WorldWideScience

Sample records for dose-escalation proof-of-concept study

  1. Early termination of prostate cancer hyperfractionated dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D; Porter, Arthur T; Kocheril, Paul; Grignon, David; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerable dose of hyperfractionated radiation in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3-T4 Nx, 0, 1 M0 and/or Gleason Score ≥ 8) were treated on the first two steps of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum dose of 78Gy to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) including the prostate, seminal vesicle and a 5mm margin at 1.3Gy b.i.d. The second group (24 patients) received a minimum dose to the CTV of 82.8Gy at 1.15Gy b.i.d. Twenty eight patients received neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with their radiation (8 of 25 patients at 78Gy and 20 of 24 patients at 82.8Gy). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading scale. Efficacy was evaluated by PSA levels and ultrasound guided biopsies. Median follow up was 36 and 18 months for the 78Gy and 82.8Gy dose levels, respectively. Results: No grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity was noted. At 36 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity were 16 and 20%, respectively. Twelve to 18 months following radiation, 41 patients (86%) underwent ultrasound guided biopsy. At 78Gy, 60% of 20 patients had a biopsy which was negative or showed a marked therapeutic effect. At 82.8Gy, these combined rates were 95% in the 21 patients who had biopsies. Nine patients (50%) who did not receive neo-adjuvant hormones had positive biopsies. No patient who received neo-adjuvant hormones plus 78Gy (5 patients) or 82.8Gy (18 patients) had a positive biopsy. Conclusion: Proceeding to the next dose level (87.4Gy) was justified by the lack of severe chronic toxicity. However, in view of the high rate of histologic sterilization when hyperfractionated irradiation was given in conjunction with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, it was felt to be unethical to

  2. Targeting interleukin-15 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a proof-of-concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, Bo; Tvede, Niels; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a proinflammatory, innate response cytokine that mediates pleiotropic effector function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inflammatory synovitis. Our objective was to study the ability of HuMax-IL15, a human IgG1 anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, to neutralize exogenous...... and endogenous IL-15 activity in vitro and to perform a phase I-II dose-escalation trial with HuMax-IL15 in patients with active RA....

  3. Collecting standardised oral health data via mobile application: A proof of concept study in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost C L den Boer

    Full Text Available FDI World Dental Federation, founded as Fédération Dentaire Internationale, has taken the initiative to develop the Oral Health Observatory, a mobile application to conduct oral health surveys worldwide. The aim is to collect reliable standardized international data on oral health and oral health care via a network of dentists. A proof of concept study project was set up in the Netherlands to test the methodology and to validate the approach. Data about caries, gingivitis, oral self-care and oral health related quality of life were analysed and compared to datasets validated in other studies. The Android app embeds three questionnaires addressing oral health history, status and patient behaviour. One questionnaire was completed by the patient and two by the dentist. The proof of concept study involved two phases: in the first phase, five dentists, regular participants in KNMT-surveys, evaluated the usability of the app; after the first phase, the app was adjusted for a second phase. For this phase an extra 15 dentists were recruited from a group of 20 other dentists: five of them declined to participate. Attention was paid to ensuring there was a proportional representation of gender, age and region. In the second phase the five first and 15 new participants collected data on up to a maximum of 38 patients. Data from this 653 patients correspond with results from previously published surveys on the prevalence of caries and gingivitis in the Netherlands. Hence demonstrating an association between caries and gingivitis with oral self-care, problems eating and experiencing oral pain. This proof of concept study shows that the app makes it possible to collect reliable information on oral health in a short period of time. Both dentists and patients evaluated the methodology as user-friendly. Altogether, the results of this proof of concept study are promising.

  4. Collecting standardised oral health data via mobile application: A proof of concept study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Joost C L; van Dijk, Ward; Horn, Virginie; Hescot, Patrick; Bruers, Josef J M

    2018-01-01

    FDI World Dental Federation, founded as Fédération Dentaire Internationale, has taken the initiative to develop the Oral Health Observatory, a mobile application to conduct oral health surveys worldwide. The aim is to collect reliable standardized international data on oral health and oral health care via a network of dentists. A proof of concept study project was set up in the Netherlands to test the methodology and to validate the approach. Data about caries, gingivitis, oral self-care and oral health related quality of life were analysed and compared to datasets validated in other studies. The Android app embeds three questionnaires addressing oral health history, status and patient behaviour. One questionnaire was completed by the patient and two by the dentist. The proof of concept study involved two phases: in the first phase, five dentists, regular participants in KNMT-surveys, evaluated the usability of the app; after the first phase, the app was adjusted for a second phase. For this phase an extra 15 dentists were recruited from a group of 20 other dentists: five of them declined to participate. Attention was paid to ensuring there was a proportional representation of gender, age and region. In the second phase the five first and 15 new participants collected data on up to a maximum of 38 patients. Data from this 653 patients correspond with results from previously published surveys on the prevalence of caries and gingivitis in the Netherlands. Hence demonstrating an association between caries and gingivitis with oral self-care, problems eating and experiencing oral pain. This proof of concept study shows that the app makes it possible to collect reliable information on oral health in a short period of time. Both dentists and patients evaluated the methodology as user-friendly. Altogether, the results of this proof of concept study are promising.

  5. SYSTEMS-2: A randomised phase II study of radiotherapy dose escalation for pain control in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available SYSTEMS-2 is a randomised study of radiotherapy dose escalation for pain control in 112 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM. Standard palliative (20 Gy/5# or dose escalated treatment (36 Gy/6# will be delivered using advanced radiotherapy techniques and pain responses will be compared at week 5. Data will guide optimal palliative radiotherapy in MPM.

  6. Proof-of-concept study of a marine ion-selective optical sensing instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, P.; Thompson, C.; Bamsey, M.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept instrument for real-time in-situ characterization of the ion chemistry of the ocean. Our instrument uses optical sensors equipped with ion-selective membranes which exhibit a change in an optical property that can be correlated with the concentration of a specific ion. We have implemented a system for multi-ion sensing that includes the use of a single spectrometer in tandem with a fiber optic multiplexer that is capable of reading a suite of attached optrodes, each of them dedicated to a unique ion. In this abstract we report the experimental characterization of calcium and potassium optrodes as a template for ion-selective optrodes and their application to the characterization of the oceans. The tests were performed at the Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility of the University of Guelph. Guelph's optrode housing was tested by immersing it in a 1/2 strength Hoagland's hydroponic solution to test functionality of the K+ and Ca2+ optrodes in this environment. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of recording spectral information in sub-minute times from more than one optrode simultaneously in a given aqueous system. This proof-of-concept study has allowed us to measure parameters of interest and comparison to analytical predictions for critical subsystems of a deployable system, and demonstrates maturity of the multi-ion sensing optrode technology. Critical advantages of our optrode system are that it: (1) enables concurrent measurements of multiple ionic species relevant in ocean sciences; (2) has high time and spatial resolution; (3) has low limits of detection; (4) uses low-cost, low-mass, energy efficient optoelectronics. Our system has the potential for facilitating new observational, experimental, and analytic capabilities in ocean sciences, including: (a) health and environment monitoring; (b) aquaculture; (c) global change, e.g. ocean acidification; and (d) origin of life research. Proof-of-concept setup at

  7. Think You Can Shrink? A Proof-of-Concept Study for Men's Health Education Through Edutainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Thomas; Norman, Cameron D; Knaak, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Connecting people to useful, actionable health resources is a substantive challenge that sits at the heart of health communication. Digital media provides means of producing, distributing and revising content and creates possibilities for new and multiple channels for reaching and engaging audiences, particularly when combined with social media. While there is much promise of digital media forms to deliver audiences and promote engagement, the health communication landscape is still largely hit-and-miss with few 'best practice' examples to follow. Proof-of-concept studies allow for a structured, focused exploration of ways to leverage the potential of digital media and learn what approaches have the promise to invest resources in amid a sea of possible options. Think You Can Shrink? (TYCS) is a multi-episode web series modelled on a reality TV show format. The show's key objective is to educate men and demonstrate, through modelling, ways men can support other men to encourage help-seeking behaviours and greater health communication, which in turn, may also lead to better health outcomes. Given the newness of the approach, the project was launched as a proof-of-concept study to explore: (a) whether this approach could engage the interest of men, (b) what initial impact this approach might induce and (c) the kind of audiences this approach might most appeal to.

  8. Proof-of-concept experimental study of damage detection of concrete piles using embedded piezoceramic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R L; Gu, H; Song, G; Mo, Y L

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a proof-of-concept experimental study of an innovative active-sensing approach for damage detection of concrete piles by using embedded piezoceramic transducers. In the proposed active-sensing approach, one piezoceramic transducer is used as an actuator to generate a stress wave to propagate through the concrete pile and the other distributed piezoceramic transducers are used as sensors to detect the wave response. Cracks or damage inside the concrete structure act as stress relief in the wave propagation path. The amplitude of the wave and the transmission energy will decrease due to the existence of cracks or damage. Experiments were performed on two bored piles instrumented with embedded piezoceramic transducers. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for pile damage detection. (fast track communication)

  9. Carbon footprinting of emergency medical services systems: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Ian; Brown, Lawrence H

    2009-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the availability of emergency medical services (EMS) system energy consumption data required to calculate a carbon footprint. Two diverse North American EMS systems with more than 125,000 combined annual unit responses agreed to report their energy consumption for the last fiscal or calendar year using a data-collection tool based on Carbon Trust recommendations. They also identified the source of information (e.g., bills, logs, receipts), whether the amounts reported were directly measured or estimated, and whether any of the amounts were prorated from shared facilities (e.g., electricity for a shared office building). For this proof-of-concept study, we report only descriptive data about the availability of data and aggregate carbon emissions. Both systems reported diesel fuel, gasoline, and electricity consumption. One system used natural gas; one system used aviation fuel. Direct measurement of consumption using utility bills and statements was possible for these energy types. One system prorated natural gas and electricity usage; one system was able to estimate commercial air travel. Annual carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions for these two systems totaled 11.1 million pounds of CO(2). The largest source of CO(2) emissions was diesel fuel (39%), followed by electricity (23%). These EMS systems were able to provide the data necessary to determine their carbon footprints. Future research could include broader study to establish EMS-specific norms for carbon emissions, benchmarking of these metrics between different EMS systems, and the assessment of programs designed to reduce EMS carbon emissions.

  10. Clinical Outcomes With Dose-Escalated Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Masodkar, Renuka; Kalyani, Nikhil; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Bakshi, Ganesh; Prakash, Gagan [Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar [Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Ghonge, Sujata; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical outcomes, and toxicity in patients with bladder cancer treated with adaptive, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder preservation as a part of trimodality treatment. The role of dose escalation was also studied. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with localized bladder cancer were enrolled in a prospective study. They underwent maximal safe resection of bladder tumor and concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with large tumors were offered induction chemotherapy. Radiation therapy planning was done using either 3 (n=34) or 6 (n=10) concentrically grown planning target volumes (PTV). Patients received 64 Gy in 32 fractions to the whole bladder and 55 Gy to the pelvic nodes and, if appropriate, a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed to 68 Gy (equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions assuming α/β of 10 [EQD2]{sub 10} = 68.7 Gy). Daily megavoltage (MV) imaging helped to choose the most appropriate PTV encompassing bladder for the particular day (using plan-of-the-day approach). Results: Most patients (88%) had T2 disease. Sixteen patients (36%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A majority of the patients (73%) received prophylactic nodal irradiation, whereas 55% of the patients received escalated dose to the tumor bed. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 3-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were 78%, 66%, and 67%, respectively. The bladder preservation rate was 83%. LRC (87% vs 68%, respectively, P=.748) and OS (74% vs 60%, respectively, P=.36) rates were better in patients receiving dose escalation. Instances of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5 (11%) and 2 (4%) patients, respectively. There was no acute or late RTOG grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using plan-of-the-day approach for bladder

  11. Clinical Outcomes With Dose-Escalated Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, Vedang; Masodkar, Renuka; Kalyani, Nikhil; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Bakshi, Ganesh; Prakash, Gagan; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar; Ghonge, Sujata; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical outcomes, and toxicity in patients with bladder cancer treated with adaptive, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder preservation as a part of trimodality treatment. The role of dose escalation was also studied. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with localized bladder cancer were enrolled in a prospective study. They underwent maximal safe resection of bladder tumor and concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with large tumors were offered induction chemotherapy. Radiation therapy planning was done using either 3 (n=34) or 6 (n=10) concentrically grown planning target volumes (PTV). Patients received 64 Gy in 32 fractions to the whole bladder and 55 Gy to the pelvic nodes and, if appropriate, a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed to 68 Gy (equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions assuming α/β of 10 [EQD2] 10  = 68.7 Gy). Daily megavoltage (MV) imaging helped to choose the most appropriate PTV encompassing bladder for the particular day (using plan-of-the-day approach). Results: Most patients (88%) had T2 disease. Sixteen patients (36%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A majority of the patients (73%) received prophylactic nodal irradiation, whereas 55% of the patients received escalated dose to the tumor bed. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 3-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were 78%, 66%, and 67%, respectively. The bladder preservation rate was 83%. LRC (87% vs 68%, respectively, P=.748) and OS (74% vs 60%, respectively, P=.36) rates were better in patients receiving dose escalation. Instances of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5 (11%) and 2 (4%) patients, respectively. There was no acute or late RTOG grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using plan-of-the-day approach for bladder preservation

  12. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  13. Prototype Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies: Branded Food Products Database for Public Health Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Prototype Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (Prototype FNDDS) Branded Food Products Database for Public Health is a proof of concept database. The database contains a small selection of food products which is being used to exhibit the approach for incorporation of the Branded Food ...

  14. Pharmaceutical development of an amorphous solid dispersion formulation of elacridar hydrochloride for proof-of-concept clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicki, E.; Schellens, J. H M; Beijnen, J. H.; Nuijen, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A novel tablet formulation containing an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of elacridar hydrochloride was developed with the purpose to resolve the drug’s low solubility in water and to conduct proof-of-concept clinical studies. Significance: Elacridar is highly demanded for

  15. Ewing sarcoma localized on spine: a dose escalation study in child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogin, G.; Marchesi, V.; Biston, M.C.; Gassa, F.; Amessis, M.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S.; De Marzi, L.; Lacroix, F.; Leroy, A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the study of dose escalation for the treatment of spinal in two types of Ewing tumours. They used 5 dose levels at the rate of five 1,6 Gy per week. They compare different radiotherapy techniques: three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy, static intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy, helical tomo-therapy, volume-modulated arc-therapy (VMAT), stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton-therapy (in passive diffusion). It appears that it is possible to safely and efficiently deliver until 70,4 Gy in some Ewing tumours. In child, exclusive radiotherapy might become a local treatment option and would require a clinic trial and comparison with exclusive surgery or post-operative radiotherapy. Short communication

  16. Online support groups for young women with breast cancer: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanne; Rojubally, Adina; Linden, Wolfgang; Zhong, Lihong; Mackenzie, Gina; Mahmoud, Sahar; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2017-07-01

    This initial study examined a therapist-led, synchronous, online support group (OSG) with psycho-education (OSG + E) compared to self-help psycho-education (E). The study aims were to examine proof of concept-feasibility, acceptability, and usefulness-and to hone methods for a formal RCT. One hundred five young breast cancer survivors (<50 years) post-treatment were randomized either to OSG + E or E. OSG + E received a therapist-led 10-week synchronous online intervention. E received a self-help workbook. Assessments were at baseline, 10 weeks, and 3 months, with willing OSG + E members completing post-study interviews. Researchers used inductive analysis, generating qualitative themes for feasibility, acceptability, and usefulness. We examined trajectories for one primary and two secondary quantitative outcomes and a combined moderator to discover who preferentially benefitted from the intervention. Qualitative analyses revealed that synchronous chat was at times challenging, but minimal technical coaching, structure, set topics, and professional facilitation enabled conversations that were focused and meaningful. A combined moderator indicated that generally more women benefitted from OSG + E relative to E and particularly those women in semi-rural and rural areas. This study suggests that therapist-led synchronous OSGs are feasible, acceptable, and useful for young breast cancer survivors and that a future RCT with a larger sample size, perhaps more focused on non-urban areas, is needed to establish its effectiveness.

  17. Psilocybin-assisted treatment for alcohol dependence: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Forcehimes, Alyssa A; Pommy, Jessica A; Wilcox, Claire E; Barbosa, P C R; Strassman, Rick J

    2015-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that classic (5HT2A agonist) hallucinogens have clinically relevant effects in alcohol and drug addiction. Although recent studies have investigated the effects of psilocybin in various populations, there have been no studies on the efficacy of psilocybin for alcohol dependence. We conducted a single-group proof-of-concept study to quantify acute effects of psilocybin in alcohol-dependent participants and to provide preliminary outcome and safety data. Ten volunteers with DSM-IV alcohol dependence received orally administered psilocybin in one or two supervised sessions in addition to Motivational Enhancement Therapy and therapy sessions devoted to preparation for and debriefing from the psilocybin sessions. Participants' responses to psilocybin were qualitatively similar to those described in other populations. Abstinence did not increase significantly in the first 4 weeks of treatment (when participants had not yet received psilocybin), but increased significantly following psilocybin administration (p psilocybin session (at week 4) strongly predicted change in drinking during weeks 5-8 (r = 0.76 to r = 0.89) and also predicted decreases in craving and increases in abstinence self-efficacy during week 5. There were no significant treatment-related adverse events. These preliminary findings provide a strong rationale for controlled trials with larger samples to investigate efficacy and mechanisms. NCT02061293. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy for Autism: An Open Label Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy is an emerging therapeutic modality with a great potential for the treatment of autism. Recent findings show that the major underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of autism are hypoperfusion and immune alterations in the brain. So conceptually, cellular therapy which facilitates counteractive processes of improving perfusion by angiogenesis and balancing inflammation by immune regulation would exhibit beneficial clinical effects in patients with autism. This is an open label proof of concept study of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in 32 patients with autism followed by multidisciplinary therapies. All patients were followed up for 26 months (mean 12.7. Outcome measures used were ISAA, CGI, and FIM/Wee-FIM scales. Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT scan recorded objective changes. Out of 32 patients, a total of 29 (91% patients improved on total ISAA scores and 20 patients (62% showed decreased severity on CGI-I. The difference between pre- and postscores was statistically significant (P<0.001 on Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. On CGI-II 96% of patients showed global improvement. The efficacy was measured on CGI-III efficacy index. Few adverse events including seizures in three patients were controlled with medications. The encouraging results of this leading clinical study provide future directions for application of cellular therapy in autism.

  19. Proof-of-concept study of an at-home, engaging, digital intervention for pediatric ADHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi O Davis

    Full Text Available Pharmacological and behavioral therapies have limited impact on the distinct neurocognitive impairments associated with ADHD, and existing cognitive training programs have shown limited efficacy. This proof-of-concept study assessed treatment acceptability and explored outcomes for a novel digital treatment targeting cognitive processes implicated in ADHD.Participants included 40 children with ADHD and 40 children without ADHD. Following psychiatric screening, ADHD ratings, and baseline neuropsychological measures, participants completed 28-days of at-home treatment. Neuropsychological assessment was repeated at end-of-study along with treatment satisfaction measures.Eighty-four percent of treatment sessions were completed and ratings showed strong intervention appeal. Significant improvements were observed on a computerized attention task for the ADHD group and a highly impaired ADHD High Severity subgroup. There was no change for the non-ADHD group. Spatial working memory also improved for the ADHD group and the ADHD High Severity subgroup.Findings provide preliminary support that this treatment may improve attention, working memory, and inhibition in children with ADHD. Future research requires larger-scale randomized controlled trials that also evaluate treatment impact on functional impairments.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01943539.

  20. Biocatalytic coatings for air pollution control: a proof of concept study on VOC biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, José M; Bernal, Oscar I; Flickinger, Michael C; Muñoz, Raúl; Deshusses, Marc A

    2015-02-01

    Although biofilm-based biotechnologies exhibit a large potential as solutions for off-gas treatment, the high water content of biofilms often causes pollutant mass transfer limitations, which ultimately limit their widespread application. The present study reports on the proof of concept of the applicability of bioactive latex coatings for air pollution control. Toluene vapors served as a model volatile organic compound (VOC). The results showed that Pseudomonas putida F1 cells could be successfully entrapped in nanoporous latex coatings while preserving their toluene degradation activity. Bioactive latex coatings exhibited toluene specific biodegradation rates 10 times higher than agarose-based biofilms, because the thin coatings were less subject to diffusional mass transfer limitations. Drying and pollutant starvation were identified as key factors inducing a gradual deterioration of the biodegradation capacity in these innovative coatings. This study constitutes the first application of bioactive latex coatings for VOC abatement. These coatings could become promising means for air pollution control. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Adaptive tight frame based medical image reconstruction: a proof-of-concept study for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Weifeng; Cai, Jian-Feng; Gao, Hao

    2013-01-01

    A popular approach for medical image reconstruction has been through the sparsity regularization, assuming the targeted image can be well approximated by sparse coefficients under some properly designed system. The wavelet tight frame is such a widely used system due to its capability for sparsely approximating piecewise-smooth functions, such as medical images. However, using a fixed system may not always be optimal for reconstructing a variety of diversified images. Recently, the method based on the adaptive over-complete dictionary that is specific to structures of the targeted images has demonstrated its superiority for image processing. This work is to develop the adaptive wavelet tight frame method image reconstruction. The proposed scheme first constructs the adaptive wavelet tight frame that is task specific, and then reconstructs the image of interest by solving an l 1 -regularized minimization problem using the constructed adaptive tight frame system. The proof-of-concept study is performed for computed tomography (CT), and the simulation results suggest that the adaptive tight frame method improves the reconstructed CT image quality from the traditional tight frame method. (paper)

  2. Tattoo-based noninvasive glucose monitoring: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Jia, Wenzhao; Yardımcı, Ceren; Wang, Xuan; Ramirez, Julian; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-06

    We present a proof-of-concept demonstration of an all-printed temporary tattoo-based glucose sensor for noninvasive glycemic monitoring. The sensor represents the first example of an easy-to-wear flexible tattoo-based epidermal diagnostic device combining reverse iontophoretic extraction of interstitial glucose and an enzyme-based amperometric biosensor. In-vitro studies reveal the tattoo sensor's linear response toward physiologically relevant glucose levels with negligible interferences from common coexisting electroactive species. The iontophoretic-biosensing tattoo platform is reduced to practice by applying the device on human subjects and monitoring variations in glycemic levels due to food consumption. Correlation of the sensor response with that of a commercial glucose meter underscores the promise of the tattoo sensor to detect glucose levels in a noninvasive fashion. Control on-body experiments demonstrate the importance of the reverse iontophoresis operation and validate the sensor specificity. This preliminary investigation indicates that the tattoo-based iontophoresis-sensor platform holds considerable promise for efficient diabetes management and can be extended toward noninvasive monitoring of other physiologically relevant analytes present in the interstitial fluid.

  3. Loving-Kindness Meditation to Target Affect in Mood Disorders: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan G. Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional treatments for mood disorders primarily focus on reducing negative affect, but little on enhancing positive affect. Loving-kindness meditation (LKM is a traditional meditation practice directly oriented toward enhancing unconditional and positive emotional states of kindness towards oneself and others. We report here two independent and uncontrolled studies carried out at different centers, one in Boston, USA (n = 10, and one in Frankfurt, Germany (n = 8, to examine the potential therapeutic utility of a brief LKM group intervention for symptoms of dysthymia and depression. Results at both centers suggest that LKM was associated with large-sized effects on self-reported symptoms of depression (d = 3.33 and 1.90, negative affect (d = 1.98 and 0.92, and positive affect (d = 1.63 and 0.94. Large effects were also found for clinician-reported changes in depression, rumination and specific positive emotions, and moderate effects for changes in adaptive emotion regulation strategies. The qualitative data analyses provide additional support for the potential clinical utility of the intervention. This proof-of-concept evaluation of LKM as a clinical strategy warrants further investigation.

  4. Targeting Endothelial Adhesion Molecule Transcription for Treatment of Inflammatory Disease: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam M. Ashander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the endothelial adhesion molecules that control leukocyte trafficking into a tissue has been explored as a biological therapy for inflammatory diseases. However, these molecules also participate in leukocyte migration for immune surveillance, and inhibiting the physiological level of an adhesion molecule might promote infection or malignancy. We explored the concept of targeting endothelial adhesion molecule transcription during inflammation in a human system. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 mediates leukocyte migration across the retinal endothelium in noninfectious posterior uveitis. We observed an increase in the transcription factor, nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NF-κB1, in parallel with ICAM-1, in human retinal endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, and identified putative binding sites for NF-κB1 within the ICAM-1 regulatory region. We targeted induced NF-κB1 expression in endothelial cells with small interfering (siRNA. Knockdown of NF-κB1 significantly decreased cell surface expression of ICAM-1 protein induced by TNF-α but did not reduce constitutive ICAM-1 expression. Consistently, NF-κB1 knockdown significantly reduced leukocyte binding to cell monolayers in the presence of TNF-α but did not impact baseline binding. Findings of this proof-of-concept study indicate that induced transcription of endothelial adhesion molecules might be targeted therapeutically for inflammatory disease in humans.

  5. Motivated Forgetting in Early Mathematics: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Ramirez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Educators assume that students are motivated to retain what they are taught. Yet, students commonly report that they forget most of what they learn, especially in mathematics. In the current study I ask whether students may be motivated to forget mathematics because of academic experiences threaten the self-perceptions they are committed to maintaining. Using a large dataset of 1st and 2nd grade children (N = 812, I hypothesize that math anxiety creates negative experiences in the classroom that threaten children’s positive math self-perceptions, which in turn spurs a motivation to forget mathematics. I argue that this motivation to forget is activated during the winter break, which in turn reduces the extent to which children grow in achievement across the school year. Children were assessed for math self-perceptions, math anxiety and math achievement in the fall before going into winter break. During the spring, children’s math achievement was measured once again. A math achievement growth score was devised from a regression model of fall math achievement predicting spring achievement. Results show that children with higher math self-perceptions showed reduced growth in math achievement across the school year as a function of math anxiety. Children with lower math interest self-perceptions did not show this relationship. Results serve as a proof-of-concept for a scientific account of motivated forgetting within the context of education.

  6. Meteorite as raw material for Direct Metal Printing: A proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Karel; Thijs, Lore; Neirinck, Bram; Lapauw, Thomas; Morrison, Brian; Lewicki, Chris; Van Vaerenbergh, Jonas

    2018-02-01

    Asteroid mining as such is not a new concept, as it has been described in science fiction for more than a century and some of its aspects have been studied by academia for more than 30 years. Recently, there is a renewed interest in this subject due the more and more concrete plans for long-duration space missions and the need for resources to support industrial activity in space. The use of locally available resources would greatly improve the economics and sustainability of such missions. Due to its economy in material, use of additive manufacturing (AM) provides an interesting route to valorize these resources for the production of spare parts, tools and large-scale structures optimized for their local microgravity environment. Proof of concept has already been provided for AM of moon regolith. In this paper the concept of In-Situ Resource Utilization is extended towards the production of metallic objects using powdered iron meteorite as raw material. The meteorite-based powder was used to produce a structural part but further research is needed to obtain a high density part without microcracks.

  7. Metacognitive executive function training for young children with ADHD: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Leanne; Nakonezny, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Executive functions (EF) are impaired in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It may be especially critical for interventions to target EF in early childhood given the developmental progression of EF deficits that may contribute to later functional impairments. This proof-of-concept study examined the initial efficacy of an intervention program on EF and ADHD. We also examined child performance on three neurocognitive tasks assessing cognitive flexibility, auditory/visual attention, and sustained/selective attention. Children with ADHD (ages 3-7) and their parents were randomized to receive an intervention targeting metacognitive EF deficits (n = 13) or to a waitlist control condition (n = 12). Linear model analysis of covariance compared groups on parent EF ratings, blinded clinician ratings of ADHD symptoms and improvement, and child performance on neurocognitive measures. Children who received the intervention significantly improved on parent ratings of attention shifting and emotion regulation in addition to clinician ratings of inattention. Moderate effect sizes showed additional intervention effects on parent ratings of inhibition, memory, and planning, and clinician ratings of hyperactivity/impulsivity and overall improvement. Small effect sizes were observed for improvement on child neurocognitive measures. Although replication with a larger sample and an active control group is needed, EF training with a metacognitive focus is a potentially promising intervention for young children with ADHD.

  8. Water-Soluble Dried Blood Spot in Protein Analysis: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosting, Cecilie; Gjelstad, Astrid; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug

    2015-08-04

    In the present work human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was used as a model protein in a proof-of-concept study combining water-soluble dried blood spot (DBS) material in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based protein analysis. A water-soluble material consisting of commercially available carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was evaluated as sampling material for this purpose. The material dissolved readily at physiological pH. Different sample preparation methods were evaluated, and in the final method, 15 μL of whole blood was deposited and dried on CMC before the whole spot was dissolved prior to cleanup by immunoaffinity extraction, tryptic digest, and preconcentration by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The results indicated complete dissolution of hCG from the spots, acceptable limit of detection (LOD) (0.1 IU/mL), linearity (R(2) = 0.959), accuracy (16%), and precision (≤22%). Long-term stability (45 days) of hCG in dried spots at reduced temperatures (≤8 °C) was also demonstrated. The analyte recovery was comparable to the commercially available nonsolvable cellulose material (FTA DMPK-C card).

  9. Automated joint space width quantification of hand and wrist joints : a proof of concept study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, Yinghe; Veldhuizen, Renske D; van der Heijde, Desiree M; Besselink, Nick J; Jacobs, Johannes W G; van Laar, Jacob M; Viergever, Max A; Vincken, Koen L; Lafeber, Floris P; De Hair, Maria JH

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare as proof of concept the sensitivity to change of automated quantification of radiographic wrist and hand joint space width (JSW) with scoring JSW according to the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SHS) in two strategy groups of a treat-to-target and tight-control early

  10. Automated joint space width quantification of hand and wrist joints: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yinghe; Veldhuizen, Renske D; van der Heijde, Desiree M; Besselink, Nick J; Jacobs, Johannes W G; van Laar, Jacob M; Viergever, Max A; Vincken, Koen L; Lafeber, Floris P; de Hair, Maria J H

    2016-01-01

    To compare as proof of concept the sensitivity to change of automated quantification of radiographic wrist and hand joint space width (JSW) with scoring JSW according to the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SHS) in two strategy groups of a treat-to-target and tight-control early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) study. Digital radiographs were assessed for JSW changes of 134 patients of the 236 patients participating in the second Computer Assisted Management in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis trial, of whom both baseline and year 2 radiographs were available (year 1 radiographs n=125). Of those 134 patients, 70 started with methotrexate and prednisone (MTX+Pred) and 64 with MTX and placebo (MTX+Plac). JSW change over 1 and 2 years of the hands and wrists was assessed, applying both the joint space narrowing (JSN) subscore of the SHS by 2 readers and the automated assessment with the JSW quantification software 'JSQ'. For both methods, progression of JSW change of the hand and wrist was analysed using linear mixed modelling (dependent variable 'JSW', factor 'strategy group', covariate 'follow-up time in years', interaction term 'strategy group*follow-up time'; radiographs of baseline, year 1 and year 2 were used). For each method the standardised mean difference (SMD) for the change in JSW from baseline to year 2 between the treatment strategies was obtained using a non-parametric method. Patient characteristics of the current subpopulation were similar to those of the whole study population. JSN of the hand and wrist according to SHS at 2 years was present in 16 vs. 23% in the MTX+Pred group vs. the MTX+Plac group. The mean yearly progression rates of JSW change of the hands and wrists using JSQ were -0.00mm (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.01; 0.01) for MTX+Pred vs. -0.02mm (95%CI -0.03; -0.01) for MTX+Plac, p=0.045, and using SHS JSN they were 0.19 units (95%CI 0.09; 0.30) vs. 0.30 units (95%CI 0.14; 0.45) for MTX+Pred vs. MTX+Plac, p=0.271. The SMD for the change from

  11. Transhiatal Chest Drainage After Hybrid Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy: Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asti, Emanuele; Sironi, Andrea; Bonitta, Gianluca; Bernardi, Daniele; Bonavina, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Intercostal pleural drainage is standard practice after transthoracic esophagectomy but has some drawbacks. We hypothesized that a transhiatal pleural drain introduced through the subxyphoid port site incision at laparoscopy can be as effective as the intercostal drainage and may enhance patient recovery. A proof of concept study was designed to assess a new method of pleural drainage in patients undergoing hybrid Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (laparoscopy and right thoracotomy). The main study aims were safety and efficacy of transhiatal pleural drainage with a 15 Fr Blake tube connected to a portable vacuum system. Pre- and postoperative data, mean duration, and total and daily output of drainage were recorded in an electronic database. Postoperative complications were scored according to the Dindo-Clavien classification. Between June 2015 and December 2016, 50 of 63 consecutive patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. No conversions from the portable vacuum system to underwater seal and suction occurred. There was no mortality. The overall morbidity rate was 40%. Two patients (4%) required reoperation for hemothorax and chylothorax, respectively. Percutaneous catheter drainage for residual pneumothorax was necessary in 2 patients (4%) on postoperative day 2. The mean duration of drainage was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] = 2), and the total volume of drain output was 1580 mL (IQR = 880). No pleural effusion on chest X-ray was detected at the 3-month follow-up visit. Transhiatal pleural drainage is safe and effective after hybrid Ivor Lewis esophagectomy and could replace the intercostal drain in selected patients.

  12. Machine learning methods to predict child posttraumatic stress: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Glenn N; Ma, Sisi; Ren, Jiwen; Aliferis, Constantin

    2017-07-10

    The care of traumatized children would benefit significantly from accurate predictive models for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), using information available around the time of trauma. Machine Learning (ML) computational methods have yielded strong results in recent applications across many diseases and data types, yet they have not been previously applied to childhood PTSD. Since these methods have not been applied to this complex and debilitating disorder, there is a great deal that remains to be learned about their application. The first step is to prove the concept: Can ML methods - as applied in other fields - produce predictive classification models for childhood PTSD? Additionally, we seek to determine if specific variables can be identified - from the aforementioned predictive classification models - with putative causal relations to PTSD. ML predictive classification methods - with causal discovery feature selection - were applied to a data set of 163 children hospitalized with an injury and PTSD was determined three months after hospital discharge. At the time of hospitalization, 105 risk factor variables were collected spanning a range of biopsychosocial domains. Seven percent of subjects had a high level of PTSD symptoms. A predictive classification model was discovered with significant predictive accuracy. A predictive model constructed based on subsets of potentially causally relevant features achieves similar predictivity compared to the best predictive model constructed with all variables. Causal Discovery feature selection methods identified 58 variables of which 10 were identified as most stable. In this first proof-of-concept application of ML methods to predict childhood Posttraumatic Stress we were able to determine both predictive classification models for childhood PTSD and identify several causal variables. This set of techniques has great potential for enhancing the methodological toolkit in the field and future studies should seek to

  13. Feasibility of Telementoring for Microneurosurgical Procedures Using a Microscope: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Bryan M; Tackla, Ryan D; Gupte, Akshay; Darrow, David; Sorenson, Jeffery; Zuccarello, Mario; Grande, Andrew W

    2017-03-01

    Our pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of our telementoring-telescripting model to facilitate seamless communication between surgeons while the operating surgeon is using a microscope. As a first proof of concept, 4 students identified 20 anatomic landmarks on a dry human skull with or without telementoring guidance. To assess the ability to communicate operative information, a senior neurosurgery resident evaluated the student's ability and timing to complete a stepwise craniotomy on a cadaveric head, with and without telementoring guidance; a second portion included exposure of the anterior circulation. The mentor was able to annotate directly onto the operator's visual field, which was visible to the operator without looking away from the binocular view. The students showed that they were familiar with half (50% ± 10%) of the structures for identification and none was familiar with the steps to complete a craniotomy before using our system. With the guidance of a remote surgeon projected into the visual field of the microscope, the students were able to correctly identify 100% of the structures and complete a craniotomy. Our system also proved effective in guiding a more experienced neurosurgery resident through complex operative steps associated with exposure of the anterior circulation. Our pilot study showed a platform feasible in providing effective operative direction to inexperienced operators while operating using a microscope. A remote mentor was able to view the visual field of the microscope, annotate on the visual stream, and have the annotated stream appear in the binocular view for the operating mentee. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using Big Data in oncology to prospectively impact clinical patient care: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougoud-Chauvin, Vérène; Lee, Jae Jin; Santos, Edgardo; Williams, Vonetta L; Battisti, Nicolò M L; Ghia, Kavita; Sehovic, Marina; Croft, Cortlin; Kim, Jongphil; Balducci, Lodovico; Kish, Julie A; Extermann, Martine

    2018-04-17

    Big Data is widely seen as a major opportunity for progress in the practice of personalized medicine, attracting the attention from medical societies and presidential teams alike as it offers a unique opportunity to enlarge the base of evidence, especially for older patients underrepresented in clinical trials. This study prospectively assessed the real-time availability of clinical cases in the Health & Research Informatics Total Cancer Care™ (TCC) database matching community patients with cancer, and the impact of such a consultation on treatment. Patients aged 70 and older seen at the Lynn Cancer Institute (LCI) with a documented malignancy were eligible. Geriatric screening information and the oncologist's pre-consultation treatment plan were sent to Moffitt. A search for similar patients was done in TCC and additional information retrieved from Electronic Medical Records. A report summarizing the data was sent and the utility of such a consultation was assessed per email after the treatment decision. Thirty one patients were included. The geriatric screening was positive in 87.1% (27) of them. The oncogeriatric consultation took on average 2.2 working days. It influenced treatment in 38.7% (12), and modified it in 19.4% (6). The consultation was perceived as "somewhat" to "very useful" in 83.9% (26). This study establishes a proof of concept of the feasibility of real time use of Big Data for clinical practice. The geriatric screening and the consultation report influenced treatment in 38.7% of cases and modified it in 19.4%, which compares very well with oncogeriatric literature. Additional steps are needed to render it financially and clinically viable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A small molecule (pluripotin as a tool for studying cancer stem cell biology: proof of concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Mertins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells (CSC are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance and heterogeneity. Bona fide CSC purified from tumor biopsies are limited in supply and this hampers study of CSC biology. Furthermore, purified stem-like CSC subpopulations from existing tumor lines are unstable in culture. Finding a means to overcome these technical challenges would be a useful goal. In a first effort towards this, we examined whether a chemical probe that promotes survival of murine embryonic stem cells without added exogenous factors can alter functional characteristics in extant tumor lines in a fashion consistent with a CSC phenotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The seven tumor lines of the NCI60 colon subpanel were exposed to SC-1 (pluripotin, a dual kinase and GTPase inhibitor that promotes self-renewal, and then examined for tumorigenicity under limiting dilution conditions and clonogenic activity in soft agar. A statistically significant increase in tumor formation following SC-1 treatment was observed (p<0.04. Cloning efficiencies and expression of putative CSC surface antigens (CD133 and CD44 were also increased. SC-1 treatment led to sphere formation in some colon tumor lines. Finally, SC-1 inhibited in vitro kinase activity of RSK2, and another RSK2 inhibitor increased colony formation implicating a role for this kinase in eliciting a CSC phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings validate a proof of concept study exposure of extant tumor lines to a small molecule may provide a tractable in vitro model for understanding CSC biology.

  16. Generation of composite Persea americana (Mill.) (avocado) plants: A proof-of-concept-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, S Ashok; Ndlovu, Buyani; Engelbrecht, Juanita; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2017-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana (Mill.)), an important commercial fruit, is severely affected by Phytophthora Root Rot in areas where the pathogen is prevalent. However, advances in molecular research are hindered by the lack of a high-throughput transient transformation system in this non-model plant. In this study, a proof-of-concept is demonstrated by the successful application of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated plant transformation to produce composite avocado plants. Two ex vitro strategies were assessed on two avocado genotypes (Itzamna and A0.74): In the first approach, 8-week-old etiolated seedlings were scarred with a sterile hacksaw blade at the base of the shoot, and in the second, inch-long incisions were made at the base of the shoot (20-week-old non-etiolated plants) with a sterile blade to remove the cortical tissue. The scarred/wounded shoot surfaces were treated with A. rhizogenes strains (K599 or ARqua1) transformed with or without binary plant transformation vectors pRedRootII (DsRed1 marker), pBYR2e1-GFP (GFP- green fluorescence protein marker) or pBINUbiGUSint (GUS- beta-glucuronidase marker) with and without rooting hormone (Dip 'N' Grow) application. The treated shoot regions were air-layered with sterile moist cocopeat to induce root formation. Results showed that hormone application significantly increased root induction, while Agrobacterium-only treatments resulted in very few roots. Combination treatments of hormone+Agrobacterium (-/+ plasmids) showed no significant difference. Only the ARqua1(+plasmid):A0.74 combination resulted in root transformants, with hormone+ARqua1(+pBINUbiGUSint) being the most effective treatment with ~17 and 25% composite plants resulting from strategy-1 and strategy-2, respectively. GUS- and GFP-expressing roots accounted for less than 4 and ~11%, respectively, of the total roots/treatment/avocado genotype. The average number of transgenic roots on the composite plants was less than one per plant in all treatments

  17. Innovative design for a phase 1 trial with intra-patient dose escalation: The Crotoxin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Medioni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crotoxin has a broad antitumor activity but has shown frequent neurotoxic toxicity. To induce tolerance and limit this toxicity, we propose a new design with intra-patient dose escalation. Methods: A new Dose Limiting Toxicity definition was used. The concept of Target Ceiling Dose was introduced. Results: Dose Limiting Toxicity was the inability to dose escalate twice. Target Ceiling Dose was the highest planned dose to be administered to a patient and could change for patients along time. Recommended Dose was defined similarly as in a (3 + 3 conventional design. Conclusion: This innovant design was used and the clinical trial is now closed for inclusions. Results will be presented later. Keywords: Clinical trial, Phase 1, Intra-patient dose escalation, Cancer

  18. ZD0473 pharmacokinetics in Japanese patients: a Phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Tamura, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, N; Ueda, Y; Shimoyama, T; Saijo, N

    2002-12-01

    ZD0473 is new platinum agent that was rationally designed to circumvent platinum resistance and reduce the potential for nephro-and neurotoxicity. This Phase I dose-escalating study investigated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and efficacy of ZD0473 in Japanese patients with solid, refractory tumours. ZD0473 was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks. Nine patients received a total of 16 cycles of ZD0473 (median 1 cycle/patient), with 3 patients treated at each of 3 doses (60, 90, 120 mg/m2). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with dose in a linear fashion for both total platinum and ZD0473 in plasma ultrafiltrate, suggesting that the pharmacokinetics of ZD0473 are linear. Haematological and non-haematological toxicities such as nausea and vomiting were mild (grade 1 or 2) and transient. No clinically significant nephro-, oto- or neurotoxicity was observed. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not observed and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. ZD0473 treatment showed evidence of disease stabilisation in 3 patients (33%). In conclusion, ZD0473 appears to have linear pharmacokinetics, and an acceptable tolerability profile at doses up to 120 mg/m2 in Japanese patients with refractory solid malignancies. Following evaluation of the data from all the Western trials, the ZD0473 development programme changed and this Japanese trial was stopped.

  19. Topical administration of regorafenib eye drops: phase I dose-escalation study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Torsten; Höchel, Joachim; Becka, Michael; Boettger, Michael K; Rohde, Beate; Schug, Barbara; Kunert, Kathleen S; Donath, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Regorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor under investigation for use in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. In this phase I study, regorafenib eye drops were administered to healthy volunteers to provide information on safety, tolerability and systemic exposure. This was a single-centre, randomized, double-masked, parallel-group, dose-escalation, placebo-controlled study. Subjects received regorafenib eye drops (30 mg ml -1 , 25 μl) as a 0.75 mg single dose (Cohort 1), 0.75 mg twice daily (bid) or thrice daily (tid) over 14 days (Cohorts 2 and 3, respectively), 1.5 mg tid unilaterally for 3 days, then bilaterally for up to 14 days (Cohort 4), or placebo. Plasma samples were taken to estimate systemic exposure. Safety and functional assessments were performed throughout the study. Thirty-six subjects received regorafenib and 12 received placebo. Regorafenib was safe and well tolerated over the dose range. No pathological changes occurred in the anterior, vitreous or posterior eye compartments. Mild eyelid redness, oedema and conjunctival hyperaemia were observed across all regorafenib cohorts; these were comparable with the effects seen with placebo. Predominant symptoms were blurred vision in the active and placebo groups. Systemic safety evaluations showed no clinically relevant findings. Absolute systemic exposure after multiple administrations of regorafenib eye drops at a dose of 0.75 mg was 600-700-fold lower than after multiple oral administration of 160 mg day -1 , the dose approved in cancer indications. These results indicate a favourable safety and tolerability profile of regorafenib eye drops up to 30 mg ml -1 tid for use in clinical studies. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Oral sodium phenylbutyrate in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: a dose escalation and pharmacologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphanich, Surasak; Baker, Sharyn D; Grossman, Stuart A; Carson, Kathryn A; Gilbert, Mark R; Fisher, Joy D; Carducci, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, pharmacokinetic parameters, and preliminary efficacy data of oral sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Twenty-three patients with supratentorial recurrent malignant gliomas were enrolled on this dose escalation trial. Four dose levels of PB were studied: 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day. Data were collected to assess toxicity, response, survival, and pharmacokinetics. All PB doses of 9, 18, and 27 g/day were well tolerated. At 36 g/day, two of four patients developed dose-limiting grade 3 fatigue and somnolence. At the MTD of 27 g/day, one of seven patients developed reversible grade 3 somnolence. Median survival from time of study entry was 5.4 months. One patient had a complete response for five years, and no partial responses were noted, which yielded an overall response rate of 5%. Plasma concentrations of 706, 818, 1225, and 1605 muM were achieved with doses of 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day, respectively. The mean value for PB clearance in this patient population was 22 liters/h, which is significantly higher than the 16 liters/h reported in patients with other malignancies who were not receiving P450 enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs (P = 0.038). This study defines the MTD and recommended phase 2 dose of PB at 27 g/day for heavily pretreated patients with recurrent gliomas. The pharmacology of PB appears to be affected by concomitant administration of P450-inducing anticonvulsants.

  1. Oral sodium phenylbutyrate in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: A dose escalation and pharmacologic study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphanich, Surasak; Baker, Sharyn D.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fisher, Joy D.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, pharmacokinetic parameters, and preliminary efficacy data of oral sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Twenty-three patients with supratentorial recurrent malignant gliomas were enrolled on this dose escalation trial. Four dose levels of PB were studied: 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day. Data were collected to assess toxicity, response, survival, and pharmacokinetics. All PB doses of 9, 18, and 27 g/day were well tolerated. At 36 g/day, two of four patients developed dose-limiting grade 3 fatigue and somnolence. At the MTD of 27 g/day, one of seven patients developed reversible grade 3 somnolence. Median survival from time of study entry was 5.4 months. One patient had a complete response for five years, and no partial responses were noted, which yielded an overall response rate of 5%. Plasma concentrations of 706, 818, 1225, and 1605 μM were achieved with doses of 9, 18, 27, and 36 g/day, respectively. The mean value for PB clearance in this patient population was 22 liters/h, which is significantly higher than the 16 liters/h reported in patients with other malignancies who were not receiving P450 enzyme–inducing anticonvulsant drugs (P = 0.038). This study defines the MTD and recommended phase 2 dose of PB at 27 g/day for heavily pretreated patients with recurrent gliomas. The pharmacology of PB appears to be affected by concomitant administration of P450-inducing anticonvulsants. PMID:15831235

  2. Dose-Escalation Study for Cardiac Radiosurgery in a Porcine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.blanck@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany); Bode, Frank [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, Maximilian [Institute of Pathology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Brandt, Sebastian [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Grossherr, Martin [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); University Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To perform a proof-of-principle dose-escalation study to radiosurgically induce scarring in cardiac muscle tissue to block veno-atrial electrical connections at the pulmonary vein antrum, similar to catheter ablation. Methods and Materials: Nine mini-pigs underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of heart function and electrophysiology assessment by catheter measurements in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). Immediately after examination, radiosurgery with randomized single-fraction doses of 0 and 17.5-35 Gy in 2.5-Gy steps were delivered to the RSPV antrum (target volume 5-8 cm{sup 3}). MRI and electrophysiology were repeated 6 months after therapy, followed by histopathologic examination. Results: Transmural scarring of cardiac muscle tissue was noted with doses ≥32.5 Gy. However, complete circumferential scarring of the RSPV was not achieved. Logistic regressions showed that extent and intensity of fibrosis significantly increased with dose. The 50% effective dose for intense fibrosis was 31.3 Gy (odds ratio 2.47/Gy, P<.01). Heart function was not affected, as verified by MRI and electrocardiogram evaluation. Adjacent critical structures were not damaged, as verified by pathology, demonstrating the short-term safety of small-volume cardiac radiosurgery with doses up to 35 Gy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with doses >32.5 Gy in the healthy pig heart can induce circumscribed scars at the RSPV antrum noninvasively, mimicking the effect of catheter ablation. In our study we established a significant dose-response relationship for cardiac radiosurgery. The long-term effects and toxicity of such high radiation doses need further investigation in the pursuit of cardiac radiosurgery for noninvasive treatment of atrial fibrillation.

  3. A dose escalation study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy with nedaplatin for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatae, Masayuki; Takahashi, Takeshi; Kodama, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Doses of nedaplatin (CDGP) were established for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer, and a collaborative dose escalation study involving 8 hospitals was conducted to investigate the safety and efficacy of this therapy. Radiotherapy was performed according to the standard treatment described in the Regulations of Cervical Carcinoma Treatment. CDGP at 80 mg/m 2 as Level 1 or at 90 mg/m 2 as Level 2 was administered on Days 1 and 29 of treatment. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed in 1 of 6 patients receiving 80 mg/m 2 of CDGP and in all 2 patients receiving 90 mg/m 2 of CDGP; therefore, Level 2 was regarded as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and Level 1 as the recommended dose. DLT signs consisted of delayed improvement in the leukocyte count in 2 patients and anorexia in 1 patient, suggesting that delayed improvement in the leukocyte count is the main DLT of this combination therapy. The main side effects were digestive disorders such as nausea and anorexia and bone marrow suppression, such as leukopenia, neutropenia, and thrombopenia. Side effects in the Level 1 group were more mild than in the Level 2 group. The efficacy was partial response (PR) or better in all patients. The complete response (CR) rates were 60% (6/10) in the Level 1 group and 50% (1/2) in the Level 2 group; there was no marked difference between the two groups. These results suggest that CCRT involving administration CDGP at 80 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 29 is safe and effective. (author)

  4. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    2012-01-01

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 18 F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET (72 Gy) and PTV-MR (60 Gy) . FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR (60 Gy) . No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  5. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET{sub (72 Gy)} and PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  6. Dose escalation to rash for erlotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: the phase II RACHEL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, E; Li, C-P; Nowara, E; Aprile, G; Moore, M; Federowicz, I; Van Laethem, J-L; Hsu, C; Tham, C K; Stemmer, S M; Lipp, R; Zeaiter, A; Fittipaldo, A; Csutor, Z; Klughammer, B; Meng, X; Ciuleanu, T

    2014-11-25

    This phase II, open-label, randomised study evaluated whether patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving erlotinib/gemcitabine derived survival benefits from increasing the erlotinib dose. After a 4-week run-in period (gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) once weekly plus erlotinib 100 mg per day), patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who developed grade 0/1 rash were randomised to receive gemcitabine plus erlotinib dose escalation (150 mg, increasing by 50 mg every 2 weeks (maximum 250 mg); n=71) or gemcitabine plus standard-dose erlotinib (100 mg per day; n=75). The primary end point was to determine whether overall survival (OS) was improved by increasing the erlotinib dose. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), incidence of grade ⩾2 rash, and safety. Erlotinib dose escalation induced grade ⩾2 rash in 29 out of 71 (41.4%) patients compared with 7 out of 75 (9.3%) patients on standard dose. Efficacy was not significantly different in the dose-escalation arm compared with the standard-dose arm (OS: median 7.0 vs 8.4 months, respectively, hazard ratio (HR), 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.80; P=0.2026; PFS: median 3.5 vs 4.5 months, respectively, HR, 1.09, 95% CI: 0.77-1.54; P=0.6298). Incidence of adverse events was comparable between randomised arms. The erlotinib dose-escalation strategy induced rash in some patients; there was no evidence that the higher dose translated into increased benefit.

  7. Pharmacogenetic testing for clopidogrel using the rapid INFINITI analyzer: a dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Patrick; White, Harvey; Voss, Jamie; Ormiston, John; Stewart, Jim; Ruygrok, Peter; Bvaldivia, Badi; Baak, Ruth; White, Catherine; Webster, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Our aim was to assess whether a higher clopidogrel maintenance dose has a greater antiplatelet effect in CYP2C19*2 allele carriers compared with noncarriers. Clopidogrel is a prodrug that is biotransformed by the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2C19, 2C9, and 3A4, 2B6, 1A2. The CYPC219*2 loss of function variant has been associated with a reduced antiplatelet response to clopidogrel and a 3-fold risk of stent thrombosis. Forty patients on standard maintenance dosage clopidogrel (75 mg), for 9.4 +/- 9.2 weeks, were enrolled into a dose escalation study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after 1 week of 150 mg once daily using the VerifyNow platelet function analyzer (Accumetrics Ltd., San Diego, California). Genomic DNA was hybridized to a BioFilmChip microarray on the INFINITI analyzer (AutoGenomics Inc., Carlsbad, California) and analyzed for the CYP19*2, *4, *17, and CYP2C9*2, *3 polymorphisms. Platelet inhibition increased over 1 week, mean +8.6 +/- 13.5% (p = 0.0003). Carriers of the CYP2C19*2 allele had significantly reduced platelet inhibition at baseline (median 18%, range 0% to 72%) compared with wildtype (wt) (median 59%, range 11% to 95%, p = 0.01) and at 1 week (p = 0.03). CYP2C19*2 allele carriers had an increase in platelet inhibition of (mean +9 +/- 11%, p = 0.03) and reduction in platelet reactivity (mean -26 +/- 38 platelet response unit, p = 0.04) with a higher dose. Together CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C9*3 loss of function carriers had a greater change in platelet inhibition with 150 mg daily than wt/wt (+10.9% vs. +0.7%, p = 0.04). Increasing the dose of clopidogrel in patients with nonresponder polymorphisms can increase antiplatelet response. Personalizing clopidogrel dosing using pharmacogenomics may be an effective method of optimizing treatment.

  8. Does selective pleural irradiation of malignant pleural mesothelioma allow radiation dose escalation. A planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botticella, A.; Defraene, G.; Nackaerts, K.; Deroose, C.; Coolen, J.; Nafteux, P.; Vanstraelen, B.; Joosten, S.; Michiels, L.A.W.; Peeters, S.; Ruysscher, D. de

    2017-01-01

    After lung-sparing radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), local failure at sites of previous gross disease represents the dominant form of failure. Our aim is to investigate if selective irradiation of the gross pleural disease only can allow dose escalation. In all, 12 consecutive stage I-IV MPM patients (6 left-sided and 6 right-sided) were retrospectively identified and included. A magnetic resonance imaging-based pleural gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured. Two sets of planning target volumes (PTV) were generated for each patient: (1) a ''selective'' PTV (S-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the GTV and (2) an ''elective'' PTV (E-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the whole ipsilateral pleural space. Two sets of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated: a ''selective'' pleural irradiation plan (SPI plan) and an ''elective'' pleural irradiation plan (EPI plan, planned with a simultaneous integrated boost technique [SIB]). In the SPI plans, the average median dose to the S-PTV was 53.6 Gy (range 41-63.6 Gy). In 4 of 12 patients, it was possible to escalate the dose to the S-PTV to >58 Gy. In the EPI plans, the average median doses to the E-PTV and to the S-PTV were 48.6 Gy (range 38.5-58.7) and 49 Gy (range 38.6-59.5 Gy), respectively. No significant dose escalation was achievable. The omission of the elective irradiation of the whole ipsilateral pleural space allowed dose escalation from 49 Gy to more than 58 Gy in 4 of 12 chemonaive MPM patients. This strategy may form the basis for nonsurgical radical combined modality treatment of MPM. (orig.) [de

  9. Reservoir Cannulas for Pediatric Oxygen Therapy: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxemia is a complication of pneumonia—the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Treatment generally requires oxygen-enriched air, but access in low-resource settings is expensive and unreliable. We explored use of reservoir cannulas (RCs, which yield oxygen savings in adults but have not been examined in children. Toddler, small child, and adolescent breathing profiles were simulated with artificial lung and airway models. An oxygen concentrator provided flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min via a standard nasal cannula (NC or RC, and delivered oxygen fraction (FdO2 was measured. The oxygen savings ratio (SR and absolute flow savings (AFS were calculated, comparing NC and RC. We demonstrated proof-of-concept that pendant RCs could conserve oxygen during pediatric therapy. SR mean and standard deviation were 1.1±0.2 to 1.4±0.4, 1.1±0.1 to 1.7±0.3, and 1.3±0.1 to 2.4±0.3 for toddler, small child, and adolescent models, respectively. Maximum AFS observed were 0.3±0.3, 0.2±0.1, and 1.4±0.3 L/min for the same models. RCs have the potential to reduce oxygen consumption during treatment of hypoxemia in children; however, further evaluation of products is needed, followed by clinical analysis in patients.

