estimates of dose and dose effectiveness from values of fluence; but as yet it has not been possible to use biological data with the same degree of precision to estimate the physical data. It would seem that the most reasonable way to use the human data that exist is to apply them as far as possible to the human animal as a whole.

  2. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  3. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18±1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  4. Dose rate measurements in the beta-photon radiation field from UO2 pellets and glazed ceramics containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1986-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, the handling of UO 2 pellets results in a significant exposure, mainly due to beta rays. Depth dose distributions have been investigated at source-to-detector distances of 5 to 80 cm using LiF detectors of different thicknesses. Detailed data for the dose equivalent quantities H(0.07), H(3) and H(10) are presented. These data are compared with those found for the use of glazed tiles and ceramics containing natural uranium. (author)

  5. Computation of radiation dose rate to non-human biota (Benthic and pelagic) from Nat.210Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamat, Rupali C.K.; Suresh, Sugandhi; Joshi, Vikram; Pulhan, Vandana

    2018-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic factors are accountable for inclusion of radioactivity into the biota (flora and fauna). Among natural radionuclides 210 Po (t 1/2 =138 days) acquires importance due to it high radiotoxicity, with alpha particle energy of 5.3 MeV. It is a main contributor (90%) to the natural radiation dose received by most marine organisms and also to critical group doses from seafood consumption. Radioprotection in the past focused only on mankind with the assumption that human protection confers protection of non-human biota. However, in recent years International Commission on Radiological Protection has focused on protection of non-human biota. Radiological dose assessment to the biota is a challenging task and is an important issue of radiation protection. In line with this, the data generated in the present work is the baseline data to examine radiation dose due to naturally occurring 210 Po to the native marine species (benthic and pelagic) of the area rich in benthic and pelagic communities

  6. Radiation exposure during ESWL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, D.L.; Van Swearingen, F.L.; Dyer, R.B.; Appel, B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses exposure to ionizing radiation by the ESWL patient and for health professionals. Although the patient is exposed acutely to the highest level of radiation, the lithotripter team is chronically exposed to ionizing radiation at varying levels. Attention to detail is important in reducing that exposure. The operator should follow the guidelines set forth in this chapter in order to minimize exposure to the patient, himself or herself, and to all co-workers. At the present time, investigation of an alternative modality for stone localization, ultrasound, is being investigated

  7. Low dose radiation exposure and atherosclerosis in ApoE{sup -/-} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Hasu, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Department of Pathology and Lab. Medicine, and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Univ. of Ottawa Heart Inst., Vascular Biology Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Little, M. [Imperial Coll., Faculty of Medicine, St. Marys Campus, London (United Kingdom); Hildebrandt, G. [Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Priest, N.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Whitman, S.C. [Univ. of Ottawa, Department of Pathology and Lab. Medicine, and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Univ. of Ottawa Heart Inst., Vascular Biology Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The hypothesis that single low dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low LET radiation, given at either high (240 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate, would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BI/6 mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE-/-). Mice were exposed either at early stage disease (2 months of age) and examined 3 or 6 months later, or at late stage disease (8 months of age) and examined 2 or 4 months later. Compared to unexposed controls, all doses given at low or high dose rate at early stage disease had significant inhibitory effects on lesion growth and, at 25 or 50 mGy, on lesion frequency. No dose given at low dose rate had any effect on total serum cholesterol, but this was elevated by every dose given at high dose rate. Exposures at low dose rate had no effect on the percentage of lesion lipids contained within macrophages, and, at either high or low dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion severity. Exposure at late stage disease, to any dose at high dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion frequency, but at low dose rate some doses produced a small transient increase in this frequency. Exposure to low doses at low, but not high dose rate, significantly, but transiently reduced average lesion size, and at either dose rate transiently reduced lesion severity. Exposure to any dose at low dose rate (but not high dose rate) resulted in large and persistent decreases in serum cholesterol. These data indicate that a single low dose exposure, depending on dose and dose rate, generally protects against various measures of atherosclerosis in genetically susceptible mice. This result contrasts with the known, generally detrimental effects of high doses on this disease in the same mice, suggesting that a linear extrapolation of risk from high doses is not appropriate. (author)

  8. Low dose radiation exposure and atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N.D.; Whitman, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that single low dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low LET radiation, given at either high (240 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate, would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BI/6 mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE-/-). Mice were exposed either at early stage disease (2 months of age) and examined 3 or 6 months later, or at late stage disease (8 months of age) and examined 2 or 4 months later. Compared to unexposed controls, all doses given at low or high dose rate at early stage disease had significant inhibitory effects on lesion growth and, at 25 or 50 mGy, on lesion frequency. No dose given at low dose rate had any effect on total serum cholesterol, but this was elevated by every dose given at high dose rate. Exposures at low dose rate had no effect on the percentage of lesion lipids contained within macrophages, and, at either high or low dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion severity. Exposure at late stage disease, to any dose at high dose rate, had no significant effect on lesion frequency, but at low dose rate some doses produced a small transient increase in this frequency. Exposure to low doses at low, but not high dose rate, significantly, but transiently reduced average lesion size, and at either dose rate transiently reduced lesion severity. Exposure to any dose at low dose rate (but not high dose rate) resulted in large and persistent decreases in serum cholesterol. These data indicate that a single low dose exposure, depending on dose and dose rate, generally protects against various measures of atherosclerosis in genetically susceptible mice. This result contrasts with the known, generally detrimental effects of high doses on this disease in the same mice, suggesting that a linear extrapolation of risk from high doses is not appropriate. (author)

  9. Study of the antioxidant effect of {alpha}-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high {gamma}-radiation dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)]. E-mail: abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca; Milochevitch, Christelle [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    It is well known that vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol, {alpha}-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with {alpha}-tocopherol and different {alpha}-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0{+-}2.5, 14.3{+-}3.0, 33.3{+-}3.7, 42.7{+-}3.5 and 48.2{+-}4.5 molecules of {alpha}-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of {sup {center_dot}}OH and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} free radicals produced by {gamma}-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous {alpha}-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL {alpha}-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. {alpha}-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10{sup -10} M s{sup -1} and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for {alpha}-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions.

  10. Study of the antioxidant effect of α-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high γ-radiation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Milochevitch, Christelle

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that vitamin E (α-tocopherol, α-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with α-tocopherol and different α-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0±2.5, 14.3±3.0, 33.3±3.7, 42.7±3.5 and 48.2±4.5 molecules of α-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of · OH and O 2 ·- free radicals produced by γ-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous α-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL α-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. α-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10 -10 M s -1 and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for α-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions

  11. User's manual of MANYCASK code for calculation of spatial distributions of radiation dose rates in a system composed of many spent-fuel-shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    A calculation code MANYCASK is designed for evaluation of spatial distributions of radiation dose rates in ships loaded with a lot of spent fuel shipping casks. Principle of the calculation method adopted in this code is different from that of ordinary codes, and is advantageous for calculating highly reliable dose rate distributions with a very short calculation time. Basic concept of the principle has been described in other reports in detail. A brief description of the principle will be included in the present report along with a technique named Shadow Technique in this report, in addition to format descriptions of output data as well as input data. Results of sample calculations are compared with measured results in figures so as to show how the calculation method adopted is valid. For the purpose of making this code popular among many people, the author writes the user's manual in the present report in Japanese for domestic users, and in English in another report for people in abroad. (author)

  12. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  13. Yield of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks in Escherichia coli and superinfecting phage lambda at different dose rates. Repair of strand breaks in different buffers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boye, E.; Johansen, I.; Brustad, T.