  10. Reservoir Cannulas for Pediatric Oxygen Therapy: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Grace; DiBlasi, Robert M.; Saxon, Eugene; Austin, Glenn; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxemia is a complication of pneumonia—the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Treatment generally requires oxygen-enriched air, but access in low-resource settings is expensive and unreliable. We explored use of reservoir cannulas (RCs), which yield oxygen savings in adults but have not been examined in children. Toddler, small child, and adolescent breathing profiles were simulated with artificial lung and airway models. An oxygen concentrator provided flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min via a standard nasal cannula (NC) or RC, and delivered oxygen fraction (FdO2) was measured. The oxygen savings ratio (SR) and absolute flow savings (AFS) were calculated, comparing NC and RC. We demonstrated proof-of-concept that pendant RCs could conserve oxygen during pediatric therapy. SR mean and standard deviation were 1.1 ± 0.2 to 1.4 ± 0.4, 1.1 ± 0.1 to 1.7 ± 0.3, and 1.3 ± 0.1 to 2.4 ± 0.3 for toddler, small child, and adolescent models, respectively. Maximum AFS observed were 0.3 ± 0.3, 0.2 ± 0.1, and 1.4 ± 0.3 L/min for the same models. RCs have the potential to reduce oxygen consumption during treatment of hypoxemia in children; however, further evaluation of products is needed, followed by clinical analysis in patients. PMID:27999601

  11. Tomotherapy PET-guided dose escalation. A dosimetric feasibility study for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Di Dia, Amalia; Bresciani, Sara; Miranti, Anna; Poli, Matteo; Stasi, Michele [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Medical Physics, Turin (Italy); Del Mastro, Elena; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Gabriele, Pietro [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Turin (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a safe escalation of the dose to the pleural cavity and PET/CT-positive areas in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is possible using helical tomotherapy (HT). We selected 12 patients with MPM. Three planning strategies were investigated. In the first strategy (standard treatment), treated comprised a prescribed median dose to the planning target volume (PTV) boost (PTV{sub 1}) of 64.5 Gy (range: 56 Gy/28 fractions to 66 Gy/30 fractions) and 51 Gy (range: 50.4 Gy/28 fractions to 54 Gy/30 fractions) to the pleura PTV (PTV{sub 2}). Thereafter, for each patient, two dose escalation plans were generated prescribing 62.5 and 70 Gy (2.5 and 2.8 Gy/fraction, respectively) to the PTV{sub 1} and 56 Gy (2.24 Gy/fraction) to the PTV{sub 2}, in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were used to evaluate the differences between the plans. For all plans, the 95 % PTVs received at least 95 % of the prescribed dose. For all patients, it was possible to perform the dose escalation in accordance with the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) constraints for organs at risk (OARs). The average contralateral lung dose was < 8 Gy. NTCP values for OARs did not increase significantly compared with the standard treatment (p > 0.05), except for the ipsilateral lung. For all plans, the lung volume ratio was strongly correlated with the V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} DVHs of the lung (p < 0.0003) and with the lung mean dose (p < 0.0001). The results of this study suggest that by using HT it is possible to safely escalate the dose delivery to at least 62.5 Gy in PET-positive areas while treating the pleural cavity to 56 Gy in 25 fractions without significantly increasing the dose to the surrounding normal organs. (orig.) [German] Ziel war es, zu untersuchen, ob mit der helikalen Tomotherapie (HT) eine

  12. Does selective pleural irradiation of malignant pleural mesothelioma allow radiation dose escalation. A planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botticella, A.; Defraene, G. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Coolen, J. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Radiology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Nafteux, P. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Vanstraelen, B. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Joosten, S.; Michiels, L.A.W. [Fontys University of Applied Science, Institute Paramedical Studies, Medical Imaging and Radiotherapeutic Techniques, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peeters, S. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Ruysscher, D. de [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    After lung-sparing radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), local failure at sites of previous gross disease represents the dominant form of failure. Our aim is to investigate if selective irradiation of the gross pleural disease only can allow dose escalation. In all, 12 consecutive stage I-IV MPM patients (6 left-sided and 6 right-sided) were retrospectively identified and included. A magnetic resonance imaging-based pleural gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured. Two sets of planning target volumes (PTV) were generated for each patient: (1) a ''selective'' PTV (S-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the GTV and (2) an ''elective'' PTV (E-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the whole ipsilateral pleural space. Two sets of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated: a ''selective'' pleural irradiation plan (SPI plan) and an ''elective'' pleural irradiation plan (EPI plan, planned with a simultaneous integrated boost technique [SIB]). In the SPI plans, the average median dose to the S-PTV was 53.6 Gy (range 41-63.6 Gy). In 4 of 12 patients, it was possible to escalate the dose to the S-PTV to >58 Gy. In the EPI plans, the average median doses to the E-PTV and to the S-PTV were 48.6 Gy (range 38.5-58.7) and 49 Gy (range 38.6-59.5 Gy), respectively. No significant dose escalation was achievable. The omission of the elective irradiation of the whole ipsilateral pleural space allowed dose escalation from 49 Gy to more than 58 Gy in 4 of 12 chemonaive MPM patients. This strategy may form the basis for nonsurgical radical combined modality treatment of MPM. (orig.) [German] Beim malignen Pleuramesotheliom (MPM) ist nach lungenschonender Radiotherapie das lokale Scheitern an Stellen eines frueheren, sichtbaren Tumors die dominierende Form des Scheiterns. Unser Ziel ist es, zu untersuchen, ob die selektive

  13. Fuzzy logic inference-based Pavement Friction Management and real-time slippery warning systems: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Shahriar; Flintsch, Gerardo W; Khaleghian, Seyedmeysam

    2016-05-01

    Minimizing roadway crashes and fatalities is one of the primary objectives of highway engineers, and can be achieved in part through appropriate maintenance practices. Maintaining an appropriate level of friction is a crucial maintenance practice, due to the effect it has on roadway safety. This paper presents a fuzzy logic inference system that predicts the rate of vehicle crashes based on traffic level, speed limit, and surface friction. Mamdani and Sugeno fuzzy controllers were used to develop the model. The application of the proposed fuzzy control system in a real-time slippery road warning system is demonstrated as a proof of concept. The results of this study provide a decision support model for highway agencies to monitor their network's friction and make appropriate judgments to correct deficiencies based on crash risk. Furthermore, this model can be implemented in the connected vehicle environment to warn drivers of potentially slippery locations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Dose escalation without split-course chemoradiation for anal cancer: results of a phase II RTOG study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Madhu; Pajak, Thomas; Kreig, Richard; Pinover, Wayne H.; Myerson, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: An attempt at radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation (from 45 Gy to 59.6 Gy) in a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) chemoradiation protocol for advanced anal cancers had resulted in an unexpectedly high 1-year colostomy rate (23%) and local failure (The Cancer Journal from Scientific American 2 (4):205-211, 1996). This was felt to be probably secondary to the split course chemoradiation (CR) that was mandated in the protocol. A second phase of this dose escalation study was therefore undertaken without a mandatory split and with an identical RT dose (59.6 Gy) and chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with anal cancers ≥2 cms were treated with a concurrent combination of 59.6 Gy to the pelvis and perineum (1.8 Gy daily, 5 times per week in 33 fractions over 6 (1(2)) weeks) and two cycles of 5 fluorouracil infusion (1000 mg/m 2 over 24 hours for 4 days) and mitomycin C (10 mg/m 2 bolus). A 10 day rest period was allowed only for severe skin reactions. A comparative analysis was made with the 47 patients in the earlier phase of this study who were treated with the identical chemoradiation course but with a mandatory 2-week break at the 36.00 Gy level. RESULTS: Predominant Grade 3 and 4 toxicities in 18 evaluable patients with dermatitis ((14(18)) or 78%), hematologic ((14(18)) or 78%), infection ((3(18)) or 17%) and gastrointestinal ((5(18)) or 28%). There were no fatalities. Nine patients (50%) completed the planned course without a break; 9 others (50%) had their treatments interrupted for a median of 11 days (range 7-19 days) at a median dose of 41.4 Gy (range 32.4 to 48.6 Gy). This compared to (40(47)) patients (85%) who had a 12 day treatment interruption at 36 Gy total dose in a planned break group. One patient had an abdomino-perineal resection (APR) for persistent disease and another for an anal fissure for (2(18)) or 11% 1-year colostomy rate. This was again favorably comparable to 23% 1-year colostomy rate for the earlier group of

  15. Volumetric MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Direct Skin Cooling for the Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids : Proof-of-Concept Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikink, Marlijne E; van Breugel, Johanna M M; Schubert, Gerald; Nijenhuis, Robbert J; Bartels, LW; Moonen, Chrit T W; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To prospectively assess the safety and technical feasibility of volumetric magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation with direct skin cooling (DISC) during treatment of uterine fibroids. Methods. In this proof-of-concept study, eight patients were

  16. Virtual Reality-Based Attention Bias Modification Training for Social Anxiety: A Feasibility and Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urech, Antoine; Krieger, Tobias; Chesham, Alvin; Mast, Fred W; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Attention bias modification (ABM) programs have been considered as a promising new approach for the treatment of various disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, previous studies yielded ambiguous results regarding the efficacy of ABM in SAD. The present proof-of-concept study investigates the feasibility of a newly developed virtual reality (VR)-based dot-probe training paradigm. It was designed to facilitate attentional disengagement from threatening stimuli in socially anxious individuals (N = 15). The following outcomes were examined: (a) self-reports of enjoyment, motivation, flow, and presence; (b) attentional bias for social stimuli; and (c) social anxiety symptoms. Results showed that ABM training is associated with high scores in enjoyment, motivation, flow, and presence. Furthermore, significant improvements in terms of attention bias and social anxiety symptoms were observed from pre- to follow-up assessment. The study suggests that VR is a feasible and presumably a promising new medium for ABM trainings. Controlled studies will need to be carried out.

  17. Virtual Reality-Based Attention Bias Modification Training for Social Anxiety: A Feasibility and Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eUrech

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Attention bias modification (ABM programs have been considered as a promising new approach for the treatment of various disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD. However, previous studies yielded ambiguous results regarding the efficacy of ABM in SAD. The present proof-of-concept study investigates the feasibility of a newly developed virtual reality (VR-based dot-probe training paradigm. It was designed to facilitate attentional disengagement from threatening stimuli in socially anxious individuals (N=15. The following outcomes were examined: (a self-reports of enjoyment, motivation, flow and presence, (b attentional bias for social stimuli, and (c social anxiety symptoms. Results showed that ABM training is associated with high scores in enjoyment, motivation, flow and presence. Furthermore, significant improvements in terms of attention bias and social anxiety symptoms were observed from pre- to follow-up assessment. The study suggests that VR is a feasible and presumably a promising new medium for ABM trainings. Controlled studies will need to be carried out.

  18. Stem cell-based treatments against stroke: observations from human proof-of-concept studies and considerations regarding clinical applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Roland Doeppner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke remains a heavy burden for industrialized countries. The only causal therapy is the recanalization of occluded vessels via thrombolysis, which due to a narrow time window still can be offered only to a minority of patients. Since the majority of patients continues to exhibit neurological deficits even following successful thrombolysis, restorative therapies are urgently needed that promote brain remodeling and repair once stroke injury has occurred. Due to their unique properties of action, stem cell-based strategies gained increasing interest during recent years. Using various stroke models in both rodents and primates, the transplantation of stem cells, namely of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or neural progenitor cells (NPCs, has been shown to promote neurological recovery most likely via indirect bystander actions. In view of promising observations, clinical proof-of-concept studies are currently under way, in which effects of stem and precursor cells are evaluated in human stroke patients. In this review we summarize already published studies, which due to the broad experience in other medical contexts mostly employed bone marrow-derived MSCs by means of intravenous transplantation. With the overall number of clinical trials limited in number, only a fraction of these studies used non-treated control groups, and only single studies were adequately blinded. Despite these limitations, first promising results justify the need for more elaborate clinical trials in order to make stem cell transplantation a success for stroke treatment in the future.

  19. Genetic moderation of the association between regulatory focus and reward responsiveness: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Elena L; Hariri, Ahmad R; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Strauman, Timothy J

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies implicate individual differences in regulatory focus as contributing to self-regulatory dysfunction, particularly not responding to positive outcomes. How such individual differences emerge, however, is unclear. We conducted a proof-of-concept study to examine the moderating effects of genetically driven variation in dopamine signaling, a key modulator of neural reward circuits, on the association between regulatory focus and reward cue responsiveness. Healthy Caucasians (N=59) completed a measure of chronic regulatory focus and a probabilistic reward task. A common functional genetic polymorphism impacting prefrontal dopamine signaling (COMT rs4680) was evaluated. Response bias, the participants' propensity to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was predicted by an interaction of regulatory focus and COMT genotype. Specifically, self-perceived success at achieving promotion goals predicted total response bias, but only for individuals with the COMT genotype (Val/Val) associated with relatively increased phasic dopamine signaling and cognitive flexibility. The combination of success in promotion goal pursuit and Val/Val genotype appears to facilitate responding to reward opportunities in the environment. This study is among the first to integrate an assessment of self-regulatory style with an examination of genetic variability that underlies responsiveness to positive outcomes in goal pursuit.

  20. Effects of tolcapone on working memory and brain activity in abstinent smokers: A proof-of-concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashare, Rebecca L.; Wileyto, E. Paul; Ruparel, Kosha; Goelz, Patricia M.; Hopson, Ryan D.; Valdez, Jeffrey N.; Gur, Ruben C.; Loughead, James; Lerman, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Background Dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are thought to play an important role in cognitive function and nicotine dependence. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone, an FDA-approved treatment for Parkinson’s disease, increases prefrontal dopamine levels, with cognitive benefits that may vary by COMT genotype. We tested whether tolcapone alters working memory-related brain activity and performance in abstinent smokers. Methods In this double-blind crossover study, 20 smokers completed 8 days of treatment with tolcapone and placebo. In both medication periods, smokers completed blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI scans while performing a working memory N-back task after 24 h of abstinence. Smokers were genotyped prospectively for the COMT val158met polymorphism for exploratory analysis. Results Compared to placebo, tolcapone modestly improved accuracy (p = 0.017) and enhanced suppression of activation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) (p = 0.002). There were no effects of medication in other a priori regions of interest (dorsolateral PFC, dorsal cingulate/medial prefrontal cortex, or posterior cingulate cortex). Exploratory analyses suggested that tolcapone led to a decrease in BOLD signal in several regions among smokers with val/val genotypes, but increased or remained unchanged among met allele carriers. Tolcapone did not attenuate craving, mood, or withdrawal symptoms compared to placebo. Conclusions Data from this proof-of-concept study do not provide strong support for further evaluation of COMT inhibitors as smoking cessation aids. PMID:24095246

  1. Stimulating neural plasticity with real-time fMRI neurofeedback in Huntington's disease: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Marina; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Langbehn, Douglas; Reilmann, Ralf; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2018-03-01

    Novel methods that stimulate neuroplasticity are increasingly being studied to treat neurological and psychiatric conditions. We sought to determine whether real-time fMRI neurofeedback training is feasible in Huntington's disease (HD), and assess any factors that contribute to its effectiveness. In this proof-of-concept study, we used this technique to train 10 patients with HD to volitionally regulate the activity of their supplementary motor area (SMA). We collected detailed behavioral and neuroimaging data before and after training to examine changes of brain function and structure, and cognitive and motor performance. We found that patients overall learned to increase activity of the target region during training with variable effects on cognitive and motor behavior. Improved cognitive and motor performance after training predicted increases in pre-SMA grey matter volume, fMRI activity in the left putamen, and increased SMA-left putamen functional connectivity. Although we did not directly target the putamen and corticostriatal connectivity during neurofeedback training, our results suggest that training the SMA can lead to regulation of associated networks with beneficial effects in behavior. We conclude that neurofeedback training can induce plasticity in patients with Huntington's disease despite the presence of neurodegeneration, and the effects of training a single region may engage other regions and circuits implicated in disease pathology. © 2017 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Body weight-supported bedside treadmill training facilitates ambulation in ICU patients: An interventional proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Juultje; Wieferink, Denise C; Dongelmans, Dave A; Nollet, Frans; Engelbert, Raoul H H; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2017-10-01

    Early mobilisation is advocated to improve recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. However, severe weakness in combination with tubes, lines and machinery are practical barriers for the implementation of ambulation with critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training (BWSTT) in critically ill patients in the ICU. A custom build bedside Body Weight-Supported Treadmill was used and evaluated in medical and surgical patients in the ICU. Feasibility was evaluated according to eligibility, successful number of BWSTT, number of staff needed, adverse events, number of patients that could not have walked without BWSTT, patient satisfaction and anxiety. Twenty participants, underwent 54 sessions BWSTT. Two staff members executed the BWSTT and no adverse events occurred. Medical equipment did not have to be disconnected during all treatment sessions. In 74% of the sessions, the participants would not have been able to walk without the BWSTT. Patient satisfaction with BWSTT was high and anxiety low. This proof of concept study demonstrated that BWSTT is safe, reduces staff resource, and facilitates the first time to ambulation in critically ill patients with severe muscle weakness in the ICU. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Belatacept-based, ATG-Fresenius-induction regimen for kidney transplant recipients: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicora, Federico; Mos, Fernando; Petroni, Jorgelina; Casanova, Matías; Reniero, Liliana; Roberti, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Belatacept provides effective immunosuppression while avoiding the nephrotoxicities associated with calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). However, existing belatacept-based regimens still have high rates of acute rejection. We hypothesized that therapy with belatacept, mycophenolic acid (MMA), steroids and induction therapy with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin Fresenius (ATGF), rejection rate could be reduced. Prospective, single center, proof-of-concept study including males and females aged ≥18years, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive recipients of a first, HLA non-identical, live or deceased donor kidney allograft. Only patients with a calculated panel reactive antibody score of 0% were included. Three donors were positive for Chagas disease. Six of twelve patients had at least one infection and five were readmitted to the hospital for treatment. One patient had a Trypanosoma cruzi infection via the graft treated successfully. Median cold ischemia time for the transplant patients with a deceased donor was 21.5h. Mean serum creatinine levels at 1, 3 and 6months were 1.76±0.59, 1.55±0.60 and 1.49±0.60mg/dl, respectively. Two of twelve patients experienced clinical, biopsy-proven rejection, successfully treated with methylprednisolone. No patient developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) or any other malignancy and no patient lost their graft or died during follow-up. The potential of this approach makes it worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Knowledge management in secondary pharmaceutical manufacturing by mining of data historians-A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghetti, Natascia; Facco, Pierantonio; Bezzo, Fabrizio; Himawan, Chrismono; Zomer, Simeone; Barolo, Massimiliano

    2016-05-30

    In this proof-of-concept study, a methodology is proposed to systematically analyze large data historians of secondary pharmaceutical manufacturing systems using data mining techniques. The objective is to develop an approach enabling to automatically retrieve operation-relevant information that can assist the management in the periodic review of a manufactory system. The proposed methodology allows one to automatically perform three tasks: the identification of single batches within the entire data-sequence of the historical dataset, the identification of distinct operating phases within each batch, and the characterization of a batch with respect to an assigned multivariate set of operating characteristics. The approach is tested on a six-month dataset of a commercial-scale granulation/drying system, where several millions of data entries are recorded. The quality of results and the generality of the approach indicate that there is a strong potential for extending the method to even larger historical datasets and to different operations, thus making it an advanced PAT tool that can assist the implementation of continual improvement paradigms within a quality-by-design framework. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Parameters recorded by software of non-invasive ventilators predict COPD exacerbation: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Jean-Christian; Pelletier, Julie; Taleux, Nellie; Briault, Amandine; Arnol, Nathalie; Pison, Christophe; Tamisier, Renaud; Timsit, Jean-François; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2015-03-01

    To assess whether daily variations in three parameters recorded by non-invasive ventilation (NIV) software (respiratory rate (RR), percentage of respiratory cycles triggered by the patient (%Trigg) and NIV daily use) predict the risk of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treated by home NIV. Patients completed the EXACT-Pro questionnaire daily to detect exacerbations. The 25th and 75th percentiles of each 24 h NIV parameter were calculated and updated daily. For a given day, when the value of any parameter was >75th or 75th, 'low value' <25th). Stratified conditional logistic regressions estimated the risk of exacerbation when ≥2 days (for RR and %Trigg) or ≥3 days (for NIV use) out of five had an 'abnormal value'. Sixty-four patients were included. Twenty-one exacerbations were detected and medically confirmed. The risk of exacerbation was increased when RR (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 22.4) and %Trigg (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 14.5) were considered as 'high value' on ≥2 days out of five. This proof-of-concept study shows that daily variations in RR and %Trigg are predictors of an exacerbation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Effects of Space Weathering on Reflectance Spectra of Ureilites: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Cloutis, E.; Applin, D.; Hibbits, C.; Klima, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Fries, M.; Decker, S.

    2017-07-01

    Space weathering and spectral studies of three ureilitic samples show that space weathering causes significant changes in UV-VIS-IR spectra and Raman spectra. Changes due to amorphization of carbon could disguise ureilitic asteroids as CC-like.

  7. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J; Markowitz, John S

    2015-04-02

    Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodology in applied ethnopharmacological research. This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal׳s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybin A, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively, results which more

  8. Iron–carbon hybrid capacitor: A proof-of-concept study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In the present study, cost-intensive Ni electrode is replaced by high surface-area activated carbon. (AC) cathode and the possibility of the Fe anode, used in Ni–Fe battery, .... capacitor shows an initial value of about 24 F g–1 at 15 mA.

  9. Treatment of Recurrent Eczematous External Otitis with Honey Eardrops: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henatsch, Darius; Nabuurs, Cindy H; van de Goor, Rens M; Wolffs, Petra F; Stokroos, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    Eczematous external otitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and often difficult to treat. Our objective was to investigate the clinical effect and in vitro antibacterial potential of medical honey eardrops as treatment of eczematous external otitis. In a prospective study, 15 patients diagnosed with recurrent eczematous external otitis were treated with medical honey eardrops for 2 weeks. The following clinical outcomes were evaluated: visual analog scale of ear complaints, score of eczema, and eradication of bacterial infection. Furthermore, the antibacterial effect of honey eardrops against different bacterial strains was tested in vitro. Treatment resulted in less discomfort and itching and decreased signs of eczema, with high patient satisfaction and without adverse reactions. Honey eardrops showed a strong in vitro inhibitory activity against all tested strains but did not eradicate Staphylococcus aureus infection in vivo. The results of this preliminary study indicate a possible role of honey eardrops in eczematous ear disease.

  10. Do Older Adults Hate Video Games until they Play them? A Proof-of-Concept Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Chris; Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal; Maguire, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The issue of negative video game influences on youth remains contentious in public debate, the scholarly community and among policy makers. Recent research has indicated that negative attitudes toward video games are, in part, generational in nature with older adults more inclined to endorse negative beliefs about video games. The current mixed design study examined the impact of exposure to games on beliefs about video games in a small (n = 34) sample of older adults. Results indicated that ...

  11. Urine colorimetry to detect Low rifampin exposure during tuberculosis therapy: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Isaac; Schlecht, Hans P; Khensouvann, Lorna; Tamuhla, Neo; Kutzler, Michele; Ivaturi, Vijay; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Gumbo, Tawanda; Peloquin, Charles A; Bisson, Gregory P; Vinnard, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The cost and complexity of current approaches to therapeutic drug monitoring during tuberculosis (TB) therapy limits widespread use in areas of greatest need. We sought to determine whether urine colorimetry could have a novel application as a form of therapeutic drug monitoring during anti-TB therapy. Among healthy volunteers, we evaluated 3 dose sizes of rifampin (150 mg, 300 mg, and 600 mg), performed intensive pharmacokinetic sampling, and collected a timed urine void at 4 h post-dosing. The absorbance peak at 475 nm was measured after rifamycin extraction. The optimal cutoff was evaluated in a study of 39 HIV/TB patients undergoing TB treatment in Botswana. In the derivation study, a urine colorimetric assay value of 4.0 × 10(-2) Abs, using a timed void 4 h after dosing, demonstrated a sensitivity of 92 % and specificity of 60 % to detect a peak rifampin concentration (Cmax) under 8 mg/L, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.92. In the validation study, this cutoff was specific (100 %) but insensitive (28 %). We observed similar test characteristics for a target Cmax target of 6.6 mg/L, and a target area under the drug concentration-versus-time curve (AUC0-8) target of 24.1 mg•hour/L. The urine colorimetric assay was specific but insensitive to detect low rifampin serum concentrations among HIV/TB patients. In future work we will attempt to optimize sampling times and assay performance, with the goal of delivering a method that can translate into a point-of-care assessment of rifampin exposure during anti-TB therapy.

  12. Intraarterial Microdosing, a Novel Drug Development Approach, Proof-of-Concept PET Study in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Tal; Rouse, Douglas C.; Lee, Kihak; Wu, Huali; Layton, Anita T.; Hawk, Thomas C.; Weitzel, Douglas H.; Chin, Bennett B.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Chow, Shein-Chung; Noveck, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Intraarterial microdosing (IAM) is a novel drug development approach combining intraarterial drug delivery and microdosing. We aimed to demonstrate that IAM leads to target exposure similar to that of systemic full-dose administration but with minimal systemic exposure. IAM could enable the safe, inexpensive, and early study of novel drugs at the first-in-human stage and the study of established drugs in vulnerable populations. Methods Insulin was administered intraarterially (ipsilateral femoral artery) or systemically to 8 CD IGS rats just before blood sampling or 60-min 18F-FDG uptake PET imaging of ipsilateral and contralateral leg muscles (lateral gastrocnemius) and systemic muscles (spinotrapezius). The 18F-FDG uptake slope analysis was used to compare the interventions. Plasma levels of insulin and glucose were compared using area under the curve calculated by the linear trapezoidal method. A physiologically based computational pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model was constructed to simulate the relationship between the administered dose and response over time. Results 18F-FDG slope analysis found no difference between IAM and systemic full-dose slopes (0.0066 and 0.0061, respectively; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.024 to 0.029; P = 0.7895), but IAM slope was statistically significantly greater than systemic microdose (0.0018; 95% CI, −0.045 to −0.007; P = 0.0147) and sham intervention (−0.0015; 95% CI, 0.023–0.058; P = 0.0052). The pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data were used to identify model parameters that describe membrane insulin binding and glucose–insulin dynamics. Conclusion Target exposure after IAM was similar to systemic full dose administration but with minimal systemic effects. The computational pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model can be generalized to predict whole-body response. Findings should be validated in larger, controlled studies in animals and humans using a range of targets and classes of drugs. PMID

  13. Continuous quality improvement in daily clinical practice: a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Lorch

    Full Text Available Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI is an iterative process of: planning to improve a product or process, plan implementation, analyzing and comparing results against those expected, and corrective action on differences between actual and expected results. It is little used in clinical medicine. Anemia, a complex problem in End Stage Renal Disease patients, served to test the ability of an unique electronic medical record (EMR optimized for daily care to empower CQI in practice. We used data collected during daily care, stored in the EMR, and organized to display temporal relationships between clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic events. Our aims were optimal hemoglobin with minimum epoetin, and maintaining stable hemoglobin and epoetin. The study was done on 250 patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis (HD, receiving epoetin prior to February 1, 2010 and followed to July 31, 2011. Repleting iron, ensuring iron sufficiency, slow epoetin reduction, and decision support tools enabling data display over long periods in patient-centered reports were key elements. Epoetin dose, adjusted 6-8 weekly, was based on current clinical conditions and past responses. Hemoglobin increased by months 1-2; epoetin decreased from month 4. By months 16-18, epoetin had decreased 42% to 9,720 units/week while hemoglobin increased 8% to 123.6 g/L. Hemoglobin and epoetin were stable from month 7 onward. New epoetin orders decreased 83%. Transferrin saturation increased after the study start. Individual patient hemoglobin variation decreased by 23%, range by 27%. Mortality, 11.78 per 100 patient years, was 42% less than United States dialysis patient mortality. Allowable epoetin charges decreased by $15.33 per treatment and were $22.88 less than current Medicare allowance. The study validates the hypothesis that an EMR optimized for daily patient care can empower CQI in clinical medicine and serve to monitor medical care quality and cost.

  14. Virtual Travel Training for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Proof-of-Concept Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marco; Bernardes, Miguel; Barros, Fernando; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2018-03-20

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and repetitive patterns of behavior, which can lead to deficits in adaptive behavior. In this study, a serious game was developed to train individuals with ASD for an important type of outdoor activity, which is the use of buses as a means of transportation. The aim of this study was to develop a serious game that defines a "safe environment" where the players became familiar with the process of taking a bus and to validate if it could be used effectively to teach bus-taking routines and adaptive procedures to individuals with ASD. In the game, players were placed in a three-dimensional city and were submitted to a set of tasks that involved taking buses to reach specific destinations. Participants with ASD (n=10) underwent between 1 to 3 training sessions. Participants with typical development (n=10) were also included in this study for comparison purposes and received 1 control session. We found a statistically significant increase in the measures of knowledge of the process of riding a bus, a reduction in the electrodermal activity (a metric of anxiety) measured inside the bus environments, and a high success rate of their application within the game (93.8%). The developed game proved to be potentially useful in the context of emerging immersive virtual reality technologies, of which use in therapies and serious games is still in its infancy. Our findings suggest that serious games, using these technologies, can be used effectively in helping people with ASD become more independent in outdoor activities, specifically regarding the use of buses for transportation. ©Marco Simões, Miguel Bernardes, Fernando Barros, Miguel Castelo-Branco. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 20.03.2018.

  15. DIY 3D printing of custom orthopaedic implants: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Mark; Leach, William

    2014-03-01

    3D printing is an emerging technology that is primarily used for aiding the design and prototyping of implants. As this technology has evolved it has now become possible to produce functional and definitive implants manufactured using a 3D printing process. This process, however, previously required a large financial investment in complex machinery and professionals skilled in 3D product design. Our pilot study's aim was to design and create a 3D printed custom orthopaedic implant using only freely available consumer hardware and software.

  16. Do Older Adults Hate Video Games until they Play them? A Proof-of-Concept Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, Chris; Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal; Maguire, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The issue of negative video game influences on youth remains contentious in public debate, the scholarly community and among policy makers. Recent research has indicated that negative attitudes toward video games are, in part, generational in nature with older adults more inclined to endorse...... negative beliefs about video games. The current mixed design study examined the impact of exposure to games on beliefs about video games in a small (n = 34) sample of older adults. Results indicated that older adults were more concerned about video games as an abstract concept but when exposed...

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy based neurofeedback of prefrontal cortex activity: a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Barth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurofeedback is a promising tool for treatment and rehabilitation of several patient groups. In this proof of principle study, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS based neurofeedback of frontal cortical areas was investigated in healthy adults. Main aims were the assessment of learning, the effects on performance in a working memory (n-back task and the impact of applied strategies on regulation.13 healthy participants underwent 8 sessions of NIRS based neurofeedback within two weeks to learn to voluntarily up-regulate hemodynamic activity in prefrontal areas. An n-back task in pre-/post measurements was used to monitor neurocognitive changes. Mean oxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb amplitudes over the course of the sessions as well as during the n-back task were evaluated. 12 out of 13 participants were able to regulate their frontal hemodynamic response via NIRS neurofeedback. However, no systematic learning effects were observed in frontal O2Hb amplitudes over the training course in our healthy sample. We found an impact of applied strategies in only 5 out of 13 subjects. Regarding the n-back task, neurofeedback appeared to induce more focused and specific brain activation compared to pre-training measurement. NIRS based neurofeedback is a feasible and potentially effective method, with an impact on activation patterns in a working memory task. Ceiling effects might explain the lack of a systematic learning pattern in healthy subjects. Clinical studies are needed to show effects in patients exhibiting pathological deviations in prefrontal function.

  18. Do manual and voxel-based morphometry measure the same? – A proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels K. Focke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Voxel-based morphometry (VBM is a commonly used method to study volumetric variations on a whole brain basis. However it is often criticised for potential confounds, mainly based on imperfect spatial registration. We therefore aimed to evaluate if VBM and gold-standard manual volumetry are measuring the same effects with respect to subcortical grey matter volumes. Manual regions-of-interest (ROIs were drawn in the hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, putamen, pallidum and caudate nucleus bilaterally. Resulting volumes were used for a whole brain VBM correlation analysis with SPM8. The hippocampus, amygdala, putamen and caudate nucleus were correctly identified by SPM using the contemporary high-dimensional normalization (DARTEL toolbox. This strongly suggests that VBM and manual volumetry both are indeed measuring the same effects with regard to subcortical brain structures.

  19. Raman spectroscopy for the assessment of acute myeloid leukemia: a proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanna, R.; Tresoldi, C.; Ronchi, P.; Lenferink, A. T. M.; Morasso, C.; Mehn, D.; Bedoni, M.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Ciceri, F.; Otto, C.; Gramatica, F.

    2014-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a proliferative neoplasm, that if not properly treated can rapidly cause a fatal outcome. The diagnosis of AML is challenging and the first diagnostic step is the count of the percentage of blasts (immature cells) in bone marrow and blood sample, and their morphological characterization. This evaluation is still performed manually with a bright field light microscope. Here we report results of a study applying Raman spectroscopy for analysis of samples from two patients affected by two AML subtypes characterized by a different maturation stage in the neutrophilic lineage. Ten representative cells per sample were selected and analyzed with high-resolution confocal Raman microscopy by scanning 64x64 (4096) points in a confocal layer through the volume of the whole cell. The average spectrum of each cell was then used to obtain a highly reproducible mean fingerprint of the two different AML subtypes. We demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy efficiently distinguishes these different AML subtypes. The molecular interpretation of the substantial differences between the subtypes is related to granulocytic enzymes (e.g. myeloperoxidase and cytochrome b558), in agreement with different stages of maturation of the two considered AML subtypes . These results are promising for the development of a new, objective, automated and label-free Raman based methods for the diagnosis and first assessment of AML.

  20. Single bacteria movement tracking by online microscopy--a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Ziegler

    Full Text Available In this technical report we demonstrate a low-cost online unit allowing movement tracking of flagellated bacteria on a single-cell level during fermentation processes. The system's ability to distinguish different metabolic states (viability of bacteria by movement velocity was investigated. A flow-through cuvette with automatically adjustable layer thickness was developed. The cuvette can be used with most commercially available laboratory microscopes equipped with 40× amplification and a digital camera. In addition, an automated sample preparation unit and a software module was developed measuring size, moved distance, and speed of bacteria. In a proof of principle study the movement velocities of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 during three batch fermentation processes were investigated. In this process the bacteria went through different metabolic states, vegetative growth, diauxic shift, vegetative growth after diauxic shift, and sporulation. It was shown that the movement velocities during the different metabolic states significantly differ from each other. Therefore, the described setup has the potential to be used as a bacteria viability monitoring tool. In contrast to some other techniques, such as electro-optical techniques, this method can even be used in turbid production media.

  1. Biodegradation of Mg-14Li alloy in simulated body fluid: A proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bo Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High corrosion kinetics and localised corrosion progress are the primary concerns arising from the clinical implementation of magnesium (Mg based implantable devices. In this study, a binary Mg-lithium (Li alloy consisting a record high Li content of 14% (in weight was employed as model material aiming to yield homogenous and slow corrosion behaviour in a simulated body fluid, i.e. minimum essential medium (MEM, in comparison to that of generic Mg alloy AZ31 and biocompatible Mg-0.5Zn-0.5Ca counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy examination reveals single-phase microstructural characteristics of Mg-14Li (β-Li, whilst the presence of insoluble phases, cathodic to α-Mg matrix, in AZ31 and Mg-0.5Zn-0.5Ca. Though slight differences exist in the corrosion kinetics of all the specimens over a short-term time scale (no longer than 60 min, as indicated by potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, profound variations are apparent in terms of immersion tests, i.e. mass loss and hydrogen evolution measurements (up to 7 days. Cross-sectional micrographs unveil severe pitting corrosion in AZ31 and Mg-0.5Zn-0.5Ca, but not the case for Mg-14Li. X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm that a compact film (25 μm in thickness consisting of lithium carbonate (Li2CO3 and calcium hydroxide was generated on the surface of Mg-14Li in MEM, which contributes greatly to its low corrosion rate. It is proposed therefore that the single-phase structure and formation of protective and defect-free Li2CO3 film give rise to the controlled and homogenous corrosion behaviour of Mg-14Li in MEM, providing new insights for the exploration of biodegradable Mg materials.

  2. Three-dimensional quantitative analysis of healthy foot shape: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Kristina; Booth, Brian G; Danckaers, Femke; Burg, Fien; Vermaelen, Philippe; Duerinck, Saartje; Sijbers, Jan; Huysmans, Toon

    2018-01-01

    Foot morphology has received increasing attention from both biomechanics researches and footwear manufacturers. Usually, the morphology of the foot is quantified by 2D footprints. However, footprint quantification ignores the foot's vertical dimension and hence, does not allow accurate quantification of complex 3D foot shape. The shape variation of healthy 3D feet in a population of 31 adult women and 31 adult men who live in Belgium was studied using geometric morphometric methods. The effect of different factors such as sex, age, shoe size, frequency of sport activity, Body Mass Index (BMI), foot asymmetry, and foot loading on foot shape was investigated. Correlation between these factors and foot shape was examined using multivariate linear regression. The complex nature of a foot's 3D shape leads to high variability in healthy populations. After normalizing for scale, the major axes of variation in foot morphology are (in order of decreasing variance): arch height, combined ball width and inter-toe distance, global foot width, hallux bone orientation (valgus-varus), foot type (e.g. Egyptian, Greek), and midfoot width. These first six modes of variation capture 92.59% of the total shape variation. Higher BMI results in increased ankle width, Achilles tendon width, heel width and a thicker forefoot along the dorsoplantar axis. Age was found to be associated with heel width, Achilles tendon width, toe height and hallux orientation. A bigger shoe size was found to be associated with a narrow Achilles tendon, a hallux varus, a narrow heel, heel expansion along the posterior direction, and a lower arch compared to smaller shoe size. Sex was found to be associated with differences in ankle width, Achilles tendon width, and heel width. Frequency of sport activity was associated with Achilles tendon width and toe height. A detailed analysis of the 3D foot shape, allowed by geometric morphometrics, provides insights in foot variations in three dimensions that can not be

  3. Pediatric microdose study of [(14)C]paracetamol to study drug metabolism using accelerated mass spectrometry: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; van Duijn, Esther; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Windhorst, Albert D; Hendrikse, N Harry; Vaes, Wouter H J; Spaans, Edwin; Fabriek, Babs O; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Hanff, Lidwien M; Janssen, Paul J J M; Koch, Birgit C P; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by practical, ethical, and scientific challenges. Microdosing is a promising new method to obtain pharmacokinetic data in children with minimal burden and minimal risk. The use of a labeled oral microdose offers the added benefit to study intestinal and hepatic drug disposition in children already receiving an intravenous therapeutic drug dose for clinical reasons. The objective of this study was to present pilot data of an oral [(14)C]paracetamol [acetaminophen (AAP)] microdosing study as proof of concept to study developmental pharmacokinetics in children. In an open-label microdose pharmacokinetic pilot study, infants (0-6 years of age) received a single oral [(14)C]AAP microdose (3.3 ng/kg, 60 Bq/kg) in addition to intravenous therapeutic doses of AAP (15 mg/kg intravenous every 6 h). Blood samples were taken from an indwelling catheter. AAP blood concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and [(14)C]AAP and metabolites ([(14)C]AAP-Glu and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Ten infants (aged 0.1-83.1 months) were included; one was excluded as he vomited shortly after administration. In nine patients, [(14)C]AAP and metabolites in blood samples were detectable at expected concentrations: median (range) maximum concentration (C max) [(14)C]AAP 1.68 (0.75-4.76) ng/L, [(14)C]AAP-Glu 0.88 (0.34-1.55) ng/L, and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul 0.81 (0.29-2.10) ng/L. Dose-normalized oral [(14)C]AAP C max approached median intravenous average concentrations (C av): 8.41 mg/L (3.75-23.78 mg/L) and 8.87 mg/L (3.45-12.9 mg/L), respectively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a [(14)C]labeled microdose to study AAP pharmacokinetics, including metabolite disposition, in young children.

  4. Combined ecological momentary assessment and global positioning system tracking to assess smoking behavior: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John T; Schick, Robert S; Hallyburton, Matt; Dennis, Michelle F; Kollins, Scott H; Beckham, Jean C; McClernon, F Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods have provided a rich assessment of the contextual factors associated with a wide range of behaviors including alcohol use, eating, physical activity, and smoking. Despite this rich database, this information has not been linked to specific locations in space. Such location information, which can now be easily acquired from global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices, could provide unique information regarding the space-time distribution of behaviors and new insights into their determinants. In a proof of concept study, we assessed the acceptability and feasibility of acquiring and combining EMA and GPS data from adult smokers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were adults with ADHD who were enrolled in a larger EMA study on smoking and psychiatric symptoms. Among those enrolled in the latter study who were approached to participate (N = 11), 10 consented, provided daily EMA entries, and carried a GPS device with them during a 7-day assessment period to assess aspects of their smoking behavior. The majority of those eligible to participate were willing to carry a GPS device and signed the consent (10 out of 11, 91%). Of the 10 who consented, 7 participants provided EMA entries and carried the GPS device with them daily for at least 70% of the sampling period. Data are presented on the spatial distribution of smoking episodes and ADHD symptoms on a subset of the sample to demonstrate applications of GPS data. We conclude by discussing how EMA and GPS might be used to study the ecology of smoking and make recommendations for future research and analysis.

  5. Phase 1 dose-escalation study of the antiplacental growth factor monoclonal antibody RO5323441 combined with bevacizumab in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Chinot, Olivier L; McBain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted a phase 1 dose-escalation study of RO5323441, a novel antiplacental growth factor (PlGF) monoclonal antibody, to establish the recommended dose for use with bevacizumab and to investigate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety/tolerability, and preliminary clinica...

  6. A phase I, dose-escalation study of TB-403, a monoclonal antibody directed against PlGF, in patients with advanced solid tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Nielsen, D L; Sørensen, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: TB-403 (RO 5323441), a humanised monoclonal antibody, is a novel antiangiogenesis agent directed against placental growth factor. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and antitumour activity of TB-403 were assessed in a phase I, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid...

  7. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Dose-Escalation Studies in Prostate Cancer Using Anti-PSMA Antibody 177Lu-J591: RIT Alone and RIT in Combination with Docetaxel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-01-01

    Phase I dose escalation studies with 177Lu-DOTA-huJ591 using dose fractionation regimen will be performed in patients with PCa and who have recurrent and/or metastatic disease. The 177Lu dose (20-45 mCi/m2...

  8. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Dose-Escalation Studies in Prostate Cancer Using Anti-PSMA Antibody 177Lu-J591: RIT Alone and RIT in Combination With Docetaxel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    Phase I dose escalation studies with 177Lu-DOTA-huJ591 using dose fractionation regimen will be performed in patients with PCa and who have recurrent and/or metastatic disease. The 177Lu dose (20-45 mCi/m2...

  9. Integrating health education and physical activity programming for cardiovascular health promotion among female inmates: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Uma S; Jordan, Jeremy S; Funk, Daniel; Gavin, Kristin; Tibbetts, Erica; Collins, Bradley N

    2016-05-01

    Female inmate populations in the United States tend to be overweight, physically inactive, experience high stress, and have a history of nicotine and other drug dependence. Thus, they bear an elevated risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease than the general population. However, few evidence-based health interventions exist for this population. This study will test proof of concept, feasibility, and potential efficacy of a multiple health behavior change intervention that integrates CV-health promotion education delivered during a physical activity (PA) program (indoor cycling) tailored to this population. This study uses a quasi-experimental 2-group design with two measurement time-points: baseline and 8-week end of treatment. N=120 incarcerated women (18-59years of age) who are medically cleared for participation in PA will be enrolled. Indoor cycling instructors will be trained to deliver five health education topics over an 8-week period during twice-weekly cycling classes. Topics match the American Heart Association recommendations for CV health: (a) nutrition, (b) PA promotion, (c) weight management, (d) stress management, and (e) smoking cessation and relapse prevention. Modes of intervention include instructor advice, written materials and audio/video clips reviewed during class. CV-related and mental health measures will be assessed at both time-points. Results will guide a full scale efficacy study. Future research in this area has potential to impact the health of female inmates, a high-risk population. Moreover, this multiple health behavior change intervention model represents a community approach to health promotion that could generalize to other underserved populations who may benefit most from similar intervention efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fostering Spontaneous Visual Attention in Children on the Autism Spectrum: A Proof-of-Concept Study Comparing Singing and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Grace Anne; Abel, Larry Allen

    2018-01-22

    Children on the autism spectrum are reported to have lower rates of social gaze as early as toddlerhood, and this pattern persists across the lifespan. Finding ways to promote more natural and spontaneous engagement in social interactions may help to boost developmental opportunities in the child's home and community settings. This proof-of-concept study hypothesized that a video of a singer would elicit more attention to the performer, particularly to her face, than a video of her reading a story, and that the child's familiarity with the material would enhance attention. Sixteen children on the autism spectrum (7-10 years old) watched 4 videos 1 min long comprising a favorite song or story, and an unfamiliar song and story. Eye movements were recorded, and three-way repeated measures ANOVAs examined the proportion of total valid visual dwell time and fixations, in each trial and each target area. For proportion of both dwell time and fixation counts, children were significantly more likely to look at the performer's face and body and less at the prop during singing than story-telling and when familiar rather than unfamiliar material was presented. These findings raise important issues for supporting children to naturally initiate looking toward a person's face. Autism Res 2018. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Children on the autism spectrum may have difficulty looking at people, particularly their faces. In this study, children watched videos of someone singing or reading a story. The results show that children look more at the person if they were singing and if the story was familiar to them. Using songs and familiar stories may be a way to help children with autism to naturally engage with others. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Design of a complex virtual reality simulation to train finger motion for persons with hemiparesis: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, Sergei V; Fluet, Gerard G; Mathai, Abraham; Qiu, Qinyin; Lewis, Jeffrey; Merians, Alma S

    2009-07-17

    Current neuroscience has identified rehabilitation approaches with the potential to stimulate adaptive changes in the brains of persons with hemiparesis. These approaches include, intensive task-oriented training, bimanual activities and balancing proximal and distal upper extremity interventions to reduce competition between these segments for neural territory. This paper describes the design and feasibility testing of a robotic/virtual environment system designed to train the hand and arm of persons with hemiparesis. The system employs a simulated piano that presents visual, auditory and tactile feedback comparable to an actual piano. Arm tracking allows patients to train both the arm and hand as a coordinated unit, emphasizing the integration of both transport and manipulation phases. The piano trainer includes songs and scales that can be performed with one or both hands. Adaptable haptic assistance is available for more involved subjects. An algorithm adjusts task difficulty in proportion to subject performance. A proof of concept study was performed on four subjects with upper extremity hemiparesis secondary to chronic stroke to establish: a) the safety and feasibility of this system and b) the concurrent validity of robotically measured kinematic and performance measures to behavioral measures of upper extremity function. None of the subjects experienced adverse events or responses during or after training. As a group, the subjects improved in both performance time and key press accuracy. Three of the four subjects demonstrated improvements in fractionation, the ability to move each finger individually. Two subjects improved their aggregate time on the Jebsen Test of Hand Function and three of the four subjects improved in Wolf Motor Function Test aggregate time. The system designed in this paper has proven to be safe and feasible for the training of hand function for persons with hemiparesis. It features a flexible design that allows for the use and further

  12. Decreasing the Burden of Side Effects Through Positive Message Framing: an Experimental Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Marcel; Rief, Winfried; Doering, Bettina K

    2018-05-21

    Informing patients about treatment side effects increases the occurrence and intensity of side effects. Since the obligatory informed consent procedure in drug treatments requires transparency and nocebo research suggests that the informed consent of a drug leads to an increased occurrence of the mentioned side effects, the aim of this proof of concept study was to determine the effect of two different framings of informed consent on the occurrence, intensity, and perceived threat of side effects. Healthy male participants (n = 80) were randomized to one of two framing groups. The positive framing group was informed that the common side effect dizziness was a sign that the drug had started to work, while the neutral framing group was told that dizziness is an unpleasant but well-known side effect. Side effects were measured after the administration of metoprolol, an antihypertensive agent. Post hoc moderator analyses investigated the effect of pre-existing negative beliefs about the general harm of medication on the framing manipulation. Metoprolol-specific drug-attributed side effects were rated significantly less threatening in the positive framing group. The between-group effect size (Cohen's d) was small (d = 0.38, p = 0.049). Exploratory post hoc moderator analyses suggest that participants who believed that medication is a source of harmful effects benefited from positive framing, compared to neutral framing of drug-attributed side effects. Positive framing was partially effective in decreasing specific side effect measures, particularly among participants with a tendency to believe that medicine is harmful. Informed consent procedures should therefore be personalized, focusing on patients with negative treatment beliefs.

  13. Analysis of the Effect of Environmental Conditions in Conducting Amphibious Assaults Using a Ship Simulator/Vessel-Response Model Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    the exit interview conducted at the conclusion of the testing period. Appendix B summarizes the recommendations the craftmasters made for improving ...the “Go/No-Go” condition. Unlike USACE applications , where that scenario is known by interviewing harbor pilots, the Go/No-Go conditions are...summarizes a proof-of-concept study for demonstrating the application of these technologies to allow commanders to determine the feasibility of surface

  14. A Proof-of-Concept Randomized Controlled Study of Gabapentin: Effects on Cannabis Use, Withdrawal and Executive Function Deficits in Cannabis-Dependent Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Barbara J; Crean, Rebecca; Goodell, Vivian; Light, John M; Quello, Susan; Shadan, Farhad; Buffkins, Kimberly; Kyle, Mark; Adusumalli, Murali; Begovic, Adnan; Rao, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    There are no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and patients seeking treatment for primary cannabis dependence represent 25% of all substance use admissions. We conducted a phase IIa proof-of-concept pilot study to examine the safety and efficacy of a calcium channel/GABA modulating drug, gabapentin, for the treatment of cannabis dependence. A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial w...

  15. Allocentric spatial memory testing predicts conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia: an initial proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A Wood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is one of the first regions to exhibit neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and knowledge of its role in allocentric spatial memory may therefore aid early diagnosis of AD. The 4 Mountains Test (4MT is a short and easily administered test of spatial memory based on the cognitive map theory of hippocampal function as derived from rodent single cell and behavioral studies. The 4MT has been shown in previous cross-sectional studies to be sensitive and specific for mild cognitive impairment due to AD. This report describes the initial results of a longitudinal study testing the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory is predictive of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.Fifteen patients with mild cognitive impairment underwent baseline testing on the 4MT in addition to CSF amyloid/tau biomarker studies, volumetric MRI and neuropsychological assessment including the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and Trail Making Test B (TMT-B. At 24 months, 9/15 patients had converted to AD dementia. The 4MT predicted conversion to AD with 93% accuracy (Cohen’s d = 2.52. The predictive accuracies of the comparator measures were as follows: CSF tau/β-amyloid1-42 ratio 92% (d = 1.81, RAVLT 64% (d = 0.41, TMT-B 78% (d = 1.56, and hippocampal volume 77% (d = 0.65. CSF tau levels were strongly negative correlated with 4MT scores (r = -0.71. This proof-of-concept study provides initial support for the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory testing is a predictive cognitive marker of hippocampal neurodegeneration in pre-dementia AD. The 4MT is a brief, noninvasive, straightforward spatial memory test and is therefore ideally suited for use in routine clinical diagnostic practice. This is of particular importance given the current unmet need for simple accurate diagnostic tests for early AD and the ongoing development of potential disease-modifying therapeutic agents which may be more efficacious when given

  16. Allocentric Spatial Memory Testing Predicts Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia: An Initial Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth A; Moodley, Kuven K; Lever, Colin; Minati, Ludovico; Chan, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is one of the first regions to exhibit neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and knowledge of its role in allocentric spatial memory may therefore aid early diagnosis of AD. The 4 Mountains Test (4MT) is a short and easily administered test of spatial memory based on the cognitive map theory of hippocampal function as derived from rodent single cell and behavioral studies. The 4MT has been shown in previous cross-sectional studies to be sensitive and specific for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD. This report describes the initial results of a longitudinal study testing the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory is predictive of conversion from MCI to dementia. Fifteen patients with MCI underwent baseline testing on the 4MT in addition to CSF amyloid/tau biomarker studies, volumetric MRI and neuropsychological assessment including the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) and Trail Making Test "B" (TMT-B). At 24 months, 9/15 patients had converted to AD dementia. The 4MT predicted conversion to AD with 93% accuracy (Cohen's d  = 2.52). The predictive accuracies of the comparator measures were as follows: CSF tau/β-amyloid 1-42 ratio 92% ( d  = 1.81), RAVLT 64% ( d  = 0.41), TMT-B 78% ( d  = 1.56), and hippocampal volume 77% ( d  = 0.65). CSF tau levels were strongly negatively correlated with 4MT scores ( r  = -0.71). This proof-of-concept study provides initial support for the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory testing is a predictive cognitive marker of hippocampal neurodegeneration in pre-dementia AD. The 4MT is a brief, non-invasive, straightforward spatial memory test and is therefore ideally suited for use in routine clinical diagnostic practice. This is of particular importance given the current unmet need for simple accurate diagnostic tests for early AD and the ongoing development of potential disease-modifying therapeutic agents, which may be more efficacious when given earlier in

  17. Treatment of Sarcopenia with Bimagrumab: Results from a Phase II, Randomized, Controlled, Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Daniel; Praestgaard, Jens; Hariry, Sam; Laurent, Didier; Petricoul, Olivier; Perry, Robert G; Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of bimagrumab on skeletal muscle mass and function in older adults with sarcopenia and mobility limitations. A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, proof-of-concept study. Five centers in the United States. Community-dwelling adults (N = 40) aged 65 and older with gait speed between 0.4 and 1.0 m/s over 4 m and an appendicular skeletal muscle index of 7.25 kg/m 2 or less for men and 5.67 kg/m 2 or less for women. Intravenous bimagrumab 30 mg/kg (n = 19) or placebo (n = 21). Change from baseline in thigh muscle volume (TMV), subcutaneous and intermuscular fat, appendicular and total lean body mass, grip strength, gait speed, and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Thirty-two (80%) participants completed the study. TMV increased by Week 2, was sustained throughout the treatment period, and remained above baseline at the end of study in bimagrumab-treated participants, whereas there was no change with placebo treatment (Week 2: 5.15 ± 2.19% vs -0.34 ± 2.59%, P < .001; Week 4: 6.12 ± 2.56% vs 0.16 ± 3.42%, P < .001; Week 8: 8.01 ± 3.70% vs 0.35 ± 3.32%, P < .001; Week 16: 7.72 ± 5.31% vs 0.42 ± 5.14%, P < .001; Week 24: 4.80 ± 5.81% vs -1.01 ± 4.43%, P = .002). Participants with slower walking speed at baseline receiving bimagrumab had clinically meaningful and statistically significantly greater improvements in gait speed (mean 0.15 m/s, P = .009) and 6MWD (mean 82 m, P = .022) than those receiving placebo at Week 16. Adverse events in the bimagrumab group included muscle-related symptoms, acne, and diarrhea, most of which were mild in severity and resolved by the end of study. Treatment with bimagrumab over 16 weeks increased muscle mass and strength in older adults with sarcopenia and improved mobility in those with slow walking speed. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. The detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from patients' breath using canine scent detection: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiyakara, Taya; Redmond, Susan; Unwanatham, Nattawut; Rattanasiri, Sasivimol; Thakkinstian, Amarin; Tangtawee, Pongsatorn; Mingphruedhi, Somkit; Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Intaraprasong, Pongphob; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri

    2017-09-13

    . Our results show that this is possible with an accuracy of 78% (p < 0.001 when compared to chance alone), and are thus a proof of concept. Further refinement of the process of detection will be needed before clinical application.

  19. BDNF-Val66Met-Polymorphism Impact on Cortical Plasticity in Schizophrenia Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Michael A.; Wobrock, Thomas; Bunse, Tilmann; Rein, Bettina; Herrmann, Maximiliane; Schmitt, Andrea; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Witt, Stephanie H.; Rietschel, Marcella; Falkai, Peter; Hasan, Alkomiet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to be a moderator of neuroplasticity. A frequent BDNF-polymorphism (Val66Met) is associated with impairments of cortical plasticity. In patients with schizophrenia, reduced neuroplastic responses following non-invasive brain stimulation have been reported consistently. Various studies have indicated a relationship between the BDNF-Val66Met-polymorphism and motor-cortical plasticity in healthy individuals, but schizophrenia patients have yet to be investigated. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was, therefore, to test the impact of the BDNF-Val66Met-polymorphism on inhibitory and facilitatory cortical plasticity in schizophrenia patients. Methods: Cortical plasticity was investigated in 22 schizophrenia patients and 35 healthy controls using anodal and cathodal transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left primary motor cortex. Animal and human research indicates that excitability shifts following anodal and cathodal tDCS are related to molecular long-term potentiation and long-term depression. To test motor-cortical excitability before and after tDCS, well-established single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation protocols were applied. Results: Our analysis revealed increased glutamate-mediated intracortical facilitation in met-heterozygotes compared to val-homozygotes at baseline. Following cathodal tDCS, schizophrenia met-heterozygotes had reduced gamma-amino-butyric-acid-mediated short-interval intracortical inhibition, whereas healthy met-heterozygotes displayed the opposite effect. The BDNF-Val66Met-polymorphism did not influence single-pulse motor-evoked potential amplitudes after tDCS. Conclusions: These preliminary findings support the notion of an association of the BDNF-Val66Met-polymorphism with observable alterations in plasticity following cathodal tDCS in schizophrenia patients. This indicates a complex interaction between inhibitory

  20. Design of the Growth hormone deficiency and Efficacy of Treatment (GET) score and non-interventional proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Peter H; Bergmann, Simona; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Dimopoulou, Christina; Pedersen, Birgitte T; Stalla, Günter K; Weber, Matthias M; Meckes-Ferber, Stefanie

    2018-02-13

    The adverse effects of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in adults (AGHD) on metabolism and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can be improved with GH substitution. This investigation aimed to design a score summarising the features of GHD and evaluate its ability to measure the effect of GH substitution in AGHD. The Growth hormone deficiency and Efficacy of Treatment (GET) score (0-100 points) assessed (weighting): HRQoL (40%), disease-related days off work (10%), bone mineral density (20%), waist circumference (10%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (10%) and body fat mass (10%). A prospective, non-interventional, multicentre proof-of-concept study investigated whether the score could distinguish between untreated and GH-treated patients with AGHD. A 10-point difference in GET score during a 2-year study period was expected based on pre-existing knowledge of the effect of GH substitution in AGHD. Of 106 patients eligible for analysis, 22 were untreated GHD controls (9 females, mean ± SD age 52 ± 17 years; 13 males, 57 ± 13 years) and 84 were GH-treated (31 females, age 45 ± 13 years, GH dose 0.30 ± 0.16 mg/day; 53 males, age 49 ± 15 years, GH dose 0.25 ± 0.10 mg/day). Follow-up was 706 ± 258 days in females and 653 ± 242 days in males. The GET score differed between the untreated control and treated groups with a least squares mean difference of + 10.01 ± 4.01 (p = 0.0145). The GET score appeared to be a suitable integrative instrument to summarise the clinical features of GHD and measure the effects of GH substitution in adults. Exercise capacity and muscle strength/body muscle mass could be included in the GET score. NCT number: NCT00934063 . Date of registration: 02 July 2009.