    1976-01-01

    Cells of E. coli K-12 strain AB 1886 were irradiated in oxygenated phosphate buffered saline at 2 0 C with electrons from a 4-MeV linear accelerator. The yield of DNA single-strand breaks was determined as a function of the dose rate between 2.5 and 21,000 krad/min. For dose rates over 100 krad/min the yield was found to be constant. Below 10 krad/min the yield of breaks decreases drastically. This is explained by rejoining of breaks during irradiation. Twenty percent of the breaks induced by acute exposure are repaired within 3 min at 2 0 C. Superinfecting phage lambda DNA is repaired at the same rate as chromosomal DNA. In contrast to the results obtained with phosphate-buffered saline, an increase in the number of breaks after irradiation is observed when the bacteria are suspended in tris buffer. It is suggested that buffers of low ionic strength facilitate the leakage through the membrane of a small-molecular-weight component(s) necessary for DNA strand rejoining

  14. Is volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate a valid option in radiation therapy for head and neck cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didona, Annamaria; Lancellotta, Valentina; Zucchetti, Claudio; Panizza, Bianca Moira; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Iacco, Martina; Di Pilato, Anna Concetta; Saldi, Simonetta; Aristei, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose distribution in head and neck (HN) radiation therapy. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new form of IMRT, delivers radiation in single or multiple arcs, varying dose rates (VDR-VMAT) and gantry speeds, has gained considerable attention. Constant dose rate VMAT (CDR-VMAT) associated with a fixed gantry speed does not require a dedicated linear accelerator like VDR-VMAT. The present study explored the feasibility, efficiency and delivery accuracy of CDR-VMAT, by comparing it with IMRT and VDR-VMAT in treatment planning for HN cancer. Step and shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), CDR-VMAT and VDR-VMAT plans were created for 15 HN cancer patients and were generated by Pinnacle 3 TPS (v 9.8) using 6 MV photon energy. Three PTVs were defined to receive respectively prescribed doses of 66 Gy, 60 Gy and 54 Gy, in 30 fractions. Organs at risk (OARs) included the mandible, spinal cord, brain stem, parotids, salivary glands, esophagus, larynx and thyroid. SS-IMRT plans were based on 7 co-planar beams at fixed gantry angles. CDR-VMAT and VDR-VMAT plans, generated by the SmartArc module, used a 2-arc technique: one clockwise from 182° to 178° and the other one anti-clockwise from 178° to 182°. Comparison parameters included dose distribution to PTVs ( D mean , D 2% , D 50% , D 95% , D 98% and Homogeneity Index), maximum or mean doses to OARs, specific dose-volume data, the monitor units and treatment delivery times. Compared with SS-IMRT, CDR-VMAT significantly reduced the maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 and significantly improved all PTV3 parameters, except D 98% and D 95% . It significantly spared parotid and submandibular glands and was associated with a lower D mean to the larynx. Compared with VDR-VMAT, CDR-VMAT was linked to a significantly better D mean , to the PTV3 but results were worse for the parotids, left submandibular gland, esophagus and mandible. Furthermore, the D mean to the larynx was also worse

  15. Radiation exposure by using unsealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preitfellner, J.

    1999-05-01

    Investigations on patients using radioactive substances are performed on a routinely basis in nuclear medicine facilities at many hospitals in our days. These investigations are performed by administering a radiopharmacon to the patient which, depending on several parameters, remains in the body of the patient for various periods of time. All these investigations have in common a g-ray exposure of the environment by the radioactive substance in the body of the patient. Among others, doctors, technical personnel, cleaning personnel, and accompanying persons of patients are exposed to g-rays. Based on these facts, the degree of danger for persons who get into contact with these patients is repeatedly questioned. An additional problem is the health risk of persons employed at a nuclear medicine facility. To answer the first question, the local dose rate in the environment of 102 patients was evaluated immediately after application of the radioactive substance, in intervals from 30 minutes up to several hours, over a period of up to 2 weeks. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the patients were subdivided into 6 groups of 16-20 persons. From the data measured, the effective and the biological half life as well as the local dose were computed. With the aid of concrete case examples, the possible radiation exposure for contact persons was estimated. Postulating unfavorable local and temporal factors in our estimations, the actual radiation exposure is to be estimated about 10-30 % lower. As a reference value for the danger of persons, the maximum permissible boundary values from the Austrian Regulations for Protection against Radiation were used. Referring to these boundary values, for none of the six nuclear medicine investigation methods a danger for contact persons could be derived, indicating that available security measures offer a sufficient protection for affected contact persons. To answer the question about the risk for persons employed at a nuclear

  16. Relative implications of protective responses versus damage induction at low dose and low-dose-rate exposures, using the microdose approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E

    2003-07-01

    In reviewing tissue effects of low-dose radiation (1) absorbed dose to tissue is replaced by the sum of energy deposited with track events in cell-equivalent tissue micromasses, i.e. with microdose hits, in the number of exposed micromasses and (2) induced cell damage and adaptive protection are related to microdose hits in exposed micromasses for a given radiation quality. DNA damage increases with the number of microdose hits. They also can induce adaptive protection, mainly against endogenous DNA damage. This protection involves cellular defenses, DNA repair and damage removal. With increasing numbers of low linear energy transfer (LET) microdose hits in exposed micromasses, adaptive protection first tends to outweigh damage and then (above 200 mGy) fails and largely disappears. These experimental data predict that cancer risk coefficients derived by epidemiology at high-dose irradiation decline at low doses and dose rates when adaptive protection outdoes DNA damage. The dose-risk function should include both linear and non-linear terms at low doses. (author)

  17. Relative implications of protective responses versus damage induction at low dose and low-dose-rate exposures, using the microdose approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    In reviewing tissue effects of low-dose radiation (1) absorbed dose to tissue is replaced by the sum of energy deposited with track events in cell-equivalent tissue micromasses, i.e. with microdose hits, in the number of exposed micromasses and (2) induced cell damage and adaptive protection are related to microdose hits in exposed micromasses for a given radiation quality. DNA damage increases with the number of microdose hits. They also can induce adaptive protection, mainly against endogenous DNA damage. This protection involves cellular defenses, DNA repair and damage removal. With increasing numbers of low linear energy transfer (LET) microdose hits in exposed micromasses, adaptive protection first tends to outweigh damage and then (above 200 mGy) fails and largely disappears. These experimental data predict that cancer risk coefficients derived by epidemiology at high-dose irradiation decline at low doses and dose rates when adaptive protection outdoes DNA damage. The dose-risk function should include both linear and non-linear terms at low doses. (author)

  18. Dose-rate effects on the bulk etch-rate of CR-39 track detector exposed to low-LET radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Oda, K; Ikeda, T; Honda, Y; Tagawa, S

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gamma-rays and pulsed electrons has been investigated on the bulk etch rate of CR-39 detector at doses up to 100 kGy under various dose-rate between 0.0044 and 35.0 Gy/s. The bulk etch rate increased exponentially with the dose at every examined dose-rates. It was reveled to be strongly depend on the dose-rate: the bulk etch rate was decreased with increasing dose-rate at the same total dose. A primitive model was proposed to explain the dose-rate effect in which oxygen dissolved was assumed to dominate the damage formation process.

  19. Terrestrial gamma dose rate, radioactivity and radiological hazards in the rocks of an elevated radiation background in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien; Alnhary, Anees; Fadhl, Shadi

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate natural radiation and radioactivity in the rock and to assess the corresponding health risk in a region of elevated background radiation in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The mean external gamma dose rate was 374 nGy h(-1) which is approximately six times the world average. The measured results were used to compute annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk, which are 2.298 mSv, 61.95 man Sv y(-1) and 8.043  ×  10(-3), respectively. Rocks samples from different geological formations were analyzed for quantitative determination of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The specific activity of the rocks samples ranges from 7  ±  1 Bq Kg(-1) to 12 513  ±  329 Bq Kg(-1) for (232)Th, from 6  ±  1 Bq kg(-1) to 3089  ±  74 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 702  ±  69 Bq kg(-1) to 2954  ±  285 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. (232)Th is the main contributor to gamma dose rate from the rock samples. Indicators of radiological health impact, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are 3738 Bq kg(-1) and 10.10, respectively. The mean external hazard index was ten times unity in the studied locations in Juban District, which is higher than the recommended value.

  20. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  1. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  2. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damast, Shari; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata; Mosenkis, Jeffrey; Bennett, Antonia; Atkinson, Thomas; Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from 5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean (± standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 (±2.0); orgasm, 2.5 (±2.4); desire, 2.4 (±1.3); arousal, 2.2 (±2.0); dryness, 2.1 (±2.1); and pain, 1.9 (±2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, −7.1 points; 95% CI, −11.2 to −3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, −4.4 points; 95% CI, −8.7 to −0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, −4.6 points; 95% CI, −9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  3. Reduced temperature (22 degrees C) results in enhancement of cell killing and neoplastic transformation in noncycling HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells irradiated with low-dose-rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Antoniono, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of reduced temperature (22 degrees C) or serum deprivation during low-dose-rate (0.66 cGy/min) γ irradiation on cell killing and neoplastic transformation has been examined using the HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cell system. The reduced temperature stops progression of these cells through the cell cycle while serum deprivation slows down cell turnover markedly. The data demonstrate an enhancement in both of the end points when cells are held at 22 degrees C compared to parallel experiments done at 37 degrees C. In operational terms, the decreased survival and increased neoplastic transformation are consistent with our earlier hypothesis of a higher probability of misrepair at reduced temperature. The interpretation that this damage enhancement was associated with the reduced temperature, and not the fact that the cells were noncycling, was supported by the results of experiments performed with cells cultured at 37 degrees C in serum-free medium for 35 h prior to and then during the 12.24 h low-dose-rate radiation exposure. Under these conditions, cell cycle progression, as shown by reduction in growth rate and dual-parameter flow cytometric analysis, was considerable inhibited (cell cycle time increased from 20 h to 40 h), and there was no significant enhancement of cell killing or neoplastic transformation. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Radiation exposure during ureteroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, D.H.; Cubler-Goodman, A.

    1990-01-01

    Use of fluoroscopy during ureteroscopy increases the risk of radiation exposure to the urologist and patient. Radiation entrance dosages were measured at skin level in 37 patients, and at the neck, trunk and finger of the urologist, and neck and trunk of the circulating nurse. Radiation exposure time was measured in 79 patients, and was related to the purpose of the procedure and the type of ureteroscope used, whether rigid or flexible. Exposure could be minimized by decreasing the fluoroscopy time. A portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit with electronic imaging and last image hold mode should be used to minimize exposure time. Lead aprons and thyroid shields should be used by the urologist and other personnel in the endoscopy room

  5. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  6. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  7. On the dose-rate effect of ionizing radiations on the initial radiation-chemical yield of paramagnetic centers upon low-temperature radiolysis of n-heptane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kiryukhin, D.P.; Kuzina, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the authors report on an experimental study of the initial regions of dose dependence of paramagnetic centers in n-heptane upon varying the dose rate from 0.035 to 2.3 x 10 3 Gy/s. The buildup at 77 K of paramagnetic centers in n-heptane was studied in outgassed samples placed in Luch-2 glass cells

  8. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  9. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tward, Jonathan D.; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Elliott, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  10. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tward, Jonathan D; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C; Elliott, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus EBRT) increases the risk of severe UAEs compared with HDR

  11. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  12. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  13. Effect of cell cycle stage, dose rate and repair of sublethal damage of radiation-induced apoptosis in F9 teratocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.E.; Quartuccio, S.G.; Kennealey, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    There are at least two different models of cell death after treatment with ionizing radiation. The first is a failure to undergo sustained cell division despite metabolic survival, and we refer to this end point as open-quotes classical reproductive cell death.close quotes The second is a process that results in loss of cell integrity. This second category includes cellular necrosis as well as apoptosis. Earlier studies in our laboratory showed that the predominant mechanism of cell death for irradiated F9 cell is apoptosis, and there is no indication that these cells die by necrosis. We have therefore used cells of this cell line to reassess basic radiobiological principles with respect to apoptosis. Classical reproductive cell death was determined by staining colonies derived from irradiated cells and scoring colonies of less than 50 cells as reproductively dead and colonies of more than 50 cells as survivors. Cells that failed to produce either type of colony (detached from the plate or disintegrated) were scored as having undergone apoptosis. Using these criteria we found that the fraction of the radiation-killed F9 cells that died by apoptosis did not vary when cells were irradiated at different stages of the cell cycle despite large variations in overall survival. This suggests that the factors that influence radiation sensitivity throughout the cell cycle have an equal impact on apoptosis and classical reproductive cell death. There was no difference in cell survival between split doses and single doses of X rays, suggesting that sublethal damage repair is not a factor in radiation-induced apoptosis of F9 cells. Apoptosis was not affected by changes in dose rate in the range of 0.038-4.96 Gy/min. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. High-dose-rate stereotactic body radiation therapy for postradiation therapy locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma: Preliminary prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Donald B; Wurzer, James; Shirazi, Reza; Bridge, Stephen S; Law, Jonathan; Mardirossian, George