  1. Design of a complex virtual reality simulation to train finger motion for persons with hemiparesis: a proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Qinyin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current neuroscience has identified rehabilitation approaches with the potential to stimulate adaptive changes in the brains of persons with hemiparesis. These approaches include, intensive task-oriented training, bimanual activities and balancing proximal and distal upper extremity interventions to reduce competition between these segments for neural territory. Methods This paper describes the design and feasibility testing of a robotic/virtual environment system designed to train the hand and arm of persons with hemiparesis. The system employs a simulated piano that presents visual, auditory and tactile feedback comparable to an actual piano. Arm tracking allows patients to train both the arm and hand as a coordinated unit, emphasizing the integration of both transport and manipulation phases. The piano trainer includes songs and scales that can be performed with one or both hands. Adaptable haptic assistance is available for more involved subjects. An algorithm adjusts task difficulty in proportion to subject performance. A proof of concept study was performed on four subjects with upper extremity hemiparesis secondary to chronic stroke to establish: a the safety and feasibility of this system and b the concurrent validity of robotically measured kinematic and performance measures to behavioral measures of upper extremity function. Results None of the subjects experienced adverse events or responses during or after training. As a group, the subjects improved in both performance time and key press accuracy. Three of the four subjects demonstrated improvements in fractionation, the ability to move each finger individually. Two subjects improved their aggregate time on the Jebsen Test of Hand Function and three of the four subjects improved in Wolf Motor Function Test aggregate time. Conclusion The system designed in this paper has proven to be safe and feasible for the training of hand function for persons with hemiparesis

  2. Using peer observers to assess the quality of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jenny Harris,1 James SA Green,2,3 Nick Sevdalis,4 Cath Taylor1 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK; 2Department of Urology, Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, UK; 3Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK; 4Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: Multidisciplinary team (MDT working is well established as the foundation for providing cancer services in the UK and elsewhere. A core activity is the weekly meeting (or case conference/tumor boards where the treatment recommendations for individual patients are agreed. Evidence suggests that the quality of team working varies across cancer teams, and this may impact negatively on the decision-making process, and ultimately patient care. Feedback on performance by expert observers may improve performance, but can be resource-intensive to implement. This proof of concept study sought to: develop a structured observational assessment tool for use by peers (managers or clinicians from the local workforce and explore its usability; assess the feasibility of the principle of observational assessment by peers; and explore the views of MDT members and observers about the utility of feedback from observational assessment. Methods: For tool development, the content was informed by national clinical consensus recommendations for best practice in cancer MDTs and developed in collaboration with an expert steering group. It consisted of ten subdomains of team working observable in MDT meetings that were rated on a 10-point scale (very poor to very good. For observational assessment, a total of 19 peer observers used the tool (assessing performance in 20 cancer teams from four hospitals. For evaluation, telephone interviews with 64 team members and all peer observers were analyzed thematically. Results: The tool was easy to use and areas for refinement were identified. Peer

  3. Risk assessment for job burnout with a mobile health web application using questionnaire data: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; van Nuffel, Marc; Fuchs, Walther J

    2016-01-01

    Job burnout has become a rampant epidemic in working societies, causing high productivity loss and healthcare costs. An easy accessible tool to detect clinically relevant risk may bear the potential to timely avert the dire sequelae of burnout. As a start, we performed a proof of concept study to test the utilization of a mobile health web application for a free and anonymous burnout risk assessment with established questionnaires. We designed a client-side javascript web application for users who filled out demographic and psychometric data forms over the internet. Users were recruited through social media, back links from hospital websites, and search engine optimization. Similar to population-based studies, we used the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) to calculate a burnout risk index (BRIX). As additional mental health burden indices, users filled out the Perceived Stress Scale, Insomina Severity Index, and Profile of Mood States. Within six months, the MBI-GS was completed by 11,311 users (median age 33 years, 85 % women) of whom 20.0 % had no clinically relevant burnout risk, 54.7 % had mild-to-moderate risk, and 25.3 % had high risk. In the 2947 users completing all questionnaires, female sex ( B  = -0.03), cohabiting ( B  = -0.03), negative affect ( B  = 0.46), positive affect ( B  = -0.20), perceived stress ( B  = 0.18), and insomnia symptoms ( B  = 0.04) explained 56.2 % of the variance in the continuously scaled BRIX. The reliability was good to excellent for all psychometric scales. The weighting of the BRIX with mental health burden indices primarily modified the risk in users with mild-to-moderate burnout risk. A low-threshold web application can reliably assess the risk of job burnout. As the bulk of users had clinically relevant burnout scores, a web application may be useful to target employees at risk. The clinical value of the BRIX and its modification with coexistent/absent mental health burden

  4. Impact of follicular G-CSF quantification on subsequent embryo transfer decisions: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lédée, N; Gridelet, V; Ravet, S; Jouan, C; Gaspard, O; Wenders, F; Thonon, F; Hincourt, N; Dubois, M; Foidart, J M; Munaut, C; Perrier d'Hauterive, S

    2013-02-01

    Previous experiments have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), quantified in the follicular fluid (FF) of individual oocytes, correlates with the potential for an ongoing pregnancy of the corresponding fertilized oocytes among selected transferred embryos. Here we present a proof of concept study aimed at evaluating the impact of including FF G-CSF quantification in the embryo transfer decisions. FF G-CSF was quantified with the Luminex XMap technology in 523 individual FF samples corresponding to 116 fresh transferred embryos, 275 frozen embryos and 131 destroyed embryos from 78 patients undergoing ICSI. Follicular G-CSF was highly predictive of subsequent implantation. The receiving operator characteristics curve methodology showed its higher discriminatory power to predict ongoing pregnancy in multivariate logistic regression analysis for FF G-CSF compared with embryo morphology [0.77 (0.69-0.83), P Embryos were classified by their FF G-CSF concentration: Class I over 30 pg/ml (a highest positive predictive value for implantation), Class II from 30 to 18.4 pg/ml and Class III Embryos derived from Class I follicles had a significantly higher implantation rate (IR) than those from Class II and III follicles (36 versus 16.6 and 6%, P Embryos derived from Class I follicles with an optimal morphology reached an IR of 54%. Frozen-thawed embryos transfer derived from Class I follicles had an IR of 37% significantly higher than those from Class II and III follicles, respectively, of 8 and 5% (P embryos but also 10% of the destroyed embryos were derived from G-CSF Class I follicles. Non-optimal embryos appear to have been transferred in 28% (22/78) of the women, and their pregnancy rate was significantly lower than that of women who received at least one optimal embryo (18 versus 36%, P = 0.04). Monitoring FF G-CSF for the selection of embryos with a better potential for pregnancy might improve the effectiveness of IVF by reducing the time and cost

  5. Capecitabine based postoperative accelerated chemoradiation of pancreatic carcinoma. A dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Caravatta, Luciana; Tambaro, Rosa; Mignogna, Samantha; Cellini, Numa; Valentini, Vincenzo; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Caprino, Paola; Sofo, Luigi; Ingrosso, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of escalating up to 55 Gy within five weeks, the dose of external beam radiotherapy to the previous tumor site concurrently with a fixed daily dose of capecitabine, in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Material and methods. Patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma were eligible for this study. Capecitabine was administered at a daily dose of 1600 mg/m 2 . Regional lymph nodes received a total radiation dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fractions. The starting radiation dose to the tumor bed was 50.0 Gy (2.0 Gy/fraction, 25 fractions). Escalation was achieved up to a total dose of 55.0 Gy by increasing the fraction size by 0.2 Gy (2.2 Gy/fraction), while keeping the duration of radiotherapy to five weeks (25 fractions). A concomitant boost technique was used. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade>3 hematologic toxicity, grade>2 liver, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, or skin toxicity, by RTOG criteria, or any toxicity producing prolonged (> 10 days) radiotherapy interruption. Results and discussion. Twelve patients entered the study (median age: 64 years). In the first cohort (six patients), no patient experienced DLT. Similarly in the second cohort, no DLT occurred. All 12 patients completed the planned regimen of therapy. Nine patients experienced grade 1-2 nausea and/or vomiting. Grade 2 hematological toxicity occurred in four patients. The results of our study indicate that a total radiation dose up to 55.0 Gy/5 weeks can be safely administered to the tumor bed, concurrently with capecitabine (1600 mg/m 2 ) in patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma.

  6. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Kamada, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Michiya

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were ≥60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with ≥62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors ≥6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy

  7. A dose-escalation study of combretastatin A4-phosphate in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, E; Smets, P; Daminet, S; Cornelis, I; De Clercq, K; Ni, Y; Vlerick, L; de Rooster, H

    2018-03-01

    Combretastatin A4-Phosphate (CA4P) is a vascular disrupting agent revealing promising results in cancer treatments for humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and adverse events of CA4P in healthy dogs as a prerequisite to application of CA4P in dogs with cancer. Ten healthy dogs were included. The effects of escalating doses of CA4P on physical, haematological and biochemical parameters, systolic arterial blood pressure, electrocardiogram, echocardiographic variables and general wellbeing were characterised. Three different doses were tested: 50, 75 and 100 mg m -2 . At all 3 CA4P doses, nausea, abdominal discomfort as well as diarrhoea were observed for several hours following administration. Likewise, a low-grade neutropenia was observed in all dogs. Doses of 75 and 100 mg m -2 additionally induced vomiting and elevation of serum cardiac troponine I levels. At 100 mg m -2 , low-grade hypertension and high-grade neurotoxicity were also observed. In healthy dogs, doses up to 75 mg m -2 seem to be well tolerated. The severity of the neurotoxicity observed at 100 mg m -2 , although transient, does not invite to use this dose in canine oncology patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A phase I dose-escalation study of lenalidomide in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav J Ullenhag

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide have both immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic properties which could confer anti-cancer effects. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of combining lenalidomide with the standard treatment gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer patients with advanced disease.Eligible patients had locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients received lenalidomide days 1-21 orally and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 intravenously (days 1, 8 and 15, each 28 day cycle. Three cohorts of lenalidomide were examined (Cohort I = 15 mg, Cohort II = 20 mg and Cohort III = 25 mg daily. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of lenalidomide given in combination with gemcitabine was defined as the highest dose level at which no more than one out of four (25% subjects experiences a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Patients should also be able to receive daily low molecular weight heparin (LMWH (e.g. dalteparin 5000 IU s.c. daily as a prophylactic anticoagulant for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs. Twelve patients (n = 4, n = 3 and n = 5 in cohort I, II and III, respectively were enrolled in this study.Median duration of treatment was 11 weeks (range 1-66, and median number of treatment cycles were three (range 1-14. The only DLT was a cardiac failure grade 3 in cohort III. Frequent treatment-related adverse events (AEs (all grades included neutropenia, leucopenia and fatigue (83% each, but there was no febrile neutropenia; thrombocytopenia (75%; dermatological toxicity (75%; diarrhea and nausea (42% each; and neuropathy (42%.This phase I study demonstrates the feasibility of the combination of lenalidomide and gemcitabine as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The tolerability profile demonstrated in the dose escalation schedule of lenalidomide suggests the dosing of lenalidomide to be 25 mg daily on days 1-21 with standard dosing of gemcitabine and merits further evaluation in a phase II trial.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  9. Phase I dose escalation study of KOS-1584, a novel epothilone, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine T; Goel, Sanjay; Schaaf, Larry J; Cropp, Gillian F; Hannah, Alison L; Zhou, Yiqing; McCracken, Barbara; Haley, Brandi I; Johnson, Robert G; Mani, Sridhar; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A

    2012-02-01

    First-in-man study of KOS-1584, a second generation epothilone. Patients with advanced solid malignancies received KOS-1584 every 3 weeks until disease progression. Using a modified Fibonacci dose escalation scheme, one patient was enrolled at each dose level until the first instance of grade 2 toxicity. Thereafter, a standard 3 + 3 design was utilized. Sixty-six patients in 14 cohorts were dosed from 0.8 to 48 mg/m(2). Diarrhea, arthralgias, and encephalopathy were dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at doses ≥36 mg/m(2). At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), the most common adverse effects were peripheral neuropathy (low grade), fatigue, arthralgias/myalgias, and diarrhea (31, 6%). The incidence of neutropenia was low. The overall clearance, volume of distribution, and half-life of KOS-1584 were 11 ± 6.17 L/h/m(2), 327 ± 161 L/m(2), and 21.9 ± 8.75 h, respectively. The half-life for the seco-metabolite (KOS-1891) was 29.6 ± 13.8 h. KOS-1584 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics. A dose-dependent increase in microtubulin bundle formation was observed at doses ≥27 mg/m(2). Two patients achieved partial responses and 24 patients had stable disease (SD). The RP2D of KOS-1584 is 36 mg/m(2). The lack of severe neurologic toxicity, diarrhea, neutropenia, or hypersensitivity reactions; favorable pharmacokinetic profile; and early evidence of activity support further evaluation.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  11. A 12-week dose-escalating study of etelcalcetide (ONO-5163/AMG 416), a novel intravenous calcimimetic, for secondary hyperparathyroidism in Japanese hemodialysis patients
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Shigematsu, Takashi; Akiba, Takashi; Fujii, Akifumi; Odani, Motoi; Akizawa, Tadao

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate dose-escalation of etelcalcetide (ONO-5163/AMG 416), a novel, intravenous (IV), long-acting calcium-sensing receptor agonist, for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in Japanese hemodialysis patients. In this multicenter study, IV injections of etelcalcetide (3 times a week for 12 weeks) were administered, with dose escalation every 4 weeks depending on changes in serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and corrected calcium (cCa). A total of 24 patients participated in this study. Serum iPTH was reduced in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with reductions (in pg/mL) at 12 weeks of -226.1 ± 125.3, -362.5 ± 161.5, and -412.4 ± 130.2, respectively, for maximum doses of 5, 10, and 15 mg. At the end of the treatment, 50% of patients had serum iPTH levels within the target range (60 - 240 pg/mL). Serum cCa and phosphorus were reduced in parallel with iPTH. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 20 patients (83.3%). The most frequently observed AEs (> 10%) were either mild or moderate nasopharyngitis (29.2%), decreased serum calcium (16.7%), and vomiting (12.5%). Dose-escalated triweekly etelcalcetide was effective for SHPT in Japanese hemodialysis patients and was satisfactorily tolerated.
.

  12. Intra-Target Microdosing - A Novel Drug Development Approach: Proof of Concept, Safety, and Feasibility Study in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, T; MacLeod, D; Lee, K; Santoro, A; DeMasi, D K; Hawk, T; Feinglos, M; Rowland, M; Noveck, R J

    2017-09-01

    Intra-Target Microdosing (ITM) is a novel drug development approach aimed at increasing the efficiency of first-in-human (FIH) testing of new molecular entities (NMEs). ITM combines intra-target drug delivery and "microdosing," the subpharmacological systemic exposure. We hypothesized that when the target tissue is small (about 1/100th of total body mass), ITM can lead to target therapeutic-level exposure with minimal (microdose) systemic exposure. Each of five healthy male volunteers received insulin microdose into the radial artery or full therapeutic dose intravenously in separate visits. Insulin and glucose levels were similar between systemic administration and ITM administration in the ipsilateral hand, and glucose levels demonstrated a reduction in the ipsilateral hand but not in the contralateral hand. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake demonstrated differences between the ipsilateral and contralateral arms. The procedures were safe and well-tolerated. Results are consistent with ITM proof-of-concept (POC) and demonstrate the ethical, regulatory, and logistical feasibility of the approach. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. Googling Service Boundaries for Endovascular Clot Retrieval Hub Hospitals in a Metropolitan Setting: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh G; Beare, Richard; Chen, Jian; Clissold, Benjamin; Ly, John; Singhal, Shaloo; Ma, Henry; Srikanth, Velandai

    2017-05-01

    There is great interest in how endovascular clot retrieval hubs provide services to a population. We applied a computational method to objectively generate service boundaries for such endovascular clot retrieval hubs, defined by traveling time to hub. Stroke incidence data merged with population census to estimate numbers of stroke in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Traveling time from randomly generated addresses to 4 endovascular clot retrieval-capable hubs (Royal Melbourne Hospital [RMH], Monash Medical Center [MMC], Alfred Hospital [ALF], and Austin Hospital [AUS]) estimated using Google Map application program interface. Boundary maps generated based on traveling time at various times of day for combinations of hubs. In a 2-hub model, catchment was best distributed when RMH was paired with MMC (model 1a, RMH 1765 km 2 and MMC 1164 km 2 ) or with AUS (model 1c, RMH 1244 km 2 and AUS 1685 km 2 ), with no statistical difference between models ( P =0.20). Catchment was poorly distributed when RMH was paired with ALF (model 1b, RMH 2252 km 2 and ALF 676 km 2 ), significantly different from both models 1a and 1c (both P AUS was superior to that of RMH, MMC, and ALF in catchment distribution and travel time. The method was also successfully applied to the city of Adelaide demonstrating wider applicability. We provide proof of concept for a novel computational method to objectively designate service boundaries for endovascular clot retrieval hubs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.L. Herpen (Carla); F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); I.M.E. Desar (Ingrid); L. Hooftman (Leon); E. Bone (Elisabeth); J.N.H. Timmerbonte (Johanna); J. Verweij (Jaap)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with

  15. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, C.M.L. van; Eskens, F.A.; Jonge, M. de; Desar, I.M.E.; Hooftman, L.; Bone, E.A.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Verweij, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. METHODS:

  16. Electrochemical degradation of PAH compounds in process water: A kinetic study on model solutions and a proof of concept study on runoff water from harbour sediment purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muff, Jens; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2010-01-01

    The present study has investigated the possibility to apply electrochemical oxidation in the treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) pollutants in water. The reaction kinetics of naphthalene, fluoranthene, and pyrene oxidation have been studied in a batch recirculation experimental...... oxidation side reaction at lower applied voltages. A proof of concept study in real polluted water demonstrated the applicability of the electrochemical oxidation technique for larger scale use, where especially the indirect chloride mediated oxidation approach was a promising technique. However, the risk....... Decreased current densities from 200 to 15 mA cm-2 in the NaCl electrolyte also decreased the removal rates, but significantly enhanced the current efficiencies of the PAH oxidation, based on a defined current efficiency constant, kq. This observation is believed to be due to the suppression of the water...

  17. Evaluation of the Wii Balance Board for walking aids prediction: proof-of-concept study in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A; Ong, Peck-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To provide proof-of-concept for the validity of the Wii Balance Board (WBB) measures to predict the type of walking aids required by inpatients with a recent (≤4 days) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional sample of 89 inpatients (mean age, 67.0±8 years) with TKA was analyzed. A multivariable proportional odds prediction model was constructed using 8 pre-specified predictors – namely, age, sex, body mass index, knee pain, knee range-of-motion, active knee lag, and WBB-derived standing balance. The type of walking aids prescribed on day 4 post-surgery was the outcome of interest – an ordinal variable with 4 categories (walking stick, narrow- and broad-base quadstick, and walking frame). Women, increasing body mass index, and poorer standing balance were independently associated with greater odds for requiring walking aids with a larger base-of-support. The concordance-index of the prediction model was 0.74. The model comprising only WBB-derived standing balance had nearly half (44%) the explanatory power of the full model. Adding WBB-derived standing balance to conventional demographic and knee variables resulted in a continuous net reclassification index of 0.60 (95%CI,0.19-1.01), predominantly due to better identification of patients who required walking aids with a large base-of-support (sensitivity gain). The WBB was able to provide quantitative measures of standing balance which could assist healthcare professionals in prescribing the appropriate type of walking aids for patients. Further investigation is needed to assess whether using the WBB could lead to meaningful changes in clinical outcomes such as falls.

  18. Evaluation of the Wii Balance Board for walking aids prediction: proof-of-concept study in total knee arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hao Pua

    Full Text Available To provide proof-of-concept for the validity of the Wii Balance Board (WBB measures to predict the type of walking aids required by inpatients with a recent (≤4 days total knee arthroplasty (TKA.A cross-sectional sample of 89 inpatients (mean age, 67.0±8 years with TKA was analyzed. A multivariable proportional odds prediction model was constructed using 8 pre-specified predictors – namely, age, sex, body mass index, knee pain, knee range-of-motion, active knee lag, and WBB-derived standing balance. The type of walking aids prescribed on day 4 post-surgery was the outcome of interest – an ordinal variable with 4 categories (walking stick, narrow- and broad-base quadstick, and walking frame.Women, increasing body mass index, and poorer standing balance were independently associated with greater odds for requiring walking aids with a larger base-of-support. The concordance-index of the prediction model was 0.74. The model comprising only WBB-derived standing balance had nearly half (44% the explanatory power of the full model. Adding WBB-derived standing balance to conventional demographic and knee variables resulted in a continuous net reclassification index of 0.60 (95%CI,0.19-1.01, predominantly due to better identification of patients who required walking aids with a large base-of-support (sensitivity gain.The WBB was able to provide quantitative measures of standing balance which could assist healthcare professionals in prescribing the appropriate type of walking aids for patients. Further investigation is needed to assess whether using the WBB could lead to meaningful changes in clinical outcomes such as falls.

  19. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  20. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monjazeb, Arta M.; Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney; Case, L. Douglas; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Lesser, Glen J.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4–5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  1. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  2. A phase I study of dose-escalated chemoradiation with accelerated intensity modulated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Clark, Catharine H.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; A'Hern, Roger; Miles, Elizabeth A.; McNair, Helen; Bidmead, Margaret; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of higher and more homogeneous radiation dose to head and neck tumours. This study aims to determine the safety of dose-escalated chemo-IMRT for larynx preservation in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: Patients with T2-4, N1-3, M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx were treated with a simultaneous-boost IMRT. Two radiation dose levels (DL) were tested: In DL 1, 63 Gy/28F was delivered to primary tumour and involved nodes and 51.8 Gy/28F to elective nodes. In DL 2, the doses were 67.2 Gy/28F and 56 Gy/28F, respectively, representing a 9% dose escalation for the primary. All patients received 2 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and concomitant cisplatin. Acute (NCICTCv.2.0) and late toxicity (RTOG and modified LENTSOM) were collected. Results: Thirty patients were entered, 15 in each dose level. All patients completed the treatment schedule. In DL 1, the incidences of acute G3 toxicities were 27% (pain), 20% (radiation dermatitis), 0% (xerostomia) and 67% required gastrostomy tubes. For DL 2 the corresponding incidences were 40%, 20%, 7%, and 87%. G3 dysphagia and pain persisted longer in DL 2. With regard to mucositis, a prolonged healing time for DL 2 was found, with prevalence of G2 of 58% in week 10. No acute grade 4 toxicity was observed. At 6 months, 1 patient in DL 2 had G3 late toxicity (dysphagia). No dose limiting toxicity was found. Complete response rates were 80% in DL 1, and 87% in DL 2. Conclusion: Moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT is safe and feasible with good compliance and acceptable acute toxicity. Dose escalation was possible without a significant difference in acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities, and tumour control rates

  3. Development of a new test for the easy characterization of the adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets: proof-of-concept study by experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busignies, Virginie; Mazel, Vincent; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2014-12-30

    Although, adhesion at the interface of bilayer tablets is critical for their design it is difficult to characterize this adhesion between layers. In view of this, a new test with an easy implementation was proposed for the characterization of the interface of bilayer tablets. This work is presented as a proof-of-concept study to investigate the reliability of this new test with regard to the effects of some critical process parameters (e.g., compaction pressure applied on each layer) and material attributes (e.g., elasticity of the layered materials) on the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets. This was investigated using a design of experiment approach and the results obtained were in good accordance with those obtained with other tests and thus, confirms the potential of such a method for the measurement of the interfacial adhesion of bilayer tablets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  5. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jvainsh@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Khan, Gazala [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  6. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  7. A phase I dose escalation study of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy as salvage therapy for persistent or recurrent malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudes, Richard S.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Andrews, David; Rosenstock, Jeffrey; Thoron, Louisa; Downes, Beverly; Curran, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A phase I dose escalation of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (H-SRT) in recurrent or persistent malignant gliomas as a means of increasing the biologically effective dose and decreasing the high rate of reoperation due to toxicity associated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: From November 1994 to September 1996, 25 lesions in 20 patients with clinical and/or imaging evidence of malignant glioma persistence or recurrence received salvage H-SRT. Nineteen patients at the time of initial diagnosis had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and one patient had an anaplastic astrocytoma. All of these patients with tumor persistence or recurrence had received initial fractionated radiation therapy (RT) with a mean and median dose of 60 Gy (44.0-72.0 Gy). The median time from completion of initial RT to H-SRT was 3.1 months (0.7-45.5 months). Salvage H-SRT was delivered using daily 3.0-3.5 Gy fractions (fxs). Three different total dose levels were sequentially evaluated: 24.0 Gy/3.0 Gy fxs (five lesions), 30.0 Gy/3.0 Gy fxs (10 lesions), and 35.0 Gy/3.5 Gy fxs (nine lesions). Median treated tumor volume measured 12.66 cc (0.89-47.5 cc). The median ratio of prescription volume to tumor volume was 2.8 (1.4-5.0). Toxicity was judged by RTOG criteria. Response was determined by clinical neurologic improvement, a decrease in steroid dose without clinical deterioration, and/or radiologic imaging. Results: No grade 3 toxicities were observed and no reoperation due to toxicity was required. At the time of analysis, 13 of 20 patients had died. The median survival time from the completion of H-SRT is 10.5 months with a 1-year survival rate of 20%. Neurological improvement was found in 45% of patients. Decreased steroid requirements occurred in 60% of patients. Minor imaging response was noted in 22% of patients. Using Fisher's exact test, response of any kind correlated strongly to total dose (p = 0.0056). None

  8. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study (ISIDE-BT-1) of Accelerated IMRT With Temozolomide in Patients With Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Balducci, Mario; Salvati, Maurizio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Ferro, Marica; Calista, Franco; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Ianiri, Massimo; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Piermattei, Angelo M.P.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Cantore, Gian Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had surgically resected or biopsy-proven glioblastoma. Patients started TMZ (75 mg/day) during IMRT and continued for 1 year (150-200 mg/day, Days 1-5 every 28 days) or until disease progression. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) was the tumor bed ± enhancing lesion with a 10-mm margin; CTV2 was the area of perifocal edema with a 20-mm margin. Planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2 were defined as the corresponding CTV plus a 5-mm margin. IMRT was delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Only the dose for PTV1 was escalated (planned dose escalation: 60 Gy, 62.5 Gy, 65 Gy) while maintaining the dose for PTV2 (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction). Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were defined as any treatment-related nonhematological adverse effects rated as Grade ≥3 or any hematological toxicity rated as ≥4 by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Nineteen consecutive glioblastoma were treated with step-and-shoot IMRT, planned with the inverse approach (dose to the PTV1: 7 patients, 60 Gy; 6 patients, 62.5 Gy; 6 patients, 65 Gy). Five coplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the 95% isodose line. Median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 8-40 months). No patient experienced DLT. Grade 1-2 treatment-related neurologic and skin toxicity were common (11 and 19 patients, respectively). No Grade >2 late neurologic toxicities were noted. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT to a dose of 65 Gy in 25 fractions is well tolerated with TMZ at a daily dose of 75 mg.

  9. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 ± 0.62 Gy and 6.29 ± 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 ± 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 ± 0.7 Gy and 32.7 ± 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 ± 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  10. Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Accelerated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: christopher.kelsey@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Gu, Lin [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dunphy, Frank R.; Ready, Neal E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy (RT) given in an accelerated fashion with concurrent chemotherapy using intensity modulated RT. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced lung cancer (non-small cell and small cell) with good performance status and minimal weight loss received concurrent cisplatin and etoposide with RT. Intensity modulated RT with daily image guidance was used to facilitate esophageal avoidance and delivered using 6 fractions per week (twice daily on Fridays with a 6-hour interval). The dose was escalated from 58 Gy to a planned maximum dose of 74 Gy in 4 Gy increments in a standard 3 + 3 trial design. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as acute grade 3-5 nonhematologic toxicity attributed to RT. Results: A total of 24 patients were enrolled, filling all dose cohorts, all completing RT and chemotherapy as prescribed. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 1 patient at 58 Gy (grade 3 esophagitis) and 1 patient at 70 Gy (grade 3 esophageal fistula). Both patients with DLTs had large tumors (12 cm and 10 cm, respectively) adjacent to the esophagus. Three additional patients were enrolled at both dose cohorts without further DLT. In the final 74-Gy cohort, no DLTs were observed (0 of 6). Conclusions: Dose escalation and acceleration to 74 Gy with intensity modulated RT and concurrent chemotherapy was tolerable, with a low rate of grade ≥3 acute esophageal reactions.

  11. Gemcitabine and paclitaxel associated pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer: report of a phase I/II dose-escalating study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A L; Cox, G; Sharma, R A; Steward, W P; Shields, F; Jeyapalan, K; Muller, S; O'Byrne, K J

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this phase I/II dose escalating study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine and paclitaxel given in combination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 12 patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC received paclitaxel administered intravenously over 1 h followed by gemcitabine given over 30 min on days 1, 8 and 15 every 28 days. Pneumonitis was the principal side-effect observed with 4 patients affected. Of these, 1 experienced grade 3 toxicity after one cycle of treatment and the others had grade 2 toxicity. All 4 cases responded to prednisolone. No other significant toxicities were observed. Of the 8 evaluable patients, 3 had a partial response and 2 had minor responses. The study was discontinued due to this dose-limiting toxicity. The combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine shows promising antitumour activity in NSCLC, however, this treatment schedule may predispose to pneumonitis.

  12. Results of a phase I dose escalation study of eltrombopag in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma receiving doxorubicin and ifosfamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Sant P; Staddon, Arthur; Hendifar, Andrew; Messam, Conrad A; Patwardhan, Rita; Kamel, Yasser Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I dose escalation study was to explore the safety and tolerability of eltrombopag, an oral, nonpeptide, thrombopoietin receptor agonist, in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and thrombocytopenia due to treatment with doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI) combination chemotherapy. Patients aged 18 or older with histologically confirmed, locally advanced or metastatic STS were treated with 1 cycle of AI followed by AI with eltrombopag starting at Cycle 2, using 2 different dosing schedules. The study design included an eltrombopag dose escalation phase starting at 75 mg daily to determine the optimal biological dose (OBD). Eighteen patients were enrolled and 15 received at least 1 dose of chemotherapy; 3 patients withdrew prior to receiving eltrombopag. Seven, 4, and 1 patients received 75 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg eltrombopag daily, respectively. No dose-limiting toxicities were reported. Due to slow recruitment, the study was closed prior to identifying an OBD. The most common hematologic adverse events (AEs) were thrombocytopenia (80%), neutropenia (73%), and anemia (67%). The most common nonhematologic AEs were fatigue (53%), alanine aminotransferase increased, constipation, and nausea (47% each). Eleven of 12 patients who received eltrombopag completed at least 2 chemotherapy cycles; all had increased platelet counts on Day 1 of Cycle 2 (cycle with eltrombopag) compared to Day 1 of Cycle 1 (cycle without eltrombopag). Although data are limited, safety data were consistent with the known toxicities of AI combination chemotherapy or the side effect profile of eltrombopag seen in other studies. Available data suggest a potential pre- and post-chemotherapy dosing scheme for eltrombopag when administered with AI chemotherapy, and support further investigation of eltrombopag treatment in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia

  13. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  14. Monitoring pharmacologically induced immunosuppression by immune repertoire sequencing to detect acute allograft rejection in heart transplant patients: a proof-of-concept diagnostic accuracy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Vollmers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation.In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412 that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without. We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient's net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = -0.867, 95% CI -0.968 to -0.523, p = 0.0014, as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9% and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1% (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard. To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several criteria including the

  15. Ustekinumab for patients with primary biliary cholangitis who have an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfield, Gideon M; Gershwin, M Eric; Strauss, Richard; Mayo, Marlyn J; Levy, Cynthia; Zou, Bin; Johanns, Jewel; Nnane, Ivo P; Dasgupta, Bidisha; Li, Katherine; Selmi, Carlo; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Jones, David; Lindor, Keith

    2016-07-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12 signaling cascade has been associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). This multicenter, open-label, proof-of-concept study evaluated the anti-IL12/23 monoclonal antibody, ustekinumab (90 mg subcutaneous at weeks 0 and 4, then every 8 weeks through week 20), in adults with PBC and an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid therapy (i.e., alkaline phosphatase [ALP] >1.67× upper limit of normal [ULN] after ≥6 months). ALP response was defined as a >40% decrease from baseline and ALP remission as ALP normalization (if baseline ALP 1.67×-2.8× ULN) or 2.8× ULN). Changes in Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) scores and serum bile acids were also assessed. At baseline, patients had median disease duration of 3.2 years, median ELF score of 9.8, and highly elevated total bile acid concentration (median, 43.3 μmol/L); 13 of 20 (65%) patients had baseline ALP >3× ULN. Although steady-state serum ustekinumab concentrations were reached by week 12, no patient achieved ALP response or remission. Median percent ALP reduction from baseline to week 28 was 12.1%. ELF score decreased slightly from baseline to week 28 (median reduction: 0.173), and total serum bile acid concentrations decreased from baseline to week 28 (median reduction: 8.8 μmol/L). No serious infections or discontinuations resulting from adverse events were reported through week 28. One patient had a serious upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage considered unrelated to test agent by the investigator. Open-label ustekinumab therapy, though associated with a modest decrease in ALP after 28 weeks of therapy, did not otherwise appreciably change ALP and overt proof-of-concept was not established as per prespecified primary endpoint of proposed efficacy. No new ustekinumab safety signals were observed. (Hepatology 2016;64:189-199). © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy leads to an increase in pain relief for spinal metastases: a comparison study with a regimen of 30 Gy in 10 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlan; Xiao, Jianghong; Peng, Xingchen; Duan, Baofeng; Li, Yan; Ai, Ping; Yao, Min; Chen, Nianyong

    2017-12-22

    Under the existing condition that the optimum radiotherapy regimen for spinal metastases is controversial, this study investigates the benefits of dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) with 60-66 Gy in 20-30 fractions for spinal metastases. In the dose-escalation group, each D50 of planning gross tumor volume (PGTV) was above 60 Gy and each Dmax of spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) was below 48 Gy. The median biological effective dose (BED) of Dmax of spinal cord was lower in the dose-escalation group compared with that in the 30-Gy group (69.70 Gy vs. 83.16 Gy, p pain responses were better in the dose-escalation group than those in the 30-Gy group ( p = 0.005 and p = 0.024), and the complete pain relief rates were respectively 73.69% and 34.29% ( p = 0.006), 73.69% and 41.38% ( p = 0.028) in two compared groups. In the dose-escalation group, there is a trend of a longer duration of pain relief, a longer overall survival and a lower incidence of acute radiation toxicities. No late radiation toxicities were observed in both groups. Dosimetric parameters and clinical outcomes, including pain response, duration of pain relief, radiation toxicities and overall survival, were compared among twenty-five metastatic spinal lesions irradiated with the dose-escalation regimen and among forty-four lesions treated with the 30-Gy regimen. Conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT for spinal metastases could escalate dose to the vertebral lesions while sparing the spinal cord, achieving a better pain relief without increasing radiation complications.

  17. A proof-of-concept randomized controlled study of gabapentin: effects on cannabis use, withdrawal and executive function deficits in cannabis-dependent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barbara J; Crean, Rebecca; Goodell, Vivian; Light, John M; Quello, Susan; Shadan, Farhad; Buffkins, Kimberly; Kyle, Mark; Adusumalli, Murali; Begovic, Adnan; Rao, Santosh

    2012-06-01

    There are no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and patients seeking treatment for primary cannabis dependence represent 25% of all substance use admissions. We conducted a phase IIa proof-of-concept pilot study to examine the safety and efficacy of a calcium channel/GABA modulating drug, gabapentin, for the treatment of cannabis dependence. A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 50 unpaid treatment-seeking male and female outpatients, aged 18-65 years, diagnosed with current cannabis dependence. Subjects received either gabapentin (1200 mg/day) or matched placebo. Manual-guided, abstinence-oriented individual counseling was provided weekly to all participants. Cannabis use was measured by weekly urine toxicology and by self-report using the Timeline Followback Interview. Cannabis withdrawal symptoms were assessed using the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist. Executive function was measured using subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System. Relative to placebo, gabapentin significantly reduced cannabis use as measured both by urine toxicology (p=0.001) and by the Timeline Followback Interview (p=0.004), and significantly decreased withdrawal symptoms as measured by the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist (pcannabis dependence that merits further study, and provides an alternative conceptual framework for treatment of addiction aimed at restoring homeostasis in brain stress systems that are dysregulated in drug dependence and withdrawal.

  18. Volumetric MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Direct Skin Cooling for the Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlijne E. Ikink

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To prospectively assess the safety and technical feasibility of volumetric magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU ablation with direct skin cooling (DISC during treatment of uterine fibroids. Methods. In this proof-of-concept study, eight patients were consecutively selected for clinical MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids with the use of an additional DISC device to maintain a constant temperature (T≈20°C at the interface between the HIFU table top and the skin. Technical feasibility was verified by successful completion of MR-HIFU ablation. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI was used to measure the treatment effect (nonperfused volume (NPV ratio. Safety was evaluated by recording of adverse events (AEs within 30 days’ follow-up. Results. All MR-HIFU treatments were successfully completed in an outpatient setting. The median NPV ratio was 0.56 (IQR [0.27–0.72]. Immediately after treatment, two patients experienced coldness related discomfort which resolved at the same day. No serious (device-related AEs were reported. Specifically, no skin burns, cold injuries, or subcutaneous edema were observed. Conclusion. This study showed that it is safe and technically feasible to complete a volumetric MR-HIFU ablation with DISC. This technique may reduce the risk of thermal injury to the abdominal wall during MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids. This trial is registered with NTR4189.

  19. Auditory-motor mapping training as an intervention to facilitate speech output in non-verbal children with autism: a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Y Wan

    Full Text Available Although up to 25% of children with autism are non-verbal, there are very few interventions that can reliably produce significant improvements in speech output. Recently, a novel intervention called Auditory-Motor Mapping Training (AMMT has been developed, which aims to promote speech production directly by training the association between sounds and articulatory actions using intonation and bimanual motor activities. AMMT capitalizes on the inherent musical strengths of children with autism, and offers activities that they intrinsically enjoy. It also engages and potentially stimulates a network of brain regions that may be dysfunctional in autism. Here, we report an initial efficacy study to provide 'proof of concept' for AMMT. Six non-verbal children with autism participated. Prior to treatment, the children had no intelligible words. They each received 40 individual sessions of AMMT 5 times per week, over an 8-week period. Probe assessments were conducted periodically during baseline, therapy, and follow-up sessions. After therapy, all children showed significant improvements in their ability to articulate words and phrases, with generalization to items that were not practiced during therapy sessions. Because these children had no or minimal vocal output prior to treatment, the acquisition of speech sounds and word approximations through AMMT represents a critical step in expressive language development in children with autism.

  20. A Proof-of-Concept Randomized Controlled Study of Gabapentin: Effects on Cannabis Use, Withdrawal and Executive Function Deficits in Cannabis-Dependent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barbara J; Crean, Rebecca; Goodell, Vivian; Light, John M; Quello, Susan; Shadan, Farhad; Buffkins, Kimberly; Kyle, Mark; Adusumalli, Murali; Begovic, Adnan; Rao, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    There are no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and patients seeking treatment for primary cannabis dependence represent 25% of all substance use admissions. We conducted a phase IIa proof-of-concept pilot study to examine the safety and efficacy of a calcium channel/GABA modulating drug, gabapentin, for the treatment of cannabis dependence. A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 50 unpaid treatment-seeking male and female outpatients, aged 18–65 years, diagnosed with current cannabis dependence. Subjects received either gabapentin (1200 mg/day) or matched placebo. Manual-guided, abstinence-oriented individual counseling was provided weekly to all participants. Cannabis use was measured by weekly urine toxicology and by self-report using the Timeline Followback Interview. Cannabis withdrawal symptoms were assessed using the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist. Executive function was measured using subtests from the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System. Relative to placebo, gabapentin significantly reduced cannabis use as measured both by urine toxicology (p=0.001) and by the Timeline Followback Interview (p=0.004), and significantly decreased withdrawal symptoms as measured by the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist (pbrain stress systems that are dysregulated in drug dependence and withdrawal. PMID:22373942

  1. Targeted adsorption of molecules in the colon with the novel adsorbent-based medicinal product, DAV132: A proof of concept study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gunzburg, Jean; Ducher, Annie; Modess, Christiane; Wegner, Danilo; Oswald, Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer; Augustin, Violaine; Feger, Céline; Andremont, Antoine; Weitschies, Werner; Siegmund, Werner

    2015-01-01

    During antibiotic treatments, active residuals reaching the colon profoundly affect the bacterial flora resulting in the emergence of resistance. To prevent these effects, we developed an enteric-coated formulated activated-charcoal based product, DAV132, meant to deliver its adsorbent to the ileum and neutralize antibiotic residues in the proximal colon. In a randomized, control, crossover study, the plasma pharmacokinetics of the probe drugs amoxicillin (500 mg) absorbed in the proximal intestine, and sulfapyridine (25 mg) metabolized from sulfasalazine in the cecum and rapidly absorbed, were compared after a single administration in 18 healthy subjects who had received DAV132, uncoated formulated activated charcoal (FAC) or water 16 and 8 hours before, concomitantly with the probe drugs, and 8 hours thereafter. The AUC0-96 h of amoxicillin was reduced by more than 70% when it was taken with FAC, but bioequivalent when it was taken with water or DAV132. By contrast, the AUC0-96 h of sulfapyridine was reduced by more than 90% when administered with either FAC or DAV132 in comparison with water. The results show that DAV132 can selectively adsorb drug compounds in the proximal colon, without interfering with drug absorption in the proximal small intestine, thereby constituting a proof of concept that DAV132 actually functions in humans. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Body weight-supported bedside treadmill training facilitates ambulation in ICU patients: An interventional proof of concept study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommers, Juultje; Wieferink, Denise C.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; Nollet, Frans; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobilisation is advocated to improve recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. However, severe weakness in combination with tubes, lines and machinery are practical barriers for the implementation of ambulation with critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to explore

  3. Effects of a ketogenic diet on auditory gating in DBA/2 mice: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregellas, Jason R; Smucny, Jason; Legget, Kristina T; Stevens, Karen E

    2015-12-01

    Although the ketogenic diet has shown promise in a pilot study and case report in schizophrenia, its effects in animal models of hypothesized disease mechanisms are unknown. This study examined effects of treatment with the ketogenic diet on hippocampal P20/N40 gating in DBA/2 mice, a translational endophenotype that mirrors inhibitory deficits in P50 sensory gating in schizophrenia patients. As expected, the diet increased blood ketone levels. Animals with the highest ketone levels showed the lowest P20/N40 gating ratios. These preliminary results suggest that the ketogenic diet may effectively target sensory gating deficits and is a promising area for additional research in schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Biofeedback effect of hybrid assistive limb in stroke rehabilitation: A proof of concept study using functional near infrared spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Saita

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted rehabilitation has been increasingly drawing attention in the field of neurorehabilitation. The hybrid assistive limb (HAL is an exoskeleton robot developed based on the "interactive biofeedback" theory, and several studies have shown its efficacy for patients with stroke. We aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the facilitative effect of neurorehabilitation using a single-joint HAL (HAL-SJ and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS.Subacute stroke patients admitted to our hospital were assessed in this study for HAL eligibility. We evaluated motor-related cortical activity using an fNIRS system at baseline and immediately after HAL-SJ treatment on the same day. Cortical activity was determined through the relative changes in the hemoglobin concentrations. For statistical analysis, we compared the number of flexion/extension movements before and immediately after HAL-SJ treatment using paired t-test. fNIRS used both the methods of statistical parametric mapping and random effect analysis.We finally included 10 patients (eight men, two women; mean age: 66.8 ± 12.0 years. The mean number of flexion/extension movements within 15 s increased significantly from 4.2 ± 3.1 to 5.3 ± 4.1 immediately after training. fNIRS showed increased cortical activation in the primary motor cortex of the ipsilesional hemisphere immediately after HAL-SJ treatment compared to the baseline condition.This study is the first to support the concept of the biofeedback effect from the perspective of changes in cortical activity measured with an fNIRS system. The biofeedback effect of HAL immediately increased the task-related cortical activity, and this may address the functional recovery. Further studies are warranted to support our findings.

  5. Linking Suspension Nasal Spray Drug Deposition Patterns to Pharmacokinetic Profiles: A Proof of Concept Study using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, Alex; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to link regional nasal spray deposition patterns of suspension formulations, predicted with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to in vivo human pharmacokinetic (PK) plasma concentration profiles. This is accomplished through the use of CFD simulations coupled with compartmental PK modeling. Results showed a rapid initial rise in plasma concentration that is due to the absorption of drug particles deposited in the nasal middle passages, followed by a slower increase in plasma concentration that is governed by the transport of drug particles from the nasal vestibule to the middle passages. Although drug deposition locations in the nasal cavity had a significant effect on the shape of the concentration profile, the absolute bioavailability remained constant provided that all of the drug remained in the nose over the course of the simulation. Loss of drug through the nostrils even after long time periods resulted in a significant decrease in bioavailability and increased variability. The results of this study quantify how differences in nasal drug deposition affect transient plasma concentrations and overall bioavailability. These findings are potentially useful for establishing bioequivalence for nasal spray devices and reducing the burden of in vitro testing, pharmacodynamics and clinical studies. PMID:27238495

  6. Correlation of In Vivo Versus In Vitro Benchmark Doses (BMDs) Derived From Micronucleus Test Data: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Fellows, Mick D; Johnson, George E; Slob, Wout

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we explored the applicability of using in vitro micronucleus (MN) data from human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to derive in vivo genotoxicity potency information. Nineteen chemicals covering a broad spectrum of genotoxic modes of action were tested in an in vitro MN test using TK6 cells using the same study protocol. Several of these chemicals were considered to need metabolic activation, and these were administered in the presence of S9. The Benchmark dose (BMD) approach was applied using the dose-response modeling program PROAST to estimate the genotoxic potency from the in vitro data. The resulting in vitro BMDs were compared with previously derived BMDs from in vivo MN and carcinogenicity studies. A proportional correlation was observed between the BMDs from the in vitro MN and the BMDs from the in vivo MN assays. Further, a clear correlation was found between the BMDs from in vitro MN and the associated BMDs for malignant tumors. Although these results are based on only 19 compounds, they show that genotoxicity potencies estimated from in vitro tests may result in useful information regarding in vivo genotoxic potency, as well as expected cancer potency. Extension of the number of compounds and further investigation of metabolic activation (S9) and of other toxicokinetic factors would be needed to validate our initial conclusions. However, this initial work suggests that this approach could be used for in vitro to in vivo extrapolations which would support the reduction of animals used in research (3Rs: replacement, reduction, and refinement). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.

  7. Transfer of Minibeam Radiation Therapy into a cost-effective equipment for radiobiological studies: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezado, Y; Dos Santos, M; Gonzalez, W; Jouvion, G; Guardiola, C; Heinrich, S; Labiod, D; Juchaux, M; Jourdain, L; Sebrie, C; Pouzoulet, F

    2017-12-11

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) is an innovative synchrotron radiotherapy technique able to shift the normal tissue complication probability curves to significantly higher doses. However, its exploration was hindered due to the limited and expensive beamtime at synchrotrons. The aim of this work was to develop a cost-effective equipment to perform systematic radiobiological studies in view of MBRT. Tumor control for various tumor entities will be addressable as well as studies to unravel the distinct biological mechanisms involved in normal and tumor tissues responses when applying MBRT. With that aim, a series of modifications of a small animal irradiator were performed to make it suitable for MBRT experiments. In addition, the brains of two groups of rats were irradiated. Half of the animals received a standard irradiation, the other half, MBRT. The animals were followed-up for 6.5 months. Substantial brain damage was observed in the group receiving standard RT, in contrast to the MBRT group, where no significant lesions were observed. This work proves the feasibility of the transfer of MBRT outside synchrotron sources towards a small animal irradiator.

  8. Feature analysis for correlation studies of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data: A proof of concept for neurofeedback approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Simões; Lima, João; Direito, Bruno; Castelhano, João; Ferreira, Carlos; Carvalho, Paulo; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The identification and interpretation of facial expressions is an important feature of social cognition. This characteristic is often impaired in various neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent therapeutic approaches to intervene in social communication impairments include neurofeedback (NF). In this study, we present a NF real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rt-fMRI), combined with electroencephalography (EEG) to train social communication skills. In this sense, we defined the right Superior Temporal Sulcus as our target region-of-interest. To analyze the correlation between the fMRI regions of interest and the EEG data, we transposed the sources located at the nearest cortical location to the target region. We extracted a set of 75 features from EEG segments and performed a correlation analysis with the brain activations extracted from rt-fMRI in the right pSTS region. The finding of significant correlations of simultaneously measured signals in distinct modalities (EEG and fMRI) is promising. Future studies should address whether the observed correlation levels between local brain activity and scalp measures are sufficient to implement NF approaches.

  9. The Milky Way: paediatric milk-based dispersible tablets prepared by direct compression - a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orubu, Samuel E F; Hobson, Nicholas J; Basit, Abdul W; Tuleu, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Dispersible tablets are proposed by the World Health Organization as the preferred paediatric formulation. It was hypothesised that tablets made from a powdered milk-base that disperse in water to form suspensions resembling milk might be a useful platform to improve acceptability in children. Milk-based dispersible tablets containing various types of powdered milk and infant formulae were formulated. The influence of milk type and content on placebo tablet properties was investigated using a design-of-experiments approach. Responses measured included friability, crushing strength and disintegration time. Additionally, the influence of compression force on the tablet properties of a model formulation was studied by compaction simulation. Disintegration times increased as milk content increased. Compaction simulation studies showed that compression force influenced disintegration time. These results suggest that the milk content, rather than type, and compression force were the most important determinants of disintegration. Up to 30% milk could be incorporated to produce 200 mg 10-mm flat-faced placebo tablets by direct compression disintegrating within 3 min in 5-10 ml of water, which is a realistic administration volume in children. The platform could accommodate 30% of a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (caffeine citrate). © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Recovery of Proprioception in the Upper Extremity by Robotic Mirror Therapy: a Clinical Pilot Study for Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Koh, Sukgyu; Beom, Jaewon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Park, Jang Woo; Koh, Eun Sil; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2017-10-01

    A novel robotic mirror therapy system was recently developed to provide proprioceptive stimulus to the hemiplegic arm during a mirror therapy. Validation of the robotic mirror therapy system was performed to confirm its synchronicity prior to the clinical study. The mean error angle range between the intact arm and the robot was 1.97 to 4.59 degrees. A 56-year-old male who had right middle cerebral artery infarction 11 months ago received the robotic mirror therapy for ten 30-minute sessions during 2 weeks. Clinical evaluation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies were performed before and after the intervention. At the follow-up evaluation, the thumb finding test score improved from 2 to 1 for eye level and from 3 to 1 for overhead level. The Albert's test score on the left side improved from 6 to 11. Improvements were sustained at 2-month follow-up. The fMRI during the passive motion revealed a considerable increase in brain activity at the lower part of the right superior parietal lobule, suggesting the possibility of proprioception enhancement. The robotic mirror therapy system may serve as a useful treatment method for patients with supratentorial stroke to facilitate recovery of proprioceptive deficit and hemineglect. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. Exercise Training and Recreational Activities to Promote Executive Functions in Chronic Stroke: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Eng, Janice J

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke survivors represent a target population in need of intervention strategies to promote cognitive function and prevent dementia. Both exercise and recreational activities are promising strategies. We assessed the effect of a six-month exercise and recreation program on executive functions in adults with chronic stroke. Methods A six-month ancillary study within a multi-centre randomized trial. Twenty-eight chronic stroke survivors (i.e., ≥ 12 months since an index stroke) were randomized to one of two experimental groups: intervention (INT; n=12) or delayed intervention (D-INT; n=16). Participants of the INT group received a six-month community-based structured program that included two sessions of exercise training and one session of recreation and leisure activities per week. Participants of the D-INT group received usual care. The primary outcome measure was the Stroop Test, a cognitive test of selective attention and conflict resolution. Secondary cognitive measures included set shifting and working memory. Mood, functional capacity, and general balance and mobility were additional secondary outcome measures. Results Compared with the D-INT group, the INT group significantly improved selective attention and conflict resolution (p=0.02), working memory (p=0.04), and functional capacity (p=0.02) at the end of the six-month intervention period. Improved selective attention and conflict resolution was significantly associated with functional capacity at six months (r=0.39; p=0.04). Conclusions This is the first randomized study to demonstrate that an exercise and recreation program can significantly benefit executive functions in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors who are mildly cognitively impaired – a population at high-risk for dementia and functional decline. Thus, clinicians should consider prescribing exercise and recreational activities in the cognitive rehabilitation of chronic stroke survivors. Clinical Trial Registration http

  12. Whole-cell bioreporters and risk assessment of environmental pollution: A proof-of-concept study using lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaokai; Qin, Boqiang; Deng, Jianming; Wells, Mona

    2017-10-01

    As the world burden of environmental contamination increases, it is of the utmost importance to develop streamlined approaches to environmental risk assessment in order to prioritize mitigation measures. Whole-cell biosensors or bioreporters and speciation modeling have both become of increasing interest to determine the bioavailability of pollutants, as bioavailability is increasingly in use as an indicator of risk. Herein, we examine whether bioreporter results are able to reflect expectations based on chemical reactivity and speciation modeling, with the hope to extend the research into a wider framework of risk assessment. We study a specific test case concerning the bioavailability of lead (Pb) in aqueous environments containing Pb-complexing ligands. Ligands studied include ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), meso-2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), leucine, methionine, cysteine, glutathione, and humic acid (HA), and we also performed experiments using natural water samples from Lake Tai (Taihu), the third largest lake in China. We find that EDTA, DMSA, cysteine, glutathione, and HA amendment significantly reduced Pb bioavailability with increasing ligand concentration according to a log-sigmoid trend. Increasing dissolved organic carbon in Taihu water also had the same effect, whereas leucine and methionine had no notable effect on bioavailability at the concentrations tested. We find that bioreporter results are in accord with the reduction of aqueous Pb 2+ that we expect from the relative complexation affinities of the different ligands tested. For EDTA and HA, for which reasonably accurate ionization and complexation constants are known, speciation modeling is in agreement with bioreporter response to within the level of uncertainty recognised as reasonable by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for speciation-based risk assessment applications. These findings represent a first step toward using bioreporter technology to streamline

  13. Whole-cell bioreporters and risk assessment of environmental pollution: A proof-of-concept study using lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaokai; Qin, Boqiang; Deng, Jianming; Wells, Mona

    2017-01-01

    As the world burden of environmental contamination increases, it is of the utmost importance to develop streamlined approaches to environmental risk assessment in order to prioritize mitigation measures. Whole-cell biosensors or bioreporters and speciation modeling have both become of increasing interest to determine the bioavailability of pollutants, as bioavailability is increasingly in use as an indicator of risk. Herein, we examine whether bioreporter results are able to reflect expectations based on chemical reactivity and speciation modeling, with the hope to extend the research into a wider framework of risk assessment. We study a specific test case concerning the bioavailability of lead (Pb) in aqueous environments containing Pb-complexing ligands. Ligands studied include ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), meso-2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), leucine, methionine, cysteine, glutathione, and humic acid (HA), and we also performed experiments using natural water samples from Lake Tai (Taihu), the third largest lake in China. We find that EDTA, DMSA, cysteine, glutathione, and HA amendment significantly reduced Pb bioavailability with increasing ligand concentration according to a log-sigmoid trend. Increasing dissolved organic carbon in Taihu water also had the same effect, whereas leucine and methionine had no notable effect on bioavailability at the concentrations tested. We find that bioreporter results are in accord with the reduction of aqueous Pb 2+ that we expect from the relative complexation affinities of the different ligands tested. For EDTA and HA, for which reasonably accurate ionization and complexation constants are known, speciation modeling is in agreement with bioreporter response to within the level of uncertainty recognised as reasonable by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for speciation-based risk assessment applications. These findings represent a first step toward using bioreporter technology to streamline

  14. Circulating tumor DNA changes for early monitoring of anti-PD1 immunotherapy: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabel, L; Riva, F; Servois, V; Livartowski, A; Daniel, C; Rampanou, A; Lantz, O; Romano, E; Milder, M; Buecher, B; Piperno-Neumann, S; Bernard, V; Baulande, S; Bieche, I; Pierga, J Y; Proudhon, C; Bidard, F-C

    2017-08-01

    Recent clinical results support the use of new immune checkpoint blockers (ICB), such as anti-PD-1 (e.g. nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 antibodies. Radiological evaluation of ICB efficacy during therapy is challenging due to tumor immune infiltration. Changes of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels during therapy could be a promising tool for very accurate monitoring of treatment efficacy, but data are lacking with ICB. This prospective pilot study was conducted in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer, uveal melanoma, or microsatellite-instable colorectal cancer treated by nivolumab or pembrolizumab monotherapy at Institut Curie. ctDNA levels were assessed at baseline and after 8 weeks (w8) by bidirectional pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization, droplet digital PCR or next-generation sequencing depending on the mutation type. Radiological evaluation of efficacy of treatment was carried out by using immune-related response criteria. ctDNA was detected at baseline in 10 out of 15 patients. At w8, a significant correlation (r = 0.86; P = 0.002) was observed between synchronous changes in ctDNA levels and tumor size. Patients in whom ctDNA levels became undetectable at w8 presented a marked and lasting response to therapy. ctDNA detection at w8 was also a significant prognostic factor in terms of progression-free survival (hazard ratio = 10.2; 95% confidence interval 2.5-41, P < 0.001) and overall survival (hazard ratio = 15; 95% confidence interval 2.5-94.9, P = 0.004). This proof-of-principle study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative ctDNA monitoring is a valuable tool to assess tumor response in patients treated with anti-PD-1 drugs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Souvenaid reduces behavioral deficits and improves social cognition skills in frontotemporal dementia: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Matteo; Serrati, Carlo; Guida, Silvia; Mattei, Chiara; Abate, Lucia; Massucco, Davide; Sassos, Davide; Amore, Mario; Krueger, Frank; Cocito, Leonardo; Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Souvenaid™ is a nutraceutical compound thought to positively enhance synaptic function. In line with this mechanism of action, Souvenaid™ has been shown to improve cognitive function in subjects with mild Alzheimer's disease in randomized clinical trials. To date, however, the potential of Souvenaid™ to improve cognitive functioning in subjects with other neurodegenerative conditions also characterized by synaptic loss has not been explored. To evaluate the impact of Souvenaid™ on executive functions, social cognition and behavioral disturbances in subjects with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD). Twenty-six subjects with bv-FTD were enrolled in the study and randomized to Souvenaid™ (125 ml/day) or placebo groups. After 12 weeks, subjects were switched between the two groups. All subjects, blinded to treatment, underwent clinical and cognitive evaluations at enrollment, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks. Treatment with Souvenaid™ was associated with a significant reduction of behavioral symptoms and an increase in Theory of Mind skills compared to placebo, which both returned to baseline when Souvenaid™ was discontinued. Souvenaid™ did not have an effect on executive functions. Our results provide evidence of the potential of Souvenaid™ therapy for the treatment of behavioral disturbances and social cognition skills in FTD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Cell therapy in the treatment of bipolar mania in an animal model: a proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna M. Ascoli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The rationale of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a novel therapeutic approach in certain neurodegenerative diseases is based on their ability to promote neurogenesis. Hippocampal atrophy has been related to bipolar disorder (BD in preclinical, imaging and postmortem studies. Therefore, the development of new strategies to stimulate the neurogenesis process in BD is crucial. Objectives To investigate the behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by transplantation of MSCs in a model of mania-like behavior induced by lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX. Methods Wistar rats (n=65 received one oral daily dose of LDX (10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days. On the 8th day of treatment, the animals additionally received intrahippocampal saline or MSC (1 µL containing 25,000 cells or lithium (47.5 mg/kg as an internal experimental control. Two hours after the last administration, behavioral and neurochemical analyses were performed. Results LDX-treated rats had increased locomotor activity compared to saline-saline rats (p=0.004, and lithium reversed LDX-related hyperactive behavior (p0.05 in the hippocampus of rats. Conclusion Even though these results suggest that a single intrahippocampal injection of MSCs was not helpful to treat hyperactivity induced by LDX and neither influenced BDNF secretion, we cannot rule out the possible therapeutic effects of MSCs. Further research is required to determine direct effects of LDX on brain structures as well as in other pathophysiological targets related to BD.

  17. Blood Glucose Prediction Using Artificial Neural Networks Trained with the AIDA Diabetes Simulator: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Robertson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major, and increasing, global problem. However, it has been shown that, through good management of blood glucose levels (BGLs, the associated and costly complications can be reduced significantly. In this pilot study, Elman recurrent artificial neural networks (ANNs were used to make BGL predictions based on a history of BGLs, meal intake, and insulin injections. Twenty-eight datasets (from a single case scenario were compiled from the freeware mathematical diabetes simulator, AIDA. It was found that the most accurate predictions were made during the nocturnal period of the 24 hour daily cycle. The accuracy of the nocturnal predictions was measured as the root mean square error over five test days (RMSE5 day not used during ANN training. For BGL predictions of up to 1 hour a RMSE5 day of (±SD 0.15±0.04 mmol/L was observed. For BGL predictions up to 10 hours, a RMSE5  day of (±SD 0.14±0.16 mmol/L was observed. Future research will investigate a wider range of AIDA case scenarios, real-patient data, and data relating to other factors influencing BGLs. ANN paradigms based on real-time recurrent learning will also be explored to accommodate dynamic physiology in diabetes.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation for scanning technique with scattering foil free electron beam: A proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonmo Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential of a newly proposed scattering foil free (SFF electron beam scanning technique for the treatment of skin cancer on the irregular patient surfaces using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. After benchmarking of the MC simulations, we removed the scattering foil to generate SFF electron beams. Cylindrical and spherical phantoms with 1 cm boluses were generated and the target volume was defined from the surface to 5 mm depth. The SFF scanning technique with 6 MeV electrons was simulated using those phantoms. For comparison, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans were also generated with two full arcs and 6 MV photon beams. When the scanning resolution resulted in a larger separation between beams than the field size, the plan qualities were worsened. In the cylindrical phantom with a radius of 10 cm, the conformity indices, homogeneity indices and body mean doses of the SFF plans (scanning resolution = 1° vs. VMAT plans were 1.04 vs. 1.54, 1.10 vs. 1.12 and 5 Gy vs. 14 Gy, respectively. Those of the spherical phantom were 1.04 vs. 1.83, 1.08 vs. 1.09 and 7 Gy vs. 26 Gy, respectively. The proposed SFF plans showed superior dose distributions compared to the VMAT plans.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation for scanning technique with scattering foil free electron beam: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong In; Kim, Jung-In; Carlson, Joel; Ye, Sung-Joon; Park, Jong Min

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of a newly proposed scattering foil free (SFF) electron beam scanning technique for the treatment of skin cancer on the irregular patient surfaces using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. After benchmarking of the MC simulations, we removed the scattering foil to generate SFF electron beams. Cylindrical and spherical phantoms with 1 cm boluses were generated and the target volume was defined from the surface to 5 mm depth. The SFF scanning technique with 6 MeV electrons was simulated using those phantoms. For comparison, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were also generated with two full arcs and 6 MV photon beams. When the scanning resolution resulted in a larger separation between beams than the field size, the plan qualities were worsened. In the cylindrical phantom with a radius of 10 cm, the conformity indices, homogeneity indices and body mean doses of the SFF plans (scanning resolution = 1°) vs. VMAT plans were 1.04 vs. 1.54, 1.10 vs. 1.12 and 5 Gy vs. 14 Gy, respectively. Those of the spherical phantom were 1.04 vs. 1.83, 1.08 vs. 1.09 and 7 Gy vs. 26 Gy, respectively. The proposed SFF plans showed superior dose distributions compared to the VMAT plans.

  20. Self-Managing Postoperative Pain with the Use of a Novel, Interactive Device: A Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Mordecai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pain is commonly experienced following surgical procedures. Suboptimal management is multifactorial. Objectives. The primary objective was to assess whether patients used a device (Navimed to self-report pain over and above a normal baseline of observations. Secondary outcome measures included comparison of pain scores and patient use of and feedback on the device. Methods. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, elective gynaecological surgery patients received standard postoperative pain care or standard care plus the Navimed, which allowed them to self-report pain and offered interactive self-help options. Results. 52 female patients, 26 in each of device and standard groups, did not differ in the frequency of nurse-documented pain scores or mean pain scores provided to nurses. The device group additionally reported pain on the device (means 18.50 versus 11.90 pain ratings per day, t(32=2.75, p<0.001 that was significantly worse than reported to nurses but retrospectively rated significantly less anxiety. 80% of patients found the device useful. Discussion and Conclusion. This study demonstrates that patients used the Navimed to report pain and to help manage it. Further work is required to investigate the difference in pain scores reported and to develop more sophisticated software.

  1. In situ iron activated persulfate oxidative fluid sparging treatment of TCE contamination--a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chenju; Lee, I-Ling

    2008-09-10

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is considered a reliable technology to treat groundwater contaminated with high concentrations of organic contaminants. An ISCO oxidant, persulfate anion (S(2)O(8)(2-)) can be activated by ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) to generate sulfate radicals (E(o)=2.6 V), which are capable of destroying trichloroethylene (TCE). The property of polarity inhibits S(2)O(8)(2-) or sulfate radical (SO(4)(-)) from effectively oxidizing separate phase TCE, a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Thus the oxidation primarily takes place in the aqueous phase where TCE is dissolved. A bench column study was conducted to demonstrate a conceptual remediation method by flushing either S(2)O(8)(2-) or Fe(2+) through a soil column, where the TCE DNAPL was present, and passing the dissolved mixture through either a Fe(2+) or S(2)O(8)(2-) fluid sparging curtain. Also, the effect of a solubility enhancing chemical, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), was tested to evaluate its ability to increase the aqueous TCE concentration. Both flushing arrangements may result in similar TCE degradation efficiencies of 35% to 42% estimated by the ratio of TCE degraded/(TCE degraded+TCE remained in effluent) and degradation byproduct chloride generation rates of 4.9 to 7.6 mg Cl(-) per soil column pore volume. The addition of HPCD did greatly increase the aqueous TCE concentration. However, the TCE degradation efficiency decreased because the TCE degradation was a lower percentage of the relatively greater amount of dissolved TCE by HPCD. This conceptual treatment may serve as a reference for potential on-site application.

  2. Evaluation of a flexible bronchoscope prototype designed for bronchoscopy during mechanical ventilation: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, M-A; Auvet, A; Mankikian, J; Herve, V; Dequin, P-F; Guillon, A

    2017-06-01

    Bronchoscopy during mechanical ventilation of patients' lungs significantly affects ventilation because of partial obstruction of the tracheal tube, and may thus be omitted in the most severely ill patients. It has not previously been possible to reduce the external diameter of the bronchoscope without reducing the diameter of the suction channel, thus reducing the suctioning capacity of the device. We believed that a better-designed bronchoscope could improve the safety of bronchoscopy in patients whose lungs were ventilated. We designed a flexible bronchoscope prototype with a drumstick-shaped head consisting of a long, thin proximal portion; a short and large distal portion for camera docking; and a large suction channel throughout the length of the device. The aims of our study were to test the impact of our prototype on mechanical ventilation when inserted into the tracheal tube, and to assess suctioning capacity. We first tested the efficiency of the suction channel, and demonstrated that the suction flow of the prototype was similar to that of conventional adult bronchoscopes. We next evaluated the consequences of bronchoscopy when using the prototype on minute ventilation and intrathoracic pressures during mechanical ventilation: firstly, in vitro using a breathing simulator; and secondly, in vivo using a porcine model of pulmonary ventilation. The insertion of adult bronchoscopes into the tracheal tube immediately impaired the protective ventilation strategy employed, whereas the prototype preserved it. For the first time, we have developed an innovative flexible bronchoscope designed for bronchoscopy during invasive mechanical ventilation, that both preserved the protective ventilation strategy, and enabled efficient suction flow. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Atorvastatin in Patients With Bronchiectasis Infected With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Pallavi; Chalmers, James D; Graham, Catriona; Clarke, Andrea; Donaldson, Samantha; Doherty, Catherine; Govan, John R W; Davidson, Donald J; Rossi, Adriano G; Hill, Adam T

    2017-08-01

    There are no randomized controlled trials of statin therapy in patients with severe bronchiectasis who are chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thirty-two patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa were recruited in this double-blind cross-over randomized controlled trial. Sixteen patients were recruited in each arm, were given atorvastatin 80 mg or placebo for 3 months followed by a washout period for 6 weeks, and then crossed over and administered the alternative therapy for 3 months. Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Atorvastatin did not significantly improve the primary end point of cough as measured by the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (mean difference, 1.92; 95% CI for difference, -0.57-4.41; P = .12). However, atorvastatin treatment resulted in an improved St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (-5.62 points; P = .016) and reduced serum levels of CXCL8 (P = .04), tumor necrosis factor (P = .01), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (P = .04). There was a trend toward improvement in serum C-reactive protein and serum neutrophil counts (P = .07 and P = .06, respectively). We demonstrated in vitro that atorvastatin 10 μM reduced formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine-induced upregulation of CD11b expression and changes in calcium flux, reflecting an ability to decrease neutrophil activation. We demonstrated that atorvastatin reduced systemic inflammation and improved quality of life in patients with bronchiectasis who were infected with P aeruginosa. These effects may be due to an ability of atorvastatin to modulate neutrophil activation. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01299194; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gadoxetate disodium-induced tachypnoea and the effect of dilution method. A proof-of-concept study in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Nojima, Masanori [University of Tokyo, Division of Advanced Medicine Promotion, The Advanced Clinical Research Centre, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yusuke [Kitasato University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Abe, Osamu [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [International University of Health and Welfare, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Kiryu, Shigeru [International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nasushiobara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2018-02-15

    To directly investigate the rapid respiratory effect of gadoxetate disodium in an experimental study using mice. After confirming the steady respiratory state under general anaesthesia, eight mice were injected with all test agents in the following order: phosphate-buffered saline (A, control group), 1.25 mmol/kg of gadoteridol (B) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (C), or 0.31 mmol/kg of gadoxetate disodium (D, E). The experimenter was not blinded to the agents. The injection dose was fixed as 100 μL for Groups A-D and 50 μL for Group E. We continuously monitored and recorded respiratory rate (RR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}), and heart rate. The time-series changes from 0 to 30 s were compared by the linear mixed method Groups D and E showed the largest RR increase (20.6 and 20.3 breaths/min, respectively) and were significantly larger compared to Group A (3.36 breaths/min, both P<0.001). RR change of Groups D and E did not differ. RR change of Groups B and C was smaller (0.72 and 12.4 breaths/min, respectively) and did not differ statistically with Group A. Significant bradycardia was observed only in Group C (P<0.001). SpO{sub 2} was constant in all groups. Gadoxetate disodium causes a rapid tachypnoea without significant change of SpO{sub 2} and heart rate regardless of the dilution method. (orig.)

  5. Continuous stroke volume estimation from aortic pressure using zero dimensional cardiovascular model: proof of concept study from porcine experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, Shun; Pretty, Christopher; Docherty, Paul; Squire, Dougie; Revie, James; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Desaive, Thomas; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, continuous, left ventricular stroke volume (SV) measurements can convey large amounts of information about patient hemodynamic status and response to therapy. However, direct measurements are highly invasive in clinical practice, and current procedures for estimating SV require specialized devices and significant approximation. This study investigates the accuracy of a three element Windkessel model combined with an aortic pressure waveform to estimate SV. Aortic pressure is separated into two components capturing; 1) resistance and compliance, 2) characteristic impedance. This separation provides model-element relationships enabling SV to be estimated while requiring only one of the three element values to be known or estimated. Beat-to-beat SV estimation was performed using population-representative optimal values for each model element. This method was validated using measured SV data from porcine experiments (N = 3 female Pietrain pigs, 29-37 kg) in which both ventricular volume and aortic pressure waveforms were measured simultaneously. The median difference between measured SV from left ventricle (LV) output and estimated SV was 0.6 ml with a 90% range (5th-95th percentile) -12.4 ml-14.3 ml. During periods when changes in SV were induced, cross correlations in between estimated and measured SV were above R = 0.65 for all cases. The method presented demonstrates that the magnitude and trends of SV can be accurately estimated from pressure waveforms alone, without the need for identification of complex physiological metrics where strength of correlations may vary significantly from patient to patient.

  6. US NDC Modernization: Service Oriented Architecture Proof of Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Encarnacao, Andre Villanova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jackson, Keilan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hays, Ian A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barron, Nathan E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Simon, Luke B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Young, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report is a progress update on the US NDC Modernization Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) study describing results from a proof of concept project completed from May through September 2013. Goals for this proof of concept are 1) gain experience configuring, using, and running an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), 2) understand the implications of wrapping existing software in standardized interfaces for use as web services, and 3) gather performance metrics for a notional seismic event monitoring pipeline implemented using services with various data access and communication patterns. The proof of concept is a follow on to a previous SOA performance study. Work was performed by four undergraduate summer student interns under the guidance of Sandia staff.

  7. The direct liquefaction proof of concept program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H. [New York & Puritan Avenues, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the Proof of Concept (POC) Program is to develop Direct Coal Liquefaction and associated transitional technologies towards commercial readiness for economically producing premium liquid fuels from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. The program focuses on developing the two-stage liquefaction (TSL) process by utilizing geographically strategic feedstocks, commercially feasible catalysts, new prototype equipment, and testing co-processing or alternate feedstocks and improved process configurations. Other high priority objectives include dispersed catalyst studies, demonstrating low rank coal liquefaction without solids deposition, improving distillate yields on a unit reactor volume basis, demonstrating ebullated bed operations while obtaining scale-up data, demonstrating optimum catalyst consumption using new concepts (e.g. regeneration, cascading), producing premium products through on-line hydrotreating, demonstrating improved hydrogen utilization for low rank coals using novel heteroatom removal methods, defining and demonstrating two-stage product properties for upgrading; demonstrating efficient and economic solid separation methods, examining the merits of integrated coal cleaning, demonstrating co-processing, studying interactions between the preheater and first and second-stage reactors, improving process operability by testing and incorporating advanced equipment and instrumentation, and demonstrating operation with alternate coal feedstocks. During the past two years major PDU Proof of Concept runs were completed. POC-1 with Illinois No. 6 coal and POC-2 with Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal. Results from these operations are continuing under review and the products are being further refined and upgraded. This paper will update the results from these operations and discuss future plans for the POC program.

  8. Noninvasive Differentiation between Hepatic Steatosis and Steatohepatitis with MR Imaging Enhanced with USPIOs in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Loek P; Coolen, Bram F; Panno, Maria D; Runge, Jurgen H; Nijhof, Wouter H; Verheij, Joanne; Nieuwdorp, Max; Stoker, Jaap; Beuers, Ulrich H; Nederveen, Aart J; Stroes, Erik S

    2016-03-01

    To (a) study the optimal timing and dosing for ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particle (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the liver in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, (b) evaluate whether hepatic USPIO uptake is decreased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and (c) study the diagnostic accuracy of USPIO-enhanced MR imaging to distinguish between NASH and simple steatosis. This prospective study was approved by the local institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Quantitative R2* MR imaging of the liver was performed at baseline and 72 hours after USPIO administration in patients with biopsy-proven NASH (n = 13), hepatic steatosis without NASH (n = 11), and healthy control subjects (n = 9). The hepatic USPIO uptake in the liver was quantified by the difference in R2* (ΔR2*) between the contrast material-enhanced images and baseline images. Between-group differences in mean ΔR2* were tested with the Student t test, and diagnostic accuracy was tested by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Patients with NASH had a significantly lower ΔR2* 72 hours after USPIO administration when compared with patients who had simple steatosis and healthy control subjects (mean ± standard deviation for patients with NASH, 37.0 sec(-1) ± 16.1; patients with simple steatosis, 61.0 sec(-1) ± 17.3; and healthy control subjects, 72.2 sec(-1) ± 22.0; P = .006 for NASH vs simple steatosis; P steatosis was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 1.00). This proof-of-concept study provides clues that hepatic USPIO uptake in patients with NASH is decreased and that USPIO MR imaging can be used to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis.

  9. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Hawk, Natalyn; Cassidy, Richard J; Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao; Brutcher, Edith; Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K; Sarmiento, Juan M; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2016-10-01

    A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Somatostatin-based radiotherapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in neuroendocrine tumors: long-term outcome of a phase I dose escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincek, Nicolas; Jörg, Ann-Catherine; Brunner, Philippe; Schindler, Christian; Koller, Michael T; Rochlitz, Christoph; Müller-Brand, Jan; Maecke, Helmut R; Briel, Matthias; Walter, Martin A

    2013-01-15

    We describe the long-term outcome after clinical introduction and dose escalation of somatostatin receptor targeted therapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumors. In a clinical phase I dose escalation study we treated patients with increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risk regression were used to compare efficacy and toxicities of the different dosage protocols. Overall, 359 patients were recruited; 60 patients were enrolled for low dose (median: 2.4 GBq/cycle, range 0.9-7.8 GBq/cycle), 77 patients were enrolled for intermediate dose (median: 3.3 GBq/cycle, range: 2.0-7.4 GBq/cycle) and 222 patients were enrolled for high dose (median: 6.7 GBq/cycle, range: 3.7-8.1 GBq/cycle) [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment. The incidences of hematotoxicities grade 1-4 were 65.0%, 64.9% and 74.8%; the incidences of grade 4/5 kidney toxicities were 8.4%, 6.5% and 14.0%, and the median survival was 39 (range: 1-158) months, 34 (range: 1-118) months and 29 (range: 1-113) months. The high dose protocol was associated with an increased risk of kidney toxicity (Hazard Ratio: 3.12 (1.13-8.59) vs. intermediate dose, p = 0.03) and a shorter overall survival (Hazard Ratio: 2.50 (1.08-5.79) vs. low dose, p = 0.03). Increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities may be associated with increasing hematological toxicities. The dose related hematotoxicity profile of [90Y-DOTA]-TOC could facilitate tailoring [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with preexisting hematotoxicities. The results of the long-term outcome suggest that fractionated [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment might allow to reduce renal toxicity and to improve overall survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00978211).

  11. Somatostatin-based radiotherapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in neuroendocrine tumors: long-term outcome of a phase I dose escalation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincek Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the long-term outcome after clinical introduction and dose escalation of somatostatin receptor targeted therapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumors. Methods In a clinical phase I dose escalation study we treated patients with increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risk regression were used to compare efficacy and toxicities of the different dosage protocols. Results Overall, 359 patients were recruited; 60 patients were enrolled for low dose (median: 2.4 GBq/cycle, range 0.9-7.8 GBq/cycle, 77 patients were enrolled for intermediate dose (median: 3.3 GBq/cycle, range: 2.0-7.4 GBq/cycle and 222 patients were enrolled for high dose (median: 6.7 GBq/cycle, range: 3.7-8.1 GBq/cycle [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment. The incidences of hematotoxicities grade 1–4 were 65.0%, 64.9% and 74.8%; the incidences of grade 4/5 kidney toxicities were 8.4%, 6.5% and 14.0%, and the median survival was 39 (range: 1–158 months, 34 (range: 1–118 months and 29 (range: 1–113 months. The high dose protocol was associated with an increased risk of kidney toxicity (Hazard Ratio: 3.12 (1.13-8.59 vs. intermediate dose, p = 0.03 and a shorter overall survival (Hazard Ratio: 2.50 (1.08-5.79 vs. low dose, p = 0.03. Conclusions Increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities may be associated with increasing hematological toxicities. The dose related hematotoxicity profile of [90Y-DOTA]-TOC could facilitate tailoring [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with preexisting hematotoxicities. The results of the long-term outcome suggest that fractionated [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment might allow to reduce renal toxicity and to improve overall survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00978211.

  12. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaib, Walid L.; Hawk, Natalyn; Cassidy, Richard J.; Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao; Brutcher, Edith; Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K.; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Results: Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). Conclusion: The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials.

  13. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaib, Walid L.; Hawk, Natalyn [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Cassidy, Richard J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Brutcher, Edith [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K.; Sarmiento, Juan M. [Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Landry, Jerome [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); El-Rayes, Bassel F., E-mail: bassel.el-rayes@emoryhealthcare.org [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Results: Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). Conclusion: The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials.

  14. Somatostatin-based radiotherapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in neuroendocrine tumors: long-term outcome of a phase I dose escalation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We describe the long-term outcome after clinical introduction and dose escalation of somatostatin receptor targeted therapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumors. Methods In a clinical phase I dose escalation study we treated patients with increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risk regression were used to compare efficacy and toxicities of the different dosage protocols. Results Overall, 359 patients were recruited; 60 patients were enrolled for low dose (median: 2.4 GBq/cycle, range 0.9-7.8 GBq/cycle), 77 patients were enrolled for intermediate dose (median: 3.3 GBq/cycle, range: 2.0-7.4 GBq/cycle) and 222 patients were enrolled for high dose (median: 6.7 GBq/cycle, range: 3.7-8.1 GBq/cycle) [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment. The incidences of hematotoxicities grade 1–4 were 65.0%, 64.9% and 74.8%; the incidences of grade 4/5 kidney toxicities were 8.4%, 6.5% and 14.0%, and the median survival was 39 (range: 1–158) months, 34 (range: 1–118) months and 29 (range: 1–113) months. The high dose protocol was associated with an increased risk of kidney toxicity (Hazard Ratio: 3.12 (1.13-8.59) vs. intermediate dose, p = 0.03) and a shorter overall survival (Hazard Ratio: 2.50 (1.08-5.79) vs. low dose, p = 0.03). Conclusions Increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities may be associated with increasing hematological toxicities. The dose related hematotoxicity profile of [90Y-DOTA]-TOC could facilitate tailoring [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with preexisting hematotoxicities. The results of the long-term outcome suggest that fractionated [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment might allow to reduce renal toxicity and to improve overall survival. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov number:NCT00978211 PMID:23320604

  15. First-in-man-proof of concept study with molidustat: a novel selective oral HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor for the treatment of renal anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, M; Lentini, S; Arens, E R; Kaiser, A; van der Mey, D; Thuss, U; Kubitza, D; Wensing, G

    2018-07-01

    Insufficient erythropoietin (EPO) synthesis is a relevant cause of renal anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Molidustat, a selective hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (HIF-PH) inhibitor, increases endogenous EPO levels dose dependently in preclinical models. We examined the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability and effect on EPO levels of single oral doses of molidustat in healthy male volunteers. This was a single-centre, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, group-comparison, dose-escalation study. Molidustat was administered at doses of 5, 12.5, 25, 37.5 or 50 mg as a polyethylene glycol-based solution. In total, 45 volunteers received molidustat and 14 received placebo. Molidustat was absorbed rapidly, and the mean maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve increased dose dependently. The mean terminal half-life was 4.64-10.40 h. A significant increase in endogenous EPO was observed following single oral doses of molidustat of 12.5 mg and above. Geometric mean peak EPO levels were 14.8 IU l -1 (90% confidence interval 13.0, 16.9) for volunteers who received placebo and 39.8 IU l -1 (90% confidence interval: 29.4, 53.8) for those who received molidustat 50 mg. The time course of EPO levels resembled the normal diurnal variation in EPO. Maximum EPO levels were observed approximately 12 h postdose and returned to baseline after approximately 24-48 h. All doses of molidustat were well tolerated and there were no significant changes in vital signs or laboratory safety parameters. Oral administration of molidustat to healthy volunteers elicited a dose-dependent increase in endogenous EPO. These results support the ongoing development of molidustat as a potential new treatment for patients with renal anaemia. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. First-in-Human PET/CT Imaging of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms with Cyclotron-Produced 44Sc-DOTATOC: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aviral; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina; Klette, Ingo; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Baum, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    44 Sc is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide (T 1/2  = 4.04 hours, E β+average  = 632 keV) and can be made available, using a cyclotron production route, in substantial quantities as a highly pure product. Herein, the authors report on a first-in-human PET/CT study using 44 Sc-DOTATOC prepared with cyclotron-produced 44 Sc. The production of 44 Sc was carried out through the 44 Ca(p,n) 44 Sc nuclear reaction at Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. After separation, 44 Sc was shipped to Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany, where radiolabeling was performed, yielding radiochemically pure 44 Sc-DOTATOC. Two patients, currently followed up after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, participated in this proof-of-concept study. Blood sampling was performed before and after application of 44 Sc-DOTATOC. PET/CT acquisitions, performed at different time points after injection of 44 Sc-DOTATOC, allowed detection of even very small lesions on delayed scans. No clinical adverse effects were observed and the laboratory hematological, renal, and hepatic profiles remained unchanged. In this study, cyclotron-produced 44 Sc was used in the clinic for the first time. It is attractive for theranostic application with 177 Lu, 90 Y, or 47 Sc as therapeutic counterparts. 44 Sc-based radiopharmaceuticals will be of particular value for PET facilities without radiopharmacy, to which they can be shipped from a centralized production site.

  17. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-Level Tragus Stimulation for the Treatment of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lilei; Huang, Bing; Po, Sunny S; Tan, Tuantuan; Wang, Menglong; Zhou, Liping; Meng, Guannan; Yuan, Shenxu; Zhou, Xiaoya; Li, Xuefei; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Songyun; Jiang, Hong

    2017-08-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-level tragus stimulation (LL-TS) treatment could reduce myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The authors' previous studies suggested that LL-TS could reduce the size of myocardial injury induced by ischemia. Patients who presented with STEMI within 12 h of symptom onset, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, were randomized to the LL-TS group (n = 47) or the control group (with sham stimulation [n = 48]). LL-TS, 50% lower than the electric current that slowed the sinus rate, was delivered to the right tragus once the patients arrived in the catheterization room and lasted for 2 h after balloon dilatation (reperfusion). All patients were followed for 7 days. The occurrence of reperfusion-related arrhythmia, blood levels of creatine kinase-MB, myoglobin, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and inflammatory markers, and echocardiographic characteristics were evaluated. The incidence of reperfusion-related ventricular arrhythmia during the first 24 h was significantly attenuated by LL-TS. In addition, the area under the curve for creatine kinase-MB and myoglobin over 72 h was smaller in the LL-TS group than the control group. Furthermore, blood levels of inflammatory markers were decreased by LL-TS. Cardiac function, as demonstrated by the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, the left ventricular ejection fraction, and the wall motion index, was markedly improved by LL-TS. LL-TS reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in patients with STEMI. This proof-of-concept study raises the possibility that this noninvasive strategy may be used to treat patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; pbrain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  20. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled proof of concept study to evaluate samidorphan in the prevention of olanzapine-induced weight gain in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bernard L; Martin, William; Memisoglu, Asli; DiPetrillo, Lauren; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M

    2017-11-17

    Antipsychotic medications are associated with weight gain and adverse metabolic effects that complicate the treatment and management of schizophrenia. Olanzapine (OLZ) in particular is associated with significant weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. The present Phase 1, proof of concept, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the safety and effect on weight of a combination of OLZ (10mg) and the opioid modulator samidorphan (SAM; 5mg) in comparison to OLZ alone in healthy, male normal weight volunteers. Altogether, 106 male subjects with stable body weight and BMI 18-25kg/m 2 were randomized to OLZ alone, OLZ+SAM, SAM alone, or placebo in a 2:2:1:1 ratio. The primary efficacy endpoint, mean (SD) body weight change from baseline to last assessment in the 3-week treatment period, was significantly less for OLZ+SAM vs. OLZ alone subjects [+2.2 (1.4) kg vs. +3.1 (1.9) kg; respectively; p=0.02]. In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight from baseline for either SAM or placebo [+0.1 (1.0) kg and +0.8 (1.4) kg, respectively]; p=0.09. Overall, OLZ+SAM compared to OLZ alone had similar safety and tolerability. In addition, less nausea was observed in subjects given OLZ+SAM compared to SAM alone. Thus, OLZ+SAM may offer effective treatment of schizophrenia with less weight gain and metabolic risk. Additional research exploring additional doses over longer durations in psychiatric populations is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Synergistic Cytotoxicity from Drugs and Cytokines In Vitro as an Approach to Classify Drugs According to Their Potential to Cause Idiosyncratic Hepatotoxicity: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Ashley R; Wassink, Bronlyn; Turkus, Jonathan D; Breier, Anna B; Lansdell, Theresa; Kaur, Gurpreet; Hession, Sarah L; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) typically occurs in a small fraction of patients and has resulted in removal of otherwise efficacious drugs from the market. Current preclinical testing methods are ineffective in predicting which drug candidates have IDILI liability. Recent results suggest that immune mediators such as tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF) and interferon- γ (IFN) interact with drugs that cause IDILI to kill hepatocytes. This proof-of-concept study was designed to test the hypothesis that drugs can be classified according to their ability to cause IDILI in humans using classification modeling with covariates derived from concentration-response relationships that describe cytotoxic interaction with cytokines. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cells were treated with drugs associated with IDILI or with drugs lacking IDILI liability and cotreated with TNF and/or IFN. Detailed concentration-response relationships were determined for calculation of parameters such as the maximal cytotoxic effect, slope, and EC 50 for use as covariates for classification modeling using logistic regression. These parameters were incorporated into multiple classification models to identify combinations of covariates that most accurately classified the drugs according to their association with human IDILI. Of 14 drugs associated with IDILI, almost all synergized with TNF to kill HepG2 cells and were successfully classified by statistical modeling. IFN enhanced the toxicity mediated by some IDILI-associated drugs in the presence of TNF. In contrast, of 10 drugs with little or no IDILI liability, none synergized with inflammatory cytokines to kill HepG2 cells and were classified accordingly. The resulting optimal model classified the drugs with extraordinary selectivity and specificity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Y-90 SPECT ML image reconstruction with a new model for tissue-dependent bremsstrahlung production using CT information: a proof-of-concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hongki; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Wilderman, Scott J.; Brooks, Allen F.; Dewaraja, Yuni K.

    2018-06-01

    While the yield of positrons used in Y-90 PET is independent of tissue media, Y-90 SPECT imaging is complicated by the tissue dependence of bremsstrahlung photon generation. The probability of bremsstrahlung production is proportional to the square of the atomic number of the medium. Hence, the same amount of activity in different tissue regions of the body will produce different numbers of bremsstrahlung photons. Existing reconstruction methods disregard this tissue-dependency, potentially impacting both qualitative and quantitative imaging of heterogeneous regions of the body such as bone with marrow cavities. In this proof-of-concept study, we propose a new maximum-likelihood method that incorporates bremsstrahlung generation probabilities into the system matrix, enabling images of the desired Y-90 distribution to be reconstructed instead of the ‘bremsstrahlung distribution’ that is obtained with existing methods. The tissue-dependent probabilities are generated by Monte Carlo simulation while bone volume fractions for each SPECT voxel are obtained from co-registered CT. First, we demonstrate the tissue dependency in a SPECT/CT imaging experiment with Y-90 in bone equivalent solution and water. Visually, the proposed reconstruction approach better matched the true image and the Y-90 PET image than the standard bremsstrahlung reconstruction approach. An XCAT phantom simulation including bone and marrow regions also demonstrated better agreement with the true image using the proposed reconstruction method. Quantitatively, compared with the standard reconstruction, the new method improved estimation of the liquid bone:water activity concentration ratio by 40% in the SPECT measurement and the cortical bone:marrow activity concentration ratio by 58% in the XCAT simulation.

  3. Breath-print analysis by e-nose for classifying and monitoring chronic liver disease: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vincentis, Antonio; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Galati, Giovanni; Gallo, Paolo; Vernile, Chiara; Pedone, Claudio; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-05-05

    Since the liver plays a key metabolic role, volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath might change with type and severity of chronic liver disease (CLD). In this study we analysed breath-prints (BPs) of 65 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), 39 with non-cirrhotic CLD (NC-CLD) and 56 healthy controls by the e-nose. Distinctive BPs characterized LC, NC-CLD and healthy controls, and, among LC patients, the different Child-Pugh classes (sensitivity 86.2% and specificity 98.2% for CLD vs healthy controls, and 87.5% and 69.2% for LC vs NC-CLD). Moreover, the area under the BP profile, derived from radar-plot representation of BPs, showed an area under the ROC curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.76-0.91) for CLD, of 0.76 (95% CI 0.66-0.85) for LC, and of 0.70 (95% CI 0.55-0.81) for decompensated LC. By applying the cut-off values of 862 and 812, LC and decompensated LC could be predicted with high accuracy (PPV 96.6% and 88.5%, respectively). These results are proof-of-concept that the e-nose could be a valid non-invasive instrument for characterizing CLD and monitoring hepatic function over time. The observed classificatory properties might be further improved by refining stage-specific breath-prints and considering the impact of comorbidities in a larger series of patients.

  4. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik V; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (O) and capecitabine (C), and evaluate the safety and efficacy of this regimen in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods. In the Phase I part of the study a dose-escalation schedule of FDR G, O and C, administered every two weeks, was performed in patients with solid tumours...... and no other treatments or advanced CC. In the Phase II part response rate, toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival was evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed advanced CC. Results. Thirty-six patients entered the Phase I part and G 1 000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 15, O 60 mg/m(2) day 1...... and 15, and C 1 000 mg/m(2) BID day 1-7 and day 15-21 were established as MTD. In the Phase II part, 41 patients with advanced CC were included. Overall response rate was 34% and 51% had stable disease, resulting in a clinical benefit rate of 85%. Grade III and IV adverse events were rare. Median...

  5. A multicenter dose-escalation study of the analgesic and adverse effects of an oral cannabis extract (Cannador) for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdcroft, Anita; Maze, Mervyn; Doré, Caroline; Tebbs, Susan; Thompson, Simon

    2006-05-01

    Cannabinoids have dose-related antinociceptive effects in animals. This clinical study aimed to investigate whether a single oral dose of cannabis plant extract (Cannador; Institute for Clinical Research, IKF, Berlin, Germany) could provide pain relief with minimal side effects for postoperative pain. Patients (aged 18-75 yr) were recruited and consented before surgery if patient-controlled analgesia was planned for provision of postoperative pain relief. Each patient received a single dose of 5, 10, or 15 mg Cannador if he or she had at least moderate pain after stopping patient-controlled analgesia. Starting with 5 mg, dose escalation was based on the number of patients requesting rescue analgesia and adverse effects. Pain relief, pain intensity, and side effects were recorded over 6 h and analyzed using tests for trend with dose. Rescue analgesia was requested by all 11 patients (100%) receiving 5 mg, 15 of 30 patient (50%) receiving 10 mg, and 6 of 24 patients (25%) receiving 15 mg Cannador (log rank test for trend in time to rescue analgesia with dose P analgesics without frequent adverse effects.

  6. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study (TED 11576) of cabazitaxel in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Shunji; Nozawa, Masahiro; Onozawa, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Jun; Ohno, Keiji; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of cabazitaxel and evaluate its safety and tolerability as a 1-h IV infusion every 3 weeks in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Seventeen patients were treated with cabazitaxel at doses of 20 and 25 mg/m(2) for PK analyses. Dose escalation was performed only in the absence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was the highest dose at which less than 33 % of the patients developed DLT. Cabazitaxel exhibited a triphasic elimination profile with a long terminal half-life of 116 ± 29.0 or 113 ± 28.0 h after IV infusion of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) cabazitaxel, respectively. The major differences in the PK parameters of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were cabazitaxel's fairly high clearance rate, representing approximately half the hepatic flow, and its large volume of distribution at steady-state conditions. No DLT was observed during Cycle 1. Mild-to-moderate hematological adverse events (AEs), including neutropenia, and other AEs typically associated with taxanes were observed; all AEs were manageable. Cabazitaxel at 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks was selected as the MTD in Japanese patients. The PK parameters of cabazitaxel in Japanese CRPC patients were comparable with those previously determined in Caucasian subjects. The safety and tolerability of cabazitaxel were also comparable in both ethnic populations.

  7. Dose Escalation Methods in Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Lee, J. Jack; Siu, Lillian L.

    2009-01-01

    Phase I clinical trials are an essential step in the development of anticancer drugs. The main goal of these studies is to establish the recommended dose and/or schedule of new drugs or drug combinations for phase II trials. The guiding principle for dose escalation in phase I trials is to avoid exposing too many patients to subtherapeutic doses while preserving safety and maintaining rapid accrual. Here we review dose escalation methods for phase I trials, including the rule-based and model-...

  8. Developing professional caregivers' empathy and emotional competencies through mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR): results of two proof-of-concept studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Martin; McDuff, Pierre; Pastore, Yves D; Duval, Michel; Sultan, Serge

    2018-01-05

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR)-based intervention and determine if the intervention is associated with a significant signal on empathy and emotional competencies. Two pre-post proof-of-concept studies. Participants were recruited at the University of Montreal's Psychology Department (Study 1) and the CHU Sainte-Justine Department of Hematology-Oncology (Study 2). Study 1: 12 students completed the 8-week programme (mean age 24, range 18-34). Study 2: 25 professionals completed the 8-week programme (mean age 48, range 27-63). Standard MBSR programme including 8-week mindfulness programme consisting of 8 consecutive weekly 2-hour sessions and a full-day silent retreat. Mindfulness as measured by the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale; empathy as measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI)'s Perspective Taking and Empathic Concern subscales; identification of one's own emotions and those of others as measured by the Profile of Emotional Competence (PEC)'s Identify my Emotions and Identify Others' Emotions subscales; emotional acceptance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) and the Emotion Regulation Scale (ERQ)'s Expressive Suppression subscale; and recognition of emotions in others as measured by the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test (GERT). In both studies, retention rates (80%-81%) were acceptable. Participants who completed the programme improved on all measures except the PEC's Identify Others' Emotions and the IRI's Empathic Concern (Cohen's d median=0.92, range 45-1.72). In Study 2, favourable effects associated with the programme were maintained over 3 months on the PEC's Identify my Emotions, the AAQ-II, the ERQ's Expressive Suppression and the GERT. The programme was feasible and acceptable. It was associated with a significant signal on the following outcomes: perspective taking, the identification of one's own emotions and emotional acceptance, thus, justifying

  9. Developing professional caregivers’ empathy and emotional competencies through mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR): results of two proof-of-concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Martin; McDuff, Pierre; Pastore, Yves D; Duval, Michel; Sultan, Serge

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR)-based intervention and determine if the intervention is associated with a significant signal on empathy and emotional competencies. Design Two pre–post proof-of-concept studies. Setting Participants were recruited at the University of Montreal’s Psychology Department (Study 1) and the CHU Sainte-Justine Department of Hematology-Oncology (Study 2). Participants Study 1: 12 students completed the 8-week programme (mean age 24, range 18–34). Study 2: 25 professionals completed the 8-week programme (mean age 48, range 27–63). Intervention Standard MBSR programme including 8-week mindfulness programme consisting of 8 consecutive weekly 2-hour sessions and a full-day silent retreat. Outcomes measures Mindfulness as measured by the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale; empathy as measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI)’s Perspective Taking and Empathic Concern subscales; identification of one’s own emotions and those of others as measured by the Profile of Emotional Competence (PEC)’s Identify my Emotions and Identify Others’ Emotions subscales; emotional acceptance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) and the Emotion Regulation Scale (ERQ)’s Expressive Suppression subscale; and recognition of emotions in others as measured by the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test (GERT). Results In both studies, retention rates (80%–81%) were acceptable. Participants who completed the programme improved on all measures except the PEC’s Identify Others’ Emotions and the IRI’s Empathic Concern (Cohen’s d median=0.92, range 45–1.72). In Study 2, favourable effects associated with the programme were maintained over 3 months on the PEC’s Identify my Emotions, the AAQ-II, the ERQ’s Expressive Suppression and the GERT. Conclusions The programme was feasible and acceptable. It was associated with a significant signal on the

  10. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Antibody BI-505 in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Markus; Gimsing, Peter; Badros, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This multicenter, first-in-human study evaluated safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of BI-505, a human anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody, in advanced relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: BI-505 was given intravenously, every 2 weeks...... generally mild to moderate, and those attributed to study medication were mostly limited to the first dose and manageable with premedication and slower infusion. No maximum tolerated dose was identified. BI-505's half-life increased with dose while clearance decreased, suggesting target-mediated clearance...

  11. Results of a Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Intravesical TMX-101 in Patients with Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, Johannes; Lammers, Rianne J. M.; Arentsen, Harm C.; Ravic, Miroslav; Pozzi, Raffaella; Cornel, Erik B.; Vergunst, Henk; de Reijke, Theo M.; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Imiquimod, a toll like receptor 7 (TLR-7) agonist, is effective as a topical treatment for skin malignancies. TMX-101 is a liquid formulation of imiquimod. In this study we establish a safety profile of TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: We

  12. Results of a phase 1 dose escalation study of intravesical TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Lammers, R.; Arentsen, H.C.; Ravic, M.; Pozzi, R.; Cornel, E.B.; Vergunst, H.; Reijke, T.M. de; Witjes, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Imiquimod, a toll like receptor 7 (TLR-7) agonist, is effective as a topical treatment for skin malignancies. TMX-101 is a liquid formulation of imiquimod. In this study we establish a safety profile of TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We

  13. Optimizing cancer radiotheraphy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Dose escalation studies in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Gupta, J.P. [Dharmshila Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Banerji, A.K. [Vidyasagar Inst. of Mental Health and Neurosciences, New Delhi (India); Dwarakanath, B.S.; Tripathi, R.P.; Mathew, T.L.; Ravindranath, T. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Jain, V. [Wright State University, Dayton, OH (United States). Kettering Medical Center

    2005-08-01

    Background and purpose: Higher rates of glucose utilization and glycolysis generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumors. Own earlier studies on model systems demonstrated that the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in a dose-dependent manner by selectively sensitizing cancer cells while protecting normal cells. Phase I/II clinical trials indicated that the combination of 2-DG, at an oral dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), with large fractions of {gamma}-radiation was well tolerated in cerebral glioma patients. Since higher 2-DG doses are expected to improve the therapeutic gain, present studies were undertaken to examine the tolerance and safety of escalating 2-DG dose during combined treatment (2-DG + radiotherapy) in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Patients and methods: Untreated patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme (WHO criteria) were included in the study. Seven weekly fractions of {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays (5 Gy/fraction) were delivered to the tumor volume (presurgical CT/MRI evaluation) plus 3 cm margin. Escalating 2-DG doses (200-250-300 mg/kg BW) were administered orally 30 min before irradiation after overnight fasting. Acute toxicity and tolerance were studied by monitoring the vital parameters and side effects. Late radiation damage and treatment responses were studied radiologically and clinically in surviving patients. Results: Transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia were observed in most of the patients. Tolerance and patient compliance to the combined treatment were very good up to a 2-DG dose of 250 mg/kg BW. However, at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg BW, two out of six patients were very restless and could not complete treatment, though significant changes in the vital parameters were not observed even at this dose. No significant damage to the normal brain tissue was observed during follow-up in seven out of ten patients who

  14. Carbohydrate restricted diet in conjunction with metformin and liraglutide is an effective treatment in patients with deteriorated type 2 diabetes mellitus: Proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Jürgen E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease. During the course of the disease intensive treatment is often necessary resulting in multiple interventions including administration of insulin. Although dietary intervention is highly recommended, the clinical results of the widely prescribed diets with low fat content and high carbohydrates are disappointing. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the effect of dietary carbohydrate-restriction in conjunction with metformin and liraglutide on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes already being treated with two oral anti-diabetic drugs or insulin treatment and who showed deterioration of their glucose metabolism (i.e. HbA1c >7.5, were treated. A carbohydrate-restricted diet and a combination of metformin and liraglutide were instituted, after stopping either insulin or oral anti-diabetic drugs (excluding metformin. After enrollment, the study patients were scheduled for follow-up visits at one, two, three and six months. Primary outcome was glycemic control, measured by HbA1c at six months. Secondary outcomes were body weight, lipid-profile and treatment satisfaction. Results Thirty-five (88% participants completed the study. Nearly all participating patients experienced a drop in HbA1c and body weight during the first three months, an effect which was maintained until the end of the study at six months. Seventy-one percent of the patients reached HbA1c values below 7.0%. The range of body weight at enrollment was extreme, reaching 165 kg as the highest initial value. The average weight loss after 6 months was 10%. Most patients were satisfied with this treatment. During the intervention no significant change of lipids was observed. Most patients who were on insulin could maintain the treatment without insulin with far better metabolic control. Conclusions Carbohydrate restriction in conjunction with

  15. Treatment assignment guesses by study participants in a double-blind dose escalation clinical trial of saw palmetto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Moore, Page; Kusek, John; Barry, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report assesses participant perception of treatment assignment in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of saw palmetto for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BCM). Participants randomized to receive saw palmetto were instructed to take one 320 mg gelcap daily for the first 24 weeks, two 320 mg gelcaps daily for the second 24 weeks, and three 320 mg gelcaps daily for the third 24 weeks. Study participants assigned to placebo were instructed to take the same number of matching placebo gelcaps in each time period. At 24, 48, and 72 weeks postrandomization, the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI) was administered and participants were asked to guess their treatment assignment. The study was conducted at 11 clinical centers in North America. Study participants were men, 45 years and older, with moderate to low severe BPH symptoms, randomized to saw palmetto (N=151) or placebo (N=155). Treatment arms were compared with respect to the distribution of participant guesses of treatment assignment. For participants assigned to saw palmetto, 22.5%, 24.7%, and 29.8% correctly thought they were taking saw palmetto, and 37.3%, 40.0%, and 44.4% incorrectly thought they were on placebo at 24, 48, and 72 weeks, respectively. For placebo participants, 21.8%, 27.4%, and 25.2% incorrectly thought they were on saw palmetto, and 41.6%, 39.9%, and 42.6% correctly thought they were on placebo at 24, 48, and 72 weeks, respectively. The treatment arms did not vary with respect to the distributions of participants who guessed they were on saw palmetto (p=0.823) or placebo (p=0.893). Participants who experienced an improvement in AUA-SI were 2.16 times more likely to think they were on saw palmetto. Blinding of treatment assignment was successful in this study. Improvement in BPH-related symptoms was associated with the perception that participants were taking saw palmetto.

  16. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Judith M.; Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide

  17. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. Objective To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Methods Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Results Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Conclusions Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and

  18. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare; Gerrand, Craig

    2016-02-22

    Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and the willingness of participants to share health

  19. Abatacept reduces disease activity and ultrasound power Doppler in ACPA-negative undifferentiated arthritis: a proof-of-concept clinical and imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Maya H; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Rakieh, Chadi; Freeston, Jane E; Middleton, Edward; Horton, Sarah; Das, Sudipto; Peterfy, Charles; Tan, Ai Lyn; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    No proven treatment exists for ACPA-negative undifferentiated arthritis (UA). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether abatacept is effective in treating poor prognosis, ACPA-negative UA, including its effect on power Doppler on US (PDUS). A proof-of-concept, open-label, prospective study of 20 patients with DMARD-naïve, ACPA-negative UA (⩾2 joint synovitis) and PDUS ⩾ 1 with clinical and 20-joint US (grey scale/PDUS) assessments at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. All patients received 12 months of abatacept (monotherapy for minimum first 6 months). The primary end point was a composite of the proportion of patients that at 6 months achieved DAS44 remission, a maximum of one swollen joint for at least 3 consecutive months and no radiographic progression (over 0-12 months). Twenty of the 23 patients screened were enrolled [14 female; mean (sd) age 53.4 (11.2) years, symptom duration 7.5 (0.9) months]. Two (10%) achieved the composite primary end point. A reduction in the mean (sd) DAS44 was observed from a baseline value of 2.66 (0.77) to 2.01 (0.81) at 6 months and to 1.78 (0.95) at 12 months. The DAS44 remission rates were 6/20 (30%; 95% CI: 15, 51%) at 6 months and 8/20 (40%; 95% CI: 22, 62%) at 12 months. A striking decrease in the median (interquartile range; IQR) total PDUS score was noted from 10 (4-23) at baseline to 3 (2-12) and 3 (0-5) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. This report is a first in potentially identifying an effective therapy, abatacept monotherapy, for poor-prognosis, ACPA-negative UA, supported by a clear reduction in PDUS. These data justify evaluation in a controlled study. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Fasinumab (REGN475, an antinerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of acute sciatic pain: results of a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiseo PJ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul J Tiseo,1 Haobo Ren,2 Scott Mellis3 1Pharmacovigilance Operations and Risk Management, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA; 2Biostatitics, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Basking Ridge, NJ, USA; 3Translational Medicine and Predictive Medicine, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subcutaneously administered fasinumab (REGN475, a nerve growth factor-neutralizing antibody, in patients with acute sciatic pain receiving standard of care therapy. Methods: This was a double-blind, parallel-group, proof-of-concept study. Patients with unilateral, moderate-to-severe sciatic pain of 2–16 weeks' duration were randomized to a subcutaneous dose of placebo (n=51, fasinumab 0.1 mg/kg (n=53, or 0.3 mg/kg (n=53; follow-up was 12 weeks. Pain was assessed in a daily diary using a numerical rating scale (NRS (0= no pain, 10= worst pain for average and worst leg and back pain. The primary efficacy end point was the area under the curve of NRS scores for average leg pain from baseline to week 4. Key secondary end points included changes in average and worst leg and back pain from baseline to the end of week 4 and to each weekly study visit. Patient functioning (Oswestry Disability Index and concomitant analgesic use were also assessed. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs. Results: Demographic and clinical characteristics were similar among the treatment groups; 141 (88.7% patients completed the study. For the primary end point, mean ± standard deviation area under the curve values from baseline to week 4 were not significantly different between placebo (96.8±6.0 and fasinumab 0.1 mg/kg (112.7±58.3; P=0.0610 or fasinumab 0.3 mg/kg (112.4±55.8; P=0.0923. All secondary efficacy end points of changes in pain and function demonstrated responses that were similar between placebo and fasinumab groups. Incidence of TEAEs was 45.1%, 50

  1. Radioimmunotherapy with Y-90-epratuzumab in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma. A fractionated dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, O.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Tennvall, J.; Hindorf, C.; Olsson, T.; Strand, S.E.; Stenberg, L.; Wingardh, K.

    2002-01-01

    unequivocal CD22 expression, as compared with one of four patients with weak expression, exhibited OR. Tumour CD22 assessments before and during therapy were made in three patients, indicating down regulation of CD22. Conclusion: Radioimmunotherapy using a 2-4 weekly injection schedule with 90 Y-epratuzumab can result in durable OR in patients with various subtypes of B-cell lymphoma. Three weekly infusions 185 MBq/m 2 resulted in only minor haematological toxicity. Unequivocally CD22 expressing lymphoma seems more responsive. Low toxicity as well as evidence of down regulation of CD22 expression during therapy make fractionated treatment with 90 Y-epratuzumab warrants further study

  2. Cone beam CT imaging with limited angle of projections and prior knowledge for volumetric verification of non-coplanar beam radiation therapy: a proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bowen; Xing, Lei; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Chang, Daniel; Cheng, Jason; Li, Ruijiang

    2013-11-01

    registration significantly improved the reconstructed image quality, with a reduction of mostly 2-3 folds (up to 100) in root mean square image error. The proposed algorithm provides a remedy for solving the problem of non-coplanar CBCT reconstruction from limited angle of projections by combining the PICCS technique and rigid image registration in an iterative framework. In this proof of concept study, non-coplanar beams with couch rotations of 45° can be effectively verified with the CBCT technique.

  3. Mindful2Work: Effects of Combined Physical Exercise, Yoga, and Mindfulness Meditations for Stress Relieve in Employees. A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Esther I; Formsma, Anne R; Frijstein, Gerard; Bögels, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    Work-related stress and associated illness and burnout is rising in western society, with now as much as almost a quarter of European and half of USA's employees estimated to be at the point of burnout. Mindfulness meditation, yoga, and physical exercise have all shown beneficial effects for work-related stress and illness. This proof of concept study assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of the newly developed Mindful2Work training, a combination of physical exercise, restorative yoga, and mindfulness meditations, delivered in six weekly group sessions plus a follow-up session. Participants ( n  = 26, four males), referred by company doctors with (work-related) stress and burnout complaints, completed measurements pre and post the intervention, as well as at 6-week (FU1) and 6-month (FU2) follow-up. Results showed very high feasibility and acceptability of the Mindful2Work training. The training and trainers were rated with an 8.1 and 8.4 on a 1-10 scale, respectively, and training dropout rate was zero. Significant improvements with (very) large effect sizes were demonstrated for the primary outcome measures of physical and mental workability, and for anxiety, depression, stress, sleep quality, positive and negative affect, which remained (very) large and mostly increased further over time. Risk for long-term dropout from work (checklist individual strength [CIS]) was 92 % at pre-test, reduced to 67 % at post-test, to 44 % at FU1, and 35 % at FU2, whereas employees worked (RTWI) 65 % of their contract hours per week at pre-test, which increased to 73 % at post-test, 81 % at FU1 and 93 % at FU2. Intensity of home practice or number of attended sessions were not related to training effects. To conclude, the newly developed Mindful2Work training seems very feasible, and acceptable, and although no control group was included, the large effects of Mindful2Work are highly promising.

  4. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  5. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  6. An open-label dose escalation study to evaluate the safety of administration of nonviral stromal cell-derived factor-1 plasmid to treat symptomatic ischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Marc S; Mendelsohn, Farrell O; Schaer, Gary L; Sherman, Warren; Farr, Maryjane; Pastore, Joseph; Rouy, Didier; Clemens, Ruth; Aras, Rahul; Losordo, Douglas W

    2013-03-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that adult stem cells induce tissue repair by activating endogenous stem cells through the stromal cell-derived factor-1:chemokine receptor type 4 axis. JVS-100 is a DNA plasmid encoding human stromal cell-derived factor-1. We tested in a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study with 12 months of follow-up in subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy to see if JVS-100 improves clinical parameters. Seventeen subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association class III heart failure, with an ejection fraction ≤40% on stable medical therapy, were enrolled to receive 5, 15, or 30 mg of JVS-100 via endomyocardial injection. The primary end points for safety and efficacy were at 1 and 4 months, respectively. The primary safety end point was a major adverse cardiac event. Efficacy end points were change in quality of life, New York Heart Association class, 6-minute walk distance, single photon emission computed tomography, N-terminal pro-brain natruretic peptide, and echocardiography at 4 and 12 months. The primary safety end point was met. At 4 months, all of the cohorts demonstrated improvements in 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and New York Heart Association class. Subjects in the 15- and 30-mg dose groups exhibited improvements in 6-minute walk distance (15 mg: median [range]: 41 minutes [3-61 minutes]; 30 mg: 31 minutes [22-74 minutes]) and quality of life (15 mg: -16 points [+1 to -32 points]; 30 mg: -24 points [+17 to -38 points]) over baseline. At 12 months, improvements in symptoms were maintained. These data highlight the importance of defining the molecular mechanisms of stem cell-based tissue repair and suggest that overexpression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 via gene therapy is a strategy for improving heart failure symptoms in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  7. Safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of neratinib (HKI-272) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors: a Phase 1 dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinori; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Takahashi, Shunji; Yokoyama, Masahiro; Onozawa, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Hironaka, Shuichi; Hashigami, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Takenaka, Nobuko; Boku, Narikazu

    2012-04-01

    Neratinib (HKI-272), a potent, irreversible, small-molecule, orally administered, pan-ErbB inhibitor that blocks signal transduction via inhibition of three epidermal growth factor receptors [ErbB1, ErbB2 (Her2) and ErbB4], is being developed for the treatment of solid tumors, including breast cancer. This Phase 1 dose-escalation study assessed the safety, tolerability, maximum-tolerated dose, antitumor activity and pharmacokinetics of neratinib in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. Patients received neratinib 80, 160, 240 or 320 mg orally; each patient enrolled in only one dose cohort. Patients received a single dose in week 1, followed by daily continuous doses. Blood samples collected were on days 1 and 21 for pharmacokinetic analyses. Twenty-one patients were enrolled (3 breast cancer; 17 colorectal cancer; 1 gastric cancer). Neratinib-related adverse events (all grades) included diarrhea (20 patients), fatigue (14 patients), nausea and abdominal pain (9 patients each) and anorexia (8 patients). Grade ≥3 neratinib-related adverse events in two or more patients were diarrhea and anorexia (two patients each). Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and anorexia (two patients, 320 mg dose). The maximum-tolerated dose and recommended dose was neratinib 240 mg once daily. Of 21 evaluable patients, 2 with breast cancer had partial response, 3 had stable disease ≥24 weeks, 7 had stable disease ≥16 weeks and 9 had progressive disease. Pharmacokinetic analyses indicated that neratinib exposures increased with dose. The safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetic profiles of neratinib are consistent with those reported for non-Japanese patients and warrant further investigation of neratinib in Japanese patients with solid tumors.

  8. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment

  9. Dose escalation methods in phase I cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Lee, J Jack; Siu, Lillian L

    2009-05-20

    Phase I clinical trials are an essential step in the development of anticancer drugs. The main goal of these studies is to establish the recommended dose and/or schedule of new drugs or drug combinations for phase II trials. The guiding principle for dose escalation in phase I trials is to avoid exposing too many patients to subtherapeutic doses while preserving safety and maintaining rapid accrual. Here we review dose escalation methods for phase I trials, including the rule-based and model-based dose escalation methods that have been developed to evaluate new anticancer agents. Toxicity has traditionally been the primary endpoint for phase I trials involving cytotoxic agents. However, with the emergence of molecularly targeted anticancer agents, potential alternative endpoints to delineate optimal biological activity, such as plasma drug concentration and target inhibition in tumor or surrogate tissues, have been proposed along with new trial designs. We also describe specific methods for drug combinations as well as methods that use a time-to-event endpoint or both toxicity and efficacy as endpoints. Finally, we present the advantages and drawbacks of the various dose escalation methods and discuss specific applications of the methods in developmental oncotherapeutics.