    2015-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate following radiation therapy (RT) present a challenging problem. We prospectively evaluated the use of "high-dose-rate-like" prostate stereotactic body RT (SBRT) salvage for this circumstance, evaluating prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity. Between February 2009 and March 2014, 29 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent locally prostate cancer >2 years post-RT were treated. Median prior RT dose was 73.8 Gy and median interval to SBRT salvage was 88 months. Median recurrence Gleason score was 7 (79% was ≥7). Pre-existing RT toxicity >grade 1 was a reason for exclusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-defined prostate volume including any suspected extraprostatic extension, comprising the planning target volume. A total of 34 Gy/5 fractions was given, delivering a heterogeneous, high-dose-rate-like dose-escalation pattern. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Twenty-nine treated patients had a median 24-month follow-up (range, 3-60 months). A median pre-SBRT salvage baseline prostate-specific antigen level of 3.1 ng/mL decreased to 0.65 ng/mL and 0.16 ng/mL at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Actuarial 2-year biochemical disease-free survival measured 82%, with no local failures. Toxicity >grade 1 was limited to the genitourinary domain, with 18% grade 2 or higher and 7% grade 3 or higher. No gastrointestinal toxicity >grade 1 occurred. Two-year disease-free survival is encouraging, and the prostate-specific antigen response kinetic appears comparable with that seen in de novo patients treated with SBRT, albeit still a preliminary finding. Grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity was occasionally seen with no obvious predictive factor. Noting that our only brachytherapy case was 1 of the 2 cases with ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, caution is recommended treating these patients. SBRT salvage of post-RT local recurrence

  15. External radiation exposure after deposition of man-made radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.

    1991-01-01

    The first step in assessing the external radiation exposure of the population is the determination of the gamma dose rate over meadows, which are used as reference points for various reasons. The second step is the description of external radiation exposures in urban and rural environments. The relation to the radiation exposure in a meadow is a function of the radionuclide distribution, i.e. the type of deposition. Finally, a simple method of calculating external radiation exposure is developed on the basis of recent findings. The method is compared with the method used in the UNSCEAR report for calculating radiation exposures after Chernobyl and with the method described in the AVV (General Administrative Regulation) of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Radiation problems of Fukushima. Little exposure of residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasawa, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    More than one and half year passed after Fukushima nuclear accident, radiation hazards, especially due to internal irradiation, were still public concern of people living within Fukushima prefecture and Tokyo metropolitan area. However according to several investigations, internal exposure was greatly lower than the level of health hazards due to internal radiation. In August 2012, Fukushima prefecture published internal dose rate of 26 persons was greater than 1 mSv (max 3 mSv) and others than 1 mSv based on whole body counters test results for 63366 residents after June 2011. Appropriate disclosure of exposure dose and related risks was required for risk communication. Target of internal exposure dose rate less than 1 mSv/year was almost attained and people with rather higher dose should be individually checked to reduce exposure. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Bruce C.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Frank, Alex H.; Peschel, Richard E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Edraki, Babak; Kohorn, Ernest I.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226 Ra or 137 Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192 Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94

  18. Health consequences of ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalci, D.; Dorter, G.; Guclu, I.

    2004-01-01

    article we examine the types of health effects associated with large acute exposures and with low dose rate chronic exposure. The biological effects of ionizing radiation to cell, tissue, organ and systems in humans will be outlined. (author)

  19. Study of the examination times using radiation equipments and the radiation exposure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Kichiro; Orito, Takeo; Maekawa, Ryuichi; Hiraki, Tatsunosuke [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Paramedicine; Koga, Sukehiko

    1985-01-01

    The relation between the examination time and the exposure to the personnel was investigated. In order to minimize radiation injury, special exposure dose-rate distribution curves were performed at the maximum exposure condition setting the phantom, and the examination times could be limited from the exprosure dose for the place where the personnel presented. The examination times are possible to be ten times by those with the Medical X-ray Protective Aprons.

  20. Study of the examination times using radiation equipments and the radiation exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshida, Kichiro; Orito, Takeo; Maekawa, Ryuichi; Hiraki, Tatsunosuke; Koga, Sukehiko.

    1985-01-01

    It was investigated for the relation between the examination times and the exposure to the personnel. At the purpose to minimize the radiation injury, the special exposure dose-rate distribution curves were performed at the maximum exposure condition setting the phantom, and the examination times could be limited from the exprosure dose for the place where the personnel presented. The examination times are possible to be ten times by those with the Medical X-ray Protective Aprons. (author)

  1. NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    History Documents US Underground Nuclear Test History Reports NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports Enewetak Atoll Cleanup Documents TRAC About Who We Are Our Values History Locations Our Leadership Director Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current

  2. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  3. Dose rate of restroon in facilities using radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Gwi [Dept. of uclear Medicine, Inha University hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); An, Seong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study is therefore aimed at measuring the surface dose rate and the spatial dose rate in and outside the radionuclide facility in order to ensure safety of the patients, radiation workers and family care-givers in their use of such equipment and to provide a basic framework for further research on radiation protection. The study was conducted at 4 restrooms in and outside the radionuclide facility of a general hospital in Incheon between May 1 and July 31, 2014. During the study period, the spatial contamination dose rate and the surface contamination dose rate before and after radiation use were measured at the 4 places−thyroid therapy room, PET center, gamma camera room, and outpatient department. According to the restroom use survey by hospitals, restrooms in the radionuclide facility were used not only by patients but also by family care-givers and some of radiation workers. The highest cumulative spatial radiation dose rate was 8.86 mSv/hr at camera room restroom, followed by 7.31 mSv/hr at radioactive iodine therapy room restroom, 2.29 mSv/hr at PET center restroom, and 0.26 mSv/hr at outpatient department restroom, respectively. The surface radiation dose rate measured before and after radiation use was the highest at toilets, which are in direct contact with patient's excretion, followed by the center and the entrance of restrooms. Unsealed radioactive sources used in nuclear medicine are relatively safe due to short half lives and low energy. A patient who received those radioactive sources, however, may become a mobile radioactive source and contaminate areas the patient contacts−camera room, sedation room, and restroom−through secretion and excretion. Therefore, patients administered radionuclides should be advised to drink sufficient amounts of water to efficiently minimize radiation exposure to others by reducing the biological half-life, and members of the public−family care-givers, pregnant women, and children−be as far away from

  4. Comparison of PSA value at last follow-up of patients who underwent low-dose rate brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2017-08-25

    To compare the PSA value at the last follow-up of patients who underwent prostate low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) with that of patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 610 prostate cancer patients (cT1c-3bN0M0) were enrolled, and 445 of them underwent LDR-BT, while 165 received IMRT (74-76 Gy). The median follow-up period of these two groups was 75 months (LDR-BT) and 78 months (IMRT), respectively. We also evaluated the biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free rate using two definitions (Phoenix definition and PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL). The percentage of patients who achieved PSA LDR-BT group and 49.7% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT group and 32.1% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT groups was 89.5 and 95.0% (p LDR-BT groups, respectively (p LDR-BT was significantly lower than that of IMRT, and this result was particularly marked in patients with a normal testosterone level at the last follow-up.

  5. Numerical investigations of radiation exposure in civil aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, P.; Felsberger, E.; O'Brien, K.; Kindl, P.

    1998-01-01

    Previous in-flight measurements of radiation exposure to air crews is compared with calculations by cosmic ray transport codes. Primary cosmic ray particle spectra modifications by solar modulation and by the geomagnetic field are discussed. The cosmic ray propagation and behaviour in the atmosphere is described by the Boltzmann equation. Results of calculations are shown in graphical form, including the altitude dependence of the effective dose rate at various geomagnetic latitudes, the effect of the 11-year solar modulation cycle, and 3 world maps of effective dose rates at usual flight altitudes. (A.K.)