  10. Targeted polyethylene glycol gold nanoparticles for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: from synthesis to proof-of-concept in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadavecchia J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jolanda Spadavecchia,1,2,* Dania Movia,3,* Caroline Moore,3,4 Ciaran Manus Maguire,3,4 Hanane Moustaoui,2 Sandra Casale,1 Yuri Volkov,3,4 Adriele Prina-Mello3,4 1Laboratoire de Réactivité de Surface, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris VI, Paris, 2Centre National de la recherche française, UMR 7244, CSPBAT, Laboratory of Chemistry, Structures, and Properties of Biomaterials and Therapeutic Agents, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; 3AMBER Centre, CRANN Institute, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The main objective of this study was to optimize and characterize a drug delivery carrier for doxorubicin, intended to be intravenously administered, capable of improving the therapeutic index of the chemotherapeutic agent itself, and aimed at the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In light of this goal, we report a robust one-step method for the synthesis of dicarboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG-gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and doxorubicin-loaded PEG-AuNPs, and their further antibody targeting (anti-Kv11.1 polyclonal antibody [pAb]. In in vitro proof-of-concept studies, we evaluated the influence of the nanocarrier and of the active targeting functionality on the anti-tumor efficacy of doxorubicin, with respect to its half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 and drug-triggered changes in the cell cycle. Our results demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin was positively influenced not only by the active targeting exploited through anti-Kv11.1-pAb but also by the drug coupling with a nanometer-sized delivery system, which indeed resulted in a 30-fold decrease of doxorubicin EC50, cell cycle blockage, and drug localization in the cell nuclei. The cell internalization pathway was strongly influenced by the active targeting of the Kv11.1 subunit of the human Ether-à-go-go related gene

  11. Exploring the Feasibility and Potential of Virtual Panels for Soliciting Feedback on Nutrition Education Materials: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Cameron D; Haresign, Helen; Mehling, Christine; Bloomberg, Honey

    2016-01-01

    A changing and cluttered information landscape has put pressure on health organizations to produce consumer information materials that are not only factual but high quality and engaging to audiences. User-centered design methods can be useful in obtaining feedback from consumers; however, they are labor intensive and slow, which is not responsive to the fast-paced communication landscape influenced by social media. EatRight Ontario (ERO), a provincial nutrition and health support program of Dietitians of Canada, develops evidence-based resources for consumers and sought to increase user-centered design activities by exploring whether the standard approach to feedback could be replicated online. While online feedback has been used in marketing research, few examples are available in health promotion and public health to guide programming and policy. This study compared a traditional in-person approach for recruitment and feedback using paper surveys with an Internet-based approach using Facebook as a recruitment tool and collecting user feedback via the Web. The purpose of the proof-of-concept study was to explore the feasibility of the approach and compare an online versus traditional approach in terms of recruitment issues and response. An exploratory, two-group comparative trial was conducted using a convenience and purposive sampling. Participants reviewed a handout on healthy eating and then completed an 18-item survey with both forced-choice items and open-ended responses. One group viewed a hard-copy prototype and completed a paper survey and the other viewed a PDF prototype via Web links and completed a Web survey. The total days required to fulfill the sample for each group were used as the primary method of efficiency calculation. In total, 44 participants (22 per condition) completed the study, consisting of 42 women and 2 men over the age of 18. Few significant differences were detected between the groups. Statistically significant (P≤.05) differences

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Leonard, Kara Lynne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Safran, Howard [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Ng, Thomas [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Taber, Angela [Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Khurshid, Humera; Birnbaum, Ariel [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E.; DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation has potential to improve outcomes for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A dose escalation study was initiated to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received chemoradiation to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and had primary and nodal volumes appropriate for SBRT boost (<120 cc and <60 cc, respectively). SBRT was delivered in 2 fractions after chemoradiation. Dose was escalated from 16 to 28 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction increments, resulting in 4 dose cohorts. MTD was defined when ≥2 of 6 patients per cohort experienced any treatment-related grade 3 to 5 toxicity within 4 weeks of treatment or the maximum dose was reached. Late toxicity, disease control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Twelve patients (3 per dose level) underwent treatment. All treatment plans met predetermined dose-volume constraints. The mean age was 64 years. Most patients had stage III disease (92%) and were medically inoperable (92%). The maximum dose level was reached with no grade 3 to 5 acute toxicities. At a median follow-up time of 16 months, 1-year local-regional control (LRC) was 78%. LRC was 50% at <24 Gy and 100% at ≥24 Gy (P=.02). Overall survival at 1 year was 67%. Late toxicity (grade 3-5) was seen in only 1 patient who experienced fatal bronchopulmonary hemorrhage (grade 5). There were no predetermined dose constraints for the proximal bronchial-vascular tree (PBV) in this study. This patient's 4-cc PBV dose was substantially higher than that received by other patients in all 4 cohorts and was associated with the toxicity observed: 20.3 Gy (P<.05) and 73.5 Gy (P=.07) for SBRT boost and total treatment, respectively. Conclusions: SBRT boost to both primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation is feasible and well tolerated. Local control rates are encouraging, especially at doses ≥24

  13. Final toxicity results of a radiation-dose escalation study in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Predictors for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Arenberg, Douglas; Lyons, Susan; Turrisi, Andrew; Lichter, Allen; Fraass, Benedick; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to report the final toxicity results on a radiation-dose escalation trial designed to test a hypothesis that very high doses of radiation could be safely administered to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by quantifying the dose-volume toxicity relationship of the lung. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 patients with unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC were enrolled and treated with radiation-dose escalation (on the basis of predicted normal-lung toxicity) either alone or with neoadjuvant chemotherapy by use of 3D conformal techniques. Eighty-four patients (77%) received more than 69 Gy, the trial was stopped after the dose reached 103 Gy. Estimated median follow-up was 110 months. Results: There were 17 (14.6%) Grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis and 15 (13.8%) Grade 2 to 3 fibrosis and no Grade 4 to 5 lung toxicity. Multivariate analyses showed them to be (1) not associated with the dose prescribed to the tumor, and (2) significantly (p < 0.001) associated with lung-dosimetric parameters such as the mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung that received at least 20 Gy (V20), and the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the lung. If cutoffs are 30% for V20, 20 Gy for MLD, and 10% for NTCP, these factors have positive predictive values of 50% to 71% and negative predictive value of 85% to 89%. Conclusions: With long-term follow-up for toxicity, we have demonstrated that much higher doses of radiation than are traditionally administered can be safely delivered to a majority of patients with NSCLC. Quantitative lung dose-volume toxicity-based dose escalation can form the basis for individualized high-dose radiation treatment to maximize the therapeutic ratio in these patients

  14. First-in-Man Dose-Escalation Study of the Selective BRAF Inhibitor RG7256 in Patients with BRAF V600-Mutated Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Lassen, Ulrik; Cebon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    V600-mutated advanced solid tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received RG7256 orally over 8 dose levels from 200 mg once a day (QD) to 2400 mg twice a day (BID) (50-, 100- and 150-mg tablets) using a classic 3 + 3 dose escalation design. RESULTS: In total, 45 patients were enrolled; most (87...... %) had advanced melanoma (94 % BRAF V600E). RG7256 was rapidly absorbed, with limited accumulation and dose-proportional increase in exposure up to 1950 mg BID. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached. The most common drug-related adverse events (AEs) were dyspepsia (20 %), dry skin (18 %), rash...

  15. Dose escalation of a curcuminoid formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowell James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is the major yellow pigment extracted from turmeric, a commonly-used spice in India and Southeast Asia that has broad anticarcinogenic and cancer chemopreventive potential. However, few systematic studies of curcumin's pharmacology and toxicology in humans have been performed. Methods A dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of a single dose of standardized powder extract, uniformly milled curcumin (C3 Complex™, Sabinsa Corporation. Healthy volunteers were administered escalating doses from 500 to 12,000 mg. Results Seven of twenty-four subjects (30% experienced only minimal toxicity that did not appear to be dose-related. No curcumin was detected in the serum of subjects administered 500, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000 or 8,000 mg. Low levels of curcumin were detected in two subjects administered 10,000 or 12,000 mg. Conclusion The tolerance of curcumin in high single oral doses appears to be excellent. Given that achieving systemic bioavailability of curcumin or its metabolites may not be essential for colorectal cancer chemoprevention, these findings warrant further investigation for its utility as a long-term chemopreventive agent.

  16. Clinical proof-of-concept trial to assess the therapeutic effect of sirolimus in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: SUISSE ADPKD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüthrich Rudolf P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently there is no effective treatment available to retard cyst growth and to prevent the progression to end-stage renal failure in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Evidence has recently been obtained from animal experiments that activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway plays a crucial role in cyst growth and renal volume expansion, and that the inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin (sirolimus markedly slows cyst development and renal functional deterioration. Based on these promising results in animals we have designed and initiated the first randomized controlled trial (RCT to examine the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of sirolimus to retard disease progression in ADPKD. Method/design This single center, randomised controlled, open label trial assesses the therapeutic effect, safety and tolerability of the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus (Rapamune® in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function. The primary outcome will be the inhibition of kidney volume growth measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI volumetry. Secondary outcome parameters will be preservation of renal function, safety and tolerability of sirolimus. Discussion The results from this proof-of-concept RCT will for the first time show whether treatment with sirolimus effectively retards cyst growth in patients with ADPKD. Trial registration NCT00346918

  17. Persistent Luminescence Nanophosphor Involved Near-Infrared Optical Bioimaging for Investigation of Foodborne Probiotics Biodistribution in Vivo: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyao; Liu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Kun; Wang, Peihua; Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2017-09-20

    Probiotics has attracted great attention in food nutrition and safety research field, but thus far there are limited analytical techniques for visualized and real-time monitoring of the probiotics when they are ingested in vivo. Herein, the optical bioimaging technique has been introduced for investigation of foodborne probiotics biodistribution in vivo, employing the near-infrared (NIR) emitting persistent luminescence nanophosphors (PLNPs) of Cr 3+ -doped zinc gallogermanate (ZGGO) as the contrast nanoprobes. The ultrabrightness, super long afterglow, polydispersed size, low toxicity, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility of PLNPs were demonstrated to be qualified as a tracer for labeling probiotics via antibody (anti-Gram positive bacteria LTA antibody) recognition as well as contrast agent for long-term bioimaging the probiotics. In vivo optical bioimaging assay showed that the LTA antibody functionalized ZGGO nanoprobes that could be efficiently tagged to the probiobics were successfully applied for real-time monitoring and nondamaged probing of the biodistribution of probiotics inside the living body after oral administration. This work presents a proof-of-concept that exploited the bioimaging methodology for real-time and nondamaged researching the foodborne probiotics behaviors in vivo, which would open up a novel way of food safety detection and nutrition investigation.

  18. ATAC Process Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    Researchers at INL with funding from the Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) evaluated a novel approach for near real-time consumption of threat intelligence. Demonstration testing in an industry environment supported the development of this new process to assist the electric sector in securing their critical networks. This report provides the reader with an understanding of the methods used during this proof of concept project. The processes and templates were further advanced with an industry partner during an onsite assessment. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these materials for use by industry.

  19. A Novel Automated Slide-Based Technology for Visualization, Counting, and Characterization of the Formed Elements of Blood: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, James W; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Zahniser, David J

    2017-08-01

    - A novel automated slide-based approach to the complete blood count and white blood cell differential count is introduced. - To present proof of concept for an image-based approach to complete blood count, based on a new slide preparation technique. A preliminary data comparison with the current flow-based technology is shown. - A prototype instrument uses a proprietary method and technology to deposit a precise volume of undiluted peripheral whole blood in a monolayer onto a glass microscope slide so that every cell can be distinguished, counted, and imaged. The slide is stained, and then multispectral image analysis is used to measure the complete blood count parameters. Images from a 600-cell white blood cell differential count, as well as 5000 red blood cells and a variable number of platelets, that are present in 600 high-power fields are made available for a technologist to view on a computer screen. An initial comparison of the basic complete blood count parameters was performed, comparing 1857 specimens on both the new instrument and a flow-based hematology analyzer. - Excellent correlations were obtained between the prototype instrument and a flow-based system. The primary parameters of white blood cell, red blood cell, and platelet counts resulted in correlation coefficients (r) of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98, respectively. Other indices included hemoglobin (r = 0.99), hematocrit (r = 0.99), mean cellular volume (r = 0.90), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (r = 0.97), and mean platelet volume (r = 0.87). For the automated white blood cell differential counts, r values were calculated for neutrophils (r = 0.98), lymphocytes (r = 0.97), monocytes (r = 0.76), eosinophils (r = 0.96), and basophils (r = 0.63). - Quantitative results for components of the complete blood count and automated white blood cell differential count can be developed by image analysis of a monolayer preparation of a known volume of peripheral blood.

  20. The problem of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in cork planks studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana R; Lopes, Luís F; Brito de Barros, Ricardo; Ilharco, Laura M

    2015-01-14

    Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) proved to be a promising detection technique for 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), which confers organoleptic defects to bottled alcoholic beverages, allowing the proposal of a criterion for cork plank acceptance when meant for stopper production. By analysis of a significant number of samples, it was proved that the presence of TCA, even in very low concentrations, imparts subtle changes to the cork spectra, namely, the growth of two new bands at ∼1417 (νC═C of TCA ring) and 1314 cm–1 (a shifted νCC of TCA) and an increase in the relative intensities of the bands at ∼1039 cm–1 (δCO of polysaccharides) and ∼813 cm–1 (τCH of suberin), the latter by overlapping with intense bands of TCA. These relative intensities were evaluated in comparison to a fingerprint of suberin (νasC–O–C), at 1161 cm–1. On the basis of those spectral variables, a multivariate statistics linear analysis (LDA) was performed to obtain a discriminant function that allows classifying the samples according to whether they contain or not TCA. The methodology proposed consists of a demanding acceptance criterion for cork planks destined for stopper production (with the guarantee of nonexistence of TCA) that results from combining the quantitative results with the absence of the two TCA correlated bands. ATR infrared spectroscopy is a nondestructive and easy to apply technique, both on cork planks and on stoppers, and has proven more restrictive than other techniques used in the cork industry that analyze the cleaning solutions. At the level of proof of concept, the method here proposed is appealing for high-value stopper applications.

  1. Design considerations and analysis planning of a phase 2a proof of concept study in rheumatoid arthritis in the presence of possible non-monotonicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to quantify the dose response for a drug in phase 2a clinical trials so the optimal doses can then be selected for subsequent late phase trials. In a phase 2a clinical trial of new lead drug being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a U-shaped dose response curve was observed. In the light of this result further research was undertaken to design an efficient phase 2a proof of concept (PoC trial for a follow-on compound using the lessons learnt from the lead compound. Methods The planned analysis for the Phase 2a trial for GSK123456 was a Bayesian Emax model which assumes the dose-response relationship follows a monotonic sigmoid “S” shaped curve. This model was found to be suboptimal to model the U-shaped dose response observed in the data from this trial and alternatives approaches were needed to be considered for the next compound for which a Normal dynamic linear model (NDLM is proposed. This paper compares the statistical properties of the Bayesian Emax model and NDLM model and both models are evaluated using simulation in the context of adaptive Phase 2a PoC design under a variety of assumed dose response curves: linear, Emax model, U-shaped model, and flat response. Results It is shown that the NDLM method is flexible and can handle a wide variety of dose-responses, including monotonic and non-monotonic relationships. In comparison to the NDLM model the Emax model excelled with higher probability of selecting ED90 and smaller average sample size, when the true dose response followed Emax like curve. In addition, the type I error, probability of incorrectly concluding a drug may work when it does not, is inflated with the Bayesian NDLM model in all scenarios which would represent a development risk to pharmaceutical company. The bias, which is the difference between the estimated effect from the Emax and NDLM models and the simulated value, is comparable if the true dose response

  2. Design considerations and analysis planning of a phase 2a proof of concept study in rheumatoid arthritis in the presence of possible non-monotonicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Walters, Stephen J; Julious, Steven A

    2017-10-02

    It is important to quantify the dose response for a drug in phase 2a clinical trials so the optimal doses can then be selected for subsequent late phase trials. In a phase 2a clinical trial of new lead drug being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a U-shaped dose response curve was observed. In the light of this result further research was undertaken to design an efficient phase 2a proof of concept (PoC) trial for a follow-on compound using the lessons learnt from the lead compound. The planned analysis for the Phase 2a trial for GSK123456 was a Bayesian Emax model which assumes the dose-response relationship follows a monotonic sigmoid "S" shaped curve. This model was found to be suboptimal to model the U-shaped dose response observed in the data from this trial and alternatives approaches were needed to be considered for the next compound for which a Normal dynamic linear model (NDLM) is proposed. This paper compares the statistical properties of the Bayesian Emax model and NDLM model and both models are evaluated using simulation in the context of adaptive Phase 2a PoC design under a variety of assumed dose response curves: linear, Emax model, U-shaped model, and flat response. It is shown that the NDLM method is flexible and can handle a wide variety of dose-responses, including monotonic and non-monotonic relationships. In comparison to the NDLM model the Emax model excelled with higher probability of selecting ED90 and smaller average sample size, when the true dose response followed Emax like curve. In addition, the type I error, probability of incorrectly concluding a drug may work when it does not, is inflated with the Bayesian NDLM model in all scenarios which would represent a development risk to pharmaceutical company. The bias, which is the difference between the estimated effect from the Emax and NDLM models and the simulated value, is comparable if the true dose response follows a placebo like curve, an Emax like curve, or log

  3. WE-G-BRB-02: The Role of Program Project Grants in Study of 3D Conformal Therapy, Dose Escalation and Motion Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH

  4. ReACT Methodology Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) funded INL Researchers to evaluate a novel process for assessing and mitigating cyber security risks. The proof of concept level of the method was tested in an industry environment. This case study, plus additional case studies will support the further development of the method into a tool to assist industry in securing their critical networks. This report provides an understanding of the process developed in the Response Analysis and Characterization Tool (ReACT) project. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these tools for use by industry.

  5. Thiazide diuretic-caused hyponatremia in the elderly hypertensive: will a bottle of Nepro a day keep hyponatremia and the doctor away? Study protocol for a proof-of-concept feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Marcel; McCormick, Brendan; Magner, Peter; Ramsay, Tim; Edwards, Cedric; Bugeja, Ann; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with an increasing prevalence with age, but with easily available medications to control it. Adverse effects of these medications do limit their use, in particular hyponatremia due to thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics. This is more common in the elderly patients due to a combination of inadequate protein intake and impaired urinary dilution capability, made worse by additional thiazide use. Limiting free water intake and increasing protein intake are often not successful resulting in thiazide avoidance. Daily protein supplement is a potential option in this clinical scenario. We describe the protocol for a feasibility study to explore this option. This is a single-arm, prospective, open-label proof-of-concept trial, including elderly patients with thiazide diuretic-induced hyponatremia. Forty patients will be enrolled and receive a bottle of a protein supplement daily, providing 120 mmol of solutes and permitting an extra 163 mL free water loss, for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures will be (1) feasibility for enrollment, (2) safety of the intervention, and (3) potential efficacy of the intervention in improving hyponatremia. Secondary outcome measures will include changes in urine osmolality, body weight, and urea measurements. Thiazide diuretic-induced hyponatremia is an important adverse effect, with significant clinical impact, such as delirium and falls, and limits the use of these potent antihypertensive agents. There are little data on the effect or safety of protein supplementation and also on whether a trial of this is feasible. The results of this proof-of-concept feasibility trial will help plan and execute a larger definitive trial to test protein supplementation as an effective strategy in this condition. The trial is registered with Clinical trials, registration identifier: NCT02614807.

  6. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined With Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Irradiation Dose Escalation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhigang; Zhao Jiandong; Gu Ke; Chen Zhen; Lin Junhua; Xu Zhiyong; Hu Weigang; Zhou Zhenhua; Liu Luming; Jiang Guoliang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients were assigned to two subgroups based on tumor diameter: Group 1 had tumors <10 cm; Group II had tumors ≥10 cm. Escalation was achieved by increments of 4.0 Gy for each cohort in both groups. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as a grade of ≥3 acute liver or gastrointestinal toxicity or any grade 5 acute toxicity in other organs at risk or radiation-induced liver disease. The dose escalation would be terminated when ≥2 of 8 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: From April 2005 to May 2008, 40 patients were enrolled. In Group I, 11 patients had grade ≤2 acute treatment-related toxicities, and no patient experienced DLT; and in Group II, 10 patients had grade ≤2 acute toxicity, and 1 patient in the group receiving 52 Gy developed radiation-induced liver disease. MTD was 62 Gy for Group I and 52 Gy for Group II. In-field progression-free and local progression-free rates were 100% and 69% at 1 year, and 93% and 44% at 2 years, respectively. Distant metastasis rates were 6% at 1 year and 15% at 2 years. Overall survival rates for 1-year and 2-years were 72% and 62%, respectively. Conclusions: The irradiation dose was safely escalated in hepatocellular carcinoma patients by using 3DCRT/IMRT with an active breathing coordinator. MTD was 62 Gy and 52 Gy for patients with tumor diameters of <10 cm and ≥10 cm, respectively.

  7. Efficacy of a Community-Based Technology-Enabled Physical Activity Counseling Program for People With Knee Osteoarthritis: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda C; Sayre, Eric C; Xie, Hui; Falck, Ryan S; Best, John R; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Grewal, Navi; Hoens, Alison M; Noonan, Greg; Feehan, Lynne M

    2018-04-30

    Current practice guidelines emphasize the use of physical activity as the first-line treatment of knee osteoarthritis; however, up to 90% of people with osteoarthritis are inactive. We aimed to assess the efficacy of a technology-enabled counseling intervention for improving physical activity in people with either a physician-confirmed diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis or having passed two validated criteria for early osteoarthritis. We conducted a proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial. The immediate group received a brief education session by a physical therapist, a Fitbit Flex, and four biweekly phone calls for activity counseling. The delayed group received the same intervention 2 months later. Participants were assessed at baseline (T0) and at the end of 2 months (T1), 4 months (T2), and 6 months (T3). Outcomes included (1) mean time on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA ≥3 metabolic equivalents [METs], primary outcome), (2) mean time on MVPA ≥4 METs, (3) mean daily steps, (4) mean time on sedentary activities, (5) Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and (6) Partners in Health scale. Mixed-effects repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess five planned contrasts of changes in outcome measures over measurement periods. The five contrasts were (1) immediate T1-T0 vs delayed T1-T0, (2) delayed T2-T1 vs delayed T1-T0, (3) mean of contrast 1 and contrast 2, (4) immediate T1-T0 vs delayed T2-T1, and (5) mean of immediate T2-T1 and delayed T3-T2. The first three contrasts estimate the between-group effects. The latter two contrasts estimate the effect of the 2-month intervention delay on outcomes. We recruited 61 participants (immediate: n=30; delayed: n=31). Both groups were similar in age (immediate: mean 61.3, SD 9.4 years; delayed: mean 62.1, SD 8.5 years) and body mass index (immediate: mean 29.2, SD 5.5 kg/m 2 ; delayed: mean 29.2, SD 4.8 kg/m 2 ). Contrast analyses revealed significant between-group effects in

  8. Impact of whole brain radiation therapy on CSF penetration ability of Icotinib in EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases: Results of phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; He, Jiazhuo; Xiong, Weijie; Liu, Yongmei; Xiang, Jing; Yu, Qin; Liang, Maozhi; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Ding, Zhenyu; Huang, Meijuan; Ren, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Lu; Hou, Mei; Ding, Lieming; Tan, Fenlai; Lu, You

    2016-06-01

    Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are both treatment options for EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases. However, the dose-escalation toxicity and efficacy of combination therapy, and the effect of WBRT on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of EGFR-TKIs are still unclear. EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with brain metastases were enrolled in this study, and the cohorts were constructed with a 3+3 design. The patients received icotinib with escalating doses (125-625mg, tid), and the concurrent WBRT (37.5Gy/15f/3weeks) started a week later. The CSF penetration rates of icotinib were tested before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after WBRT, respectively. Potential toxicities and benefits from dose-escalation treatment were analyzed. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 3 at each dose level from 125mg-375mg and 6 at 500mg with 3 occurred dose-limiting toxicities. The maximal tolerated dose of icotinib was 375mg tid in this combination therapy. There was a significant correlation between icotinib concentration in the CSF and plasma (R(2)=0.599, Picotinib, from 1.2% to 9.7%, reached a maximum at 375mg (median, 6.1%). There was no significant difference for CSF penetration rates among the three test points (median, 4.1% vs. 2.8% vs. 2.8%, P=0.16). The intracranial objective response rate and median intracranial progression free survival are 80% and 18.9 months. WBRT plus concurrent icotinib is well tolerated in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with brain metastases, up to an icotinib dose of 375mg tid. The icotinib CSF concentration seemed to have a potential ceiling effect with the dose escalation, and WBRT seemed to have no significant impact on CSF penetration of icotinib till 4 weeks after the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase I study of continuous MKC-1 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid malignancies using the modified Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method (TITE-CRM) dose escalation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye; Wilding, George; Eickhoff, Jens; Chappell, Rick; Sidor, Carolyn; Arnott, Jamie; Bailey, Howard; Schelman, William; Liu, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    MKC-1 is an oral cell-cycle inhibitor with broad antitumor activity in preclinical models. Clinical studies demonstrated modest antitumor activity using intermittent dosing schedule, however additional preclinical data suggested continuous dosing could be efficacious with additional effects against the mTor/AKT pathway. The primary objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and response of continuous MKC-1. Secondary objectives included characterizing the dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) and pharmacokinetics (PK). Patients with solid malignancies were eligible, if they had measurable disease, ECOG PS ≤1, and adequate organ function. Exclusions included brain metastases and inability to receive oral drug. MKC-1 was dosed twice daily, continuously in 28-day cycles. Other medications were eliminated if there were possible drug interactions. Doses were assigned using a TITE-CRM algorithm following enrollment of the first 3 pts. Disease response was assessed every 8 weeks. Between 5/08-9/09, 24 patients enrolled (15 M/9 F, median 58 years, range 44-77). Patients 1-3 received 120 mg/d of MKC-1; patients 4-24 were dosed per the TITE-CRM algorithm: 150 mg [n = 1], 180 [2], 200 [1], 230 [1], 260 [5], 290 [6], 320 [5]. The median time on drug was 8 weeks (range 4-28). The only DLT occurred at 320 mg (grade 3 fatigue). Stable disease occurred at 150 mg/d (28 weeks; RCC) and 320 mg/d (16 weeks; breast, parotid). Escalation halted at 320 mg/d. Day 28 pharmacokinetics indicated absorption and active metabolites. Continuous MKC-1 was well-tolerated; there were no RECIST responses, although clinical benefit occurred in 3/24 pts. Dose escalation stopped at 320 mg/d, and this is the MTD as defined by the CRM dose escalation algorithm; this cumulative dose/cycle exceeds that determined from intermittent dosing studies. A TITE-CRM allowed for rapid dose escalation and was able to account for late toxicities with continuous dosing via a modified algorithm.

  10. Adalimumab dose escalation and dose de-escalation success rate and predictors in a large national cohort of Crohn's patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, Filip; Glorieus, Elien; Reenaers, Cathérine; D'Haens, Geert; Peeters, Harald; Franchimont, Dennis; Dewit, Olivier; Caenepeel, Philippe; Louis, Edouard; van Assche, Gert; D'Heygere, F.; George, C.; van Hootegem, P.; Ilegems, S.; Fontaine, F.; Colard, A.; Schoofs, N.; Belaiche, J.; Louis, E.; Reenaers, C.; van Kemseke, C.; Coche, J. C.; Dewit, O.; Rahier, J. F.; de Reuck, M.; Baert, F.; Decaestecker, J.; de Wulf, D.; Amininejad, L.; Franchimont, D.; van Gossum, A.; Du Ville, L.; Hendrickx, K.; Lepoutre, L.; Vandervoort, J.; van der Spek, P.; Sprengers, D.; van de Mierop, F.; Potvin, P.; Bontems, P.; Moreels, T.; van Outryve, M.; Mana, F.; de Looze, D.; de Vos, M.; Peeters, H.; Ferrante, M.; Rutgeerts, P.; van Assche, G.; Vermeire, S.

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab is efficacious in inducing and maintaining remission in Crohn's disease but dose escalation is needed in 30-40% after 1 year. Attempts for dose de-escalation have not been studied. This study aimed to assess the need for, predictors, and outcome of dose escalation and de-escalation in a

  11. Post treatment PSA nadirs support continuing dose escalation study in patients with pretreatment PSA levels >10 ng/ml, but not in those with PSA <10 NG/ML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, D.H.; Hanlon, A.L.; Movsas, B.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: We have recently shown that ICRU reporting point radiation doses above 71 Gy are not associated with improved bNED survival in prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA level 20 ng/ml we found a strong correlation between dose and nadir values < 1.0 ng/ml (p=.003) as well as for nadir's < 0.5 ng/ml (p=.04). This dose/nadir effect held at several dose levels, but 74 Gy for nadir values < 1.0 ng/ml and 72 Gy for nadir's < 0.5 ng/ml remained the most significant. 32% of these patients achieved a nadir < 1.0ng/ml and 15% < 0.5ng/ml. Conclusions: This analysis provides strong additional support that patients with pretreatment PSA values of < 10 ng/ml do not benefit from dose escalation beyond an ICRU reporting point dose of 71 Gy. For patients with pretreatment PSA's of 10-19.9 ng/ml there is no dose/nadir response evaluated at a nadir of 1.0 ng/ml; however, there is a borderline effect observed at a nadir of 0.5 ng/ml. Patients with pretreatment PSA's of 20 ng/ml or greater clearly benefit from higher doses as evaluated by PSA nadirs of 1.0 ng/ml, and 0.5 ng/ml. These studies support the continued investigation of dose escalation in treating patients with PSA levels over 10 ng/ml, they do not support continued investigation of dose escalation beyond 71 Gy in patients with pretreatment PSA levels < 10 ng/ml. The failure to demonstrate any dose response for the low PSA group and the finding of only a borderline effect for the intermediate PSA group may be influenced by the relatively small number of patients in our series treated to doses < 70 Gy and the fact that none of our patients were treated to doses below 65.98 Gy. The lower limit of acceptible dose has yet to be defined

  12. Natural tuning: towards a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    The cosmological constant problem and the absence of new natural physics at the electroweak scale, if confirmed by the LHC, may either indicate that the nature is fine-tuned or that a refined notion of naturalness is required. We construct a family of toy UV complete quantum theories providing a proof of concept for the second possibility. Low energy physics is described by a tuned effective field theory, which exhibits relevant interactions not protected by any symmetries and separated by an arbitrary large mass gap from the new "gravitational" physics, represented by a set of irrelevant operators. Nevertheless, the only available language to describe dynamics at all energy scales does not require any fine-tuning. The interesting novel feature of this construction is that UV physics is not described by a fixed point, but rather exhibits asymptotic fragility. Observation of additional unprotected scalars at the LHC would be a smoking gun for this scenario. Natural tuning also favors TeV scale unification.

  13. Ewing sarcoma localized on spine: a dose escalation study in child; Sarcome d'Ewing localise au rachis: une etude d'escalade de dose chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogin, G.; Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France); Biston, M.C.; Gassa, F. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Amessis, M.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S. [Institut Curie, Paris (France); De Marzi, L.; Lacroix, F.; Leroy, A. [Institut Curie, Orsay (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the study of dose escalation for the treatment of spinal in two types of Ewing tumours. They used 5 dose levels at the rate of five 1,6 Gy per week. They compare different radiotherapy techniques: three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy, static intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy, helical tomo-therapy, volume-modulated arc-therapy (VMAT), stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton-therapy (in passive diffusion). It appears that it is possible to safely and efficiently deliver until 70,4 Gy in some Ewing tumours. In child, exclusive radiotherapy might become a local treatment option and would require a clinic trial and comparison with exclusive surgery or post-operative radiotherapy. Short communication

  14. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  15. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teughels, W; Newman, M G; Coucke, W; Haffajee, A D; Van Der Mei, H C; Haake, S Kinder; Schepers, E; Cassiman, J-J; Van Eldere, J; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2007-11-01

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oropharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and pharyngitis, but their effectiveness in the treatment of periodontitis is unknown. Therefore, this study addressed the hypothesis that the application of selected beneficial bacteria, as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, would inhibit the periodontopathogen recolonization of periodontal pockets. Analysis of the data showed, in a beagle dog model, that when beneficial bacteria were applied in periodontal pockets adjunctively after root planing, subgingival recolonization of periodontopathogens was delayed and reduced, as was the degree of inflammation, at a clinically significant level. The study confirmed the hypothesis and provides a proof of concept for a guided pocket recolonization (GPR) approach in the treatment of periodontitis.

  16. A Numerical Proof of Concept for Thermal Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dragan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper computational fluid dynamics is used to provide a proof of concept for controlled flow separation using thermal wall interactions with the velocity boundary layer. A 3D case study is presented, using a transition modeling Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The highly loaded single slot flap airfoil was chosen to be representative for a light aircraft and the flow conditions were modeled after a typical landing speed. In the baseline case, adiabatic walls were considered while in the separation control case, the top surface of the flaps was heated to 500 K. This heating lead to flow separation on the flaps and a significant alteration of the flow pattern across all the elements of the wing. The findings indicate that this control method has potential, with implications in both aeronautical as well as sports and civil engineering applications.

  17. Toward prediction of efficacy of chemotherapy: A proof of concept study in lung cancer patients using [11C]docetaxel and positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. van der Veldt (Astrid); M. Lubberink (Mark); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); W.J. Loos (Walter); G.J.M. Herder (G. J M); M.J.W. Greuter (Marcel); E.F.I. Comans (Emile); H.B. Rutten (Hugo); J. Eriksson (Joel); A.D. Windhorst (Albert); N.H. Hendrikse (N. Harry); D. Postmus (Douwe); E.F. Smit (Egbert); A.A. Lammertsma (Adriaan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pharmacokinetics of docetaxel can be measured in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) and a microdose of radiolabeled docetaxel ([11C]docetaxel). The objective of this study was to investigate whether a [11C]docetaxel PET microdosing study could predict tumor uptake of

  18. Co-registration of pre-operative CT with ex vivo surgically excised ground glass nodules to define spatial extent of invasive adenocarcinoma on in vivo imaging: a proof-of-concept study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, Mirabela [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Rajiah, Prabhakar [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States); Gilkeson, Robert; Yang, Michael; Donatelli, Christopher; Linden, Philip [Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States); Thawani, Rajat; Madabhushi, Anant [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); Jacono, Frank J. [Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States); Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To develop an approach for radiology-pathology fusion of ex vivo histology of surgically excised pulmonary nodules with pre-operative CT, to radiologically map spatial extent of the invasive adenocarcinomatous component of the nodule. Six subjects (age: 75 ± 11 years) with pre-operative CT and surgically excised ground-glass nodules (size: 22.5 ± 5.1 mm) with a significant invasive adenocarcinomatous component (>5 mm) were included. The pathologist outlined disease extent on digitized histology specimens; two radiologists and a pulmonary critical care physician delineated the entire nodule on CT (in-plane resolution: <0.8 mm, inter-slice distance: 1-5 mm). We introduced a novel reconstruction approach to localize histology slices in 3D relative to each other while using CT scan as spatial constraint. This enabled the spatial mapping of the extent of tumour invasion from histology onto CT. Good overlap of the 3D reconstructed histology and the nodule outlined on CT was observed (65.9 ± 5.2%). Reduction in 3D misalignment of corresponding anatomical landmarks on histology and CT was observed (1.97 ± 0.42 mm). Moreover, the CT attenuation (HU) distributions were different when comparing invasive and in situ regions. This proof-of-concept study suggests that our fusion method can enable the spatial mapping of the invasive adenocarcinomatous component from 2D histology slices onto in vivo CT. (orig.)

  19. Coupling HPLC-SPE-NMR with a microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay for efficient analysis of antioxidants in food--validation and proof-of-concept study with caper buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Stefanie; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nielsen, John; Staerk, Dan

    2013-12-15

    This work describes the coupling of a microplate-based antioxidant assay with a hyphenated system consisting of high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-SPE-NMR/high-resolution antioxidant assay, for the analysis of complex food extracts. The applicability of the microplate-based antioxidant assay for high-resolution screening of common food phenolics as well as parameters related to their trapping efficiency, elution behavior, and recovery on/from SPE cartridges are described. It was found that the microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay is an attractive and easy implementable alternative to direct on-line screening methods. Furthermore, it was shown that Resin SH and Resin GP SPE material are superior to RP C18HD for trapping of phenolic compounds. Proof-of-concept study was performed with caper bud extract, revealing the most important antioxidants to be quercetin, kaempferol, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-β-rutinoside and N(1),N(5),N(10)-triphenylpropenoyl spermidine amides. Targeted isolation of the latter, and comprehensive NMR experiments showed them to be N(1),N(10)-di-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5)-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(1)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5),N(10)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(10)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(1),N(5)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, and N(1),N(5),N(10)-tri-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine amides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-registration of pre-operative CT with ex vivo surgically excised ground glass nodules to define spatial extent of invasive adenocarcinoma on in vivo imaging: a proof-of-concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Rajiah, Prabhakar; Gilkeson, Robert; Yang, Michael; Donatelli, Christopher; Linden, Philip; Thawani, Rajat; Madabhushi, Anant; Jacono, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    To develop an approach for radiology-pathology fusion of ex vivo histology of surgically excised pulmonary nodules with pre-operative CT, to radiologically map spatial extent of the invasive adenocarcinomatous component of the nodule. Six subjects (age: 75 ± 11 years) with pre-operative CT and surgically excised ground-glass nodules (size: 22.5 ± 5.1 mm) with a significant invasive adenocarcinomatous component (>5 mm) were included. The pathologist outlined disease extent on digitized histology specimens; two radiologists and a pulmonary critical care physician delineated the entire nodule on CT (in-plane resolution: <0.8 mm, inter-slice distance: 1-5 mm). We introduced a novel reconstruction approach to localize histology slices in 3D relative to each other while using CT scan as spatial constraint. This enabled the spatial mapping of the extent of tumour invasion from histology onto CT. Good overlap of the 3D reconstructed histology and the nodule outlined on CT was observed (65.9 ± 5.2%). Reduction in 3D misalignment of corresponding anatomical landmarks on histology and CT was observed (1.97 ± 0.42 mm). Moreover, the CT attenuation (HU) distributions were different when comparing invasive and in situ regions. This proof-of-concept study suggests that our fusion method can enable the spatial mapping of the invasive adenocarcinomatous component from 2D histology slices onto in vivo CT. (orig.)

  1. Smart rocks and wireless communication system for real-time monitoring and mitigation of bridge scour : a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to integrate commercial measurement and communication components into a scour : monitoring system with magnets or electronics embedded in smart rocks, and evaluate and improve its : performance in laboratory and field conditions for t...

  2. A systematic methodology review of phase I radiation dose escalation trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Mastrigt, Ghislaine van; Hahn, Steve M.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Lammering, Guido; Buijsen, Jeroen; Bentzen, Soren M.; Lievens, Yolande; Kramar, Andrew; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate the methodology used in published phase I radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation trials. A specific emphasis was placed on the frequency of reporting late complications as endpoint. Materials and methods: We performed a systematic literature review using a predefined search strategy to identify all phase I trials reporting on external radiotherapy dose escalation in cancer patients. Results: Fifty-three trials (phase I: n = 36, phase I-II: n = 17) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 20 used a modified Fibonacci design for the RT dose escalation, but 32 did not specify a design. Late toxicity was variously defined as >3 months (n = 43) or > 6 months (n = 3) after RT, or not defined (n = 7). In only nine studies the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was related to late toxicity, while only half the studies reported the minimum follow-up period for dose escalation (n = 26). Conclusion: In phase I RT trials, late complications are often not taken into account and there is currently no consensus on the methodology used for radiation dose escalation studies. We therefore propose a decision-tree algorithm which depends on the endpoint selected and whether a validated early surrogate endpoint is available, in order to choose the most appropriate study design.

  3. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of naltrexone to counteract antipsychotic-associated weight gain: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tek, Cenk; Ratliff, Joseph; Reutenauer, Erin; Ganguli, Rohan; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2014-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia experience higher rates of obesity as well as related morbidity and mortality than the general population does. Women with schizophrenia are at particular risk for antipsychotic-associated weight gain, obesity, and related medical disorders such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given preclinical studies revealing the role of the endogenous opioid systems in human appetite and the potential of antipsychotic medications to interfere with this system, we hypothesized that opioid antagonists may be beneficial in arresting antipsychotic-associated weight gain and promoting further weight loss in women with schizophrenia. In the present study, 24 overweight women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomized to placebo or naltrexone (NTX) 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in body weight from baseline. The patients in the NTX group had significant weight loss (-3.40 kg) compared with weight gain (+1.37 kg) in the patients in the placebo group. Mainly, nondiabetic subjects lost weight in the NTX arm. These data support the need to further investigate the role of D2 blockade in reducing food reward-based overeating. A larger study addressing the weaknesses of this pilot study is currently underway.

  4. GnRH agonist ovulation trigger and hCG-based, progesterone-free luteal support: a proof of concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    in normal responder IVF patients. We here present a novel approach for luteal support after a GnRHa trigger. METHODS Normal responder patients who failed at least one previous IVF attempt, during which a conventional hCG trigger was used, were consecutively enrolled in the study. A GnRH antagonist...

  5. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Naltrexone to Counteract Antipsychotic-Associated Weight Gain: Proof of Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Tek, Cenk; Ratliff, Joseph; Reutenauer, Erin; Ganguli, Rohan; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from higher rates of obesity and related morbidity and mortality than the general population. Women with schizophrenia are at particular risk for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, obesity, and related medical disorders such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given preclinical studies revealing the role of the endogenous opioid systems in human appetite and the potential of antipsychotic medications to interfere with this system, we hypothesized that op...

  6. Effects of a food-specific inhibition training in individuals with binge eating disorder-findings from a randomized controlled proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Speer, Eva; Schag, Kathrin; Leehr, Elisabeth Johanna; Zipfel, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Impulsivity might contribute to the development and maintenance of obesity and eating disorders. Patients suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) show an impulsive eating pattern characterized by regular binge eating episodes. Novel behavioral interventions increasing inhibitory control could improve eating behavior in BED. We piloted a novel food-specific inhibition training in individuals with BED. N = 22 BED patients according to SCID-I were randomly assigned to three sessions of a training or control condition. In both conditions, pictures of high-caloric food items were presented in peripheral vision on a computer screen while assessing gaze behavior. The training group had to suppress the urge to turn their gaze towards these pictures (i.e., to perform antisaccades). The control group was allowed to freely explore the pictures. We assessed self-reported food craving, food addiction, and wanting/liking of food pictures pre- and post-intervention. Twenty participants completed the study. The training proved to be feasible and acceptable. Patients of the training group significantly improved inhibitory control towards high-caloric food stimuli. Both groups reported a significantly lower number of binge eating episodes in the last four weeks after termination of the study. No changes were found in food craving, food addiction, liking, and wanting ratings. A food-specific inhibition training could be a useful element in the treatment of BED and other eating disorders; however, larger efficacy studies in patient samples are needed to investigate the efficacy of this and similar training approaches.

  7. Formulation optimization and in vivo proof-of-concept study of thermosensitive liposomes balanced by phospholipid, elastin-like polypeptide, and cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Min Park

    Full Text Available One application of nanotechnology in medicine that is presently being developed involves a drug delivery system (DDS employing nanoparticles to deliver drugs to diseased sites in the body avoiding damage of healthy tissue. Recently, the mild hyperthermia-triggered drug delivery combined with anticancer agent-loaded thermosensitive liposomes was widely investigated. In this study, thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol-2000] (DSPE-PEG, cholesterol, and a fatty acid conjugated elastin-like polypeptide (ELP, were developed and optimized for triggered drug release, controlled by external heat stimuli. We introduced modified ELP, tunable for various biomedical purposes, to our thermosensitive liposome (e-TSL to convey a high thermoresponsive property. We modulated thermosensitivity and stability by varying the ratios of e-TSL components, such as phospholipid, ELP, and cholesterol. Experimental data obtained in this study corresponded to results from a simulation study that demonstrated, through the calculation of the lateral diffusion coefficient, increased permeation of the lipid bilayer with higher ELP concentrations, and decreased permeation in the presence of cholesterol. Finally, we identified effective drug accumulation in tumor tissues and antitumor efficacy with our optimized e-TSL, while adjusting lag-times for systemic accumulation.

  8. Linking Suspension Nasal Spray Drug Deposition Patterns to Pharmacokinetic Profiles: A Proof-of-Concept Study Using Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, Alex; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to link regional nasal spray deposition patterns of suspension formulations, predicted with computational fluid dynamics, to in vivo human pharmacokinetic plasma concentration profiles. This is accomplished through the use of computational fluid dynamics simulations coupled with compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling. Results showed a rapid initial rise in plasma concentration that is due to the absorption of drug particles deposited in the nasal middle passages, followed by a slower increase in plasma concentration that is governed by the transport of drug particles from the nasal vestibule to the middle passages. Although drug deposition locations in the nasal cavity had a significant effect on the shape of the concentration profile, the absolute bioavailability remained constant provided that all the drug remained in the nose over the course of the simulation. Loss of drug through the nostrils even after long periods resulted in a significant decrease in bioavailability and increased variability. The results of this study quantify how differences in nasal drug deposition affect transient plasma concentrations and overall bioavailability. These findings are potentially useful for establishing bioequivalence for nasal spray devices and reducing the burden of in vitro testing, pharmacodynamics, and clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS on markers of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT in large airway samples in COPD: an exploratory proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohal SS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sukhwinder Singh Sohal,1,* Amir Soltani,1,* David Reid,1,2 Chris Ward,1,3 Karen E Wills,1,4 H Konrad Muller,1 Eugene Haydn Walters1 1National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence for Chronic Respiratory Disease, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; 2Iron Metabolism Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 3Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK; 4Department of Biostatistics, Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: We recently reported that epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT is active in the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, suggesting presence of an active profibrotic and promalignant stroma. With no data available on potential treatment effects, we undertook a blinded analysis of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS effects versus placebo on EMT markers in previously obtained endobronchial biopsies in COPD patients, as a “proof of concept” study.Methods: Assessment of the effects of inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP; 500 µg twice daily for 6 months versus placebo in 34 COPD patients (23 on fluticasone propionate and eleven on placebo. The end points were epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; marker of epithelial activation and the biomarkers of EMT: reticular basement membrane (Rbm fragmentation (“hallmark” structural marker, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 cell expression, and S100A4 expression in basal epithelial and Rbm cells (mesenchymal transition markers.Results: Epithelial activation, “clefts/fragmentation” in the Rbm, and changes in the other biomarkers all regressed on ICS, at or close to conventional levels of statistical significance. From these data, we have been able to nominate primary and secondary end points and develop

  10. Motivational and Behavioral Activation as an Adjunct to Psychiatric Rehabilitation for Mild to Moderate Negative Symptoms in Individuals with Schizophrenia: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Hong Choi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Few psychosocial approaches address the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, which shares common features with depression and anxiety. Behavioral activation (BA is effective for addressing depression and anxiety in adults with various mental disorders. Motivational Interviewing (MI has been successfully applied to address ambivalence or lack of motivation towards treatment. Motivational and behavioral activation (mBA has been developed by incorporating the core principles from BA and MI with recent findings on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of mBA in a non-randomized controlled pilot study that included individuals with schizophrenia with mild to moderate negative symptoms receiving psychiatric rehabilitation. A total of 73 individuals with schizophrenia were recruited. Forty-seven of the participants who met the study inclusion and exclusion criteria were assigned to either an mBA + usual psychiatric rehabilitation group (mBA or a usual psychiatric rehabilitation only group (treatment as usual, TAU. Administering mBA to individuals with schizophrenia with mild to moderate negative symptoms was feasible in a community mental health setting. Relative to TAU, mBA was associated with large effects in reducing negative symptoms measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS. However, after considering PANSS cognitive deficits and marital status as covariates due to significant differences in their baseline levels, the treatment effects on the BNSS were partially observed. In addition, participants in the mBA group showed improved verbal learning and memory compared with those in the TAU group. In individuals with schizophrenia receiving the usual forms of psychiatric rehabilitation in a community mental health setting, mBA appears to offer a promising adjunctive approach for addressing mild to moderate

  11. New onset of constipation during long-term physical inactivity: a proof-of-concept study on the immobility-induced bowel changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Iovino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathophysiological mechanisms underlining constipation are incompletely understood, but prolonged bed rest is commonly considered a relevant determinant. AIMS: Our primary aim was to study the effect of long-term physical inactivity on determining a new onset of constipation. Secondary aim were the evaluation of changes in stool frequency, bowel function and symptoms induced by this prolonged physical inactivity. METHODS: Ten healthy men underwent a 7-day run-in followed by 35-day study of experimentally-controlled bed rest. The study was sponsored by the Italian Space Agency. The onset of constipation was evaluated according to Rome III criteria for functional constipation. Abdominal bloating, flatulence, pain and urgency were assessed by a 100mm Visual Analog Scales and bowel function by adjectival scales (Bristol Stool Form Scale, ease of passage of stool and sense of incomplete evacuation. Daily measurements of bowel movements was summarized on a weekly score. Pre and post bed rest Quality of Life (SF-36, general health (Goldberg's General Health and depression mood (Zung scale questionnaires were administered. RESULTS: New onset of functional constipation fulfilling Rome III criteria was found in 60% (6/10 of participants (p=0.03. The score of flatulence significantly increased whilst the stool frequency significantly decreased during the week-by-week comparisons period (repeated-measures ANOVA, p=0.02 and p=0.001, respectively. Stool consistency and bowel symptoms were not influenced by prolonged physical inactivity. In addition, no significant changes were observed in general health, in mood state and in quality of life at the end of bed rest. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide evidence that prolonged physical inactivity is relevant etiology in functional constipation in healthy individuals. The common clinical suggestion of early mobilization in bedridden patients is supported as well.

  12. Measures and Metrics for Feasibility of Proof-of-Concept Studies With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Rapid Point-of-Care Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant Pai, Nitika; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Vijh, Rohit; Karatzas, Nicolaos; Daher, Jana; Smallwood, Megan; Wong, Tom; Engel, Nora

    2017-01-01

    Objective Pilot (feasibility) studies form a vast majority of diagnostic studies with point-of-care technologies but often lack use of clear measures/metrics and a consistent framework for reporting and evaluation. To fill this gap, we systematically reviewed data to (a) catalog feasibility measures/metrics and (b) propose a framework. Methods For the period January 2000 to March 2014, 2 reviewers searched 4 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus), retrieved 1441 citations, and abstracted data from 81 studies. We observed 2 major categories of measures, that is, implementation centered and patient centered, and 4 subcategories of measures, that is, feasibility, acceptability, preference, and patient experience. We defined and delineated metrics and measures for a feasibility framework. We documented impact measures for a comparison. Findings We observed heterogeneity in reporting of metrics as well as misclassification and misuse of metrics within measures. Although we observed poorly defined measures and metrics for feasibility, preference, and patient experience, in contrast, acceptability measure was the best defined. For example, within feasibility, metrics such as consent, completion, new infection, linkage rates, and turnaround times were misclassified and reported. Similarly, patient experience was variously reported as test convenience, comfort, pain, and/or satisfaction. In contrast, within impact measures, all the metrics were well documented, thus serving as a good baseline comparator. With our framework, we classified, delineated, and defined quantitative measures and metrics for feasibility. Conclusions Our framework, with its defined measures/metrics, could reduce misclassification and improve the overall quality of reporting for monitoring and evaluation of rapid point-of-care technology strategies and their context-driven optimization. PMID:29333105

  13. Measures and Metrics for Feasibility of Proof-of-Concept Studies With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Rapid Point-of-Care Technologies: The Evidence and the Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant Pai, Nitika; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Vijh, Rohit; Karatzas, Nicolaos; Daher, Jana; Smallwood, Megan; Wong, Tom; Engel, Nora

    2017-12-01

    Pilot (feasibility) studies form a vast majority of diagnostic studies with point-of-care technologies but often lack use of clear measures/metrics and a consistent framework for reporting and evaluation. To fill this gap, we systematically reviewed data to ( a ) catalog feasibility measures/metrics and ( b ) propose a framework. For the period January 2000 to March 2014, 2 reviewers searched 4 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus), retrieved 1441 citations, and abstracted data from 81 studies. We observed 2 major categories of measures, that is, implementation centered and patient centered, and 4 subcategories of measures, that is, feasibility, acceptability, preference, and patient experience. We defined and delineated metrics and measures for a feasibility framework. We documented impact measures for a comparison. We observed heterogeneity in reporting of metrics as well as misclassification and misuse of metrics within measures. Although we observed poorly defined measures and metrics for feasibility, preference, and patient experience, in contrast, acceptability measure was the best defined. For example, within feasibility, metrics such as consent, completion, new infection, linkage rates, and turnaround times were misclassified and reported. Similarly, patient experience was variously reported as test convenience, comfort, pain, and/or satisfaction. In contrast, within impact measures, all the metrics were well documented, thus serving as a good baseline comparator. With our framework, we classified, delineated, and defined quantitative measures and metrics for feasibility. Our framework, with its defined measures/metrics, could reduce misclassification and improve the overall quality of reporting for monitoring and evaluation of rapid point-of-care technology strategies and their context-driven optimization.

  14. Upper airway stabilization by osteopathic manipulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion versus sham manipulation in OSAS patients: a proof-of-concept, randomized, crossover, double-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacq, Olivier; Arnulf, Isabelle; Similowski, Thomas; Attali, Valérie

    2017-12-20

    Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is used empirically for the treatment of rhinitis and snoring and is thought to increase pharyngeal stability. This trial was designed to study the effects of this treatment on pharyngeal stability evaluated by critical closing pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. This single-centre, randomized, crossover, double-blind study compared active manipulation and sham manipulation of the SPG. Randomization was computer-generated. Patients each received one active manipulation and one sham manipulation at an interval of 21 days and were evaluated 30 min and 48 h after each session administered by a qualified osteopath. Neither the patients, nor the investigator performing the evaluations were informed about the order of the two techniques (double-blind). The primary endpoint was the percentage of responding patients presenting increased pharyngeal stability defined by a variation of critical closing pressure (Pcrit) of at least -4 cmH 2 O at 30 min. Secondary endpoints were the variation of Pcrit in absolute values, sleepiness and snoring. Others endpoints were lacrimation (Schirmer's test), induced pain, sensations experienced during OMT. Ten patients were included and nine (57 [50; 58] years, comprising 7 men, with an apnoea-hypopnoea index of 31.0 [25.5; 33.2]/h; (values are median [quartiles])) were analysed. Seven patients were analysed for the primary endpoint and nine patients were analysed for secondary endpoints. Five patients responded after active manipulation versus no patients after sham manipulation (p = 0.0209). Active manipulation induced more intense pain (p = 0.0089), increased lacrimation (ns) and more tactile, nociceptive and gustatory sensations (13 versus 1) compared to sham manipulation. No significant difference was observed for the other endpoints. Osteopathic manipulative treatment of the SPG may improve pharyngeal stability in obstructive sleep

  15. Thoughts turned into high-level commands: Proof-of-concept study of a vision-guided robot arm driven by functional MRI (fMRI) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Nigri, Anna; Rosazza, Cristina; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the possibility of using functional MRI to control a robot arm through a brain-machine interface by directly coupling haemodynamic activity in the sensory-motor cortex to the position of two axes. Here, we extend this work by implementing interaction at a more abstract level, whereby imagined actions deliver structured commands to a robot arm guided by a machine vision system. Rather than extracting signals from a small number of pre-selected regions, the proposed system adaptively determines at individual level how to map representative brain areas to the input nodes of a classifier network. In this initial study, a median action recognition accuracy of 90% was attained on five volunteers performing a game consisting of collecting randomly positioned coloured pawns and placing them into cups. The "pawn" and "cup" instructions were imparted through four mental imaginery tasks, linked to robot arm actions by a state machine. With the current implementation in MatLab language the median action recognition time was 24.3s and the robot execution time was 17.7s. We demonstrate the notion of combining haemodynamic brain-machine interfacing with computer vision to implement interaction at the level of high-level commands rather than individual movements, which may find application in future fMRI approaches relevant to brain-lesioned patients, and provide source code supporting further work on larger command sets and real-time processing. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy for HIV-1 Infection: Considerations for Proof of Concept Studies and Translation to Standard Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. DiGiusto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years we have been investigating an alternative approach to treating HIV-1/AIDS, based on the creation of a disease-resistant immune system through transplantation of autologous, gene-modified (HIV-1-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (GM-HSPC. We propose that the expression of selected RNA-based HIV-1 inhibitors in the CD4+ cells derived from GM-HSPC will protect them from HIV-1 infection and results in a sufficient immune repertoire to control HIV-1 viremia resulting in a functional cure for HIV-1/AIDS. Additionally, it is possible that the subset of protected T cells will also be able to facilitate the immune-based elimination of latently infected cells if they can be activated to express viral antigens. Thus, a single dose of disease resistant GM-HSPC could provide an effective treatment for HIV-1+ patients who require (or desire an alternative to lifelong antiretroviral chemotherapy. We describe herein the results from several pilot clinical studies in HIV-1 patients and our strategies to develop second generation vectors and clinical strategies for HIV-1+ patients with malignancy who require ablative chemotherapy as part of treatment and others without malignancy. The important issues related to stem cell source, patient selection, conditioning regimen and post-infusion correlative studies become increasingly complex and are discussed herein.

  17. Subtype assignment of CLL based on B-cell subset associated gene signatures from normal bone marrow – A proof of concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Caroline Holm; Jakobsen, Lasse Hjort; Gentles, Andrew J.

    2018-01-01

    . Our hypothesis is that by segregating CLL according to BAGS, we can identify subtypes with prognostic implications in support of pathogenetic value of BAGS. Microarray-based gene-expression samples from eight independent CLL cohorts (1,024 untreated patients) were BAGS-stratified into pre-BI, pre...... subtype resistance towards rituximab and cyclophosphamide varied for rituximab, whereas all subtypes were sensitive to cyclophosphamide. This study supports our hypothesis that BAGS-subtyping may be of tangible prognostic and pathogenetic value for CLL patients.......Diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) involves blood cell counts, immunophenotyping, IgVH mutation status, and cytogenetic analyses. We generated B-cell associated gene-signatures (BAGS) based on six naturally occurring B-cell subsets within normal bone marrow...

  18. Evaluation of medicine retail outlets for sale of typhoid fever vaccine among adults in two urban and rural settings in western Kenya: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Julius; Odhiambo, Gladys; Meng'anyi, Lucy W; Musuva, Rosemary M; Mule, Joseph M; Alaly, Zakayo S; Odiere, Maurice R; Mwinzi, Pauline N; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2016-09-29

    Private sector medicine outlets are an important provider of health services across the developing world, and are an untapped means of distributing and selling vaccines outside of childhood immunization programs. The present study assessed the viability of medicine outlets (chemists and pharmacies) as potential channels for sale of vaccines. To evaluate the viability of the medicine outlet model, we partnered with nine outlets across urban and rural communities in western Kenya to sell a nurse-administered typhoid vaccine. Purchasers were surveyed to reveal market demographic characteristics, reasons for vaccine purchase, and sources of information about the program. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions defined acceptability, demand, and additional suggestions for improving this mechanism of selling and distributing vaccines. There was a higher than expected demand for the vaccine that resulted in stock-outs. Previous instance of typhoid, desire to prevent disease, affordable price and convenience were cited by most participants as main reasons for purchase of vaccine at the local outlet. The most common source of information on the vaccine sale was word-of-mouth and referral from friends. Longer vaccine sale duration, adequate stocking of vaccines and extended hours of administration in the evening to allow working individuals to buy vaccines were cited by participants as ways for improved participation in the future. This study demonstrated a high demand for vaccines at community medicine outlets. Important insights on how to improve and sustain such a program included extension of distribution time, education of outlet keepers, and minimizing vaccine stockouts. With improved social marketing, infrastructure mapping, education and pricing schemes, medicine outlets could become a sustainable avenue for selling adult vaccines in emerging markets for both routine and pandemic vaccines.

  19. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-04

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue.

  20. Improved Muscle Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy through L-Arginine and Metformin: An Investigator-Initiated, Open-Label, Single-Center, Proof-Of-Concept-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hafner

    Full Text Available Altered neuronal nitric oxide synthase function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to impaired mitochondrial function which is thought to be one cause of muscle damage in this disease. The study tested if increased intramuscular nitric oxide concentration can improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a novel therapeutic approach through the combination of L-arginine with metformin. Five ambulatory, genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients aged between 7–10 years were treated with L-arginine (3 x 2.5 g/d and metformin (2 x 250 mg/d for 16 weeks. Treatment effects were assessed using mitochondrial protein expression analysis in muscular biopsies, indirect calorimetry, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, quantitative thigh muscle MRI, and clinical scores of muscle performance. There were no serious side effects and no patient dropped out. Muscle biopsy results showed pre-treatment a significantly reduced mitochondrial protein expression and increased oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients compared to controls. Post-treatment a significant elevation of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was observed as well as a reduction in oxidative stress. Treatment also decreased resting energy expenditure rates and energy substrate use shifted from carbohydrates to fatty acids. These changes were associated with improved clinical scores. In conclusion pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway leads to improved mitochondria function and clinically a slowing of disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study shall lead to further development of this novel therapeutic approach into a real alternative for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516085.

  1. Fostering Social Cognition through an Imitation- and Synchronization-Based Dance/Movement Intervention in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Controlled Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Svenja; Behrends, Andrea; Fairhurst, Merle T; Dziobek, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Since social cognition is impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aimed at establishing the efficacy of a newly developed imitation- and synchronization-based dance/movement intervention (SI-DMI) in fostering emotion inference and empathic feelings (emotional reaction to feelings of others) in adults with high-functioning ASD. Fifty-five adults with ASD (IQ ≥85) who were blinded to the aim of the study were assigned to receive either 10 weeks of a dance/movement intervention focusing on interpersonal movement imitation and synchronization (SI-DMI, n = 27) or a control movement intervention (CMI, n = 24) focusing on individual motor coordination (2 participants from each group declined before baseline testing). The primary outcome measure was the objective Multifaceted Empathy Test targeting emotion inference and empathic feelings. Secondary outcomes were scores on the self-rated Interpersonal Reactivity Index. The well-established automatic imitation task and synchronization finger-tapping task were used to quantify effects on imitation and synchronization functions, complemented by the more naturalistic Assessment of Spontaneous Interaction in Movement. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that from baseline to 3 months, patients treated with SI-DMI showed a significantly larger improvement in emotion inference (d = 0.58), but not empathic feelings, than those treated with CMI (d = -0.04). On the close generalization level, SI-DMI increased synchronization skills and imitation tendencies, as well as whole-body imitation/synchronization and movement reciprocity/dialogue, compared to CMI. SI-DMI can be successful in promoting emotion inference in adults with ASD and warrants further investigation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Brain-computer interface training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic severe hemiparesis: Proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima-Shindo, Yuko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ushiba, Junichi; Matsushika, Yayoi; Kamatani, Daiki; Oto, Misa; Ono, Takashi; Nishimoto, Atsuko; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Liu, Meigen

    2015-04-01

    Brain-computer interface technology has been applied to stroke patients to improve their motor function. Event-related desynchronization during motor imagery, which is used as a brain-computer interface trigger, is sometimes difficult to detect in stroke patients. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is known to increase event-related desynchronization. This study investigated the adjunctive effect of anodal tDCS for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparesis. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke. A non-randomized controlled study. Subjects were divided between a brain-computer interface group and a tDCS- brain-computer interface group and participated in a 10-day brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was detected in the affected hemisphere during motor imagery of the affected fingers. The tDCS-brain-computer interface group received anodal tDCS before brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was evaluated before and after the intervention. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score (FM-U) was assessed before, immediately after, and 3 months after, the intervention. Event-related desynchronization was significantly increased in the tDCS- brain-computer interface group. The FM-U was significantly increased in both groups. The FM-U improvement was maintained at 3 months in the tDCS-brain-computer interface group. Anodal tDCS can be a conditioning tool for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparetic stroke.