  6. Dose rate calculations for a reconnaissance vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, L.; Mackey, J.; Salmon, M.; Smith, C.; Wall, S.

    2005-01-01

    A Chemical Nuclear Reconnaissance System (CNRS) has been developed by the British Ministry of Defence to make chemical and radiation measurements on contaminated terrain using appropriate sensors and recording equipment installed in a land rover. A research programme is under way to develop and validate a predictive capability to calculate the build-up of contamination on the vehicle, radiation detector performance and dose rates to the occupants of the vehicle. This paper describes the geometric model of the vehicle and the methodology used for calculations of detector response. Calculated dose rates obtained using the MCBEND Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code in adjoint mode are presented. These address the transient response of the detectors as the vehicle passes through a contaminated area. Calculated dose rates were found to agree with the measured data to be within the experimental uncertainties, thus giving confidence in the shielding model of the vehicle and its application to other scenarios. (authors)

  7. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K; Godette, Denise J; Stall, Bronwyn R; Coleman, C Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Ménard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Susil, Robert C; Citrin, Deborah E; Ning, Holly; Miller, Robert W; Ullman, Karen; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears

    2006-01-01

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  8. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  9. Risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Vlahovich, S.; Cornett, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Excess radiation-induced cardiac mortalities have been reported among radiotherapy patients. Many case reports describe the occurrence of atherosclerosis following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Some case reports describe the cerebral infarction following radiotherapy to neck region, and of peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities following radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The association of atomic bomb radiation and cardiovascular disease has been examined recently by incidence studies and prevalence studies of various endpoints of atherosclerosis; all endpoints indicated an increase of cardiovascular disease in the exposed group. It is almost certain that the cardiovascular disease is higher among atomic bomb survivors. However, since a heavy exposure of 10-40 Gy is delivered in radiotherapy and the bomb survivors were exposed to radiation at high dose and dose-rate, the question is whether the results can be extrapolated to individuals exposed to lower levels of radiation. Some recent epidemiological studies on occupationally exposed workers and population living near Chernobyl have provided the evidence for cardiovascular disease being a significant late effect at relatively low doses of radiation. However, the issue of non-cancer mortality from radiation is complicated by lack of adequate information on doses, and many other confounding factors (e.g., smoking habits or socio-economic status). This presentation will evaluate possible radiobiological mechanisms for radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, and will address its relevance to radiation protection management at low doses and what the impact might be on future radiation risk assessments. (authors)

  10. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  11. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  12. American National Standard: neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose rate factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This Standard presents data recommended for computing biological dose rates due to neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are given; the energy range for the gamma-ray conversion factors is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Specifically, this Standard is intended for use by shield designers to calculate wholebody dose rates to radiation workers and the general public. Establishing dose-rate limits is outside the scope of this Standard. Use of this Standard in cases where the dose equivalents are far in excess of occupational exposure guidelines is not recommended

  13. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Shayna L.; Petroni, Gina; Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce; Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R.; Dalal, Parchayi; Smolkin, Mark; Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  14. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Shayna L., E-mail: snl2t@virginia.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Petroni, Gina [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Dalal, Parchayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Smolkin, Mark [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  15. Dose rate in the reactor room and environment during maintenance in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Satoh, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Seki, Yasushi

    1995-01-01

    According to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) conceptual design activity, after reactor shutdown, damaged segments are pulled up from the reactor and hung from the reactor room ceiling by a remote handling device. The dose rate in the reactor room and the environment is estimated for this situation, and the following results are obtained. First, the dose rate in the room is > 10 8 μSv/h. Since this dose rate is 10 7 times greater than the biological radiation shielding design limit of 25 μSv/h, workers cannot enter the room. Second, lenses and optical fiber composed of glass that is radiation resistant up to 10 6 Gy would be damaged after <100 h near the segment, and devices using semiconductors could not work after several hours or so in the aforementioned dose-rate conditions. Third, during suspension of one blanket segment from the ceiling, the dose rate in the site boundary can be reduced by one order by a 23-cm-thicker reactor building roof. To reduce dose rate in public exposure to a value that is less than one-tenth of the public exposure radiation shielding design limit of 100 μSv/yr, the distance of the site boundary from the reactor must be greater than 200 m for a reactor building with a 160-cm-thick concrete roof. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  17. Phase I/II trial of single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy-boosted hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael A; Hagan, Michael P; Todor, Dorin; Gilbert, Lynn; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Randolf, Jessica; Heimiller, Jeffrey; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2012-01-01

    A Phase I/II protocol was conducted to examine the toxicity and efficacy of the combination of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant. From 2001 through 2006, 26 consecutive patients were treated on the trial. The primary objective was to demonstrate a high rate of completion without experiencing a treatment-limiting toxicity. Eligibility was limited to patients with T stage ≤2b, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤20, and Gleason score ≤7. Treatment began with a single HDR fraction of 6Gy to the entire prostate and 9Gy to the peripheral zone, followed by IMRT optimized to deliver in 28 fractions with a normalized total dose of 70Gy. Patients received 50.4Gy to the pelvic lymph node. The prostate dose (IMRT and HDR) resulted in an average biologic equivalent dose >128Gy (α/β=3). Patients whose pretreatment PSA was ≥10ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or stage ≥T2b received short-term androgen ablation. Median followup was 53 months (9-68 months). There were no biochemical failures by either the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology or the Phoenix definitions. The median nadir PSA was 0.32ng/mL. All the 26 patients completed the treatment as prescribed. The rate of Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity was 3.8% consisting of a urethral stricture. There was no other Grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicities. Single-fraction HDR-boosted IMRT is a safe effective method of dose escalation for localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the spatial rates dose rates during dental panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Safety Management Commission, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Myeong Hwan [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A dental panoramic radiography which usually uses low level X-rays is subject to the Nuclear Safety Act when it is installed for the purpose of education. This paper measures radiation dose and spatial dose rate by usage and thereby aims to verify the effectiveness of radiation safety equipment and provide basic information for radiation safety of radiation workers and students. After glass dosimeter (GD-352M) is attached to direct exposure area, the teeth, and indirect exposure area, the eye lens and the thyroid, on the dental radiography head phantom, these exposure areas are measured. Then, after dividing the horizontal into a 45°, it is separated into seven directions which all includes 30, 60, 90, 120 cm distance. The paper shows that the spatial dose rate is the highest at 30 cm and declines as the distance increases. At 30 cm, the spatial dose rate around the starting area of rotation is 3,840 μSv/h, which is four times higher than the lowest level 778 μSv/h. Furthermore, the spatial dose rate was 408 μSv/h on average at the distance of 60 cm where radiation workers can be located. From a conservative point of view, It is possible to avoid needless exposure to radiation for the purpose of education. However, in case that an unintended exposure to radiation happens within a radiation controlled area, it is still necessary to educate radiation safety. But according to the current Medical Service Act, in medical institutions, even if they are not installed, the equipment such as interlock are obliged by the Nuclear Safety Law, considering that the spatial dose rate of the educational dental panoramic radiography room is low. It seems to be excessive regulation.

  19. Modification of radiation dose-rate sparing effects in a human carcinoma of the cervix cell line by inhibitors of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, L.R.; Steel, G.G.

    1988-08-01

    The in vitro cell survival of a human cervix carcinoma cell line (HX156c) was assessed using /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays administered at 150 cGy/min or 3.2 cGy/min dose rate. Recovery during low dose-rate irradiation was observed; dose reduction factor at 10/sup -2/ cell kill for 150 versus 3.2 cGy/min was around 1.3. Possible underlying mechanisms of this recovery process have been investigated by addition of non-toxic concentrations of various agents thought to inhibit eukaryotic DNA repair. Differential effects among inhibitors were observed; aphidicolin had no effect on cell survival, novobiocin, hydroxyurea and 3-aminobenzamide reduced survival by a similar extent at both dose rates, ..beta..-ara A and caffeine reduced survival to a greater extent during low dose-rate irradiation. ..beta..-ara A and caffeine seemed to effect mainly by increasing the alpha component of the acute survival curve. Since survival curves obtained at dose rates of around 3 cGy/min help define a dominant component of the initial slope of the acute curve the authors claim to demonstrate that ..beta..-ara A and caffeine modify the initial slope, probably by inhibiting DNA repair processes involved in tumour cell sparing during protracted irradiation.

  20. Fuji Amulet 1000 MS mammography system and radiation dose rate at the image receptor; El mamografo Fuji Amulet 1000 MS y la tasa de dosis de radiacion en el receptor de imagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Jimenez Albericio, J.

    2011-07-01

    Measurements for commissioning and for establishing the performance reference level of Fuji Amulet 1000 MS mammography digital system yielded conflicting results regarding compliance with the defined tolerances for dose rate at the receiver input defined at the Spanish Protocol for Quality Control in Diagnostic X-Ray Systems. It was found that this result is due to the pulsed nature of the radiation emitted and it is concluded by recommending that in these cases dose rate has to be measured at tube loadings typical of clinical examinations (50 mAs or higher). (Author) 2 refs.

  1. Radiation exposure in medicare-occupational and medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozumi, Kunihiko

    2012-01-01

    Recent cases of the occupational and medical exposures are discussed in relation to the justification of practice, optimization of protection and effort to reduce the dose. Instances of the occupational exposure in doctors and nurses like 26.5 mSv/15 mo and 53.9 mSv/y, and of skin cancer were reported in newspapers of 1999-2004, which might have had been prevented by their self evaluation of daily and monthly exposed dose. For reasonably lowering the occupational dose and number of exposed stuff in the present law, the prior radiation protection measures are to be taken in consideration of social/economical factors to conduct beneficial radiation medicare without restriction of practice under safest conditions, protecting personal determinative hazard and preventing stochastic effect. Medical stuff must be equipped with personal dosimeter. Further, recent media also commented such cases as unwished abortions after careless X-CT of pregnant women, and risk of increased cancer prevalence (3.2% in Japan) due to medical exposure, etc (200-2010). The prevalence is calculated on the linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis and is probably overestimated, possibly causing patient's fear. There has been a history of proposal by IAEA (1996) of the guidance levels of the ordinary roentgenography and in vivo nuclear medical test, and introduction of the concept of dose constraint by ICRP (Pub. 60). The incident dose rate to the patient under fluoroscopy defined by Japan Medical Service Law (2001) is, as an air-kerma rate, 15,600 residents for their contamination as well as remains, and measured the ambient dose rate of cities nearby. (T.T.)

  2. High dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) as part of the management strategy for locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Louis B.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Enker, Warren E.; Mychalczak, Borys; Guillem, Jose; Paty, Philip B.; Anderson, Lowell; White, Carol; Cohen, Alfred M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Primary unresectable and locally advanced recurrent rectal cancer presents a significant clinical challenge. Local failure rates are high in both situations. Under such circumstances, there is a significant need to safely deliver tumoricidal doses of radiation in an attempt to improve local control. For this reason, we have incorporated a new approach utilizing high dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 11/92-12/96, a total of 112 patients were explored, of which 68 patients were treated with HDR-IORT, and 66 are evaluable. The majority of the 44 patients were excluded for unresectable disease or for distant metastases which eluded preoperative imaging. There were 22 patients with primary unresectable disease, and 46 patients who presented with recurrent disease. The histology was adenocarcinoma in 64 patients, and squamous cell carcinoma in four patients. In general, the patients with primary unresectable disease received preoperative chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, and external beam irradiation to 4500-5040 cGy, followed by surgical resection and HDR-IORT (1000-2000 cGy). In general , the patients with recurrent disease were treated with surgical resection and HDR-IORT (1000-2000 cGy) alone. All surgical procedures were done in a dedicated operating room in the brachytherapy suite, so that HDR-IORT could be delivered using the Harrison-Anderson-Mick (HAM) applicator. The median follow-up is 17.5 months (1-48 mo). Results: In primary cases, the actuarial 2-year local control is 81%. For patients with negative margins, the local control was 92% vs. 38% for those with positive margins (p = 0.002). The 2-year actuarial disease-free survival was 69%; 77% for patients with negative margins vs. 38% for patients with positive margins (p = 0.03). For patients with recurrent disease, the 2-year actuarial local control rate was 63%. For patients with negative margins, it was 82%, while it was

  3. Personnel radiation exposure in the Asse saltmine repository during 1967 to 2008. Health monitoring Asse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    The health monitoring Asse includes the following chapters: Introduction, background information including handling of radioactive materials and radiation protection issues, data on radiation exposure (personnel dosimetry, incorporation surveillance, local dose rate measurements, exhaust monitoring, radioactivity in the salt mine air and in the brine, contamination), concept of the data base, interrogation of the personnel, quantification of the individual radiation doses, results of the radiation exposure quantification; significance of the results and perspectives.

  4. Model of the contribution of the compton generated radiation to the dose rate for an experiment in a semi industrial irradiation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, Josefina

    2007-01-01

    The model of the build up contribution to the absorbed dose rate in a semi industrial irradiation plant is presented. A static irradiation of a lucite phantom with and without water is modeled. The absorbed dose was measured with silver and potassium dichromate dosemeters. Two approximations are used, the first one is a global adjustment of the attenuation coefficient and the second one consists in a detailed description of the Compton scattering. A specific numerical model is developed for each approximation and the absorbed dose rates calculated are compared with the experimental measurements. The achievements and limitations of both models are discussed. (author) [es

  5. Radioactivities (dose rates) of rocks in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu; Minato, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The radioactive distribution (radiation doses) of major rocks in Japan was monitored to clarify the factors influencing terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates. The rock samples were reduced to powder and analyzed by well-type NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and pulse height analyzer. Terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates were estimated in terms of gamma radiation dose rate 1 m above the ground. The radioactivity concentration was highest in acidic rock which contains much SiO 2 among igneous rock, followed by neutral rock, basic rock, and ultrabasic rock. The radioactive concentration was 30-40% lower in acidic and clastic rocks than those of the world average concentration. Higher radioactive concentration was observed in soils than the parent rocks of sedimentary rock and metamorphic rock. The gamma radiation dose rate was in proportion to the radioactive concentration of the rocks. To clarify the radioactive effect in the change course of rocks into soils, comparative measurement of outcrop and soil radioactive concentrations is important. (S.Y.)