  3. The relationship between pulmonary artery wedge pressure and pulmonary blood volume derived from contrast echocardiography: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Ken; Lenihan, Daniel; Brittain, Evan L; Saliba, Linda; Piana, Robert N; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2018-05-14

    Pulmonary transit time (PTT) obtained from contrast echocardiography is a marker of global cardiopulmonary function. Pulmonary blood volume (PBV), derived from PTT, may be a noninvasive surrogate for left-sided filling pressures, such as pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP). We sought to assess the relationship between PBV obtained from contrast echocardiography and PAWP. Participants were adult survivors of childhood cancer that had contrast echocardiography performed nearly simultaneously with right-heart catheterization. PTT was derived from time-intensity curves of contrast passage through the right ventricle (RV) and left atrium (LA). PBV relative to overall stroke volume (rPBV) was estimated from the product of PTT and heart rate during RV-LA transit. PAWP was obtained during standard right-heart catheterization. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship between rPBV and PAWP. The study population consisted of 7 individuals who had contrast echocardiography and right-heart catheterization within 3 hours of each other. There was a wide range of right atrial (1-17 mm Hg), mean pulmonary artery (18-42 mm Hg), and PAW pressures (4-26 mm Hg) as well as pulmonary vascular resistance (<1-6 Wood Units). We observed a statistically significant correlation between rPBV and PAWP (r = .85; P = .02). Relative PBV derived from contrast echocardiography correlates with PAWP. If validated in larger studies, rPBV could potentially be used as an alternative to invasively determine left-sided filling pressure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development and initial validation of the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index and Physician Global Assessment of disease Damage: a proof-of-concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaiyuk, Soamarat; Torok, Kathryn S.; Medsger, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To develop and assess the psychometric properties of the Localized Scleroderma (LS) Skin Damage Index (LoSDI) and Physician Global Assessment of disease Damage (PGA-D). Methods. Damage was defined as irreversible/persistent changes (>6 months) due to previous active disease/complications of therapy. Eight rheumatologists assessed the importance of 17 variables in formulating the PGA-D/LoSDI. LS patients were evaluated by two rheumatologists using both tools to assess their psychometric properties. LoSDI was calculated by summing three scores for cutaneous features of damage [dermal atrophy (DAT), subcutaneous atrophy (SAT) and dyspigmentation (DP)] measured at 18 anatomic sites. Patient GA of disease severity (PtGA-S), Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) and PGA-D were recorded at the time of each examination. Results. Thirty LS patients (112 lesions) and nine patient-visit pairs (18 lesions) were included for inter- and intra-rater reliability study. LoSDI and its domains DAT, SAT, DP and PGA-D demonstrated excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability (reliability coefficients 0.86–0.99 and 0.74–0.96, respectively). LoSDI correlated moderately with PGA-D and poorly with PtGA-S and CDLQI. PGA-D correlated moderately with PtGA-S, but poorly with CDLQI. Conclusions. To complete the LS Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), we developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of the LoSDI and PGA-D in addition to the LS Skin Severity Index (LoSSI). These instruments will facilitate evaluation of LS patients for individual patient management and clinical trials. LoSDI and PGA-D demonstrated excellent reliability and high validity. LoSCAT provides an improved understanding of LS natural history. Further study in a larger group of patients is needed to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:20008472

  5. Improved Muscle Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy through L-Arginine and Metformin: An Investigator-Initiated, Open-Label, Single-Center, Proof-Of-Concept-Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Patricia; Bonati, Ulrike; Erne, Beat; Schmid, Maurice; Rubino, Daniela; Pohlman, Urs; Peters, Thomas; Rutz, Erich; Frank, Stephan; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Deuster, Stefanie; Gloor, Monika; Bieri, Oliver; Fischmann, Arne; Sinnreich, Michael; Gueven, Nuri; Fischer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Altered neuronal nitric oxide synthase function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to impaired mitochondrial function which is thought to be one cause of muscle damage in this disease. The study tested if increased intramuscular nitric oxide concentration can improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a novel therapeutic approach through the combination of L-arginine with metformin. Five ambulatory, genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients aged between 7–10 years were treated with L-arginine (3 x 2.5 g/d) and metformin (2 x 250 mg/d) for 16 weeks. Treatment effects were assessed using mitochondrial protein expression analysis in muscular biopsies, indirect calorimetry, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, quantitative thigh muscle MRI, and clinical scores of muscle performance. There were no serious side effects and no patient dropped out. Muscle biopsy results showed pre-treatment a significantly reduced mitochondrial protein expression and increased oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients compared to controls. Post-treatment a significant elevation of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was observed as well as a reduction in oxidative stress. Treatment also decreased resting energy expenditure rates and energy substrate use shifted from carbohydrates to fatty acids. These changes were associated with improved clinical scores. In conclusion pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway leads to improved mitochondria function and clinically a slowing of disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study shall lead to further development of this novel therapeutic approach into a real alternative for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516085.

  6. Heart deformation analysis for automated quantification of cardiac function and regional myocardial motion patterns: A proof of concept study in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kai, E-mail: kai-lin@northwestern.edu; Collins, Jeremy D.; Chowdhary, Varun; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Heart deformation analysis (HDA) can quantify global and regional cardiac function. • HDA works based on cine CMR images without the needs of operator interaction. • HDA-derived cardiac motion indices are reproducible. - Abstract: Objective: To test the performance of HDA in characterizing left ventricular (LV) function and regional myocardial motion patterns in the context of cardiomyopathy based on cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Following the approval of the institutional review board (IRB), standard cine images of 45 subjects, including 15 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 15 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were retrospectively analyzed using HDA. The variations of LV ejection fraction (LVEF), LV mass (LVM), and regional myocardial motion indices, including radial (Drr), circumferential (Dcc) displacement, radial (Vrr) and circumferential (Vcc) velocity, radial (Err), circumferential (Ecc) and shear (Ess) strain and radial (SRr) and circumferential (SRc) strain rate, were calculated and compared among subject groups. Inter-study reproducibility of HDA-derived myocardial motion indices were tested on 15 volunteers by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Results: HDA identified significant differences in cardiac function and motion indices between subject groups. DCM patients had significantly lower LVEF (33.5 ± 9.65%), LVM (105.88 ± 21.93 g), peak Drr (0.29 ± 0.11 cm), Vrr-sys (2.14 ± 0.72 cm/s), Err (0.17 ± 0.08), Ecc (−0.08 ± 0.03), SRr-sys (0.91 ± 0.44s{sup −1}) and SRc-sys (−0.64 ± 0.27s{sup −1}) compared to the other two groups. HCM patients demonstrated increased LVM (171.69 ± 34.19) and lower peak Vcc-dia (0.78 ± 0.30 cm/s) than other subjects. Good inter-study reproducibility was found for all HDA-derived myocardial indices in healthy volunteers (ICC = 0.664–0.942, CoV = 15.1%–37

  7. Long-term use of a new topical formulation containing piroxicam 0.8% and sunscreen: efficacy and tolerability on actinic keratosis. A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babino, Graziella; Diluvio, Laura; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto; Di Prete, Monia; Chimenti, Sergio; Milani, Massimo; Campione, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 enzyme up-regulation is involved in the pathogenetic process of actinic keratosis (A.K.) and non-melanoma skin cancers. Diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (N.S.A.I.D.) drug, is used as topical treatment of A.K. Piroxicam is a N.S.A.I.D. characterized by a high COX-1 inhibition activity. We conducted an 18 month exploratory open-label study on A.K., to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a new topical formulation of piroxicam and sunscreen in A.K. Enrolled subjects applied a galenic formulation of piroxicam 0.8%, vehiculated in a topical product containing sun filters with high (50+) and broad spectrum (UVA) actions, twice a day for 6 months. Subjects were then followed up for additional 12 months. Thirty-eight subjects with a total of 69 A.K. lesions participated in the trial. The primary outcome was the evolution of the Actinic Keratosis Erythema Scale Atrophy (A.K.E.S.A) score assessing erythema, scale, and atrophy of a target A.K. lesion. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of treated lesions with complete (100%) or partial (≥75%) clearance and the evaluation skin tolerability. A.K.E.S.A. mean (S.D.) score at baseline was 7.5 (1.2). After 6 months of treatment, A.K.E.S.A. score decreased to 0.9 (1.1), a -88% reduction versus baseline. At the end of follow-up, A.K.E.S.A. score was 0.8 (1.2). A complete response was achieved in 38 of the 69 lesions (55%, 95% C.I.: 43% to 66%) and clearance was maintained 1 year post-treatment. A partial clearance was observed in 57 of 69 treated lesions (83%, 95% C.I.: 73% to 91%). Adverse events were limited to mild local irritation. Our experience suggests that 6 month topical piroxicam 0.8% is efficacious and well tolerated in A.K. Clinical efficacy is maintained 1 year post-treatment. The main limitation of our study is that it was an open label non-controlled trial. Future controlled trials are warranted in order to compare the efficacy and tolerability of this topical

  8. Heart deformation analysis for automated quantification of cardiac function and regional myocardial motion patterns: A proof of concept study in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kai; Collins, Jeremy D.; Chowdhary, Varun; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Heart deformation analysis (HDA) can quantify global and regional cardiac function. • HDA works based on cine CMR images without the needs of operator interaction. • HDA-derived cardiac motion indices are reproducible. - Abstract: Objective: To test the performance of HDA in characterizing left ventricular (LV) function and regional myocardial motion patterns in the context of cardiomyopathy based on cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Following the approval of the institutional review board (IRB), standard cine images of 45 subjects, including 15 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 15 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were retrospectively analyzed using HDA. The variations of LV ejection fraction (LVEF), LV mass (LVM), and regional myocardial motion indices, including radial (Drr), circumferential (Dcc) displacement, radial (Vrr) and circumferential (Vcc) velocity, radial (Err), circumferential (Ecc) and shear (Ess) strain and radial (SRr) and circumferential (SRc) strain rate, were calculated and compared among subject groups. Inter-study reproducibility of HDA-derived myocardial motion indices were tested on 15 volunteers by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Results: HDA identified significant differences in cardiac function and motion indices between subject groups. DCM patients had significantly lower LVEF (33.5 ± 9.65%), LVM (105.88 ± 21.93 g), peak Drr (0.29 ± 0.11 cm), Vrr-sys (2.14 ± 0.72 cm/s), Err (0.17 ± 0.08), Ecc (−0.08 ± 0.03), SRr-sys (0.91 ± 0.44s −1 ) and SRc-sys (−0.64 ± 0.27s −1 ) compared to the other two groups. HCM patients demonstrated increased LVM (171.69 ± 34.19) and lower peak Vcc-dia (0.78 ± 0.30 cm/s) than other subjects. Good inter-study reproducibility was found for all HDA-derived myocardial indices in healthy volunteers (ICC = 0.664–0.942, CoV = 15.1%–37

  9. Delivery of a survivin promoter-driven antisense survivin-expressing plasmid DNA as a cancer therapeutic: a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin KY

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kun-Yuan Lin,1 Siao Muk Cheng,2 Shing-Ling Tsai,2 Ju-Ya Tsai,1 Chun-Hui Lin,1 Chun Hei Antonio Cheung1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC; 2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC Abstract: Survivin is a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins family. It is overexpressed in many different cancer types but not in the differentiated normal tissue. In addition, overexpression of survivin promotes cancer cell survival and induces chemotherapeutic drug resistance, making it an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. Despite survivin being a promising molecular target for anticancer treatment, it is widely accepted that survivin is only a “semi-druggable” target. Therefore, it is important to develop a new strategy to target survivin for anticancer treatment. In this study, we constructed a novel survivin promoter-driven full-length antisense survivin (pSur/AS-Sur expression plasmid DNA. Promoter activity assay revealed that the activity of the survivin promoter of pSur/AS-Sur correlated with the endogenous expression of survivin at the transcriptional level in the transfected A549, MDA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cancer cells. Western blot analysis showed that liposomal delivery of pSur/AS-Sur successfully downregulated the expression of survivin in A549, MBA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cells in vitro. In addition, delivery of pSur/AS-Sur induced autophagy, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and caspase-independent apoptosis as indicated by the increased LC3B-II conversion, autophagosome formation, caspase-9/-3 and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 cleavage, and apoptosis-inducing factor nuclear translocation in A549, MBA-MB-231, and PANC-1 cells. Importantly, liposomal delivery of pSur/AS-Sur was also capable of decreasing the proliferation of the survivin/MDR1 coexpressing multidrug-resistant KB-TAX50 cancer cells and

  10. The efficacy of lapatinib in metastatic breast cancer with HER2 non-amplified primary tumors and EGFR positive circulating tumor cells: a proof-of-concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Stebbing

    Full Text Available Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs provides real-time measures of cancer sub-populations with potential for CTC-directed therapeutics. We examined whether lapatinib which binds both HER2 and EGFR could induce depletion of the EGFR-positive pool of CTCs, which may in turn lead to clinical benefits.Patients with metastatic breast cancer and HER2 non-amplified primary tumors with EGFR-positive CTCs were recruited and lapatinib 1500 mg daily was administered, in a standard two step phase 2 trial.There were no responses leading to termination at the first analysis with 16 patients recruited out of 43 screened. In 6 out of 14 (43% individuals eligible for the efficacy analysis, a decrease in CTCs was observed with most of these having a greater decrease in their EGFR-positive CTC pool.This is one of the first studies of CTC-directed therapeutics and suggests that lapatinib monotherapy is not having any demonstrable clinical effects by reducing the EGFR-positive pool of CTCs in HER2 non-amplified primary tumors. Our attempt to expand the pool of patients eligible for a targeted therapy was unsuccessful; the role of clonal populations in cancer biology and therapeutic strategies to control them will require extensive evaluation in years to come.Clinical trials.gov NCT00820924.

  11. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor for use in a mobile unicompartmental knee replacement bearing: An in vitro proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M J A; Van Duren, B H; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2017-08-01

    Instrumented knee replacements can provide in vivo data quantifying physiological loads acting on the knee. To date instrumented mobile unicompartmental knee replacements (UKR) have not been realised. Ideally instrumentation would be embedded within the polyethylene bearing. This study investigated the feasibility of an embedded flexible capacitive load sensor. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor was developed which could be incorporated into standard manufacturing of compression moulded polyethylene bearings. Dynamic experiments were performed to determine the characteristics of the sensor on a uniaxial servo-hydraulic material testing machine. The instrumented bearing was measured at sinusoidal frequencies between 0.1 and 10Hz, allowing for measurement of typical gait load magnitudes and frequencies. These correspond to frequencies of interest in physiological loading. The loads that were applied were a static load of 390N, corresponding to an equivalent body weight load for UKR, and a dynamic load of ±293N. The frequency transfer response of the sensor suggests a low pass filter response with a -3dB frequency of 10Hz. The proposed embedded capacitive load sensor was shown to be applicable for measuring in vivo loads within a polyethylene mobile UKR bearing. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A proof of concept study to assess the potential of PCR testing to detect natural Mycobacterium bovis infection in South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Timothy R; Chanter, Jeremy I; McGoldrick, Adrian; Line, Kirsty

    2014-02-07

    Cases of Mycobacterium bovis infection South American camelids have been increasing in Great Britain. Current antemortem immunological tests have some limitations. Cases at post mortem examination frequently show extensive pathology. The feasibility of detecting Mycobacterium bovis DNA in clinical samples was investigated. A sensitive extraction methodology was developed and used on nasal swabs and faeces taken post-mortem to assess the potential for a PCR test to detect Mycobacterium bovis in clinical samples. The gross pathology of the studied South American camelids was scored and a significantly greater proportion of South American camelids with more severe pathology were positive in both the nasal swab and faecal PCR tests. A combination of the nasal swab and faecal PCR tests detected 63.9% of all the South American camelids with pathology that were tested. The results suggest that antemortem diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis in South American camelids may be possible using a PCR test on clinical samples, however more work is required to determine sensitivity and specificity, and the practicalities of applying the test in the field.

  13. A combined prosodic and linguistic treatment approach for language-communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorders: A proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Kuschke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine whether the use of prosodically varied speech within a traditional language therapy framework had any effect on the listening skills, pragmatic skills and social interaction behaviour of three children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. A single participant multiple baseline design across behaviours was implemented. Three participants with ASD were selected for this research. The listening skills, pragmatic skills and social interaction behaviour of the participants were compared before treatment, after a 3-week period of treatment and after a 2-week withdrawal period from treatment, utilising prosodically varied speech within a traditional language therapy approach. Statistical significance was not calculated for each individual due to the limited data, but visual inspection indicated that all the participants showed positive behavioural changes in performance across all areas after 3 weeks of treatment, independent of their pre-treatment performance level. The use of prosodically varied speech within a traditional language therapy framework appears to be a viable form of treatment for children with ASD.

  14. Revisiting Bevacizumab + Cytotoxics Scheduling Using Mathematical Modeling: Proof of Concept Study in Experimental Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; El Cheikh, Raouf; Boyer, Arnaud; Ciccolini, Joseph; Mascaux, Céline; Lacarelle, Bruno; Barlesi, Fabrice; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benzekry, Sébastien

    2018-01-01

    Concomitant administration of bevacizumab and pemetrexed-cisplatin is a common treatment for advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Vascular normalization following bevacizumab administration may transiently enhance drug delivery, suggesting improved efficacy with sequential administration. To investigate optimal scheduling, we conducted a study in NSCLC-bearing mice. First, experiments demonstrated improved efficacy when using sequential vs. concomitant scheduling of bevacizumab and chemotherapy. Combining this data with a mathematical model of tumor growth under therapy accounting for the normalization effect, we predicted an optimal delay of 2.8 days between bevacizumab and chemotherapy. This prediction was confirmed experimentally, with reduced tumor growth of 38% as compared to concomitant scheduling, and prolonged survival (74 vs. 70 days). Alternate sequencing of 8 days failed in achieving a similar increase in efficacy, thus emphasizing the utility of modeling support to identify optimal scheduling. The model could also be a useful tool in the clinic to personally tailor regimen sequences. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  15. Two-Port Laparoscopic Reconstructive Surgery of the Urinary Tract with Reusable Umbilical System (Hybrid Less): A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier C; Pérez, Sergio; García-Tello, Ana; Redondo, Cristina; Meilán, Elisa; Arance, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We compared perioperative results and complications of reconstructive surgery of the urinary tract performed using a multichannel platform through the umbilicus and one additional 3.5-mm with a cohort of patients simultaneously treated with conventional 4-port laparoscopy. Matched-pair study comparing perioperative outcomes, postoperative visual analogue pain scale (VAPS) and morbidity of 2-port (n = 20) and 4-port (n = 10) laparoscopic reconstructive urological surgery. Preoperative and perioperative data compared included demographics, type of surgery, operative time, blood loss, decrease in serum hemoglobin, operative complications, length of stay and postoperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification. There was no significant difference between groups regarding age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, type of surgery, operative time, operative complications and intraoperative or postoperative transfusion. Estimated blood loss was lower using reduced-port approach. VAPS at postoperative day one was significantly lower for 2-port approach and so was the length of stay. Patient satisfaction with the wound was higher for 2-port surgery. Differences were not observed in number and severity of postoperative complications. Urological reconstructive operations can be safely performed using the hybrid laparoendoscopic single-site umbilical approach, resulting in lower blood loss, higher patient satisfaction and lower postoperative pain, which also facilitate earlier hospital discharge, than the same reconstructive procedures performed through multiport conventional laparoscopy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Kernel-based adaptive learning improves accuracy of glucose predictive modelling in type 1 diabetes: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georga, Eleni I; Principe, Jose C; Rizos, Evangelos C; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2017-07-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the need for nonlinear recursive models to the identification and prediction of the dynamic glucose system in type 1 diabetes. Nonlinear regression is performed in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space, by the Approximate Linear Dependency Kernel Recursive Least Squares (KRLS-ALD) algorithm, such that a sparse model structure is accomplished. The method is evaluated on seven people with type 1 diabetes in free-living conditions, where a change in glycaemic dynamics is forced by increasing the level of physical activity in the middle of the observational period. The univariate input allows for short-term (≤30 min) predictions with KRLS-ALD reaching an average root mean square error of 15.22±5.95 mgdL -1 and an average time lag of 17.14±2.67 min for an horizon of 30 min. Its performance is considerably better than that of time-invariant (regularized) linear regression models.

  17. Feasibility of using tissue microarray cores of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue for measurement of gene expression: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Suzanne; Salter, Janine; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven; Dowsett, Mitch

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether 0.6 mm cores of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, as commonly used to construct immunohistochemical tissue microarrays, may be a valid alternative to tissue sections as source material for quantitative real-time PCR-based transcriptional profiling of breast cancer. Four matched 0.6 mm cores of invasive breast tumour and two 10 microm whole sections were taken from eight FFPE blocks. RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed, and TaqMan assays were performed on the 21 genes of the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer assay. Expression of the 16 recurrence-related genes was normalised to the set of five reference genes, and the recurrence score (RS) was calculated. RNA yield was lower from 0.6 mm cores than from 10 microm whole sections, but was still more than sufficient to perform the assay. RS and single gene data from cores were highly comparable with those from whole sections (RS p=0.005). Greater variability was seen between cores than between sections. FFPE sections are preferable to 0.6 mm cores for RNA profiling in order to maximise RNA yield and to allow for standard histopathological assessment. However, 0.6 mm cores are sufficient and would be appropriate to use for large cohort studies.

  18. Non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening using array comparative genomic hybridization on spent culture media: a proof-of-concept pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Michael; Vaccari, Enrico; Carli, Luca; Wallner, Elisabeth; Mädel, Ulrike; Figl, Katharina; Palini, Simone; Feichtinger, Wilfried

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess if array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) on blastocyst culture media is feasible. Therefore, aCGH analysis was carried out on 22 spent blastocyst culture media samples after polar body PGS because of advanced maternal age. All oocytes were fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and all embryos underwent assisted hatching. Concordance of polar body analysis and culture media genetic results was assessed. Thirteen out of 18 samples (72.2%) revealed general concordance of ploidy status (euploid or aneuploid). At least one chromosomal aberration was found concordant in 10 out of 15 embryos found to be aneuploid by both polar body and culture media analysis. Overall, 17 out of 35 (48.6%) single chromosomal aneuploidies were concordant between the culture media and polar body analysis. By analysing negative controls (oocytes with fertilization failure), notable maternal contamination was observed. Therefore, non-invasive PGS could serve as a second matrix after polar body or cleavage stage PGS; however, in euploid results, maternal contamination needs to be considered and results interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vitro Capture of Small Ferrous Particles with a Magnetic Filtration Device Designed for Intravascular Use with Intraarterial Chemotherapy: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C; Lillaney, Prasheel; Sze, Chia-Hung; Losey, Aaron D; Yang, Jeffrey; Kondapavulur, Sravani; Liu, Derek; Saeed, Maythem; Patel, Anand; Cooke, Daniel; Jun, Young-Wook; El-Sayed, Ivan; Wilson, Mark; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-03-01

    To establish that a magnetic device designed for intravascular use can bind small iron particles in physiologic flow models. Uncoated iron oxide particles 50-100 nm and 1-5 µm in size were tested in a water flow chamber over a period of 10 minutes without a magnet (ie, control) and with large and small prototype magnets. These same particles and 1-µm carboxylic acid-coated iron oxide beads were likewise tested in a serum flow chamber model without a magnet (ie, control) and with the small prototype magnet. Particles were successfully captured from solution. Particle concentrations in solution decreased in all experiments (P particles in water with a large magnet), 97% (50-100-nm particles in water with a small magnet), 99% (1-5-µm particles in water with a large magnet), 99% (1-5-µm particles in water with a small magnet), 95% (50-100-nm particles in serum with a small magnet), 92% (1-5-µm particles in serum with a small magnet), and 75% (1-µm coated beads in serum with a small magnet) lower compared with matched control runs. This study demonstrates the concept of magnetic capture of small iron oxide particles in physiologic flow models by using a small wire-mounted magnetic filter designed for intravascular use. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. To Go or Not to Go: A Proof of Concept Study Testing Food-Specific Inhibition Training for Women with Eating and Weight Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Robert; Nazar, Bruno P; Burgess, Emilee E; Lawrence, Natalia S; Cardi, Valentina; Treasure, Janet; Hirsch, Colette R

    2018-01-01

    Inefficient food-specific inhibitory control is a potential mechanism that underlies binge eating in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Go/no-go training tools have been developed to increase inhibitory control over eating impulses. Using a within-subjects design, this study examined whether one session of food-specific go/no-go training, versus general inhibitory control training, modifies eating behaviour. The primary outcome measure was food consumption on a taste test following each training session. Women with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder had small non-significant reductions in high-calorie food consumption on the taste test following the food-specific compared with the general training. There were no effects on eating disorder symptomatic behaviour (i.e. binge eating/purging) in the 24 h post-training. The training task was found to be acceptable by the clinical groups. More research is needed with larger sample sizes to determine the effectiveness of this training approach for clinical populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise to assess and influence aerobic capacity early after stroke: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Bichsel, Lukas; Schuster, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; de Bruin, Eling D; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-07-01

    The majority of post-stroke individuals suffer from low exercise capacity as a secondary reaction to immobility. The aim of this study was to prove the concept of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) to assess aerobic capacity and guide cardiovascular exercise in severely impaired individuals early after stroke. Subjects underwent constant load and incremental exercise testing using a human-in-the-loop feedback system within a robotics-assisted exoskeleton (Lokomat, Hocoma AG, CH). Inclusion criteria were: stroke onset ≤8 weeks, stable medical condition, non-ambulatory status, moderate motor control of the lower limbs and appropriate cognitive function. Outcome measures included oxygen uptake kinetics, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), gas exchange threshold (GET), peak heart rate (HRpeak), peak work rate (Ppeak) and accuracy of reaching target work rate (P-RMSE). Three subjects (18-42 d post-stroke) were included. Oxygen uptake kinetics during constant load ranged from 42.0 to 60.2 s. Incremental exercise testing showed: VO2peak range 19.7-28.8 ml/min/kg, GET range 11.6-12.7 ml/min/kg, and HRpeak range 115-161 bpm. Ppeak range was 55.2-110.9 W and P-RMSE range was 3.8-7.5 W. The concept of feedback-controlled RATE for assessment of aerobic capacity and guidance of cardiovascular exercise is feasible. Further research is warranted to validate the method on a larger scale. Aerobic capacity is seriously reduced in post-stroke individuals as a secondary reaction to immobility. Robotics-assisted walking devices may have substantial clinical relevance regarding assessment and improvement of aerobic capacity early after stroke. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise represents a new concept for cardiovascular assessment and intervention protocols for severely impaired individuals.

  2. Nicotine deprivation elevates neural representation of smoking-related cues in object-sensitive visual cortex: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Anne; van Schayck, Onno C P; Vuurman, Eric F P M; Riedel, Wim J; van den Hurk, Job

    2017-08-01

    In the current study, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to investigate whether tobacco addiction biases basic visual processing in favour of smoking-related images. We hypothesize that the neural representation of smoking-related stimuli in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is elevated after a period of nicotine deprivation compared to a satiated state, but that this is not the case for object categories unrelated to smoking. Current smokers (≥10 cigarettes a day) underwent two fMRI scanning sessions: one after 10 h of nicotine abstinence and the other one after smoking ad libitum. Regional blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) response was measured while participants were presented with 24 blocks of 8 colour-matched pictures of cigarettes, pencils or chairs. The functional data of 10 participants were analysed through a pattern classification approach. In bilateral LOC clusters, the classifier was able to discriminate between patterns of activity elicited by visually similar smoking-related (cigarettes) and neutral objects (pencils) above empirically estimated chance levels only during deprivation (mean = 61.0%, chance (permutations) = 50.0%, p = .01) but not during satiation (mean = 53.5%, chance (permutations) = 49.9%, ns.). For all other stimulus contrasts, there was no difference in discriminability between the deprived and satiated conditions. The discriminability between smoking and non-smoking visual objects was elevated in object-selective brain region LOC after a period of nicotine abstinence. This indicates that attention bias likely affects basic visual object processing.

  3. Real-time fMRI neurofeedback to down-regulate superior temporal gyrus activity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Natasza D; Giampietro, Vincent; O'Daly, Owen; Lam, Sheut-Ling; Barker, Gareth J; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Allen, Paul

    2018-02-12

    Neurocognitive models and previous neuroimaging work posit that auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) arise due to increased activity in speech-sensitive regions of the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). Here, we examined if patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and AVH could be trained to down-regulate STG activity using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback (rtfMRI-NF). We also examined the effects of rtfMRI-NF training on functional connectivity between the STG and other speech and language regions. Twelve patients with SCZ and treatment-refractory AVH were recruited to participate in the study and were trained to down-regulate STG activity using rtfMRI-NF, over four MRI scanner visits during a 2-week training period. STG activity and functional connectivity were compared pre- and post-training. Patients successfully learnt to down-regulate activity in their left STG over the rtfMRI-NF training. Post- training, patients showed increased functional connectivity between the left STG, the left inferior prefrontal gyrus (IFG) and the inferior parietal gyrus. The post-training increase in functional connectivity between the left STG and IFG was associated with a reduction in AVH symptoms over the training period. The speech-sensitive region of the left STG is a suitable target region for rtfMRI-NF in patients with SCZ and treatment-refractory AVH. Successful down-regulation of left STG activity can increase functional connectivity between speech motor and perception regions. These findings suggest that patients with AVH have the ability to alter activity and connectivity in speech and language regions, and raise the possibility that rtfMRI-NF training could present a novel therapeutic intervention in SCZ.

  4. Evaluation of intraoperative fluorescence imaging-guided surgery in cancer-bearing dogs: a prospective proof-of-concept phase II study in 9 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, Quentin; Sayag, David; Texier, Isabelle; Navarro, Fabrice; Boisgard, Raphaël; Virieux-Watrelot, Dorothée; Ponce, Frédérique; Carozzo, Claude

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to prospectively evaluate the application of intraoperative fluorescence imaging (IOFI) in the surgical excision of malignant masses in dogs, using a novel lipid nanoparticle contrast agent. Dogs presenting with spontaneous soft-tissue sarcoma or subcutaneous tumors were prospectively enrolled. Clinical staging and whole-body computed tomography (CT) were performed. All the dogs received an intravenous injection of dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles, LipImage 815. Wide or radical resection was realized after CT examination. Real-time IOFI was performed before skin incision and after tumor excision. In cases of radical resection, the lymph nodes (LNs) were imaged. The margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio or LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was measured and compared with the histologic margins or LN status. Nine dogs were included. Limb amputation was performed in 3 dogs, and wide resection in 6. No adverse effect was noted. Fluorescence was observed in all 9 of the tumors. The margins were clean in 5 of 6 dogs after wide surgical resection, and the margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was close to 1.0 in all these dogs. Infiltrated margins were observed in 1 case, with a margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio of 3.2. Metastasis was confirmed in 2 of 3 LNs, associated with LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratios of 2.1 and 4.2, whereas nonmetastatic LN was associated with a ratio of 1.0. LipImage 815 used as a contrast agent during IOFI seemed to allow for good discrimination between tumoral and healthy tissues. Future studies are scheduled to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of IOFI using LipImage 815 as a tracer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postexposure protection of non-human primates against a lethal Ebola virus challenge with RNA interference: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Lee, Amy C H; Robbins, Marjorie; Geisbert, Joan B; Honko, Anna N; Sood, Vandana; Johnson, Joshua C; de Jong, Susan; Tavakoli, Iran; Judge, Adam; Hensley, Lisa E; Maclachlan, Ian

    2010-05-29

    We previously showed that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) RNA polymerase L protein formulated in stable nucleic acid-lipid particles (SNALPs) completely protected guineapigs when administered shortly after a lethal ZEBOV challenge. Although rodent models of ZEBOV infection are useful for screening prospective countermeasures, they are frequently not useful for prediction of efficacy in the more stringent non-human primate models. We therefore assessed the efficacy of modified non-immunostimulatory siRNAs in a uniformly lethal non-human primate model of ZEBOV haemorrhagic fever. A combination of modified siRNAs targeting the ZEBOV L polymerase (EK-1 mod), viral protein (VP) 24 (VP24-1160 mod), and VP35 (VP35-855 mod) were formulated in SNALPs. A group of macaques (n=3) was given these pooled anti-ZEBOV siRNAs (2 mg/kg per dose, bolus intravenous infusion) after 30 min, and on days 1, 3, and 5 after challenge with ZEBOV. A second group of macaques (n=4) was given the pooled anti-ZEBOV siRNAs after 30 min, and on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 after challenge with ZEBOV. Two (66%) of three rhesus monkeys given four postexposure treatments of the pooled anti-ZEBOV siRNAs were protected from lethal ZEBOV infection, whereas all macaques given seven postexposure treatments were protected. The treatment regimen in the second study was well tolerated with minor changes in liver enzymes that might have been related to viral infection. This complete postexposure protection against ZEBOV in non-human primates provides a model for the treatment of ZEBOV-induced haemorrhagic fever. These data show the potential of RNA interference as an effective postexposure treatment strategy for people infected with Ebola virus, and suggest that this strategy might also be useful for treatment of other emerging viral infections. Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Folic acid induces cell type-specific changes in the transcriptome of breast cancer cell lines: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R Jordan; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C

    2016-01-01

    The effect of folic acid (FA) on breast cancer (BC) risk is uncertain. We hypothesised that this uncertainty may be due, in part, to differential effects of FA between BC cells with different phenotypes. To test this we investigated the effect of treatment with FA concentrations within the range of unmetabolised FA reported in humans on the expression of the transcriptome of non-transformed (MCF10A) and cancerous (MCF7 and Hs578T) BC cells. The total number of transcripts altered was: MCF10A, seventy-five (seventy up-regulated); MCF7, twenty-four (fourteen up-regulated); and Hs578T, 328 (156 up-regulated). Only the cancer-associated gene TAGLN was altered by FA in all three cell lines. In MCF10A and Hs578T cells, FA treatment decreased pathways associated with apoptosis, cell death and senescence, but increased those associated with cell proliferation. The folate transporters SLC19A1, SLC46A1 and FOLR1 were differentially expressed between cell lines tested. However, the level of expression was not altered by FA treatment. These findings suggest that physiological concentrations of FA can induce cell type-specific changes in gene regulation in a manner that is consistent with proliferative phenotype. This has implications for understanding the role of FA in BC risk. In addition, these findings support the suggestion that differences in gene expression induced by FA may involve differential activities of folate transporters. Together these findings indicate the need for further studies of the effect of FA on BC.

  7. Where's WALY? : A proof of concept study of the 'wellbeing adjusted life year' using secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca; Jenkinson, David; Stinton, Chris; Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Madan, Jason; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-09-08

    The Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY) is a measure that combines life extension and health improvement in a single score, reflecting preferences around different types of health gain. It can therefore be used to inform decision-making around allocation of health care resources to mutually exclusive options that would produce qualitatively different health benefits. A number of quality-of-life instruments can be used to calculate QALYs. The EQ-5D is one of the most commonly used, and is the preferred option for submissions to NICE ( https://www.nice.org.uk/process/pmg9/ ). However, it has limitations that might make it unsuitable for use in areas such as public and mental health where interventions may aim to improve well-being. One alternative to the QALY is a Wellbeing-Adjusted Life Year. In this study we explore the need for a Wellbeing-Adjusted Life Year measure by examining the extent to which a measure of wellbeing (the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale) maps onto the EQ-5D-3L. Secondary analyses were conducted on data from the Coventry Household Survey in which 7469 participants completed the EQ-5D-3L, Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and a measure of self-rated health. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's and Spearman's correlations, linear regression, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Approximately 75 % of participants scored the maximum on the EQ-5D-3L. Those with maximum EQ-5D-3L scores reported a wide range of levels of mental wellbeing. Both the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and the EQ-5D-3L were able to detect differences between those with higher and lower levels of self-reported health. Linear regression indicated that scores on the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and the EQ-5D-3L were weakly, positively correlated (with R(2) being 0.104 for the index and 0.141 for the visual analogue scale). The Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale maps onto the EQ-5D-3L to only a

  8. Randomised controlled trial to assess the effect of a Just-in-Time training on procedural performance: a proof-of-concept study to address procedural skill decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzetti, Jeremy B; Adedipe, Adeyinka A; Gittinger, Matthew J; Rosenman, Elizabeth D; Brolliar, Sarah; Chipman, Anne K; Grand, James A; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2017-11-01

    A subset of high-risk procedures present significant safety threats due to their (1) infrequent occurrence, (2) execution under time constraints and (3) immediate necessity for patient survival. A Just-in-Time (JIT) intervention could provide real-time bedside guidance to improve high-risk procedural performance and address procedural deficits associated with skill decay. To evaluate the impact of a novel JIT intervention on transvenous pacemaker (TVP) placement during a simulated patient event. This was a prospective, randomised controlled study to determine the effect of a JIT intervention on performance of TVP placement. Subjects included board-certified emergency medicine physicians from two hospitals. The JIT intervention consisted of a portable, bedside computer-based procedural adjunct. The primary outcome was performance during a simulated patient encounter requiring TVP placement, as assessed by trained raters using a technical skills checklist. Secondary outcomes included global performance ratings, time to TVP placement, number of critical omissions and System Usability Scale scores (intervention only). Groups were similar at baseline across all outcomes. Compared with the control group, the intervention group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in the technical checklist score (11.45 vs 23.44, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size 4.64), the global rating scale (2.27 vs 4.54, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size 3.76), and a statistically significant reduction in critical omissions (2.23 vs 0.68, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size -1.86). The difference in time to procedural completion was not statistically significant between conditions (11.15 min vs 12.80 min, p=0.12, Cohen's d effect size 0.65). System Usability Scale scores demonstrated excellent usability. A JIT intervention improved procedure perfromance, suggesting a role for JIT interventions in rarely performed procedures. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) levels in post-mortem brain tissue from patients with depression compared to healthy individuals - a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrick, A; Camara, S; Ilieva, M; Riederer, P; Michel, T M

    2017-10-01

    The neurotrophic factors (NTF) hypothesis of depression was postulated nearly a decade ago and is nowadays widely acknowledged. Previous reports suggest that cerebral concentrations of NTF may be reduced in suicide victims who received minimal or no antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that antidepressant treatment may improve or normalise cerebral concentrations of neurotrophic factors. Therefore, we examined the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) in different brain regions (cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, hippocampus, putamen and nucleus caudatus) of 21 individuals - 7 patients of which 4 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and overall age 86.8±5 years who received antidepressant pharmacotherapy (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors [SSRI]; tricyclic antidepressants [TCA]), 3 patients with MDD without antidepressant treatment and overall age 84.3±5 years versus 14 unaffected subjects at age 70.3±13.8. We detected significant elevation of BDNF (parietal cortex) and NT3 (parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, putamen and nucleus caudatus regions) in MDD patients who received antidepressant medication compared to MDD untreated patients and controls. Moreover, we detected a significant decrease of NT3 levels in the parietal cortex of patients suffering from MDD non-treated patients without treatment compared to healthy individuals. Although the limited statistical power due to the small sample size in this proof of concept study corroborates data from previous studies, which show that treatment with antidepressants mediates alterations in neuroplasticity via the action of NTF. However, more research using post-mortem brain tissue with larger samples needs to be carried out as well as longitudinal studies to further verify these results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Parameter Optimization for Feature and Hit Generation in a General Unknown Screening Method-Proof of Concept Study Using a Design of Experiment Approach for a High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Procedure after Data Independent Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmiger, Marco P; Poetzsch, Michael; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas

    2018-03-06

    High resolution mass spectrometry and modern data independent acquisition (DIA) methods enable the creation of general unknown screening (GUS) procedures. However, even when DIA is used, its potential is far from being exploited, because often, the untargeted acquisition is followed by a targeted search. Applying an actual GUS (including untargeted screening) produces an immense amount of data that must be dealt with. An optimization of the parameters regulating the feature detection and hit generation algorithms of the data processing software could significantly reduce the amount of unnecessary data and thereby the workload. Design of experiment (DoE) approaches allow a simultaneous optimization of multiple parameters. In a first step, parameters are evaluated (crucial or noncrucial). Second, crucial parameters are optimized. The aim in this study was to reduce the number of hits, without missing analytes. The obtained parameter settings from the optimization were compared to the standard settings by analyzing a test set of blood samples spiked with 22 relevant analytes as well as 62 authentic forensic cases. The optimization lead to a marked reduction of workload (12.3 to 1.1% and 3.8 to 1.1% hits for the test set and the authentic cases, respectively) while simultaneously increasing the identification rate (68.2 to 86.4% and 68.8 to 88.1%, respectively). This proof of concept study emphasizes the great potential of DoE approaches to master the data overload resulting from modern data independent acquisition methods used for general unknown screening procedures by optimizing software parameters.

  11. The efficacy and tolerability of 5-aminolevulinic acid 5% thermosetting gel photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris. A two-center, prospective assessor-blinded, proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serini, Stefano Maria; Cannizzaro, Maria Vittoria; Dattola, Annunziata; Garofalo, Virginia; Del Duca, Esther; Ventura, Alessandra; Milani, Massimo; Campione, Elena; Bianchi, Luca

    2018-05-22

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, commonly treated with topical or systemic drugs, according to the severity of the condition. Retinoids and antibiotic compounds are considered cornerstone approaches in this condition. However, low adherence to the therapy and the issue of bacterial resistance undermine the efficacy in the long term. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 20% aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has shown to be effective in the treatment of inflammatory acne. Skin tolerability, however, could be a limiting factor for a widespread use of this approach. A new formulation of 5% ALA in thermosetting gel has been recently available. This formulation allows a more convenient application procedure without occlusion and better and more efficient release of the active compound in comparison with traditional ALA formulations like creams or ointments. To evaluate in a two-center, assessor-blinded, prospective, proof-of-concept study, the efficacy, and tolerability of red-light (630 nm) PDT with a new 5-ALA "low-dose" topical gel formulation (5%) in the treatment of inflammatory mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris (AV). A total of 35 subjects with moderate AV of the face (mean age: 24 ± 8 years, 13 men and 22 women) were enrolled, after their written informed consent. The primary outcome was the evolution of GAG (Global Acne Grade System) score at baseline and after an average of three, 630-nm, 15-minute, PDT sessions, performed every 2 weeks. GAG score was also calculated in a follow-up visit 6 months after the last PDT session. Skin tolerability was assessed during PDT sessions with a patient-reported discomfort level evaluation score from 0 (no discomfort at all) to 3 (severe discomfort). At baseline, the GAG score was 21 ± 6. After the last PDT session, the GAG score evaluated in a blinded fashion (digital photographs) was significantly reduced to 6.5 ± 5.7, representing a 70% reduction (P = .0001, Wilcoxon test; mean difference 14.9; 95% CI of

  12. Penile bulb dose and impotence after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 9406: Findings from a prospective, multi-institutional, phase I/II dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Winter, Kathryn; Michalski, Jeffrey M.; Cox, James D.; Purdy, James A.; Bosch, Walter; Lin Xiao; Shipley, William S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between the dose to the bulb of the penis and the risk of impotence in men treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406. Methods and materials: Men enrolled on a Phase I/II dose-escalation study, RTOG 9406, who were reported to be potent at entry and evaluable (n = 158) were selected for inclusion. Follow-up evaluations were scheduled every 3, 4, and 6 months for the first, second, and the third through fifth years, then annually. At each follow-up visit an assessment of potency status was made. Penile structures were defined by a single observer blinded to the potency status, using Web-based, on-line software. The dosimetry for penile structures was calculated at the Quality Assurance Center at Washington University and provided to RTOG Statistical Headquarters to determine whether there was a relationship between dose and impotence. Results: Patients whose median penile dose was ≥52.5 Gy had a greater risk of impotence compared with those receiving <52.5 Gy (p = 0.039). In a multivariate analysis neither age, the dose to the prostate, nor the use of hormonal therapy correlated with the risk of impotence. Conclusions: Dose to the bulb of the penis seems to be associated with the risk of radiation-induced impotence

  13. Strategies for Biologic Image-Guided Dose Escalation: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in how to incorporate functional and molecular information obtained by noninvasive, three-dimensional tumor imaging into radiotherapy. The key issues are to identify radioresistant regions that can be targeted for dose escalation, and to develop radiation dose prescription and delivery strategies providing optimal treatment for the individual patient. In the present work, we review the proposed strategies for biologic image-guided dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Biologic imaging modalities and the derived images are discussed, as are methods for target volume delineation. Different dose escalation strategies and techniques for treatment delivery and treatment plan evaluation are also addressed. Furthermore, we consider the need for response monitoring during treatment. We conclude with a summary of the current status of biologic image-based dose escalation and of areas where further work is needed for this strategy to become incorporated into clinical practice

  14. Pharmacological cardioversion of atrial fibrillation--a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentre, dose-escalation study of AZD1305 given intravenously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rónaszéki, Aladár; Alings, Marco; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    AZD1305 is a combined ion channel blocker developed for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of this study was to determine whether AZD1305 was effective in converting AF to sinus rhythm (SR)....

  15. Nonresponders to Daily Paroxetine and Another SSRI in Men With Lifelong Premature Ejaculation : A Pharmacokinetic Dose-Escalation Study for a Rare Phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Paddy Kc; Touw, Daan; Schweitzer, Dave H; Waldinger, Marcel D

    PURPOSE: Nonresponse to any selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment is rare. In this study, we aimed to investigate ejaculation delay nonresponse to paroxetine treatment in men with lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) who were also known to be nonresponders to other SSRIs. MATERIALS

  16. Gemcitabine Plus Radiation Therapy for High-Grade Glioma: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M., E-mail: michekim@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Camelo-Piragua, Sandra [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew; Tao, Yebin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Betz, Bryan L. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kim, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Heth, Jason; Sagher, Oren [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of gemcitabine plus radiation therapy (RT) in this phase 1 study of patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma (HGG). Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2012, 29 adults with HGG were enrolled. After any extent of resection, RT (60 Gy over 6 weeks) was given concurrent with escalating doses of weekly gemcitabine. Using a time-to-event continual reassessment method, 5 dose levels were evaluated starting at 500 mg/m{sup 2} during the last 2 weeks of RT and advanced stepwise into earlier weeks. The primary objective was to determine the recommended phase 2 dose of gemcitabine plus RT. Secondary objectives included progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and long-term toxicity. Results: Median follow-up was 38.1 months (range, 8.9-117.5 months); 24 patients were evaluable for toxicity. After 2005 when standard practice changed, patients with World Health Organization grade 4 tumors were no longer enrolled. Median progression-free survival for 22 patients with grade 3 tumors was 26.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.6-inestimable), and OS was 48.5 months (95% CI 26.8-inestimable). In 4 IDH mutated, 1p/19q codeleted patients, no failures occurred, with all but 1 alive at time of last follow-up. Seven with IDH mutated, non-codeleted tumors with ATRX loss had intermediate OS of 73.5 months (95% CI 32.8-inestimable). Six nonmutated, non-codeleted patients had a median OS of 26.5 months (95% CI 25.4-inestimable). The recommended phase 2 dose of gemcitabine plus RT was 750 mg/m{sup 2}/wk given the last 4 weeks of RT. Dose reductions were most commonly due to grade 3 neutropenia; no grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. Conclusions: Gemcitabine concurrent with RT is well-tolerated and yields promising outcomes, including in patients with adverse molecular features. It is a candidate for further study, particularly for poor-prognosis patient subgroups with HGG.

  17. Phase I dose-escalation study of vinflunine hard capsules administered twice a day for 2 consecutive days every week in patients with advanced/metastatic solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, E; Vermorken, J B; Hiret, S; Rodon, J; Cortes, J; Senellart, H; Van den Brande, J; Dyck, J; Pétain, A; Ferre, P; Bennouna, J

    2012-06-01

    Vinflunine is a new microtubule inhibitor of the vinca-alkaloid family. It is marketed in transitional cell carcinoma of urothelial tract as a 20 min infusion given every 3 weeks in Europe. In this phase I study, vinflunine was administered to patients with advanced malignancies as hard capsules given twice a day on days 1-2 every week, with 3 weeks cycles. Serial blood samples were collected during the first cycle for pharmacokinetic investigations. Thirty-six patients (pts) were treated at 6 dose levels 150 (3 pts), 190 (3 pts), 230 (8 pts), 300 mg/day (6 pts) and then 250 (3 pts) and 270 mg/day (13 pts). The Maximal Tolerated Dose (MTD) was reached at 300 mg/day where 2 patients out of 6 experienced a dose limiting toxicity (febrile neutropenia with diarrhea). The lower dose level of 270 mg/day was the recommended dose (RD), the toxicity profile being mainly anaemia, neutropenia, fatigue and constipation. The pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated the adequacy of the flat-fixed dosing regimen, as no correlation between clearance of vinflunine and body surface area was evidenced. Blood concentrations and exposure increased with dose, and a pharmacokinetic accumulation was observed, which is consistent with the terminal half-life of the compounds. The inter-individual exposure variability at the RD was 35%. Repeated weekly administration of oral vinflunine is feasible and exhibits a moderate inter-individual PK variability. The MTD was achieved at 300 mg/day given for 2 consecutive days. According to the protocol rules, the RD was established at 270 mg/day.

  18. Open-label, dose escalation phase I study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a human monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claribel P; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2008-06-25

    Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events (AE) related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean C(max) ranged from 6.82 microg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 microg/ml for the 20 mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. C(max) increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway.

  19. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Targeting Primary Motor Versus Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortices: Proof-of-Concept Study Investigating Functional Connectivity of Thalamocortical Networks Specific to Sensory-Affective Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Cunningham, David A; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Beall, Erik B; Roelle, Sarah M; Varnerin, Nicole M; Machado, Andre G; Jones, Stephen E; Lowe, Mark J; Plow, Ela B

    2017-04-01

    The pain matrix is comprised of an extensive network of brain structures involved in sensory and/or affective information processing. The thalamus is a key structure constituting the pain matrix. The thalamus serves as a relay center receiving information from multiple ascending pathways and relating information to and from multiple cortical areas. However, it is unknown how thalamocortical networks specific to sensory-affective information processing are functionally integrated. Here, in a proof-of-concept study in healthy humans, we aimed to understand this connectivity using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting primary motor (M1) or dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC). We compared changes in functional connectivity (FC) with DLPFC tDCS to changes in FC with M1 tDCS. FC changes were also compared to further investigate its relation with individual's baseline experience of pain. We hypothesized that resting-state FC would change based on tDCS location and would represent known thalamocortical networks. Ten right-handed individuals received a single application of anodal tDCS (1 mA, 20 min) to right M1 and DLPFC in a single-blind, sham-controlled crossover study. FC changes were studied between ventroposterolateral (VPL), the sensory nucleus of thalamus, and cortical areas involved in sensory information processing and between medial dorsal (MD), the affective nucleus, and cortical areas involved in affective information processing. Individual's perception of pain at baseline was assessed using cutaneous heat pain stimuli. We found that anodal M1 tDCS and anodal DLPFC tDCS both increased FC between VPL and sensorimotor cortices, although FC effects were greater with M1 tDCS. Similarly, anodal M1 tDCS and anodal DLPFC tDCS both increased FC between MD and motor cortices, but only DLPFC tDCS modulated FC between MD and affective cortices, like DLPFC. Our findings suggest that M1 stimulation primarily modulates FC of sensory networks

  20. Three-dimensional structure discrepancy between HLA alleles for effective prediction of aGVHD severity and optimal selection of recipient-donor pairs: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongxing; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Yuying; Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Shuguang; Luo, Yuan; Liang, Fei; Liu, Nan; Long, Juan; Zhao, Xiao; Kong, Fanhua; Xi, Yongzhi

    2015-11-24

    The optimal selection of recipient-donor pair and accurate prediction of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) severity are always the two most crucial works in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), which currently rests mostly with HLA compatibility, the most polymorphic loci in the human genome, in clinic. Thus, there is an urgent need for a rapid and reliable quantitative system for optimal recipient-donor pairs selection and accurate prediction of aGVHD severity prior to allo-HSCT. For these reasons, we have developed a new selection/prediction system for optimal recipient-donor selection and effective prediction of aGVHD severity based on HLA three-dimensional (3D) structure modeling (HLA-TDSM) discrepancy, and applied this system in a pilot randomized clinical allo-HSCT study. The 37 patient-donor pairs in the study were typed at low- and high-resolution levels for HLA-A/-B/-DRB1/-DQB1 loci. HLA-TDSM system covering the 10000 alleles in HLA class I and II consists of the revised local and coordinate root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values for each locus. Its accuracy and reliability were confirmed using stably transfected Hmy2.CIR-HLA-B cells, TCR Vβ gene scan, and antigen-specific alloreactive cytotoxic lymphocytes. Based on the preliminary results, we theoretically defined all HLA acceptable versus unacceptable mismatched alleles. More importantly, HLA-TDSM enabled a successful retrospective verification and prospective prediction for aGVHD severity in a pilot randomized clinical allo-HSCT study of 32 recipient-donor transplant pairs. There was a strong direct correlation between single/total revised RMSD and aGVHD severity (92% in retrospective group vs 95% in prospective group). These results seem to be closely related to the 3D structure discrepancy of mismatched HLA-alleles, but not the number or loci of mismatched HLA-alleles. Our data first provide the proof-of-concept that HLA-TDSM is essential for optimal selection of

  1. Safety and efficacy of at-home robotic locomotion therapy in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: a prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Rupp

    Full Text Available The compact Motorized orthosis for home rehabilitation of Gait (MoreGait was developed for continuation of locomotion training at home. MoreGait generates afferent stimuli of walking with the user in a semi-supine position and provides feedback about deviations from the reference walking pattern.Prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of an unsupervised home-based application of five MoreGait prototypes in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI.Twenty-five (5 tetraplegia, 20 paraplegia participants with chronic (mean time since injury: 5.8 ± 5.4 (standard deviation, SD years sensorimotor iSCI (7 ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS C, 18 AIS D; Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI II: Interquartile range 9 to 16 completed the training (45 minutes / day, at least 4 days / week, 8 weeks. Baseline status was documented 4 and 2 weeks before and at training onset. Training effects were assessed after 4 and 8 weeks of therapy.After therapy, 9 of 25 study participants improved with respect to the dependency on walking aids assessed by the WISCI II. For all individuals, the short-distance walking velocity measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test showed significant improvements compared to baseline (100% for both self-selected (Mean 139.4% ± 35.5% (SD and maximum (Mean 143.1% ± 40.6% (SD speed conditions as well as the endurance estimated with the six-minute walk test (Mean 166.6% ± 72.1% (SD. One device-related adverse event (pressure sore on the big toe occurred in over 800 training sessions.Home-based robotic locomotion training with MoreGait is feasible and safe. The magnitude of functional improvements achieved by MoreGait in individuals with iSCI is well within the range of complex locomotion robots used in hospitals. Thus, unsupervised MoreGait training potentially represents an option to prolong effective training aiming at recovery of locomotor function beyond in-patient rehabilitation

  2. Phase I dose-escalation study to examine the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a checkpoint 1 kinase inhibitor, administered 1 day after pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) every 21 days in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Donehower, Ross C; Iyengar, Tara; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Lewandowski, Karen; Westin, Eric; Hurt, Karla; Hynes, Scott M; Anthony, Stephen P; McKane, Scott

    2013-02-01

    This phase I study aims at assessing the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a selective inhibitor of Checkpoint Kinase 1, in combination with pemetrexed and determining the maximum tolerable dose and the pharmacokinetic parameters. This was an open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. Increasing doses of LY2603618 (40-195 mg/m(2)) were combined with 500 mg/m(2) of pemetrexed. LY2603618 was administered on Days 1 and 9 and pemetrexed on Day 8 in a 28-day cycle. For all subsequent 21-day cycles, pemetrexed was administered on Day 1 and LY2603618 on Day 2. Antitumor activity was evaluated as per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0. A total of 31 patients were enrolled into six cohorts (three at 40 mg/m(2) over 4.5-hour infusion, 1-hour infusion in subsequent cohorts: three each at 40 mg/m(2), 70 mg/m(2), and 195 mg/m(2); 13 at 105 mg/m(2); six at 150 mg/m(2)). Four patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity: diarrhea (105 mg/m(2)); reversible infusion-related reaction (150 mg/m(2)); thrombocytopenia (195 mg/m(2)); and fatigue (195 mg/m(2)). The maximum tolerated dose was defined as 150 mg/m(2). The pharmacokinetic data demonstrated that the exposure of LY2603618 increased in a dose-dependent manner, displayed a suitable half-life for maintaining required human exposures while minimizing the intra- and inter-cycle accumulation, and was unaffected by the pemetrexed administration. The pharmacokinetic-defined biologically efficacious dose was achieved at doses ≥105 mg/m(2). LY2603618 administered approximately 24 h after pemetrexed showed acceptable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles.

  3. Can Fire and Rescue Services and the National Health Service work together to improve the safety and wellbeing of vulnerable older people? Design of a proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whiting David G

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older adults are at increased risk both of falling and of experiencing accidental domestic fire. In addition to advanced age, these adverse events share the risk factors of balance or mobility problems, cognitive impairment and socioeconomic deprivation. For both events, the consequences include significant injury and death, and considerable socioeconomic costs for the individual and informal carers, as well as for emergency services, health and social care agencies. Secondary prevention services for older people who have fallen or who are identifiable as being at high risk of falling include NHS Falls clinics, where a multidisciplinary team offers an individualised multifactorial targeted intervention including strength and balance exercise programmes, medication changes and home hazard modification. A similar preventative approach is employed by most Fire and Rescue Services who conduct Home Fire Safety Visits to assess and, if necessary, remedy domestic fire risk, fit free smoke alarms with instruction for use and maintenance, and plan an escape route. We propose that the similarity of population at risk, location, specific risk factors and the commonality of preventative approaches employed could offer net gains in terms of feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability if activities within these two preventative approaches were to be combined. Methods/Design This prospective proof of concept study, currently being conducted in two London boroughs, (Southwark and Lambeth aims to reduce the incidence of both fires and falls in community-dwelling older adults. It comprises two concurrent 12-month interventions: the integration of 1 fall risk assessments into the Brigade's Home Fire Safety Visit and 2 fire risk assessments into Falls services by inviting older clinic attendees to book a Visit. Our primary objective is to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of these interventions. Furthermore, we are evaluating their

  4. Electronic Vehicle Identification Architecture and Proof of Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, I.; Chevrollier, N.G.; Mulder,A.; Vliet,A.O.T.van

    2009-01-01

    An architecture and a proof of concept for Electronic Vehicle Identification have beendeveloped. The system has been successfully tested in a pilot with 23 participants over a period of three months and a total distance of 75.000 km travelled. The architecture consists of a functional definition, a

  5. A phase I open-label dose-escalation study of the anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody LJM716 in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus or head and neck and HER2-overexpressing breast or gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kerry Lynn; Bedard, Philippe L; Lee, Se-Hoon; Lin, Chia-Chi; Tabernero, Josep; Alsina, Maria; Cohen, Ezra; Baselga, José; Blumenschein, George; Graham, Donna M; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Juric, Dejan; Sharma, Sunil; Salgia, Ravi; Seroutou, Abdelkader; Tian, Xianbin; Fernandez, Rose; Morozov, Alex; Sheng, Qing; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Zubel, Angela; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-09-12

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is important in maintaining epidermal growth factor receptor-driven cancers and mediating resistance to targeted therapy. A phase I study of anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody LJM716 was conducted with the primary objective to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or recommended dose for expansion (RDE), and dosing schedule. Secondary objectives were to characterize safety/tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary antitumor activity. This open-label, dose-finding study comprised dose escalation, followed by expansion in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or esophagus, and HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer or gastric cancer. During dose escalation, patients received LJM716 intravenous once weekly (QW) or every two weeks (Q2W), in 28-day cycles. An adaptive Bayesian logistic regression model was used to guide dose escalation and establish the RDE. Exploratory pharmacodynamic tumor studies evaluated modulation of HER3 signaling. Patients received LJM716 3-40 mg/kg QW and 20 mg/kg Q2W (54 patients; 36 patients at 40 mg/kg QW). No dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported during dose-escalation. One patient experienced two DLTs (diarrhea, hypokalemia [both grade 3]) in the expansion phase. The RDE was 40 mg/kg QW, providing drug levels above the preclinical minimum effective concentration. One patient with gastric cancer had an unconfirmed partial response; 17/54 patients had stable disease, two lasting >30 weeks. Down-modulation of phospho-HER3 was observed in paired tumor samples. LJM716 was well tolerated; the MTD was not reached, and the RDE was 40 mg/kg QW. Further development of LJM716 is ongoing. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT01598077 (registered on 4 May, 2012).