  6. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InsTEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  7. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.

    2015-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm -1 which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm -1 which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm -1 which were associated with NH stretch of NH 2 and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  8. Radiation exposure after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, Federica; Vavassori, Andrea; Polo, Alfredo; Rondi, Elena; Cambria, Raffaella; Orecchia, Roberto; Tosi, Giampiero

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Limited information is available on the true radiation exposure and associated risks for the relatives of the patients submitted to prostate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive sources and for any other people coming into contact with them. In order to provide appropriate information, we analyzed the radiation exposure data from 216 prostate cancer patients who underwent 125 I or 103 Pd implants at the European Institute of Oncology of Milan, Italy. Patients and methods: Between October 1999 and October 2004, 216 patients with low risk prostate carcinoma were treated with 125 I (200 patients) or 103 Pd (16 patients) permanent seed implantation. One day after the procedure, radiation exposure measurements around the patients were performed using an ionization chamber survey meter (Victoreen RPO-50) calibrated in dose rate at an accredited calibration center (calibration Centre SIT 104). Results: The mean dose rate at the posterior skin surface (gluteal region) following 125 I implants was 41.3 μSv/h (range: 6.2-99.4 μSv/h) and following 103 Pd implants was 18.9 μSv/h (range 5.0-37.3 μSv/h). The dose rate at 50 cm from the skin decreased to the mean value of 6.4 μSv/h for the 125 I implants and to the mean value of 1.7 μSv/h for the 103 Pd implants. Total times required to reach the annual dose limit (1 mSv/year) recommended for the general population by the European Directive 96/29/Euratom and by the Italian law (Decreto Legislativo 241/2000) at a distance of 50 cm from the posterior skin surface of the implanted patient would be 7.7 and 21.6 days for 125 I and for 103 Pd. Good correlation between the measured dose rates and both the total implanted activity and the distance between the most posteriorly implanted seed and the skin surface of the patients was found. Conclusions: Our data show that the dose rates at 50 cm away from the prostate brachytherapy patients are very low and that the doses possibly absorbed by the

  9. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  10. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of ∼10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate

  11. [Effects of radiation exposure on human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Sasatani, Megumi

    2012-03-01

    There are two types of radiation health effect; acute disorder and late on-set disorder. Acute disorder is a deterministic effect that the symptoms appear by exposure above a threshold. Tissues and cells that compose the human body have different radiation sensitivity respectively, and the symptoms appear in order, from highly radiosensitive tissues. The clinical symptoms of acute disorder begin with a decrease in lymphocytes, and then the symptoms appear such as alopecia, skin erythema, hematopoietic damage, gastrointestinal damage, central nervous system damage with increasing radiation dose. Regarding the late on-set disorder, a predominant health effect is the cancer among the symptoms of such as cancer, non-cancer disease and genetic effect. Cancer and genetic effect are recognized as stochastic effects without the threshold. When radiation dose is equal to or more than 100 mSv, it is observed that the cancer risk by radiation exposure increases linearly with an increase in dose. On the other hand, the risk of developing cancer through low-dose radiation exposure, less 100 mSv, has not yet been clarified scientifically. Although uncertainty still remains regarding low level risk estimation, ICRP propound LNT model and conduct radiation protection in accordance with LNT model in the low-dose and low-dose rate radiation from a position of radiation protection. Meanwhile, the mechanism of radiation damage has been gradually clarified. The initial event of radiation-induced diseases is thought to be the damage to genome such as radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Recently, it is clarified that our cells could recognize genome damage and induce the diverse cell response to maintain genome integrity. This phenomenon is called DNA damage response which induces the cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, cell senescence and so on. These responses act in the direction to maintain genome integrity against genome damage, however, the death of large number of

  12. The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J.

    1997-12-01

    This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly

  13. Pregnancy and radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.H.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Neuherberg

    1978-01-01

    In confirmed or presumptive pregnancy it is especially critical to determine the indications for X-ray examination. This assumes that every young woman, before an examination in the pelvic region, be asked explicity when her last normal period was. Examinations of the pelvis which are not acutely necessary should be postponed until the first 10 days after menstruation. If radiologic examination of the true pelvis must be carried out despite pregnancy or is inadvertently done because pregnancy was not recognized, the radiation exposure of the embryo is so small in most cases because of modern dose-sparing equipment, that an interruption of pregnancy is not justified. A dose of less than 1 rad is, as a rule, justifiable, but it is less justifiable that alarmed, uninformed physicians instill a deep-seated fear of giving brith to a freak in a woman through false information. (orig.) [de

  14. Environmental radiation and exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Compared to 1977 the exposure to radiation of the population of the Federal Republic of Germany from both natural and artificial radiation sources has not greatly charged. The amin part of exposure to natural radiation is caused by environmental radiation and by the absorption of naturally radioactive substances into the body. Artificial exposure to radiation of the population is essentially caused by the use of ionizing rays and radioactive substances in medicine. When radioactive materials are released from nuclear facilities the exposure to radiation of the population is only very slightly increased. The real exposure to radiation of individual people can even in the worst affected places, have been at most fractions of a millirem. The exposure to radiation in the worst afected places in the area of a hard-coal power station is higher than that coming from a nuclear power station of the same capacity. The summation of all contributions to the exposure of radiation by nuclear facilities to the population led in 1978 in the Federal Republic of Germany to a genetically significant dose of clearly less than 1 millerem per year. The medium-ranged exposure to radiation by external radiation effects through professional work was in 1978 at 80 millirems. No difference to 1977. The contribution of radionuclide from the fallout coming from nuclear-weapon tests and which has been deposited in the soil, to the whole-body dose for 1978 applies the same as the genetically significant dose of the population with less than 1 millirem. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using Ralstron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, C.O.; Kim, G.E.; Loh, J.J.K.