  6. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y. [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Fois, G. R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  7. PET-guided dose escalation tomotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Andrei; Dell' Oca, Italo; Pasetti, Marcella; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-11-15

    To test the feasibility of salvage radiotherapy using PET-guided helical tomotherapy in patients with progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). A group of 12 consecutive MPM patients was treated with 56 Gy/25 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV); FDG-PET/CT simulation was always performed to include all positive lymph nodes and MPM infiltrations. Subsequently, a second group of 12 consecutive patients was treated with the same dose to the whole pleura adding a simultaneous integrated boost of 62.5 Gy to the FDG-PET/CT positive areas (BTV). Good dosimetric results were obtained in both groups. No grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC) acute or late toxicities were reported in the first group, while 3 cases of grade 3 late pneumonitis were registered in the second group: the duration of symptoms was 2-10 weeks. Median overall survival was 8 months (1.2-50.5 months) and 20 months (4.3-33.8 months) from the beginning of radiotherapy, for groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.19). A significant impact on local relapse from radiotherapy was seen (median time to local relapse: 8 vs 17 months; 1-year local relapse-free rate: 16% vs 81%, p = 0.003). The results of this pilot study support the planning of a phase III study of combined sequential chemoradiotherapy with dose escalation to BTV in patients not able to undergo resection. (orig.)

  8. Repeat dose of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger in polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing In Vitro fertilization cycles provides a better cycle outcome - a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Deepika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Is a single dose of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa trigger to induce final oocyte maturation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles with GnRH antagonist protocol sufficient to provide optimal oocyte maturity? Design: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, proof-of-concept study. Setting: This study was carried out at a tertiary care center. Material and Methods: A total of 125 patients diagnosed with PCOS defined as per the ESHRE/ASRM Rotterdam criteria (2003 undergoing IVF in antagonist protocol were randomized into two groups. Group A: single dose of GnRHa 0.2 mg, 35 h prior to oocyte retrieval, and Group B: 0.2 mg GnRHa 35 h prior to oocyte retrieval + repeat dose of 0.1 mg 12 h following the 1st dose. 12 h post-trigger, luteinizing hormone (LH, progesterone (P4, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH values were estimated. Statistical Analysis: Continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and categorical variables as proportions where applicable. Independent sample t-test was used for continuous variables which were normally distributed and Mann–Whitney U-test for data not normally distributed. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables where appropriate. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs was calculated. In addition, receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the post-trigger LH, P4, and FSH values at 12 h as predictors of oocyte maturity. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome: maturity rate of the oocytes. Secondary outcomes: oocyte yield, fertilization rate, availability of good quality embryos on day 3, blastocyst conversion, OHSS rates, post-trigger serum LH (IU/L, FSH (IU/L, and P4 (ng/mL levels implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Results: A higher number of mature (metaphase II oocytes were obtained in Group B compared to Group A (OR of 0.47; CI: 0.38–0

  9. First-In-Human, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Dose-Escalation Study of BG00010, a Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Family Member, in Subjects with Unilateral Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolan, Paul E; O'Neill, Gilmore; Versage, Eve; Rana, Jitesh; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Aycardi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single doses of BG00010 (neublastin, artemin, enovin) in subjects with unilateral sciatica. This was a single-center, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized Phase 1 sequential-cohort, dose-escalation study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00961766; funded by Biogen Idec). Adults with unilateral sciatica were enrolled at The Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia. Four subjects were assigned to each of eleven cohorts (intravenous BG00010 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 800 μg/kg, or subcutaneous BG00010 50 μg/kg) and were randomized 3:1 to receive a single dose of BG00010 or placebo. The primary safety and tolerability assessments were: adverse events; clinical laboratory parameters and vital signs; pain as measured by a Likert rating scale; intra-epidermal nerve fiber density; and longitudinal assessment of quantitative sensory test parameters. Blood, serum, and plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Subjects were blinded to treatment assignment throughout the study. The investigator was blinded to treatment assignment until the Data Safety Review Committee review of unblinded data, which occurred after day 28. Beyond the planned enrollment of 44 subjects, four additional subjects were enrolled into to the intravenous BG00010 200 μg/kg cohort after one original subject experienced mild generalized pruritus. Therefore, a total of 48 subjects were enrolled between August 2009 and December 2011; all were included in the safety analyses. BG00010 was generally well tolerated: in primary analyses, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events were changes in temperature perception, pruritus, rash, or headache; no trends were observed in clinical laboratory parameters, vital signs, intra-epidermal nerve fiber density, or quantitative sensory testing. BG00010 was not associated with any clear, dose-dependent trends in Likert pain scores. BG00010 was

  10. Heterogeneous FDG-guided dose-escalation for locally advanced NSCLC (the NARLAL2 trial): Design and early dosimetric results of a randomized, multi-centre phase-III study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Local recurrence is frequent in locally advanced NSCLC and is primarily located in FDG-avid parts of tumour and lymph nodes. Aiming at improving local control without increasing toxicity, we designed a multi-centre phase-III trial delivering inhomogeneous dose-escalation d......Background and purpose: Local recurrence is frequent in locally advanced NSCLC and is primarily located in FDG-avid parts of tumour and lymph nodes. Aiming at improving local control without increasing toxicity, we designed a multi-centre phase-III trial delivering inhomogeneous dose...

  11. Phase I dose-escalation study of the c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor SAR125844 in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients with MET-amplified gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shitara, Kohei; Kim, Tae Min; Yokota, Tomoya; Goto, Masahiro; Satoh, Taroh; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hyo Song; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Doi, Toshihido; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-01-01

    SAR125844 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the c-Met kinase receptor. This was an open-label, phase I, multicenter, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion trial of SAR125844 in Asian patients with solid tumors, a subgroup of whom had gastric cancer and MET amplification (NCT01657214). SAR125844 was administered by intravenous infusion (260–570 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 28-day cycle. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to evaluate SAR125844 safety...

  12. Improving Dialysis Adherence for High Risk Patients Using Automated Messaging: Proof of Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Som, A.; Groenendyk, J.; An, T.; Patel, K.; Peters, R.; Polites, G.; Ross, W. R.

    2017-01-01

    Comorbidities and socioeconomic barriers often limit patient adherence and self-management with hemodialysis. Missed sessions, often associated with communication barriers, can result in emergency dialysis and avoidable hospitalizations. This proof of concept study explored using a novel digital-messaging platform, EpxDialysis, to improve patient-to-dialysis center communication via widely available text messaging and telephone technology. A randomized controlled trial was conducted through W...

  13. Development of a small prototype for a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Tsuji, Atsushi; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Kinouchi, Shoko; Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji; Nakajima, Yasunori; Kawai, Hideyuki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio

    2011-01-01

    The OpenPET geometry is our new idea to visualize a physically opened space between two detector rings. In this paper, we developed the first small prototype to show a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging. Two detector rings of 110 mm diameter and 42 mm axial length were placed with a gap of 42 mm. The basic imaging performance was confirmed through phantom studies; the open imaging was realized at the cost of slight loss of axial resolution and 24% loss of sensitivity. For a proof-of-concept of PET image-guided radiation therapy, we carried out the in-beam tests with 11 C radioactive beam irradiation in the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba to visualize in situ distribution of primary particles stopped in a phantom. We showed that PET images corresponding to dose distribution were obtained. For an initial proof-of-concept of real-time multimodal imaging, we measured a tumor-inoculated mouse with 18 F-FDG, and an optical image of the mouse body surface was taken during the PET measurement by inserting a digital camera in the ring gap. We confirmed that the tumor in the gap was clearly visualized. The result also showed the extension effect of an axial field-of-view (FOV); a large axial FOV of 126 mm was obtained with the detectors that originally covered only an 84 mm axial FOV. In conclusion, our initial imaging studies showed promising performance of the OpenPET.

  14. SU-E-T-622: Identification and Improvement of Patients Eligible for Dose Escalation with Matched Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, K; Holcombe, C; Kapp, D; Buyyounouski, M; Hancock, S; Xing, L; Atwood, T; King, M

    2014-01-01

    Gy. Conclusion: Patientmatching is a promising method to identify eligible patients, and to assist in creating acceptable plans for dose-escalation. Further study will investigate other disease states. Additionally, the time-savings provided by patientmatching warrants further investigation. The following authors have equity ownership in Siris Medical, Inc: K Bush, TF Atwood

  15. Clinical Factors Associated With Dose Escalation of Solifenacin for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder in Real Life Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Chun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo determine the baseline clinical characteristics associated with dose escalation of solifenacin in patients with overactive bladder (OAB.MethodsWe analyzed the data of patients with OAB (micturition frequency ≥8/day and urgency ≥1/day who were treated with solifenacin and followed up for 24 weeks. According to our department protocol, all the patients kept voiding diaries, and OAB symptom scores (OABSS were monitored at baseline and after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of solifenacin treatment.ResultsIn total, 68 patients (mean age, 60.8±10.0 years were recruited. The dose escalation rate by the end of the study was 41.2%, from 23.5% at 4 weeks and 17.6% at 12 weeks. At baseline, the dose escalator group had significantly more OAB wet patients (53.6% vs. 20.0% and higher total OABSS (10.2±2.4 vs. 7.9±3.5, P=0.032 than the nonescalator group. OAB wet (odds ratio [OR], 4.615; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.578-13.499; P<0.05 and total OABSS (OR, 1.398; 95% CI, 1.046-1.869; P<0.05 were found to be independently associated with dose escalation.ConclusionsPatients who have urgency urinary incontinence and high total OABSS have a tendency for dose escalation of solifenacin.

  16. Phase I dose-escalation study of the c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor SAR125844 in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients with MET-amplified gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitara, Kohei; Kim, Tae Min; Yokota, Tomoya; Goto, Masahiro; Satoh, Taroh; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hyo Song; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Doi, Toshihido; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-10-03

    SAR125844 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the c-Met kinase receptor. This was an open-label, phase I, multicenter, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion trial of SAR125844 in Asian patients with solid tumors, a subgroup of whom had gastric cancer and MET amplification (NCT01657214). SAR125844 was administered by intravenous infusion (260-570 mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 28-day cycle. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to evaluate SAR125844 safety and pharmacokinetic profile. Antitumor activity was also assessed. Of 38 patients enrolled (median age 64.0 years), 22 had gastric cancer, including 14 with MET amplification. In the dose-escalation cohort ( N = 19; unselected population, including three patients with MET -amplification [two with gastric cancer and one with lung cancer]), the MTD was not reached, and the recommended dose was established at 570 mg/m 2 . Most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were nausea (36.8%), vomiting (34.2%), decreased appetite (28.9%), and fatigue or asthenia, constipation, and abdominal pains (each 21.1%); none appeared to be dose-dependent. Grade ≥ 3 AEs were observed in 39.5% of patients and considered drug-related in 7.9%. SAR125844 exposure increased slightly more than expected by dose proportionality; dose had no significant effect on clearance. No objective responses were observed in the dose-escalation cohort, with seven patients (three gastric cancer, two colorectal cancer, one breast cancer, and one with cancer of unknown primary origin) having stable disease. Modest antitumor activity was observed at 570 mg/m 2 in the dose-expansion cohort, comprising patients with MET -amplified tumors ( N = 19). Two gastric cancer patients had partial responses, seven patients had stable disease (six gastric cancer and one kidney cancer), and 10 patients had progressive disease. Single-agent SAR125844 administered up to 570 mg/m 2 has acceptable tolerability and modest

  17. In-line carbon nanofiber reinforced hollow fiber-mediated liquid phase microextraction using a 3D printed extraction platform as a front end to liquid chromatography for automatic sample preparation and analysis: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worawit, Chanatda; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Varanusupakul, Pakorn; Miró, Manuel

    2018-08-01

    A novel concept for automation of nanostructured hollow-fiber supported microextraction, combining the principles of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and sorbent microextraction synergically, using mesofluidic platforms is proposed herein for the first time, and demonstrated with the determination of acidic drugs (namely, ketoprofen, ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen) in urine as a proof-of-concept applicability. Dispersed carbon nanofibers (CNF) are immobilized in the pores of a single-stranded polypropylene hollow fiber (CNF@HF) membrane, which is thereafter accommodated in a stereolithographic 3D-printed extraction chamber without glued components for ease of assembly. The analytical method involves continuous-flow extraction of the acidic drugs from a flowing stream donor (pH 1.7) into an alkaline stagnant acceptor (20 mmol L -1 NaOH) containing 10% MeOH (v/v) across a dihexyl ether impregnated CNF@HF membrane. The flow setup features entire automation of the microextraction process including regeneration of the organic film and on-line injection of the analyte-laden acceptor phase after downstream neutralization into a liquid chromatograph (LC) for reversed-phase core-shell column-based separation. Using a 12-cm long CNF@HF and a sample volume of 6.4 mL, linear dynamic ranges of ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen, taken as models of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, spanned from ca. 5-15 µg L -1 to 500 µg L -1 with enhancement factors of 43-97 (against a direct injection of 10 µL standards into LC), and limits of detection from 1.6 to 4.3 µg L -1 . Relative recoveries in real urine samples ranged from 97% to 105%, thus demonstrating the reliability of the automatic CNF@HF-LPME method for in-line matrix clean-up and determination of drugs in urine at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware performance results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Keith O.

    1993-01-01

    The Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware activities, accomplishments, and test results are discussed. The Magnetic Gimbal Fabrication and Test (MGFT) program addressed the feasibility of using a magnetic gimbal to isolate an Electro-Optical (EO) sensor from the severe angular vibrations induced during the firing of divert and attitude control system (ACS) thrusters during space flight. The MGFT effort was performed in parallel with the fabrication and testing of a mechanically gimballed, flex pivot based isolation system by the Hughes Aircraft Missile Systems Group. Both servo systems supported identical EO sensor assembly mockups to facilitate direct comparison of performance. The results obtained from the MGFT effort indicate that the magnetic gimbal exhibits the ability to provide significant performance advantages over alternative mechanically gimballed techniques.

  19. Mobile Data Collection Applications: A Proof of Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J

    2006-01-01

    This project's goal is to provide a proof of concept for mobile data collection applications, and identify the best ways such applications could be implemented and used. Such an application should decrease the time and resources users now need to devote to redundant data processes, and provide an easy of locating and retrieving data at a later time. The two types of available mobile devices, Personal Digital Assistants and Tablet Personal Computers, each have their particular strengths that suggest themselves for certain types of applications. As such, parallel data collection applications have been developed, with a common web application for uploading information to the database. While these aspects have been developed and proven, it still remains to refine these applications, develop the tables to hold their data, and field-test with users for their feedback

  20. Addressing asthma and obesity in children with community health workers: proof-of-concept intervention development

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Molly A; Rothschild, Steven K.; Lynch, Elizabeth; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer; Pag?n, Militza M.; Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Barnes, Anna; Karavolos, Kelly; Diaz, Antonieta; Hoffman, Lucretia M.; Plata, Diana; Villalpando, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to design and test the feasibility and impact of a community health worker (CHW) intervention for comorbid asthma and obesity. Methods Using a proof of concept study design, we collected pre/post outcomes from a single intervention cohort of urban low-income in a single community area. A community-based participatory research approach was employed. Forty-six children and their caregivers were recruited. Children were 5?12 years old with physician-dia...

  1. Development of a small prototype for a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Tsuji, Atsushi; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Kinouchi, Shoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nakajima, Yasunori [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Kawai, Hideyuki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio, E-mail: taiga@nirs.go.jp [Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2011-02-21

    The OpenPET geometry is our new idea to visualize a physically opened space between two detector rings. In this paper, we developed the first small prototype to show a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging. Two detector rings of 110 mm diameter and 42 mm axial length were placed with a gap of 42 mm. The basic imaging performance was confirmed through phantom studies; the open imaging was realized at the cost of slight loss of axial resolution and 24% loss of sensitivity. For a proof-of-concept of PET image-guided radiation therapy, we carried out the in-beam tests with {sup 11}C radioactive beam irradiation in the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba to visualize in situ distribution of primary particles stopped in a phantom. We showed that PET images corresponding to dose distribution were obtained. For an initial proof-of-concept of real-time multimodal imaging, we measured a tumor-inoculated mouse with {sup 18}F-FDG, and an optical image of the mouse body surface was taken during the PET measurement by inserting a digital camera in the ring gap. We confirmed that the tumor in the gap was clearly visualized. The result also showed the extension effect of an axial field-of-view (FOV); a large axial FOV of 126 mm was obtained with the detectors that originally covered only an 84 mm axial FOV. In conclusion, our initial imaging studies showed promising performance of the OpenPET.

  2. High-dose radiation improved local tumor control and overall survival in patients with inoperable/unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: Long-term results of a radiation dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Schipper, Matthew J.; Sullivan, Molly A.; Chen, Ming; Lopez, Carlos; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether high-dose radiation leads to improved outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included 106 patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent Stages I-III NSCLC, treated with 63-103 Gy in 2.1-Gy fractions, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) per a dose escalation trial. Targets included the primary tumor and any lymph nodes ≥1 cm, without intentionally including negative nodal regions. Nineteen percent of patients (20/106) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment factors were evaluated for association with outcomes. Estimated median follow-up was 8.5 years. Results: Median survival was 19 months, and 5-year overall survival (OS) was 13%. Multivariate analysis revealed weight loss (p = 0.011) and radiation dose (p = 0.0006) were significant predictors for OS. The 5-year OS was 4%, 22%, and 28% for patients receiving 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Although presence of nodal disease was negatively associated with locoregional control under univariate analysis, radiation dose was the only significant predictor when multiple variables were included (p = 0.015). The 5-year control rate was 12%, 35%, and 49% for 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Higher dose radiation is associated with improved outcomes in patients with NSCLC treated in the range of 63-103 Gy

  3. Kinesthetic stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An "on-off" proof of concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Alfredo I; Pérez, Diego; Feuerstein, Delphine; Loiodice, Corinne; Graindorge, Laurence; Guerrero, Gustavo; Limousin, Nadège; Gagnadoux, Frédéric; Dauvilliers, Yves; Tamisier, Renaud; Prigent, Arnaud; Mabo, Philippe; Amblard, Amel; Senhadji, Lotfi; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2018-02-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs when the upper airway narrows or collapses due to the loss of upper airway muscle activation at sleep onset. This study investigated the effectiveness of triggered kinesthetic stimulation in patients with OSA. This proof-of-concept, open-label, multicenter prospective study was conducted on 24 patients with severe OSA. During a one night evaluation, kinesthetic stimulation was intermittently delivered in 30 minute periods. The duration of apneas and hypopneas during Stim on and Stim off periods were compared. Five hospital-based university centers in France participated. Sleep studies were evaluated by a single scorer at a core laboratory (CHU Grenoble). Results show that during the Stim on phases, statistically significant decreases in durations of apneas and hypopneas were observed in 56% and 46% of patients, respectively. Overall, 75% of patients showed an improvement in apneas or hypopneas durations. The mean reduction in durations for patients with a significant decrease was 4.86 seconds for apneas and 6.00 seconds for hypopneas. This proof of concept study is the first to identify kinesthetic stimulation as a potentially effective therapy for OSA. These data justify evaluation in a controlled study.

  4. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  5. DOSE-ESCALATED EXTERNAL BEAM RADIOTHERAPY DURING HORMONO-RADIOTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The introduction of modern technologies of conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT into clinical practice for the treatment of prostate cancer requires proper quality assurance measures as well as a careful analysis of both the efficacy and toxicity data of treatments. The purpose of this study was to inves- tigate tolerance and the immediate efficacy of conformal dose-escalated EBRT during hormono-radiotherapy for prostate cancer. material and methods. The study involved 156 prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT. Among them, 30 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, and in 126 patients the total dose was esca- lated to 72-76 Gy (median total dose - 74.0 Gy. Fifty-nine patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Results. The prescribed course of treatment was completed in all the patients with prostate cancer. Acute radiation-induced bladder reactions (RTOG were observed in 50 (32.1 % patients, of whom 48 (30.8 % experienced grade I reactions, and 2 (1.3 % experienced grade II reactions. Eighteen (11.5 % patients had radiation-induced rectum reactions, not above grade I. The development of grade II dysuric phenomena necessitated treatment interruption only in two patients. Of 9 (5.8 % patients who had late bladder complica- tions (RTOG/EORTC, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and one (0.6 % patient developed grade II complications. Of 11 (7.1 % patients who had rectum complications, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and 3 (1.9 % patients developed grade II complications. No patients experienced the increase in toxicity of treatment during dose escalation up to a total dose exceeding 70 Gy. During the follow-up period, only one patient developed recurrent disease. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest acceptable levels of toxicity following a continuous course of dose-escalated EBRT given in conjunction with hormono-radiotherapy to prostate cancer patients. Further

  6. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3-6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered.

  7. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Dust Control Tool Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Marshall, J.; Nuth, J.; Calle, C.

    2010-01-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the performance-compromising dust. Once in contact with surfaces, whether set in motion by natural or mechanical means, regolith fines, or dust, behave like abrasive Velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, making movement progressively more difticult, and being almost impossible to remove by mechanical mcans (brushing). The successful dust removal strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between Van der Waals and Coulombic forces. Here, proof of concept for an electrostatically-based concept for dust control tool is described and demonstrated. A low power focused electron beam is used in the presence of a small electrical field to increase the negative charge to mass ratio of a dusty surface until dust repulsion and attraction to a lower potential surface, acting as a dust collector, occurred. Our goal is a compact device of less than 5 kg mass and using less than 5 watts of power to be operational in less than 5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g ., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could hamess the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  8. Proof of Concept for a Simple Smartphone Sky Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantamneni, Abhilash; Nemiroff, R. J.; Brisbois, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach of obtaining a cloud and bright sky monitor by using a standard smartphone with a downloadable app. The addition of an inexpensive fisheye lens can extend the angular range to the entire sky visible above the device. A preliminary proof of concept image shows an optical limit of about visual magnitude 5 for a 70-second exposure. Support science objectives include cloud monitoring in a manner similar to the more expensive cloud monitors in use at most major astronomical observatories, making expensive observing time at these observatories more efficient. Primary science objectives include bright meteor tracking, bright comet tracking, and monitoring the variability of bright stars. Citizen science objectives include crowd sourcing of many networked sky monitoring smartphones typically in broader support of many of the primary science goals. The deployment of a citizen smartphone array in an active science mode could leverage the sky monitoring data infrastructure to track other non-visual science opportunities, including monitoring the Earth's magnetic field for the effects of solar flares and exhaustive surface coverage for strong seismic events.

  9. Feasibility of extreme dose escalation for glioblastoma multiforme using 4π radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Yu, Victoria Y; Kaprealian, Tania; Kupelian, Patrick; Selch, Michael; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) frequently recurs at the same location after radiotherapy. Further dose escalation using conventional methods is limited by normal tissue tolerance. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy has recently emerged as a new potential method to deliver highly conformal radiation dose using the C-arm linacs. We aim to study the feasibility of very substantial GBM dose escalation while maintaining normal tissue tolerance using 4π. 11 GBM patients previously treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT/RapidArc) on the NovalisTx™ platform to a prescription dose of either 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were included. All patients were replanned with 30 non-coplanar beams using a 4π radiotherapy platform, which inverse optimizes both beam angles and fluence maps. Four different prescriptions were used including original prescription dose and PTV (4πPTV PD ), 100 Gy to the PTV and GTV (4πPTV 100Gy ), 100 Gy to the GTV only while maintaining prescription dose to the rest of the PTV (4πGTV 100Gy ), and a 5 mm margin expansion plan (4πPTV PD+5mm ). OARs included in the study are the normal brain (brain – PTV), brainstem, chiasm, spinal cord, eyes, lenses, optical nerves, and cochleae. The 4π plans resulted in superior dose gradient indices, as indicated by >20% reduction in the R50, compared to the clinical plans. Among all of the 4π cases, when compared to the clinical plans, the maximum and mean doses were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by a range of 47.01-98.82% and 51.87-99.47%, respectively, or unchanged (p > 0.05) for all of the non-brain OARs. Both the 4πPTV PD and 4π GTV 100GY plans reduced the mean normal brain mean doses. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy substantially increases the dose gradient outside of the PTV and better spares critical organs. Dose escalation to 100 Gy to the GTV or additional margin expansion while meeting clinical critical organ dose constraints is feasible. 100 Gy to the PTV result in higher normal brain doses but may

  10. Wireless Roadside Inspection Proof of Concept Test Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL; Plate, Randall S [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) FMCSA commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the condition of the vehicles and their drivers. It is hypothesized that these inspections will: -- Increase safety -- Decrease the number of unsafe commercial vehicles on the road; -- Increase efficiency -- Speed up the inspection process, enabling more inspections to occur, at least on par with the number of weight inspections; -- Improve effectiveness -- Reduce the probability of drivers bypassing CMV inspection stations and increase the likelihood that fleets will attempt to meet the safety regulations; and -- Benefit industry -- Reduce fleet costs, provide good return-on-investment, minimize wait times, and level the playing field. The WRI Program is defined in three phases which are: Phase 1: Proof of Concept Test (POC) Testing of commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) or near-COTS technology to validate the wireless inspection concept. Phase 2: Pilot Test Safety technology maturation and back office system integration Phase 3: Field Operational Test Multi-vehicle testing over a multi-state instrumented corridor This report focuses on Phase 1 efforts that were initiated in March, 2006. Technical efforts dealt with the ability of a Universal Wireless Inspection System (UWIS) to collect driver, vehicle, and carrier information; format a Safety Data Message Set from this information; and wirelessly transmit a Safety Data Message Set to a roadside receiver unit or mobile enforcement vehicle.

  11. The potential influence of cell protectors for dose escalation in cancer therapy: an analysis of amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCumber, Linda M.

    2004-01-01

    The attempt to increase the therapeutic ratio in an effort to improve survival or quality of life is the goal of modern cancer therapy. It is commonly accepted that local and systemic tumor control would increase if the dose intensity of antineoplastic drugs, radiation therapy, or the combination were increased. Radiation dose escalation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), accelerated or hypofractionated radiation schemes, and multidrug chemotherapy regimens are being used to try to increase tumor kill while inflicting minimal injury to normal tissue. Modern chemoradiation techniques have led to improved local regional control and increased cure rates, but the potentially severe and debilitating adverse effects of the therapies prevent them from reaching the ultimate goal of curing the disease while leaving the patient with a good quality of life. Cell protectants such as amifostine function by reducing the effects of therapy on normal cells while maintaining tumor sensitivity to the therapy. In various studies, amifostine has been analyzed and appears to be a potentially powerful adjuvant to current cancer therapy. Administering amifostine may allow dose escalation with less or equal risk to surrounding normal tissues. This could improve therapeutic efficacy, survival, and quality of life for cancer patients

  12. An Hourly Dose-Escalation Desensitization Protocol for Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Justin R; Buchmiller, Brett L; Khan, David A

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization followed by maintenance therapy effectively improves symptom control in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). The majority of current desensitization protocols use 3-hour dosing intervals and often require 2 to 3 days to complete. We evaluated hourly dose escalations in a subset of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and asthma who historically reacted to aspirin within 1 hour or were avoiding aspirin with the goal of developing a safe and efficient desensitization protocol. Fifty-seven aspirin desensitizations were performed under the hourly protocol. All patients had refractory nasal polyposis as an indication for aspirin desensitization. The clinical characteristics of each subject were analyzed in relation to aspects of his or her reactions during the procedure. Ninety-eight percent of study patients were successfully treated under the hourly protocol, including those with a history of severe reactions and intubation. None required further medication than is available in an outpatient allergy clinic. A total of 96% of reactors recorded a bronchial or naso-ocular reaction within 1 hour of the preceding dose. Of the total patients on this protocol, 40% were able to complete the procedure in a single day, and 60% within 2 days. Patients with AERD who have a history of symptoms less than 1 hour after aspirin exposure can be safely desensitized with a 1-hour dose-escalation protocol that can often be completed in a single day. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakespeare TP

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Shakespeare,1,2 Shea W Wilcox,1 Noel J Aherne1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, 2Rural Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia Aim: Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients and methods: Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3–6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. Results: In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered. Keywords: radiotherapy, IMRT, dose

  14. What is Proof of Concept Research and how does it Generate Epistemic and Ethical Categories for Future Scientific Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Catherine Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    "Proof of concept" is a phrase frequently used in descriptions of research sought in program announcements, in experimental studies, and in the marketing of new technologies. It is often coupled with either a short definition or none at all, its meaning assumed to be fully understood. This is problematic. As a phrase with potential implications for research and technology, its assumed meaning requires some analysis to avoid it becoming a descriptive category that refers to all things scientifically exciting. I provide a short analysis of proof of concept research and offer an example of it within synthetic biology. I suggest that not only are there activities that circumscribe new epistemological categories but there are also associated normative ethical categories or principles linked to the research. I examine these and provide an outline for an alternative ethical account to describe these activities that I refer to as "extended agency ethics". This view is used to explain how the type of research described as proof of concept also provides an attendant proof of principle that is the result of decision-making that extends across practitioners, their tools, techniques, and the problem solving activities of other research groups.

  15. Dose Escalation and Healthcare Resource Use among Ulcerative Colitis Patients Treated with Adalimumab in English Hospitals: An Analysis of Real-World Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Black

    Full Text Available To describe the real-world use of adalimumab for maintenance treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC and associated healthcare costs in English hospitals.Retrospective cohort study.Analysis of NHS Hospital Episode Statistics linked with pharmacy dispensing data in English hospitals.Adult UC patients receiving ≥240mg during adalimumab treatment induction, subsequently maintained on adalimumab.Frequency and pattern of adalimumab use and dose escalation during maintenance treatment and associated healthcare costs (prescriptions and hospital visits.191 UC patients completed adalimumab treatment induction. 83 (43.46% dose escalated during maintenance treatment by ≥100% (equivalent to weekly dosing (median time to dose escalation: 139 days. 56 patients (67.47% subsequently de-escalated by ≥50% (median time to dose de-escalation: 21 days. Mean all-cause healthcare costs for all patients ≤12 months of index were £13,892. Dose escalators incurred greater mean healthcare costs than non-escalators ≤12 months of index (£14,596 vs. £13,351. Prescriptions accounted for 96.49% of UC-related healthcare costs (£11,090 of £11,494 in all patients.Within the cohort, 43.46% of UC patients escalated their adalimumab dose by ≥100% and incurred greater costs than non-escalators. The apparent underestimation of adalimumab dose escalation in previous studies may have resulted in underestimated costs in healthcare systems.

  16. Proof of concept in cardiovascular risk: the paradoxical findings in blood pressure and lipid abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs FD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Flavio Danni Fuchs, Sandra Costa Fuchs, Leila Beltrami Moreira, Miguel GusDivision of Cardiology and Postgraduate Studies Program in Cardiology, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilAbstract: High blood pressure and lipoprotein abnormalities were identified by many cohort studies as the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Laboratory experiments apparently confirmed their role in the causation of atherosclerosis, but a proof of concept requires the corroboration by clinical trials in human beings. The size of benefit in clinical trials regarding the control of high blood pressure was within the estimations of risk provided by cohort studies. For a reduction of 10 mmHg in systolic blood pressure or 5 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure, the relative risk reduction of coronary heart disease was 22% (95% confidence interval 27%–17% in a meta-analysis of clinical trials, close to the estimation of reduction of 25% (95% confidence interval 23%–27% provided by a meta-analysis of cohort studies. The corresponding values for stroke were 41% (95% confidence interval 33%–48% in clinical trials compared to a cohort risk prediction of 36% (95% confidence interval 34%–38%. This efficacy was shared by all blood pressure-lowering drugs. The same figure has not paradoxically happened with drugs that act over abnormalities of cholesterol and lipoproteins. Only statins, which have other beneficial actions as well, have consistently lowered the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, an efficacy that was not reproduced by older and newer quite potent lipid drugs. The adverse effects of these drugs may nullify their beneficial effects over lipoproteins and abnormalities of lipoproteins may only be surrogate markers of the underlying real risks.Keywords: proof of concept, hypertension, lipoproteins, clinical trials

  17. An adaptive two-stage dose-response design method for establishing proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, Yoko; Anderson, Stewart J; Sampson, Allan R

    2013-01-01

    We propose an adaptive two-stage dose-response design where a prespecified adaptation rule is used to add and/or drop treatment arms between the stages. We extend the multiple comparison procedures-modeling (MCP-Mod) approach into a two-stage design. In each stage, we use the same set of candidate dose-response models and test for a dose-response relationship or proof of concept (PoC) via model-associated statistics. The stage-wise test results are then combined to establish "global" PoC using a conditional error function. Our simulation studies showed good and more robust power in our design method compared to conventional and fixed designs.

  18. "Mobile technology to improve heart failure outcomes: A proof of concept paper".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Jenkins, Bradlee A; Zumpano, Heather; Labrador, Miguel A

    2018-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes significant symptom burden and human suffering with considerable economic burden due to hospital readmissions. Targeted interventions to encourage and support self-management behavior is warranted. To test the proof of concept of a mobile application (HeartMapp) in improving self-care management of patients with heart failure. An exploratory inquiry used a field study strategy with purposeful sampling and constant comparative analysis to test the proof of concept of HeartMapp using The Business Model Canvas framework. A total of 125 individuals, who were identified as potential candidates to use the HeartMapp completed the interview over a seven-week period in 2016. Constant comparative analysis indicated themes that Skilled Nursing Facilities had increased readmissions. Participants from Skilled Nursing Facilities reported concern on lack of staffing, star rating, and malpractice claims. Two types of patients were identified as early adapters of technology and those in denial. Health care facilities reported challenges on transitional care, nurses struggle with engagement of patients on self-care management. To avoid readmission penalty, hospitals task home care agencies to keep the patients home for 30-days. While home care agencies rely on remote telemonitoring reported that current telemonitoring devices are costly to maintain, thus exploring novel technology. The Business Model Canvas provided directions for future testing of HeartMapp for its usability as an adjunct device in home health setting to improve self-management and enhance communication with providers, and ultimately reduce readmissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac output-based fluid optimization for kidney transplant recipients: a proof-of-concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Davide; Toppin, Patrick Jason; Ghanekar, Anand; Ayach, Nour; Schiff, Jeffery; Van Rensburg, Adrian; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2018-04-10

    Intravenous fluid management for deceased donor kidney transplantation is an important, modifiable risk factor for delayed graft function (DGF). The primary objective of this study was to determine if goal-directed fluid therapy using esophageal Doppler monitoring (EDM) to optimize stroke volume (SV) would alter the amount of fluid given. This randomized, proof-of-concept trial enrolled 50 deceased donor renal transplant recipients. Data collected included patient characteristics, fluid administration, hemodynamics, and complications. The EDM was used to optimize SV in the EDM group. In the control group, fluid management followed the current standard of practice. The groups were compared for the primary outcome of total intraoperative fluid administered. There was no difference in the mean (standard deviation) volume of intraoperative fluid administered to the 24 control and 26 EDM patients [2,307 (750) mL vs 2,675 (842) mL, respectively; mean difference, 368 mL; 95% confidence interval (CI), - 87 to + 823; P = 0.11]. The incidence of complications in the control and EDM groups was similar (15/24 vs 17/26, respectively; P = 0.99), as was the incidence of delayed graft failure (8/24 vs 11/26, respectively; P = 0.36). Goal-directed fluid therapy did not alter the volume of fluid administered or the incidence of complications. This proof-of-concept trial provides needed data for conducting a larger trial to determine the influence of fluid therapy on the incidence in DGF in deceased donor kidney transplantation. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02512731). Registered 31 July 2015.

  20. Development of e-Juba, a preliminary proof of concept unmanned ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of e-Juba, a preliminary proof of concept unmanned aerial vehicle designed to facilitate the transportation of microbiological test samples from remote rural clinics to National Health Laboratory Service laboratories.

  1. Vehicle Infrastructure Integration Proof of Concept Executive Summary – Vehicle Submitted

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-19

    This report summarizes a program of work resulting from a Cooperative Agreement between USDOT and the VII Consortium to develop and test a Proof of Concept VII system based on DSRC wireless communication between an infrastructure and mobile terminals...

  2. Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for Snowmelt Runoff at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 7- 1 Engineering for Polar Operations , Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for...January 2017 Flow-Control Systems Proof of Concept for Snowmelt Runoff at McMurdo Station, Antarctica Rosa Affleck U.S. Army Engineer Research and...runoff can be extreme where the flow can overwhelm both the drainage system and the operations and maintenance (O&M) crew. CRREL has been involved

  3. Subgroup analysis of patients with localized prostate cancer treated within the Dutch-randomized dose escalation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Levendag, Peter C.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of dose escalation within prognostic risk groups in prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 664 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68- or 78-Gy of radiotherapy. Two prognostic models were examined: a risk group model (low-, intermediate-, and high-risk) and PSA-level groupings. High-risk patients with hormonal therapy (HT) were analyzed separately. Outcome variable was freedom from failure (FFF) (clinical failure or PSA nadir + 2 μg/L). Results: In relation to the advantage of high-dose radiotherapy, intermediate-risk patients benefited most from dose escalation. However no significant heterogeneity could be demonstrated between the risk groups. For two types of PSA-level groupings: PSA 8 μg/L, the test for heterogeneity was significant (p = 0.03 and 0.05, respectively). Patients with PSA 8-18 μg/L (n = 297, HR = 0.59) derived the greatest benefit from dose escalation. No heterogeneity could be demonstrated for high-risk patients with and without HT. Conclusion: Intermediate-risk group derived the greatest benefit for dose escalation. However, from this trial no indication was found to exclude low-risk or high-risk patients from high-dose radiotherapy. Patients could be selected for high-dose radiotherapy based on PSA-level groupings: for patients with a PSA < 8 μg/L high-dose radiotherapy is probably not indicated, but should be confirmed in other randomized studies.

  4. LDL-cholesterol lowering activity of a blend of rice bran oil and safflower oil (8:2) in patients with hyperlipidaemia: a proof of concept, double blind, controlled, randomised parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malve, Harshad; Kerkar, Prafulla; Mishra, Nidheesh; Loke, Sanjita; Rege, N N; Marwaha-Jaspal, Ankita; Jainani, Kiran J

    2010-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have emerged as major health burden worldwide in recent times. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) serves as the primary marker for cardiovascular diseases. Reports suggest that rice bran oil has antihyperlipidaemic properties. However, current evidence suggests that no single oil can provide the recommended dietary fat ratio. Hence the present study was undertaken in patients with hyperlipidaemia to study effects of substitution of the cooking oil with a blend of 80% rice bran oil and 20% safflower oil on LDL-C levels. The selected patients (n = 73) were randomly assigned either to the study oil group (blend under study) or control oil group (the oil which the patient was using before). The lipid profile was monitored monthly in these patients for 3 months during which they consumed the oil as per the randomisation. At each follow up, LDL-C levels showed a significant reduction from baseline in the study oil group and reduction was more than that observed in the control group. It was also observed that the percentage of the respondents was higher in the study oil group. At the end of the study period, 82% patients from this group had LDL levels less than 150 mg% as against 57% in the control group. Thus, the substitution of usual cooking oil with a blend of rice bran oil and safflower oil (8:2) was found to exert beneficial effects on the LDL-C levels shifting them to low-risk lipid category.

  5. Fabrication of an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with an in-office digital light processing three-dimensional printer: A proof-of-concept technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Pellerito, John; Morton, Dean

    2018-04-30

    This report describes a proof of concept for fabricating an interim complete removable dental prosthesis with a digital light processing 3-dimensional (3D) printer. Although an in-office 3D printer can reduce the overall production cost for an interim complete removable dental prosthesis, the process has not been validated with clinical studies. This report provided a preliminary proof of concept in developing a digital workflow for the in-office additively manufactured interim complete removable dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seladelpar (MBX-8025), a selective PPAR-δ agonist, in patients with primary biliary cholangitis with an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 2, proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Boudes, Pol F; Swain, Mark G; Bowlus, Christopher L; Galambos, Michael R; Bacon, Bruce R; Doerffel, Yvonne; Gitlin, Norman; Gordon, Stuart C; Odin, Joseph A; Sheridan, David; Wörns, Markus-Alexander; Clark, Virginia; Corless, Linsey; Hartmann, Heinz; Jonas, Mark E; Kremer, Andreas E; Mells, George F; Buggisch, Peter; Freilich, Bradley L; Levy, Cynthia; Vierling, John M; Bernstein, David E; Hartleb, Marek; Janczewska, Ewa; Rochling, Fedja; Shah, Hemant; Shiffman, Mitchell L; Smith, John H; Choi, Yun-Jung; Steinberg, Alexandra; Varga, Monika; Chera, Harinder; Martin, Robert; McWherter, Charles A; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2017-10-01

    Many patients with primary biliary cholangitis have an inadequate response to first-line therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid. Seladelpar is a potent, selective agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-δ), which is implicated in bile acid homoeostasis. This first-in-class study evaluated the anti-cholestatic effects and safety of seladelpar in patients with an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid. The study was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial of patients with alkaline phosphatase of at least 1·67 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) despite treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid. Patients, recruited at 29 sites in North America and Europe, were randomly assigned to placebo, seladelpar 50 mg/day, or seladelpar 200 mg/day while ursodeoxycholic acid was continued. Randomisation was done centrally (1:1:1) by a computerised system using an interactive voice-web response system with a block size of three. Randomisation was stratified by region (North America and Europe). The primary outcome was the percentage change from baseline in alkaline phosphatase over 12 weeks, analysed in the modified intention-to-treat (ITT) population (any randomised patient who received at least one dose of medication and had at least one post-baseline alkaline phosphatase evaluation). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02609048) and the EU Clinical Trials Registry (EudraCT2015-002698-39). Between Nov 4, 2015, and May 26, 2016, 70 patients were screened at 29 sites in North America and Europe. During recruitment, three patients treated with seladelpar developed fully reversible, asymptomatic grade 3 alanine aminotransferase increases (one on 50 mg, two on 200 mg), ranging from just over five to 20 times the ULN; as a result, the study was terminated after 41 patients were randomly assigned. The modified ITT population consisted of 12 patients in the placebo group, 13 in the seladelpar 50 mg group, and 10 in the

  7. Diagnostic Value of MRI in Patients With Implanted Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators Across a Cross Population: Does the Benefit Justify the Risk? A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samar, Huma; Yamrozik, June A; Williams, Ronald B; Doyle, Mark; Shah, Moneal; Bonnet, Christopher A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic usefulness of thoracic and nonthoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging in patients with implantable cardiac devices (permanent pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators [ICDs]) to determine if there was a substantial benefit to patients with regard to diagnosis and/or management. MRI is infrequently performed on patients with conventional pacemakers or ICDs. Multiple studies have documented the safety of MRI scans in patients with implanted devices, yet the diagnostic value of this approach has not been established. Evaluation data were acquired in 136 patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent MRIs during a 10-year period at a single institution. Specific criteria were followed for all patients to objectively define if the diagnosis by MRI enhanced patient care; 4 questions were answered after scan interpretation by both MRI technologists and MRI physicians who performed the scan. 1) Did the primary diagnosis change? 2) Did the MRI provide additional information to the existing diagnosis? 3) Was the pre-MRI (tentative) diagnosis confirmed? 4) Did patient management change? If "Yes" was answered to any of the preceding questions, the MRI scan was considered to be of value to patient diagnosis and/or therapy. In 97% (n = 132) of patients, MR added value to patient diagnosis and management. In 49% (n = 67) of patients, MRI added additional valuable information to the primary diagnosis, and in 30% (n = 41) of patients, MRI changed the principle diagnosis and subsequent management of the patient. No safety issues were encountered, and no adverse effects of undergoing the MRI scan were noted in any patient. MRI in patients with implanted pacemakers and defibrillators added value to patient diagnosis and management, which justified the risk of the procedure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Hair-Normalized Cortisol Waking Response as a Novel Biomarker of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity following Acute Trauma: A Proof-of-Concept Study with Pilot Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Walton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the development of persistent posttraumatic pain and disability remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that disordered stress-system pathway (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity may be responsible for the genesis and maintenance of long-term sensory and emotional problems. However, confidence in current evidence is limited by the necessarily retrospective collection of data. Hair cortisol can serve as a calendar of HPA axis activity going back several months prior to injury. The purposes of this pilot study were to determine the feasibility of using hair cortisol and hair-normalized salivary cortisol as biomarkers of distress following traumatic injuries of whiplash or distal radius fracture. Ten subjects provided complete data within 3 weeks of injury. Hair cortisol, cortisol waking response (CWR, and mean daily cortisol (MDC were captured at inception, as were self-report indicators of pain, disability, and pain catastrophizing. Pain and disability were also captured 3 months after injury. Results indicate that cortisol waking response may be a useful biomarker of current distress as measured using the pain catastrophizing scale, especially when normalized to 3-month hair cortisol (r=0.77 raw, 0.93 normalized. Hair-normalized CWR may also have predictive capacity, correlating with 3-month self-reported disability at r=0.70. While promising, the results must be viewed in light of the small sample.

  9. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 10 kHz High-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Axial Low Back Pain in Patients With No History of Spinal Surgery: A Preliminary, Prospective, Open Label and Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kaisy, Adnan; Palmisani, Stefano; Smith, Thomas E; Pang, David; Lam, Khai; Burgoyne, William; Houghton, Russell; Hudson, Emma; Lucas, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of 10 kHz high frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF10 therapy) treatment of chronic low back pain in patients who have not had spinal surgery. Patients with chronic low back pain without prior spinal surgery were evaluated by a team of spine surgeons to rule out any spinal pathology amenable to surgical interventions and by a multidisciplinary pain team to confirm eligibility for the study. After a successful (>50% back pain reduction) trial of HF10 therapy, enrolled subjects underwent permanent system implantation and were followed-up one year post-implant. About 95% of the enrolled subjects (20/21) received the permanent system. At 12 months post-implant, both back pain VAS score and ODI were significantly reduced compared with baseline values (by 73% and 48%, respectively); an estimated quality-adjusted life year gain of 0.47 and a reduction in opioid use by 64% was observed. Four more patients among those unable to work at baseline due to back pain were employed at 12 months post-implant. There were no serious adverse events. HF10 therapy may provide significant back pain relief, reduction in disability, improvement quality of life, and reduction in opioid use in chronic low back pain not resulting from spinal surgery. © 2016 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. A possible role of the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile in screening for autism: a proof-of-concept study in the specific sample of prematurely born children with birth weights <1,500 g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beranova S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stepanka Beranova,1 Jan Stoklasa,2 Iva Dudova,1 Daniela Markova,3 Martina Kasparova,4 Jana Zemankova,5 Tomas Urbanek,6 Tomas Talasek,2 Pasi Luukka,7 Michal Hrdlicka1 1Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, 2Department of Applied Economics, Faculty of Arts, Palacky University, Olomouc, 3Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Charles University First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Prague, 4Department of Pediatrics, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, 5Department of Pediatrics, Charles University Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital, Hradec Kralove, 6Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic; 7Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the potential of the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile (ITSP as a screening tool for autism spectrum disorders (ASD in prematurely born children.Methods: Parents of 157 children with birth weights <1,500 g (aged 2 years, corrected for prematurity; 88 boys, 69 girls completed a screening battery that included the ITSP, Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT, and the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Profile Infant-Toddler Checklist (CSBS-DP-ITC. Children with known disabilities were excluded. All the children who were screened positive on any of the screening tools subsequently underwent clinical examination including the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule.Results: We used classification trees to answer the question whether ITSP (or some of its subscales could be combined with the M-CHAT and/or the CSBS-DP-ITC or its subscales into an effective ASD screening tool. Using the CSBS-DP-ITC, overall score, and the Sensation Seeking subscale of the ITSP, we obtained a screening tool that was able

  12. Effect of a simple dose-escalation schedule on tramadol tolerability : assessment in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro, I; Herrera, J; Barutell, C; Díez, M C; Marín, M; Samper, D; Busquet, C; Rodríguez, M J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effect of a very simple dose-escalation schedule on tramadol tolerability in clinical practice. This schedule consists of starting treatment with sustained-release tramadol 50mg twice daily, and escalating the dose around 7 days later to 100mg twice daily. Data from 1925 outpatients with non-malignant chronic pain were collected in this multicentre, prospective, comparative, non-randomised, open, observational study. A total of 1071 patients (55.6%) were included in the dose-escalation group (50mg group) and 854 patients (44.4%) in the control group (sustained-release tramadol 100mg twice daily; 100mg group). The proportion of patients who interrupted tramadol treatment due to the occurrence of adverse reactions was significantly lower in the 50mg group (5.6%) than in the 100mg group (12.6%) [p = 0.001]. In line with this, the proportion of patients who experienced at least one adverse reaction was significantly lower in the 50mg group (18.4%) than in the 100mg group (30.4%) [p = 0.001] and, interestingly, the two most frequently reported adverse reactions, nausea and dizziness, were found with a significantly lower frequency in the 50mg group (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of safety-related treatment cessations was 2.3 times higher in the 100mg group than in the 50mg group, and 2.2 times higher in females than in males. The two treatments were equally effective in reducing pain intensity (p = 0.121), measured as a reduction in pain score obtained by means of a visual analogue scale. The instauration of tramadol treatment, starting with sustained-release 50mg capsules twice daily and escalating the dose some days later to 100mg twice daily, was shown to be an effective and easy way to improve tramadol tolerability in clinical practice, whilst maintaining its analgesic efficacy.

  13. Dose escalation for non-small cell lung cancer: Analysis and modelling of published literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, Mike; Ramos, Monica; Sardaro, Angela; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the published clinical data on non-small cell lung cancer treated with radical radiotherapy to confirm a dose-response relationship as a basis for further dose-escalation trials. Methods: Twenty-four published clinical trials were identified, 16 of which - with 29 different standard, hyper- and hypofractionated treatment schedules - were analysed. Prescription doses were converted to biologically-equivalent dose (BED), with a correction for repopulation. Disease-free survival data were corrected for the stage profile of each cohort to allow better comparison of results. We also analysed moderate (grade II and III) lung and oesophageal acute toxicity related to the corrected BED delivered to the tumour. Results: The clinical data analysed showed good agreement between the observed and modelled disease-free survival at 2 years when compared to the published models of Fenwick (correlation coefficient 0.525, p = 0.003) and Martel (correlation coefficient 0.492, p = 0.007), indicating a clear tumour dose-response. In the normally fractionated treatments (∼2 Gy per fraction), improved disease-free survival was generally observed in the shorter schedules (maximum around 6 weeks). However, the best outcomes were obtained for the hypofractionated schedules. No systematic relationship was seen between prescribed dose and lung or oesophageal acute toxicity, possibly due to dose selection depending on V 20 or MLD in some studies and the diversity of the patients analysed. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a dose-response relationship for NSCLC based on clinical data. The clinical data provide a rational basis for selection of dose escalation schedules to be tested in future randomised trials.

  14. Radiation Dose Escalation in Esophageal Cancer Revisited: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base, 2004 to 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey V. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Chen, Shuai [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bassetti, Michael F. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yu, Menggang [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harari, Paul M.; Ritter, Mark A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Baschnagel, Andrew M., E-mail: baschnagel@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the INT-0123 trial. Furthermore, these data highlight that many radiation oncologists have not embraced the concept that dose escalation does not improve OS. Although local control, not investigated in the present study, might benefit from dose escalation, novel therapies are needed to improve the OS of patients with esophageal cancer.

  15. Analysis and Test Correlation of Proof of Concept Box for Blended Wing Body-Low Speed Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Regina L.

    2003-01-01

    The Low Speed Vehicle (LSV) is a 14.2% scale remotely piloted vehicle of the revolutionary Blended Wing Body concept. The design of the LSV includes an all composite airframe. Due to internal manufacturing capability restrictions, room temperature layups were necessary. An extensive materials testing and manufacturing process development effort was underwent to establish a process that would achieve the high modulus/low weight properties required to meet the design requirements. The analysis process involved a loads development effort that incorporated aero loads to determine internal forces that could be applied to a traditional FEM of the vehicle and to conduct detailed component analyses. A new tool, Hypersizer, was added to the design process to address various composite failure modes and to optimize the skin panel thickness of the upper and lower skins for the vehicle. The analysis required an iterative approach as material properties were continually changing. As a part of the material characterization effort, test articles, including a proof of concept wing box and a full-scale wing, were fabricated. The proof of concept box was fabricated based on very preliminary material studies and tested in bending, torsion, and shear. The box was then tested to failure under shear. The proof of concept box was also analyzed using Nastran and Hypersizer. The results of both analyses were scaled to determine the predicted failure load. The test results were compared to both the Nastran and Hypersizer analytical predictions. The actual failure occurred at 899 lbs. The failure was predicted at 1167 lbs based on the Nastran analysis. The Hypersizer analysis predicted a lower failure load of 960 lbs. The Nastran analysis alone was not sufficient to predict the failure load because it does not identify local composite failure modes. This analysis has traditionally been done using closed form solutions. Although Hypersizer is typically used as an optimizer for the design

  16. An intra-patient dose-escalation study of disodium pamidronate plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for the treatment of osteolytic metastases. Monitoring of recalcification using image-processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilis Kouloulias, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); John Kouvaris, R.; Antypas, C.; Mystakidou, K.; Moulopoulos, A.; Lambros Vlahos, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Matsopoulos, G.; Nikolaos Uzunoglu, C. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    2003-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical benefit and mainly to monitor quantitatively the recalcification of osteolytic lesions after radiotherapy with or without intravenous infusion of disodium pamidronate (DP) in different doses. Patients and Methods: 42 patients with solitary lytic metastasis in weight-bearing bones were studied. Primary endpoints were the mean value and energy of gray-level histogram in plain radiographs (MVGLH and EGLH) and relative electron density (RED) of CT scans in bone lesions. In eleven patients (group A) the DP dose was increased stepwise from 90 up to 180 mg (flat dose), while in other 15 patients (group B) a flat dose of 180 mg was administered intravenously in 2 h. In both groups, the first session of DP was given concurrently with local radiotherapy (30 Gy in ten fractions, 5 days a week). Another 16 patients (group C) underwent radiotherapy only. Results: Morbidity related to pamidronate was mild. Significant differences from the baseline (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon test) were recorded for MVGLH, EGLH and RED values, regarding all groups. Improvement was significantly higher in patients of group B versus A, while the results of pamidronate groups (A and B) were superior to group C, concerning the above indices (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney test). Additionally, pamidronate groups had significantly lower skeletal morbidity than group C. Conclusion: The 2-h infusional flat dose of 180 mg every 4 weeks seems to be tolerable and superior to 90 mg regarding palliation and mainly recalcification of osteolytic lesions. Radiotherapy alone is effective but inferior to the combined treatment. Last but not least, the findings of MVGLH, EGLH and RED indicate an important increase in bone mass and bone formation, which was difficult to be identified visually by the experts. (orig.)

  17. Feasibility of international data collection and feedback on post-operative pain data: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, R; Chapman, C R; Rothaug, J; Bäckström, R; Brill, S; Davidson, E; Elessi, K; Fletcher, D; Fodor, L; Karanja, E; Konrad, C; Kopf, A; Leykin, Y; Lipman, A; Puig, M; Rawal, N; Schug, S; Ullrich, K; Volk, T; Meissner, W

    2012-03-01

    Post-operative pain exacts a high toll from patients, families, healthcare professionals and healthcare systems worldwide. PAIN-OUT is a research project funded by the European Union's 7th Framework Program designed to develop effective, evidence-based approaches to improve pain management after surgery, including creating a registry for feedback, benchmarking and decision support. In preparation for PAIN-OUT, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of international data collection with feedback to participating sites. Adult orthopaedic or general surgery patients consented to participate between May and October 2008 at 14 collaborating hospitals in 13 countries. Project staff collected patient-reported outcomes and process data from 688 patients and entered the data into an online database. Project staff in 10 institutions met the enrolment criteria of collecting data from at least 50 patients. The completeness and quality of the data, as assessed by rate of missing data, were acceptable; only 2% of process data and 0.06% of patient-reported outcome data were missing. Participating institutions received access to select items as Web-based feedback comparing their outcomes to those of the other sites, presented anonymously. We achieved proof of concept because staff and patients in all 14 sites cooperated well despite marked differences in cultures, nationalities and languages, and a central database management team was able to provide valuable feedback to all. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  18. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Okasaka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP and user plane (UP will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access.

  19. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasaka, Shozo; Weiler, Richard J; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Pudeyev, Andrey; Maltsev, Alexander; Karls, Ingolf; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-08-25

    The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G) will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave) spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet) architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP) and user plane (UP) will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC) was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access.

  20. A contact-free volumetric measurement of facial volume after third molar osteotomy: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüllmann, Dan; Jürchott, Lena Marie; John, Christoph; Trempler, Christina; Schwanecke, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf K W

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability of an optical scanning device for the objective assessment of postoperative facial swelling. Twenty control subjects bearing a defined volume of water (10-30 mL) in an intraorally carried balloon were tested to assess the measurement accuracy of the device. As a proof of concept, facial volumes of 59 surgical cases were recorded before osteotomy and 1 and 7 days after intervention with the use of a structured light scanner. The median difference between the applied and the measured volumes was 0.67 mL for the control test with the artificial swelling simulated using water balloons. For subjects having third molar osteotomy, extraoral volume increased to 5.29 cm(3) 1 day after surgery (95% CI 5.22-8.52) and decreased to 0.00 mL (95% CI 0.85-2.55) after 7 days. Contact-free visible-light 3-dimensional scanning is reliable for the objective assessment of postoperative facial swelling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photodynamic therapy in neurosurgery: a proof of concept of treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, C.; Reyns, N.; Mordon, S.; Vermandel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor. PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT) appears as an interesting research field to improve GBM treatment. Nevertheless, PDT cannot fit into the current therapeutic modalities according to several reasons: the lack of reliable and reproducible therapy schemes (devices, light delivery system), the lack of consensus on a photosensitizer and the absence of randomized and controlled multicenter clinical trial. The main objective of this study is to bring a common support for PDT planning. Here, we describe a proof of concept of Treatment Planning System (TPS) dedicated to interstitial PDT for GBM treatment. The TPS was developed with the integrated development environment C++ Builder XE8 and the environment ArtiMED, developed in our laboratory. This software enables stereotactic registration of DICOM images, light sources insertion and an accelerated CUDA GPU dosimetry modeling. Although, Monte-Carlo is more robust to describe light diffusion in biological tissue, analytical model accelerated by GPU remains relevant for dose preview or fast reverse planning processes. Finally, this preliminary work proposes a new tool to plan interstitial or intraoperative PDT treatment and might be included in the design of future clinical trials in order to deliver PDT straightforwardly and homogenously in investigator centers.