    1988-01-01

    From May 1979 through December 1981, a total of 530 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Of the 530 patients, 365 were treated with a high-dose-rate remote-controlled afterloading system (RALS) using a cobalt source, and 165 patients received a low dose rate using a radium source. External pelvic irradiation with a total of 40-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by intracavitary radiation (ICR) with a total dose of 30-39 Gy in ten to 13 fractions to point A was the treatment protocol. ICR was given three times a week with a dose of 3 Gy per fraction. Five-year actuarial survival rate with high-dose-rate ICR by stage was as follows: stage I:82.7% (N = 19) stage II:69.6% (N = 184), and stage III:52.2% (N = 156). The above results were comparable with those with conventional low-dose-rate ICR treatment, and late complications were far less. The application of high-dose-rate ICR was technically simple and easily performed on an outpatient basis without anesthesia, and the patients tolerated it very well. Radiation exposure to personnel was virtually none as compared with that of low-dose-rate ICR. Within a given period of time, more patients can be treated with high-dose-rate ICR because of the short treatment time. The authors therefore conclude that high-dose-rate ICR is suitable for a cancer center where a large number of patients are to be treated

  16. Assessment of background gamma radiation levels using airborne gamma ray spectrometer data over uranium deposits, Cuddapah Basin, India - A comparative study of dose rates estimated by AGRS and PGRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, D; Ramesh Babu, V; Patra, I; Tripathi, Shailesh; Ramayya, M S; Chaturvedi, A K

    2017-02-01

    The Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research (AMD) has conducted high-resolution airborne gamma ray spectrometer (AGRS), magnetometer and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys for uranium exploration, along the northern margins of Cuddapah Basin. The survey area includes well known uranium deposits such as Lambapur-Peddagattu, Chitrial and Koppunuru. The AGRS data collected for uranium exploration is utilised for estimating the average absorbed rates in air due to radio-elemental (potassium in %, uranium and thorium in ppm) distribution over these known deposit areas. Further, portable gamma ray spectrometer (PGRS) was used to acquire data over two nearby locations one from Lambapur deposit, and the other from known anomalous zone and subsequently average gamma dose rates were estimated. Representative in-situ rock samples were also collected from these two areas and subjected to radio-elemental concentration analysis by gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) in the laboratory and then dose rates were estimated. Analyses of these three sets of results complement one another, thereby providing a comprehensive picture of the radiation environment over these deposits. The average absorbed area wise dose rate level is estimated to be 130 ± 47 nGy h -1 in Lambapur-Peddagattu, 186 ± 77 nGy h -1 in Chitrial and 63 ± 22 nGy h -1 in Koppunuru. The obtained average dose levels are found to be higher than the world average value of 54 nGy h -1 . The gamma absorbed dose rates in nGy h -1 were converted to annual effective dose rates in mSv y -1 as proposed by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual average effective dose rates for the entire surveyed area is 0.12 mSv y -1 , which is much lower than the recommended limit of 1 mSv y -1 by International Commission on Radiation protection (ICRP). It may be ascertained here that the present study establishes a reference data set (baseline) in these areas

  17. Combination therapy with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and low dose rate radiation in the 9L rat brain tumor and spheroid models: implications for brain tumor brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutin, P.H.; Bernstein, M.; Sano, Y.; Deen, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of combination treatment with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and low dose rate radiation were studied in the 9L rat brain tumor in vivo model and the 9L multicellular tumor spheroid model. F-344 rats bearing intracerebral 9L gliosarcomas were implanted with removable 125 I sources. Minimal (peripheral) tumor doses of 6387 rad produced an increased life-span (ILS) of 28% over that of control rats implanted with dummy sources, BCNU alone (13.3 mg/kg) produced in an ILS of 67%, and combination treatment with BCNU and implanted 125 I sources produced an ILS of 167%. As measured by a colony-forming efficiency assay, the greatest cell kill in 9L spheroids occurred when BCNU was administered 24 hours before irradiation from a 137 Cs source at a low dose rate of 5 rad/minute. At a higher dose rate of 210 rad/minute, the time dependence of the effects of combination treatment was identical and therefore independent of dose rate

  18. Phase II trial of combined surgical resection, high dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy, and external beam radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raben, A.; Rusch, V.; Mychalczak, B.; Ginsberg, R.; Burt, M.; Bains, M.; Francois, Damien; Harrison, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combining extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) or pleurectomy / decortication (PD), high dose rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) and postoperative external beam radiation hemithoracic radiation (EBHRT) to treat malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Materials and Methods: From 3/94 through 9/94, 15 patients (pts) were enrolled on this trial. This included 3 females and 12 males with a median age of 59 (Range: 45-75). Eligibility criteria included biopsy proven MPM, no evidence of T4 or N3 disease by exam/CT/MRI, no evidence of metastatic disease, no previous treatment, and a Karnofsky performance status of ≥ 80%. Pts with pulmonary function tests permitting EPP, underwent EPP and HDR-IORT (N=7). The rest underwent PD/HDR-IORT (N=4). An intraoperative dose of 15 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 5 mm in tissue to the ipsilateral mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Postoperatively, 54 Gy of EBHRT was prescribed to the hemithorax, surgical scar and surgical drain site. The median surgical procedure time, median IORT time and median overall operating time was 554 minutes, 240 minutes, and 649 minutes respectively. The median dose of EBHRT was 50.4 Gy (Range 50-54 Gy). The median follow-up time is 8 months (Range: 3.5 to 28 months). Four of 15 pts had unresectable disease at the time of surgery and were taken off study. Results are presented in crude and actuarial analysis. Results: A complete resection of all visible gross disease was accomplished in 10 pts. One pt had a single focus of gross residual disease (less than 5 mm in size) left behind in the chest wall. The overall complication rate was 54%. Treatment related mortality occurred in 2 pts (18%) at 1 and 7 months respectively. This was attributed to ARDS in 1 pt (EPP/HDR-IORT) and radiation pneumonitis combined with a tracheoesophageal fistula in 1 pt (PD/HDR-IORT). Of the 6 remaining pts undergoing EPP/HDR-IORT, 2 pts developed a postoperative empyema with

  19. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  20. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  1. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigl, Martina L. [Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), Reston, VA (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Morgan, William F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  2. The biological effects of exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios for exposure to ionising radiation range from natural background radiation (chronic) to the explosions of atomic bombs (acute), with some medical, industrial and research exposures lying between these extremes. Biological responses to radiation that predominate at high doses incurred at high dose rates are different from those that predominate at low doses and low dose rates. Single doses from bomb explosions ranged up to many thousand mGy. Acute doses greater than about 1000 mGy cause acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Below this threshold, radiation has a variety of potential latent health effects: Change to the incidence of cancer is the most usual subject of attention but change to longevity may be the best overall measure because decreased incidences of non-cancer mortality have been observed to coincide with increased incidence of cancer mortality. Acute doses greater than 500 mGy cause increased risks of cancer and decreased life expectancy. For doses less than 100 mGy, beneficial overall health effects ('radiation hormesis') have been observed. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic exposure to natural radiation has occurred throughout evolution and is necessary for the normal life and health of current species. Dose rates greater than the present global average of about 2 mGy per year have either no discernible health effect or beneficial health effects up to several hundred mGy per year. It is clearly not credible that a single health effects model -- such as the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of risk estimation -- could fit all latent health effects. A more realistic model is suggested.

  3. Contribution of cosmic rays to radiation exposure of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.; Nikl, I.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the exposure of the Hungarian population to cosmic rays, the absorbed dose rate in air of cosmic radiation was directly measured by high pressure ionization chamber at ground level on the surface of different bodies of water and at various altitudes on the board of an aircraft. From the dose rates measured this way, the outdoor dose equivalent rate from the ionizing components of cosmic radiation to people living at sea level would be 300-325 μSv per year. Taking into account the altitude distribution of the population, the average weighted dose equivalent is about 320 μSv per year. At Kekestetoe, the highest peak of the Matra Mountains, (the highest altitude in Hungary), the annual dose equivalent is about 50 per cent higher than on the Great Hungarian Plain. (author)

  4. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the