  2. Forward Genetic Screening Using Behavioral Tests in Zebrafish: A Proof of Concept Analysis of Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, Robert; Poshusta, Tanya L; Rampersad, Mindy; Fernandes, Yohaan; Greenwood, Tammy M; Cousin, Margot A; Klee, Eric W; Clark, Karl J

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish enjoys several advantages over other model organisms. It is small, easy to maintain, prolific, and numerous genetic tools are available for it. For example, forward genetic screens have allowed investigators to identify important genes potentially involved in a variety of functions from embryogenesis to cancer. However, despite its sophisticated behavioral repertoire, behavioral methods have rarely been utilized in forward genetic screens. Here, we employ a two-tiered strategy, a proof of concept study, to explore the feasibility of behavioral screens. We generated mutant lines using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis, allowing us to bias mutant selection with target genes expressed within the brain. Furthermore, we employed an efficient and fast behavioral pre-selection in which we investigated the locomotory response of 5-day post-fertilization old larval fish to hyperosmotic shock. Based on this assay, we selected five lines for our lower throughput secondary adult behavioral screen. The latter screen utilized tests in which computer animated image presentation and video-tracking-based automated quantification of behavior allowed us to compare heterozygous zebrafish with their wild-type siblings on their responses to a variety of stimuli. We found significant mutation induced adult behavioral alterations in 4 out of the 5 lines analyzed, including changes in response to social or fear inducing stimuli, to handling and novelty, or in habituation to novelty. We discuss the pros and cons of behavioral phenotyping and of the use of different forward genetic methods in biomedical research with zebrafish.

  3. Systems for Teaching Complex Texts: A Proof-of-Concept Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    In this article we investigate the systems that need to be in place for students to learn from increasingly complex texts. Our concept, drawn from past research, includes clear learning targets, teacher modeling, collaborative conversations, close reading, small group reading, and wide reading. Using a "proof of concept" model, we follow…

  4. Vehicle infrastructure integration proof of concept : results and findings summary-vehicle : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-18

    This document describes the objectives and the approach to the testing of the VII Proof of Concept system. A summary of the test results and findings for both the major system functions and the applications designed for the system, are presented alon...

  5. Proof of Concept for an Approach to a Finer Resolution Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris J. Cieszewski; Kim Iles; Roger C. Lowe; Michal Zasada

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a proof of concept for a statistical framework to develop a timely, accurate, and unbiased fiber supply assessment in the State of Georgia, U.S.A. The proposed approach is based on using various data sources and modeling techniques to calibrate satellite image-based statewide stand lists, which provide initial estimates for a State inventory on a...

  6. Research designs for proof-of-concept chronic pain clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2014-01-01

    Proof-of-concept (POC) clinical trials play an important role in developing novel treatments and determining whether existing treatments may be efficacious in broader populations of patients. The goal of most POC trials is to determine whether a treatment is likely to be efficacious for a given i...

  7. Can we avoid dose escalation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the setting of short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve the outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Despite this, there are only few reports evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant ADT, and virtually no studies investigating dose escalation >74 Gy in this setting. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improved the outcomes for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who received neoadjuvant ADT. In our institution, patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, with doses sequentially increasing from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy between 2006 and 2012. We identified 435 patients treated with DE-EBRT and ADT, with a median follow-up of 70 months. For the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups, five-year biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.0%, 97.8%, and 95.3%, respectively; metastasis-free survival rates were 99.1%, 100.0%, and 98.6%, respectively; and prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for all three dose levels. There was no significant benefit for dose escalation either on univariate or multivariate analysis for any outcome. There was no benefit for DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT. Given the higher risks of toxicity associated with dose escalation, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose de-escalation should be considered.

  8. Lack of benefit for the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to dose-escalated radiotherapy in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krauss, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng\\/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA >\\/=20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason >\\/=8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. CONCLUSION: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  9. Use of radiobiological indices to guide dose escalation of the prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, Chandra; Happersett, Laura; Kutcher, Gerald; Leibel, Steven; Zelefsky, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Ling, C. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In the radiation treatment of localized prostate carcinoma, a portion of the anterior rectal wall is included in the planning target volume (PTV). Thus, in dose escalation studies, radiation induced rectal complication may limit the dose that can be delivered safely. In this study we investigate the potential of increasing tumor control without increasing rectal complication by limiting the rectal volume receiving the high prescription dose. The evaluation is with the aid of radiobiological indices. Methods and Materials: Two types of 3D conformal treatment plans were performed for a group of ten patients, for prescription doses of 75.6 to 95.0 Gy. Type I plan involved 6 fields (2 lateral, 2 anterior oblique and 2 posterior oblique), with the dose prescribed to the maximum isodose line encompassing the PTV. Type II plan comprised a primary treatment (using the 6 fields of the first plan) of 72 Gy to the PTV, and a boost with 6 posterior obliques to deliver the additional dose, except to the portion of the rectal wall included by the PTV. Based on the composite 3D dose distribution, TCP and rectal NTCP were calculated with the Goitein and Lyman models, respectively, using parameters derived from our clinical experience and from the 1991 NCI Collaborating Work Group publication. Results: In the figure, the calculated values of TCP, NTCP and TCP * [1-NTCP] (or uncomplicated control), averaged over the 10 patients, are plotted against the prescription dose. The dotted and solid lines are for type I (with uniform PTV dose) and type II (with reduction in rectal dose for the boost) plans, respectively, and the error bars represent the range of computed values for the 10 patients. For type I plans, the increase in TCP, from 75% at 75.6 Gy to 98% at 95 Gy, must be balanced against the rise in rectal NTCP to >20%. The TCP for type II plan is slightly less, but with little increase in NTCP with prescription dose. Thus, the uncomplicated control continues to increase

  10. Radiation Dose Escalation in Esophageal Cancer Revisited: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base, 2004 to 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jeffrey V.; Chen, Shuai; Bassetti, Michael F.; Yu, Menggang; Harari, Paul M.; Ritter, Mark A.; Baschnagel, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    oncologists have not embraced the concept that dose escalation does not improve OS. Although local control, not investigated in the present study, might benefit from dose escalation, novel therapies are needed to improve the OS of patients with esophageal cancer.

  11. Proof of Concept: Iraqi Enrollment via Voice Authentication Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Samuel K

    2005-01-01

    ...). The IEVAP is an Office of the Secretary of Defense sponsored research project commissioned to study the feasibility of speaker verification technology in support of the Global War on Terrorism security requirements...

  12. Proof of concept : Temperature sensing waders for environmental sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R.W.; Tyler, S.; Van Emmerik, T.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    A prototype temperature sensing pair of waders is introduced and tested. The water temperature at the stream-bed is interesting both for scientist studying the hyporheic zone as well as for, e.g., fishers spotting good fishing locations. A temperature sensor incorporated in waders worn by members of

  13. Proof of concept : Temperature-sensing waders for environmental sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R.W.; Tyler, S.; Van Emmerik, T.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype temperature-sensing pair of waders is introduced and tested. The water temperature at the streambed is interesting both for scientists studying the hyporheic zone and for, e.g., fishers spotting good fishing locations. A temperature sensor incorporated into waders worn by members of the

  14. Fast time-resolved aerosol collector: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.-Y.; Cowin, J. P.; Iedema, M. J.; Ali, H.

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric particles can be collected in the field on substrates for subsequent laboratory analysis via chemically sensitive single particle methods such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. With moving substrates time resolution of seconds to minutes can be achieved. In this paper, we demonstrate how to increase the time resolution when collecting particles on a substrate to a few milliseconds to provide real-time information. Our fast time-resolved aerosol collector ("Fast-TRAC") microscopically observes the particle collection on a substrate and records an on-line video. Particle arrivals are resolved to within a single frame (4-17 ms in this setup), and the spatial locations are matched to the subsequent single particle analysis. This approach also provides in-situ information on particle size and number concentration. Applications are expected in airborne studies of cloud microstructure, pollution plumes, and surface long-term monitoring.

  15. Kepler Ground-Based Photometry Proof-of-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, D.; Howell, S.; Everett, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our efforts to evaluate the feasibility of using the 4-Shooter CCD camera on the 48-inch reflector at the Whipple Observatory to carry out a multi-band photometric survey of the Kepler target region. We also include recommendations for future work. We were assigned 36 nights with the &hooter during 2003 for this feasibility study. Most of the time during the first two dozen nights was dedicated to the development of procedures, test exposures, and a reconnaissance across the Kepler field. The final 12 nights in September and October 2003 were used for "production" observing in the middle of the Kepler field using the full complement of seven filters (SDSS u, g, r, i, z, plus our special Gred and D51 intermediate-band filters). Nine of these 12 nights were clear and photometric, and production observations were obtained at 109 pointings, corresponding to 14.6 square degrees.

  16. Green IT Readiness: A Framework and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu Molla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Businesses are under increasing pressure from customers, competitors, regulators and community groups to implement sustainable business practices. Balancing economic and environmental performance to be green and competitive is therefore a key strategic issue. The information technology (IT sector is one of the pioneer sectors which started working on the sustainable development model. However, it is only lately that researchers and organisations have begun to consider the role of IT, not only in contributing to a businesses environmental footprint but also in tackling climate change problems. Usually coined as, “Green Information Technology”, the role of IT in causing and resolving ecological sustainability, in maintaining low cost IT shops, in building green reputation capital and in supporting corporate green strategies has hardly been researched. This paper identifies four main areas of Green IT capability and describes the main pillars of a G-readiness framework to help organisations evaluate their maturity for Green IT. The utility of the framework is demonstrated through a desk-based research case study of seven organisations. The paper argues that just as e-readiness has been, and continues to be, a critical capability in the digital economy, G-readiness is an equally critical capability in the low carbon digital economy. Without a clear understanding of G-readiness, organisations would approach Green IT initiatives on an ad hoc and somewhat reactive basis, which is undesirable.

  17. 3D-printed orthodontic brackets - proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Karl-Friedrich; Darkazanly, Nawras; Kühnert, Rolf; Ruge, Sebastian

    Today, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is usually carried out using preprogrammed straight-wire brackets made of metal or ceramics. The goal of this study was to determine the possibility of clinically implementing a fully digital workflow with individually designed and three-dimensionally printed (3D-printed) brackets. Edgewise brackets were designed using computer-aided design (CAD) software for demonstration purposes. After segmentation of the malocclusion model generated based on intraoral scan data, the brackets were digitally positioned on the teeth and a target occlusion model created. The thus-defined tooth position was used to generate a template for an individualized arch form in the horizontal plane. The base contours of the brackets were modified to match the shape of the tooth surfaces, and a positioning guide (fabricated beforehand) was used to ensure that the brackets were bonded at the correct angle and position. The brackets, positioning guide, and retainer splint, digitally designed on the target occlusion model, were 3D printed using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) 3D printer. The archwires were individually pre-bent using the template. In the treatment sequence, it was shown for the first time that, in principle, it is possible to perform treatment with an individualized 3D-printed brackets system by using the proposed fully digital workflow. Technical aspects of the system, problems encountered in treatment, and possible future developments are discussed in this article.

  18. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  19. Dextromethorphan/quinidine pharmacotherapy in patients with treatment resistant depression: A proof of concept clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrough, James W; Wade, Elizabeth; Sayed, Sehrish; Ahle, Gabriella; Kiraly, Drew D; Welch, Alison; Collins, Katherine A; Soleimani, Laili; Iosifescu, Dan V; Charney, Dennis S

    2017-08-15

    At least one-third of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have treatment-resistant depression (TRD), defined as lack of response to two or more adequate antidepressant trials. For these patients, novel antidepressant treatments are urgently needed. The current study is a phase IIa open label clinical trial examining the efficacy and tolerability of a combination of dextromethorphan (DM) and the CYP2D6 enzyme inhibitor quinidine (Q) in patients with TRD. Dextromethorphan acts as an antagonist at the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, in addition to other pharmacodynamics properties that include activity at sigma-1 receptors. Twenty patients with unipolar TRD who completed informed consent and met all eligibility criteria we enrolled in an open-label study of DM/Q up to 45/10mg by mouth administered every 12h over the course of a 10-week period, and constitute the intention to treat (ITT) sample. Six patients discontinued prior to study completion. There was no treatment-emergent suicidal ideation, psychotomimetic or dissociative symptoms. Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score was reduced from baseline to the 10-week primary outcome (mean change: -13.0±11.5, t 19 =5.0, p<0.001), as was QIDS-SR score (mean change: -5.9±6.6, t 19 =4.0, p<0.001). The response and remission rates in the ITT sample were 45% and 35%, respectively. Open-label, proof-of-concept design. Herein we report acceptable tolerability and preliminary efficacy of DM/Q up to 45/10mg administered every 12h in patients with TRD. Future larger placebo controlled randomized trials in this population are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proof of Concept: Design and Initial Evaluation of a Device to Measure Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert H; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Halama, James R; Venu, Mukund; Gabriel, Medhat S; Bova, Davide

    2017-09-01

    Chronic constipation and gastrointestinal motility disorders constitute a large part of a gastroenterology practice and have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and lifestyle. In most cases, medications are prescribed to alleviate symptoms without there being an objective measurement of response. Commonly used investigations of gastrointestinal transit times are currently limited to radiopaque markers or electronic capsules. Repeated use of these techniques is limited because of the radiation exposure and the significant cost of the devices. We present the proof of concept for a new device to measure gastrointestinal transit time using commonly available and inexpensive materials with only a small amount of radiotracer. Methods: We assembled gelatin capsules containing a 67 Ga-citrate-radiolabeled grain of rice embedded in paraffin for use as a point-source transit device. It was tested for stability in vitro and subsequently was given orally to 4 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with constipation or diarrhea. Imaging was performed at regular intervals until the device was excreted. Results: The device remained intact and visible as a point source in all subjects until excretion. When used along with a diary of bowel movement times and dates, the device could determine the total transit time. The device could be visualized either alone or in combination with a barium small-bowel follow-through study or a gastric emptying study. Conclusion: The use of a point-source transit device for the determination of gastrointestinal transit time is a feasible alternative to other methods. The device is inexpensive and easy to assemble, requires only a small amount of radiotracer, and remains inert throughout the gastrointestinal tract, allowing for accurate determination of gastrointestinal transit time. Further investigation of the device is required to establish optimum imaging parameters and reference values. Measurements of gastrointestinal transit time

  1. Improving ethanol productivity through self-cycling fermentation of yeast: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chae, Michael; Sauvageau, Dominic; Bressler, David C

    2017-01-01

    The cellulosic ethanol industry has developed efficient strategies for converting sugars obtained from various cellulosic feedstocks to bioethanol. However, any further major improvements in ethanol productivity will require development of novel and innovative fermentation strategies that enhance incumbent technologies in a cost-effective manner. The present study investigates the feasibility of applying self-cycling fermentation (SCF) to cellulosic ethanol production to elevate productivity. SCF is a semi-continuous cycling process that employs the following strategy: once the onset of stationary phase is detected, half of the broth volume is automatically harvested and replaced with fresh medium to initiate the next cycle. SCF has been shown to increase product yield and/or productivity in many types of microbial cultivation. To test whether this cycling process could increase productivity during ethanol fermentations, we mimicked the process by manually cycling the fermentation for five cycles in shake flasks, and then compared the results to batch operation. Mimicking SCF for five cycles resulted in regular patterns with regards to glucose consumption, ethanol titer, pH, and biomass production. Compared to batch fermentation, our cycling strategy displayed improved ethanol volumetric productivity (the titer of ethanol produced in a given cycle per corresponding cycle time) and specific productivity (the amount of ethanol produced per cellular biomass) by 43.1 ± 11.6 and 42.7 ± 9.8%, respectively. Five successive cycles contributed to an improvement of overall productivity (the aggregate amount of ethanol produced at the end of a given cycle per total processing time) and the estimated annual ethanol productivity (the amount of ethanol produced per year) by 64.4 ± 3.3 and 33.1 ± 7.2%, respectively. This study provides proof of concept that applying SCF to ethanol production could significantly increase productivities, which will help strengthen the

  2. Computing under-ice discharge: A proof-of-concept using hydroacoustics and the Probability Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John W.; Henneberg, Mark F.; Mills, Taylor J.; Kohn, Michael S.; Epstein, Brian; Hittle, Elizabeth A.; Damschen, William C.; Laveau, Christopher D.; Lambrecht, Jason M.; Farmer, William H.

    2018-01-01

    Under-ice discharge is estimated using open-water reference hydrographs; however, the ratings for ice-affected sites are generally qualified as poor. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a proof-of-concept to develop an alternative method for computing under-ice discharge using hydroacoustics and the Probability Concept.The study site was located south of Minturn, Colorado (CO), USA, and was selected because of (1) its proximity to the existing USGS streamgage 09064600 Eagle River near Minturn, CO, and (2) its ease-of-access to verify discharge using a variety of conventional methods. From late September 2014 to early March 2015, hydraulic conditions varied from open water to under ice. These temporal changes led to variations in water depth and velocity. Hydroacoustics (tethered and uplooking acoustic Doppler current profilers and acoustic Doppler velocimeters) were deployed to measure the vertical-velocity profile at a singularly important vertical of the channel-cross section. Because the velocity profile was non-standard and cannot be characterized using a Power Law or Log Law, velocity data were analyzed using the Probability Concept, which is a probabilistic formulation of the velocity distribution. The Probability Concept-derived discharge was compared to conventional methods including stage-discharge and index-velocity ratings and concurrent field measurements; each is complicated by the dynamics of ice formation, pressure influences on stage measurements, and variations in cross-sectional area due to ice formation.No particular discharge method was assigned as truth. Rather one statistical metric (Kolmogorov-Smirnov; KS), agreement plots, and concurrent measurements provided a measure of comparability between various methods. Regardless of the method employed, comparisons between each method revealed encouraging results depending on the flow conditions and the absence or presence of ice

  3. Endoventricular Deep Brain Stimulation of the Third Ventricle: Proof of Concept and Application to Cluster Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabardès, Stéphan; Carron, Romain; Seigneuret, Eric; Torres, Napoleon; Goetz, Laurent; Krainik, Alexandre; Piallat, Brigitte; Pham, Pascale; David, Olivier; Giraud, Pierrick; Benabid, Alim Louis

    2016-12-01

    The third ventricle (3rd V) is surrounded by centers related to satiety, homeostasis, hormones, sleep, memory, and pain. Stimulation of the wall of the 3rd V could be useful to treat disorders related to dysfunction of the hypothalamus. To assess safety and efficacy of endoventricular electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus using a floating deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead laid on the floor of the 3rd V to treat refractory cluster headaches (CH). Seven patients, aged 24 to 60 years, experiencing chronic CH (mean chronic duration 5.8 ± 2.5 years) were enrolled in this pilot, prospective, open study assessing the safety and potential efficacy of chronic DBS of the 3rd V. Number of attacks was collected during baseline and was compared with those occurring at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperation. Any side effects that occurred during or after surgery were reported. Effect on mood was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale during baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperation. Insertion of the lead into the posterior 3rd V and chronic stimulation was feasible and safe in all patients. The voltage ranged from 0.9 to 2.3 volts. The most common side effect was transient trembling vision during stimulation. At 12 months, 3 of 7 patients were pain free, 2 had 90% improvement, 1 of 7 had 75% improvement, and 1 of 7 was not significantly improved. This proof of concept demonstrates the feasibility, safety, and potential efficacy of 3rd V DBS using an endoventricular road that could be applied to treat various diseases involving hypothalamic areas. CCH, chronic cluster headacheCH, cluster headacheDBS, deep brain stimulationHAD, hospital anxiety depressionONS, occipital nerve stimulationPAG, periaqueductal gray matterPH, posterior hypothalamusPVG, periventricular gray matter3rd V, third ventricle.

  4. The larynx ruler to measure height and profile of vocal folds: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desuter, Gauthier; Mertens, Benjamin; Delchambre, Alain; van Lith-Bijl, Julie; van Benthem, Peter Paul; Sjögren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Glottic leakage during phonation is a direct consequence of unilateral vocal fold (VF) paralysis. This air leakage can be in the horizontal plane and in the vertical plane. Presently, there is no easily applicable medical device allowing noninvasive, office-based measurement of the relative vertical position of the VFs. The larynx ruler (LR) is a laser-based measuring device that could meet the previously stated need, using a flexible endoscope. This study represents a proof of concept regarding the use of the LR in assessing VF relative positions in the vertical plane. One fresh male human cadaver larynx, free of neurologic and anatomic disease, was explored with the LR system through the operative channel of a flexible gastroenterology video-endoscope. The tip of the video-endoscope was located in the laryngeal vestibule. The right crico-arytenoid joint was posteriorly disarticulated. Tilting of the VF was obtained by pulling or pushing the arytenoid cartilage with a mosquito forceps fixed to the stump of the previously sectioned superior tip of the posterior crico-arytenoid muscle allowing anterior and posterior tilting of the arytenoid cartilage in order to induce an elevation or a depression of the VF process. Ten "push" and ten "pull" sessions were performed. The distance from the tip of the video-endoscope to each illuminated pixel of the laser beam was recorded. The level difference between the left and right VFs was measured for each recording. Data provided by the LR were consistently in accordance with the movements applied on the VFs. The accuracy of 0.2 mm of the LR is compatible with the envisioned applications for the human larynx. The LR system represents a feasible technique to evaluate respective vertical position of VFs in the human larynx. Technical limitations were identified that will require improvements before experimental use on human beings.

  5. Towards soil property retrieval from space: Proof of concept using in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Ranmalee; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable that controls the exchange of water and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, the temporal evolution of soil moisture is neither easy to measure nor monitor at large scales because of its high spatial variability. This is mainly a result of the local variation in soil properties and vegetation cover. Thus, land surface models are normally used to predict the evolution of soil moisture and yet, despite their importance, these models are based on low-resolution soil property information or typical values. Therefore, the availability of more accurate and detailed soil parameter data than are currently available is vital, if regional or global soil moisture predictions are to be made with the accuracy required for environmental applications. The proposed solution is to estimate the soil hydraulic properties via model calibration to remotely sensed soil moisture observation, with in situ observations used as a proxy in this proof of concept study. Consequently, the feasibility is assessed, and the level of accuracy that can be expected determined, for soil hydraulic property estimation of duplex soil profiles in a semi-arid environment using near-surface soil moisture observations under naturally occurring conditions. The retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were then assessed by their reliability to predict the root zone soil moisture using the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator model. When using parameters that were retrieved using soil moisture observations, the root zone soil moisture was predicted to within an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3, which is an improvement of ∼0.025 m3/m3 on predictions that used published values or pedo-transfer functions.

  6. Space network scheduling benchmark: A proof-of-concept process for technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Karen; Happell, Nadine; Hayden, B. J.; Barclay, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed proof-of-concept activity to evaluate flexible scheduling technology as implemented in the Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE) and applied to Space Network (SN) scheduling. The criteria developed for an operational evaluation of a reusable scheduling system is addressed including a methodology to prove that the proposed system performs at least as well as the current system in function and performance. The improvement of the new technology must be demonstrated and evaluated against the cost of making changes. Finally, there is a need to show significant improvement in SN operational procedures. Successful completion of a proof-of-concept would eventually lead to an operational concept and implementation transition plan, which is outside the scope of this paper. However, a high-fidelity benchmark using actual SN scheduling requests has been designed to test the ROSE scheduling tool. The benchmark evaluation methodology, scheduling data, and preliminary results are described.

  7. Process control plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Saltcake Dissolution Proof of Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the process controls for the tank 241-U-107 (U-107) saltcake dissolution proof-of-concept operations. Saltcake dissolution is defined as a method by which water-soluble salts will be retrieved from the Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks utilizing dissolution as the mobilizing mechanism. The proof-of-concept operations will monitor the retrieval process and transfer at least 100 kgal of fluid from tank U-107 to the double-shell tank (DST) system during the performance period. Tank U-107 has been identified as posing the highest long-term risk to the Columbia River of all single shell tanks (SSTs). This is because of the high content of mobile, long-lived radionuclides mostly in the saltcake waste in the tank. To meet current contractual and consent decree commitments, tank U-107 is being prepared for interim stabilization in August 2001. It is currently scheduled for saltcake retrieval in 2023, near the end of the SST retrieval campaign because of a lack of infrastructure in U-Farm. The proof-of-concept test will install a system to dissolve and retrieve a portion of the saltcake as part of, and operating in parallel with, the standard interim stabilization system to be installed on tank U-107. This proof-of-concept should provide key information on spray nozzle selection and effective spray patterns, leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) and in-tank saltcake solubility data that will help in the design of a full-tank retrieval demonstration system

  8. Application Development for Optimizing Patient Placement on Aeromedical Evacuation Flights: Proof-of-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Brittany Fouts, Jennifer Serres, Ray Hill, Frank Ciarallo 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...APPENDIX A – Flowchart for Graphical Prototype ...................................................................... 9 APPENDIX B – Proof-of-Concept App...would like to thank the programming team at the Department of Operational Analysis at the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air

  9. Can we avoid dose escalation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the setting of short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakespeare TP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Shakespeare,1,2 Shea W Wilcox,1 Noel J Aherne1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, 2Faculty of Medicine, Rural Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia Background: Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT improve the outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Despite this, there are only few reports evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant ADT, and virtually no studies investigating dose escalation >74 Gy in this setting. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improved the outcomes for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who received neoadjuvant ADT. Findings: In our institution, patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, with doses sequentially increasing from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy between 2006 and 2012. We identified 435 patients treated with DE-EBRT and ADT, with a median follow-up of 70 months. For the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups, five-year biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.0%, 97.8%, and 95.3%, respectively; metastasis-free survival rates were 99.1%, 100.0%, and 98.6%, respectively; and prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for all three dose levels. There was no significant benefit for dose escalation either on univariate or multivariate analysis for any outcome. Conclusion: There was no benefit for DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT. Given the higher risks of toxicity associated with dose escalation, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose de-escalation should be considered. Keywords: radiotherapy, IMRT, dose, dose escalation, dose de-escalation, androgen deprivation therapy

  10. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART): Radiobiological and dose escalation considerations for localized carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William; Schaly, Bryan; Bauman, Glenn; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of various image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) techniques to deliver and escalate dose to the prostate in the presence of geometric uncertainties. Five prostate patients with 15-16 treatment CT studies each were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were planned with an 18 MV, six-field conformal technique with a 10 mm margin size and an initial prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The adaptive strategy employed in this work for patient-specific dose escalation was to increase the prescription dose in 2 Gy-per-fraction increments until the rectum normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) reached a level equal to that of the nominal plan NTCP (i.e., iso-NTCP dose escalation). The various target localization techniques simulated were: (1) daily laser-guided alignment to skin tattoo marks that represents treatment without image-guidance, (2) alignment to bony landmarks with daily portal images, and (3) alignment to the clinical target volume (CTV) with daily CT images. Techniques (1) and (3) were resimulated with a reduced margin size of 5 mm to investigate further dose escalation. When delivering the original clinical prescription dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the 'CTV registration' technique yielded the highest tumor control probability (TCP) most frequently, followed by the 'bone registration' and 'tattoo registration' techniques. However, the differences in TCP among the three techniques were minor when the margin size was 10 mm (≤1.1%). Reducing the margin size to 5 mm significantly degraded the TCP values of the 'tattoo registration' technique in two of the five patients, where a large difference was found compared to the other techniques (≤11.8%). The 'CTV registration' technique, however, did maintain similar TCP values compared to their 10 mm margin counterpart. In terms of normal tissue sparing, the technique producing the lowest NTCP varied from patient to patient. Reducing the

  11. Toward a Proof of Concept Cloud Framework for Physics Applications on Blue Gene Supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreher, Patrick; Scullin, William; Vouk, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Traditional high performance supercomputers are capable of delivering large sustained state-of-the-art computational resources to physics applications over extended periods of time using batch processing mode operating environments. However, today there is an increasing demand for more complex workflows that involve large fluctuations in the levels of HPC physics computational requirements during the simulations. Some of the workflow components may also require a richer set of operating system features and schedulers than normally found in a batch oriented HPC environment. This paper reports on progress toward a proof of concept design that implements a cloud framework onto BG/P and BG/Q platforms at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. The BG/P implementation utilizes the Kittyhawk utility and the BG/Q platform uses an experimental heterogeneous FusedOS operating system environment. Both platforms use the Virtual Computing Laboratory as the cloud computing system embedded within the supercomputer. This proof of concept design allows a cloud to be configured so that it can capitalize on the specialized infrastructure capabilities of a supercomputer and the flexible cloud configurations without resorting to virtualization. Initial testing of the proof of concept system is done using the lattice QCD MILC code. These types of user reconfigurable environments have the potential to deliver experimental schedulers and operating systems within a working HPC environment for physics computations that may be different from the native OS and schedulers on production HPC supercomputers. (paper)

  12. Using fluorescence lymphangiography to define the ileocolic mesentery: proof of concept for the watershed area using real-time imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D S; Joshi, H M; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Walsh, D; Coffey, J C; Chand, M

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in mesenteric science have demonstrated that the mesentery is a continuous structure with a 'watershed' area at the mesenteric apex between the right colon and terminal ileum, where lymphatic flow can proceed either proximally or distally. With this new understanding of the anatomy, functional features are emerging, which can have an impact on surgical management. Fluorescence lymphangiography or lymphoscintigraphy with indocyanine green allows real-time visualization of lymphatic channels, which highlights sentinel lymph nodes and may facilitate identification of the ideal margins for mesenteric lymphadenectomy during bowel resection for colon cancer. By using this novel technology, it is possible to demonstrate a watershed area in the ileocolic region and may facilitate more precise mesenteric dissection. In the present study, we provide proof of concept for the ileocolic watershed area using fluorescence lymphangiography.

  13. PET/CT. Dose-escalated image fusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate a gain in diagnostic accuracy by employing combined PET/CT instead of separate CT and PET imaging. However, whole-body PET/CT examinations result in a comparatively high radiation burden to patients and thus require a proper justification and optimization to avoid repeated exposure or over-exposure of patients. This review article summarizes relevant data concerning radiation exposure of patients resulting from the different components of a combined PET/CT examination and presents different imaging strategies that can help to balance the diagnostic needs and the radiation protection requirements. In addition various dose reduction measures are discussed, some of which can be adopted from CT practice, while others mandate modifications to the existing hard- and software of PET/CT systems. (orig.)

  14. Dose-escalation designs in oncology: ADEPT and the CRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jianfen; O'Quigley, John

    2008-11-20

    The ADEPT software package is not a statistical method in its own right as implied by Gerke and Siedentop (Statist. Med. 2008; DOI: 10.1002/sim.3037). ADEPT implements two-parameter CRM models as described in O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48). All of the basic ideas (use of a two-parameter logistic model, use of a two-dimensional prior for the unknown slope and intercept parameters, sequential estimation and subsequent patient allocation based on minimization of some loss function, flexibility to use cohorts instead of one by one inclusion) are strictly identical. The only, and quite trivial, difference arises in the setting of the prior. O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48) used priors having an analytic expression whereas Whitehead and Brunier (Statist. Med. 1995; 14:33-48) use pseudo-data to play the role of the prior. The question of interest is whether two-parameter CRM works as well, or better, than the one-parameter CRM recommended in O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48). Gerke and Siedentop argue that it does. The published literature suggests otherwise. The conclusions of Gerke and Siedentop stem from three highly particular, and somewhat contrived, situations. Unlike one-parameter CRM (Biometrika 1996; 83:395-405; J. Statist. Plann. Inference 2006; 136:1765-1780; Biometrika 2005; 92:863-873), no statistical properties appear to have been studied for two-parameter CRM. In particular, for two-parameter CRM, the parameter estimates are inconsistent. This ought to be a source of major concern to those proposing its use. Worse still, for finite samples the behavior of estimates can be quite wild despite having incorporated the kind of dampening priors discussed by Gerke and Siedentop. An example in which we illustrate this behavior describes a single patient included at level 1 of 6 levels and experiencing a dose limiting toxicity. The subsequent recommendation is to experiment at level 6! Such problematic behavior is not

  15. Dose escalation of cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qiang; Gao Xianshu; Qiao Xueying; Zhou Zhiguo; Zhang Jun; Yang Xiangran; Wan Xin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and observe the side effect of escalating cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma in Chinese, with toxicity studied. Methods: Previously untreated fifteen Chinese patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma received conventional fractionation radiotherapy, with 5 daily fractions of 2.0 Gy per week. The total radiation dose was 60 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy dose escalation was given by the relatively safe and kidney-sparing modified Fibonacci sequence. The starting dose was cisplatin 37.5 mg/m 2 D1 and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m 2 D1-5, respectively. This regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. Escalation dose was cisplatin 7.5 mg/m 2 and 5- fluorouracil 100 mg/m 2 . Every. cohort contained at least 3 patients. If no dose-limiting toxicity(DLT) was observed, the next dose level was opened for entry. These courses were repeated until DLT appeared. MTD was declared as one dose level below which DLT appeared. Results: DLT was defined as grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at the level of cisplatin 60 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 700 mg/m 2 . MTD was defined as cisplatin 52.5 mg/m 2 , 5- fiuorouracil 700 mg/m 2 . The major side effect were radiation-induced esophagitis, leucopenia, nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Conclusion: Maximun tolerated dose of cisplatin with 5-fiuorouracil in concurrent ehemoradiotherapy in the Chinese people with esophageal carcinoma were eisplatin 52.5 mg/m2 D1,5-fluorouracil 700 mg/m 2 D1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days. (authors)

  16. [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Stelzer, Keith J.; Mankoff, David A.; Tralins, Kevin S.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Muzi, Mark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning

  17. RNA Interference Technology to Control Pest Sea Lampreys - A Proof-of-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, George; Childs, Darcy; Docker, Margaret F.; McCauley, David W.; Whyard, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has caused extensive losses to commercial fish stocks of the upper Great Lakes of North America. Methods of controlling the sea lamprey include trapping, barriers to prevent migration, and use of a chemical lampricide (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) to kill the filter-feeding larvae. Concerns about the non-specificity of these methods have prompted continued development of species-specific methods to control lampreys outside their native range. In this study, we considered the utility of RNA interference to develop a sea lamprey-specific lampricide. Injection of six different short interfering, double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into lamprey embryos first confirmed that the siRNAs could reduce the targeted transcript levels by more than 50%. Two size classes of lamprey larvae were then fed the siRNAs complexed with liposomes, and three of the siRNAs (targeting elongation factor 1α, calmodulin, and α-actinin) reduced transcript levels 2.5, 3.6, and 5.0–fold, respectively, within the lamprey midsections. This is not only the first demonstration of RNAi in lampreys, but it is also the first example of delivery of siRNAs to a non-mammalian vertebrate through feeding formulations. One of the siRNA treatments also caused increased mortality of the larvae following a single feeding of siRNAs, which suggests that prolonged or multiple feedings of siRNAs could be used to kill filter-feeding larvae within streams, following development of a slow-release formulation. The genes targeted in this study are highly conserved across many species, and only serve as a proof-of-concept demonstration that siRNAs can be used in lampreys. Given that RNA interference is a sequence-specific phenomenon, it should be possible to design siRNAs that selectively target gene sequences that are unique to sea lampreys, and thus develop a technology to control these pests without adversely affecting non-target species. PMID:24505485

  18. RNA interference technology to control pest sea lampreys--a proof-of-concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Heath

    Full Text Available The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus has caused extensive losses to commercial fish stocks of the upper Great Lakes of North America. Methods of controlling the sea lamprey include trapping, barriers to prevent migration, and use of a chemical lampricide (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol to kill the filter-feeding larvae. Concerns about the non-specificity of these methods have prompted continued development of species-specific methods to control lampreys outside their native range. In this study, we considered the utility of RNA interference to develop a sea lamprey-specific lampricide. Injection of six different short interfering, double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs into lamprey embryos first confirmed that the siRNAs could reduce the targeted transcript levels by more than 50%. Two size classes of lamprey larvae were then fed the siRNAs complexed with liposomes, and three of the siRNAs (targeting elongation factor 1α, calmodulin, and α-actinin reduced transcript levels 2.5, 3.6, and 5.0-fold, respectively, within the lamprey midsections. This is not only the first demonstration of RNAi in lampreys, but it is also the first example of delivery of siRNAs to a non-mammalian vertebrate through feeding formulations. One of the siRNA treatments also caused increased mortality of the larvae following a single feeding of siRNAs, which suggests that prolonged or multiple feedings of siRNAs could be used to kill filter-feeding larvae within streams, following development of a slow-release formulation. The genes targeted in this study are highly conserved across many species, and only serve as a proof-of-concept demonstration that siRNAs can be used in lampreys. Given that RNA interference is a sequence-specific phenomenon, it should be possible to design siRNAs that selectively target gene sequences that are unique to sea lampreys, and thus develop a technology to control these pests without adversely affecting non-target species.

  19. RNA interference technology to control pest sea lampreys--a proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, George; Childs, Darcy; Docker, Margaret F; McCauley, David W; Whyard, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has caused extensive losses to commercial fish stocks of the upper Great Lakes of North America. Methods of controlling the sea lamprey include trapping, barriers to prevent migration, and use of a chemical lampricide (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) to kill the filter-feeding larvae. Concerns about the non-specificity of these methods have prompted continued development of species-specific methods to control lampreys outside their native range. In this study, we considered the utility of RNA interference to develop a sea lamprey-specific lampricide. Injection of six different short interfering, double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into lamprey embryos first confirmed that the siRNAs could reduce the targeted transcript levels by more than 50%. Two size classes of lamprey larvae were then fed the siRNAs complexed with liposomes, and three of the siRNAs (targeting elongation factor 1α, calmodulin, and α-actinin) reduced transcript levels 2.5, 3.6, and 5.0-fold, respectively, within the lamprey midsections. This is not only the first demonstration of RNAi in lampreys, but it is also the first example of delivery of siRNAs to a non-mammalian vertebrate through feeding formulations. One of the siRNA treatments also caused increased mortality of the larvae following a single feeding of siRNAs, which suggests that prolonged or multiple feedings of siRNAs could be used to kill filter-feeding larvae within streams, following development of a slow-release formulation. The genes targeted in this study are highly conserved across many species, and only serve as a proof-of-concept demonstration that siRNAs can be used in lampreys. Given that RNA interference is a sequence-specific phenomenon, it should be possible to design siRNAs that selectively target gene sequences that are unique to sea lampreys, and thus develop a technology to control these pests without adversely affecting non-target species.

  20. Hyperbrain features of team mental models within a juggling paradigm: a proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Filho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Research on cooperative behavior and the social brain exists, but little research has focused on real-time motor cooperative behavior and its neural correlates. In this proof of concept study, we explored the conceptual notion of shared and complementary mental models through EEG mapping of two brains performing a real-world interactive motor task of increasing difficulty. We used the recently introduced participative “juggling paradigm,” and collected neuro-physiological and psycho-social data. We were interested in analyzing the between-brains coupling during a dyadic juggling task, and in exploring the relationship between the motor task execution, the jugglers’skill level and the task difficulty. We also investigated how this relationship could be mirrored in the coupled functional organization of the interacting brains. Methods To capture the neural schemas underlying the notion of shared and complementary mental models, we examined the functional connectivity patterns and hyperbrain features of a juggling dyad involved in cooperative motor tasks of increasing difficulty. Jugglers’ cortical activity was measured using two synchronized 32-channel EEG systems during dyadic juggling performed with 3, 4, 5 and 6 balls. Individual and hyperbrain functional connections were quantified through coherence maps calculated across all electrode pairs in the theta and alpha bands (4–8 and 8–12 Hz. Graph metrics were used to typify the global topology and efficiency of the functional networks for the four difficulty levels in the theta and alpha bands. Results Results indicated that, as task difficulty increased, the cortical functional organization of the more skilled juggler became progressively more segregated in both frequency bands, with a small-world organization in the theta band during easier tasks, indicative of a flow-like state in line with the neural efficiency hypothesis. Conversely, more integrated functional patterns

  1. The larynx ruler to measure height and profile of vocal folds: a proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desuter G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gauthier Desuter,1,2 Benjamin Mertens,3 Alain Delchambre,3 Julie van Lith-Bijl,1,4 Peter Paul van Benthem,2 Elisabeth Sjögren2 1Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery Department, Voice & Swallowing Clinic, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; 2Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery Department, LUMC, University of Leiden, Leiden, the Netherlands; 3BEAMS Department, Ecole Polytechnique de Bruxelles, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium; 4Otolaryngology Department, Flevoziekenhuis, Almere, the Netherlands Introduction: Glottic leakage during phonation is a direct consequence of unilateral vocal fold (VF paralysis. This air leakage can be in the horizontal plane and in the vertical plane. Presently, there is no easily applicable medical device allowing noninvasive, office-based measurement of the relative vertical position of the VFs. The larynx ruler (LR is a laser-based measuring device that could meet the previously stated need, using a flexible endoscope. This study represents a proof of concept regarding the use of the LR in assessing VF relative positions in the vertical plane. Materials and methods: One fresh male human cadaver larynx, free of neurologic and anatomic disease, was explored with the LR system through the operative channel of a flexible gastroenterology video-endoscope. The tip of the video-endoscope was located in the laryngeal vestibule. The right crico-arytenoid joint was posteriorly disarticulated. Tilting of the VF was obtained by pulling or pushing the arytenoid cartilage with a mosquito forceps fixed to the stump of the previously sectioned superior tip of the posterior crico-arytenoid muscle allowing anterior and posterior tilting of the arytenoid cartilage in order to induce an elevation or a depression of the VF process. Ten “push” and ten “pull” sessions were performed. The distance from the tip of the video-endoscope to each illuminated pixel of the

  2. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  3. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B. [and others

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management.

  4. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B.

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management

  5. ISOCELL trademark proof-of-concept for retrieval of wastes and contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatwin, T.D.; Krieg, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    ISOCELL TM cryogenic technology is designed to immobilize buried hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste and contaminated soil by creating a block of frozen waste and soil that can be safely retrieved, stored, transported, and treated with a minimum of dust or aerosol production. A ''proof-of-concept'' test of the ISOCELL process was conducted in clean soil by RKK, Ltd., for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Results indicate ISOCELL technology successfully froze moist soil into a solid block capable of being lifted and retrieved. Test conditions were compared to characteristics of possible buried waste sites in the INEL

  6. Supply Chain Based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion: Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; McIntyre, Timothy J [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Moore, Sheila A [ORNL

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a proof-of-concept (POC) system for preventing non-taxable (non-highway diesel use) or low-taxable (jet fuel) petrochemical products from being blended with taxable fuel products and preventing taxable fuel products from cross-jurisdiction evasion. The research worked to fill the need to validate the legitimacy of individual loads, offloads, and movements by integrating and validating, on a near-real-time basis, information from global positioning system (GPS), valve sensors, level sensors, and fuel-marker sensors.

  7. Accelerated hyperfractionated hepatic irradiation in the management of patients with liver metastases: Results of the RTOG dose escalating protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.H.; Clyde, C.; Wasserman, T.H.; Turner, S.S.; Rotman, M.

    1993-01-01

    This study was prepared to address two objectives: (a) to determine whether progressively higher total doses of hepatic irradiation can prolong survival in a selected population of patients with liver metastases and (b) to refine existing concepts of liver tolerance for fractionated external radiation. One hundred seventy-three analyzable patients with computed tomography measurable liver metastases from primary cancers of the gastrointestinal tract were entered on a dose escalating protocol of twice daily hepatic irradiation employing fractions of 1.5 Gy separated by 4 hr or longer. Sequential groups of patients received 27 Gy, 30 Gy, and 33 Gy to the entire liver and were monitored for acute and late toxicities, survival, and cause of death. Dose escalation was implemented following survival of 10 patients at each dose level for a period of 6 months or longer without clinical or biochemical evidence of radiation hepatitis. The use of progressively larger total doses of radiation did not prolong median survival or decrease the frequency with which liver metastases were the cause of death. None of 122 patients entered at the 27 Gy and 30 Gy dose levels revealed clinical or biochemical evidence of radiation induced liver injury. Five of 51 patients entered at the 33 Gy level revealed clinical or biochemical evidence of late liver injury with an actuarial risk of severe (Grade 3) radiation hepatitis of 10.0% at 6 months, resulting in closure of the study to patient entry. The study design could not credibly establish a safe dose for hepatic irradiation, however, it did succeed in determining that 33 Gy in fractions of 1.5 Gy is unsafe, carrying a substantial risk of delayed radiation injury. The absence of apparent late liver injury at the 27 Gy and 30 Gy dose levels suggests that a prior clinical trial of adjuvant hepatic irradiation in patients with resected colon cancer may have employed an insufficient radiation dose (21 Gy) to fully test the question

  8. Pelvic nodal dose escalation with prostate hypofractionation using conformal avoidance defined (H-CAD) intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim; Raisbeck, Bridget M.; Ritter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The management of prostate cancer patients with a significant risk of pelvic lymph node involvement is controversial. Both whole pelvis radiotherapy and dose escalation to the prostate have been linked to improved outcome in such patients, but it is unclear whether conventional whole pelvis doses of only 45-50 Gy are optimal for ultimate nodal control. The purpose of this study is to examine the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of combining prostate dose escalation via hypofractionation with conformal avoidance-based IMRT (H-CAD) dose escalation to the pelvic lymph nodes. One conformal avoidance and one conventional plan were generated for each of eight patients. Conformal avoidance-based IMRT plans were generated that specifically excluded bowel, rectum, and bladder. The prostate and lower seminal vesicles (PTV 70) were planned to receive 70 Gy in 2.5 Gy/fraction while the pelvic lymph nodes (PTV 56) were to concurrently receive 56 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction. The volume of small bowel receiving >45 Gy was restricted to 300 ml or less. These conformal avoidance plans were delivered using helical tomotherapy or LINAC-based IMRT with daily imaging localization. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation with a planned total of two years. The conventional, sequential plans created for comparison purposes for all patients consisted of a conventional 4-field pelvic box prescribed to 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) followed by an IMRT boost to the prostate of 25.2 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) yielding a final prostate dose of 75.6 Gy. For all plans, the prescription dose was to cover the target structure. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) analyses were performed on all targets and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were displayed in terms of both physical and normalized total dose (NTD), i.e. dose in 2 Gy fraction equivalents. H-CAD IMRT plans were created for and delivered to all eight patients. Analysis of the H-CAD plans demonstrates prescription dose coverage of >95

  9. Resolution of methylphenidate osmotic release oral system-induced hair loss in two siblings after dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Ulku Akyol; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2017-11-01

    This report describes the cases of two siblings who experienced hair loss after treatment with methylphenidate (MPH) osmotic release oral system (OROS). Hair loss was resolved after discontinuation of the drug, but the children re-initiated treatment, after which hair loss again occurred, but they continued the treatment. After dose escalation, the hair loss resolved. This is the first report to describe resolution of OROS-MPH-induced hair loss after dose escalation. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

    2010-12-15

    Urbanization is reshaping China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2008 China added more than 300 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 46%. The ongoing population shift is spurring energy demand for new construction, as well as additional residential use with the replacement of rural biomass by urban commercial energy services. This project developed a modeling tool to quantify the full energy consequences of a particular form of urban residential development in order to identify energy- and carbon-efficient modes of neighborhood-level development and help mitigate resource and environmental implications of swelling cities. LBNL developed an integrated modeling tool that combines process-based lifecycle assessment with agent-based building operational energy use, personal transport, and consumption modeling. The lifecycle assessment approach was used to quantify energy and carbon emissions embodied in building materials production, construction, maintenance, and demolition. To provide more comprehensive analysis, LBNL developed an agent-based model as described below. The model was applied to LuJing, a residential development in Jinan, Shandong Province, to provide a case study and model proof of concept. This study produced results data that are unique by virtue of their scale, scope and type. Whereas most existing literature focuses on building-, city-, or national-level analysis, this study covers multi-building neighborhood-scale development. Likewise, while most existing studies focus exclusively on building operational energy use, this study also includes embodied energy related to personal consumption and buildings. Within the boundaries of this analysis, food is the single largest category of the building energy footprint, accounting for 23% of the total. On a policy level, the LCA approach can be useful for quantifying the energy and environmental benefits of longer average building lifespans. In

  11. Dose escalated radiotherapy for T1 and T2 nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J. J.; Zhang, Q.; Lee, K. M.; Loh, K. S.; Tan, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is most prevalent in the Guangzhou province in southern China, in Hong Kong and in Singapore. It also occurs in Europe and North America, partly due to its epidemiological association with the woodworking and shoe manufacturing industry. Because of its anatomical location, i.e. so close to vital organs at risk, such as the brain stem and eyes, the technique of radiotherapy and dose/fractionation prescription is of extreme importance. This communication describes our experience with dose escalation radiotherapy for stages T1 and T2 of NPC. (author)

  12. Proof of Concept: Model Based Bionic Muscle with Hyperbolic Force-Velocity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. B. Haeufle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE, a parallel damper element (PDE, and a serial element (SE exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, a technical proof of this concept was presented. AE and PDE were implemented as electric motors, SE as a mechanical spring. The force-velocity relation of this artificial CE was determined in quick release experiments. The CE exhibited hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. This proof of concept can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles.

  13. Opportunities and pitfalls in clinical proof-of-concept: principles and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao

    2018-04-01

    Clinical proof-of-concept trials crucially inform major resource deployment decisions. This paper discusses several mechanisms for enhancing their rigour and efficiency. The importance of careful consideration when using a surrogate endpoint is illustrated; situational effectiveness of run-in patient enrichment is explored; a versatile tool is introduced to ensure a strong pharmacological underpinning; the benefits of dose-titration are revealed by simulation; and the importance of adequately scheduled observations is shown. The general process of model-based trial design and analysis is described and several examples demonstrate the value in historical data, simulation-guided design, model-based analysis and trial adaptation informed by interim analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring Light Pollution with Fisheye Lens Imagery from A Moving Boat – A Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jechow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Near all-sky imaging photometry was performed from a boat on the Gulf of Aqaba to measure the night sky brightness in a coastal environment. The boat was not anchored, and therefore drifted and rocked. The camera was mounted on a tripod without any inertia/motion stabilization. A commercial digital single lens reflex (DSLR camera and fisheye lens were used with ISO setting of 6400, with the exposure time varied between 0.5 s and 5 s. We find that despite movement of the vessel the measurements produce quantitatively comparable results apart from saturation effects. We discuss the potential and limitations of this method for mapping light pollution in marine and freshwater systems. This work represents the proof of concept that all-sky photometry with a commercial DSLR camera is a viable tool to determine light pollution in an ecological context from a moving boat.

  15. The proof-of-concept experiment for the spiral line induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putnam, S D; Bailey, V L; Smith, J; Lidestri, J; Thomas, H; Lackner, H; Nishimoto, H [Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A proof-of-concept experiment (POCE) for the Spiral Line Induction Accelerator (SLIA) is underway at Pulse Sciences, Inc. to demonstrate a new compact high current ({>=} few kiloamperes) recirculating induction accelerator for high power ({>=} 100 kW) commercial processing and other applications. Hardware has been fabricated to generate 9.5 MeV electron beams at 2 and 10 kA by recirculating the beam for two passes through each of two 1.5 MeV accelerating units. Initial experiments have demonstrated acceleration of 2 and 10 kA beams to 5.5 MeV by transport around a complete turn with two passes through a single accelerating unit and work is currently in progress to complete the full POCE. Experimental results to date are reported. (author). 5 figs., 14 refs.

  16. Ionospheric Data Assimilation and Targeted Observation Strategies: Proof of Concept Analysis in a Geomagnetic Storm Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelich, Eric; Durazo, Juan; Mahalov, Alex

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of the ionosphere involve complex interactions between the atmosphere, solar wind, cosmic radiation, and Earth's magnetic field. Geomagnetic storms arising from solar activity can perturb these dynamics sufficiently to disrupt radio and satellite communications. Efforts to predict ``space weather,'' including ionospheric dynamics, require the development of a data assimilation system that combines observing systems with appropriate forecast models. This talk will outline a proof-of-concept targeted observation strategy, consisting of the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, coupled with the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model, to select optimal locations where additional observations can be made to improve short-term ionospheric forecasts. Initial results using data and forecasts from the geomagnetic storm of 26-27 September 2011 will be described. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0096) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant Number DMS-0940314).

  17. A proof-of-concept implementation of persistence in a hierarchical storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, R.; Qin, Xiao; Lifka, D.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of providing transparent access to a collection of files in a mass storage system is a familiar one. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of providing similar access to a collection of persistent, complex objects. We describe an architecture for interfacing a persistent store of complex objects to a hierarchical storage system. Persistent object stores support the uniform creation, storage, and access of complex objects, regardless of their lifetimes. In other words, a mechanism is provided so that persistent objects outlive the processes which create them and can be accessed in a uniform manner by other processes. We validated this architecture by implementing a proof-of-concept system and testing the system on two stores of data. These tests indicate that this architecture supports the creation. storage and access of very large persistent object stores

  18. Protecting an island nation from extreme pandemic threats: Proof-of-concept around border closure as an intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Boyd

    Full Text Available Countries are well advised to prepare for future pandemic risks (e.g., pandemic influenza, novel emerging agents or synthetic bioweapons. These preparations do not typically include planning for complete border closure. Even though border closure may not be instituted in time, and can fail, there might still plausible chances of success for well organized island nations.To estimate costs and benefits of complete border closure in response to new pandemic threats, at an initial proof-of-concept level. New Zealand was used as a case-study for an island country.An Excel spreadsheet model was developed to estimate costs and benefits. Case-study specific epidemiological data was sourced from past influenza pandemics. Country-specific healthcare cost data, valuation of life, and lost tourism revenue were imputed (with lost trade also in scenario analyses.For a new pandemic equivalent to the 1918 influenza pandemic (albeit with half the mortality rate, "Scenario A", it was estimated that successful border closure for 26 weeks provided a net societal benefit (e.g., of NZ$11.0 billion, USD$7.3 billion. Even in the face of a complete end to trade, a net benefit was estimated for scenarios where the mortality rate was high (e.g., at 10 times the mortality impact of "Scenario A", or 2.75% of the country's population dying giving a net benefit of NZ$54 billion (USD$36 billion. But for some other pandemic scenarios where trade ceased, border closure resulted in a net negative societal value (e.g., for "Scenario A" times three for 26 weeks of border closure-but not for only 12 weeks of closure when it would still be beneficial.This "proof-of-concept" work indicates that more detailed cost-benefit analysis of border closure in very severe pandemic situations for some island nations is probably warranted, as this course of action might sometimes be worthwhile from a societal perspective.

  19. Narrative Constructions for the Organization of Self Experience: Proof of Concept via Embodied Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Mealier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that starting from meaning that the child derives directly from shared experience with others, adult narrative enriches this meaning and its structure, providing causal links between unseen intentional states and actions. This would require a means for representing meaning from experience—a situation model—and a mechanism that allows information to be extracted from sentences and mapped onto the situation model that has been derived from experience, thus enriching that representation. We present a hypothesis and theory concerning how the language processing infrastructure for grammatical constructions can naturally be extended to narrative constructions to provide a mechanism for using language to enrich meaning derived from physical experience. Toward this aim, the grammatical construction models are augmented with additional structures for representing relations between events across sentences. Simulation results demonstrate proof of concept for how the narrative construction model supports multiple successive levels of meaning creation which allows the system to learn about the intentionality of mental states, and argument substitution which allows extensions to metaphorical language and analogical problem solving. Cross-linguistic validity of the system is demonstrated in Japanese. The narrative construction model is then integrated into the cognitive system of a humanoid robot that provides the memory systems and world-interaction required for representing meaning in a situation model. In this context proof of concept is demonstrated for how the system enriches meaning in the situation model that has been directly derived from experience. In terms of links to empirical data, the model predicts strong usage based effects: that is, that the narrative constructions used by children will be highly correlated with those that they experience. It also relies on the notion of narrative or discourse function words. Both of

  20. Narrative Constructions for the Organization of Self Experience: Proof of Concept via Embodied Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealier, Anne-Laure; Pointeau, Gregoire; Mirliaz, Solène; Ogawa, Kenji; Finlayson, Mark; Dominey, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that starting from meaning that the child derives directly from shared experience with others, adult narrative enriches this meaning and its structure, providing causal links between unseen intentional states and actions. This would require a means for representing meaning from experience—a situation model—and a mechanism that allows information to be extracted from sentences and mapped onto the situation model that has been derived from experience, thus enriching that representation. We present a hypothesis and theory concerning how the language processing infrastructure for grammatical constructions can naturally be extended to narrative constructions to provide a mechanism for using language to enrich meaning derived from physical experience. Toward this aim, the grammatical construction models are augmented with additional structures for representing relations between events across sentences. Simulation results demonstrate proof of concept for how the narrative construction model supports multiple successive levels of meaning creation which allows the system to learn about the intentionality of mental states, and argument substitution which allows extensions to metaphorical language and analogical problem solving. Cross-linguistic validity of the system is demonstrated in Japanese. The narrative construction model is then integrated into the cognitive system of a humanoid robot that provides the memory systems and world-interaction required for representing meaning in a situation model. In this context proof of concept is demonstrated for how the system enriches meaning in the situation model that has been directly derived from experience. In terms of links to empirical data, the model predicts strong usage based effects: that is, that the narrative constructions used by children will be highly correlated with those that they experience. It also relies on the notion of narrative or discourse function words. Both of these are validated

  1. Narrative Constructions for the Organization of Self Experience: Proof of Concept via Embodied Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealier, Anne-Laure; Pointeau, Gregoire; Mirliaz, Solène; Ogawa, Kenji; Finlayson, Mark; Dominey, Peter F

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that starting from meaning that the child derives directly from shared experience with others, adult narrative enriches this meaning and its structure, providing causal links between unseen intentional states and actions. This would require a means for representing meaning from experience-a situation model-and a mechanism that allows information to be extracted from sentences and mapped onto the situation model that has been derived from experience, thus enriching that representation. We present a hypothesis and theory concerning how the language processing infrastructure for grammatical constructions can naturally be extended to narrative constructions to provide a mechanism for using language to enrich meaning derived from physical experience. Toward this aim, the grammatical construction models are augmented with additional structures for representing relations between events across sentences. Simulation results demonstrate proof of concept for how the narrative construction model supports multiple successive levels of meaning creation which allows the system to learn about the intentionality of mental states, and argument substitution which allows extensions to metaphorical language and analogical problem solving. Cross-linguistic validity of the system is demonstrated in Japanese. The narrative construction model is then integrated into the cognitive system of a humanoid robot that provides the memory systems and world-interaction required for representing meaning in a situation model. In this context proof of concept is demonstrated for how the system enriches meaning in the situation model that has been directly derived from experience. In terms of links to empirical data, the model predicts strong usage based effects: that is, that the narrative constructions used by children will be highly correlated with those that they experience. It also relies on the notion of narrative or discourse function words. Both of these are validated in

  2. Development of a lozenge for oral transmucosal delivery of trans-resveratrol in humans: proof of concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otis L Blanchard

    Full Text Available Resveratrol provides multiple physiologic benefits which promote healthspan in various model species and clinical trials support continued exploration of resveratrol treatment in humans. However, there remains concern regarding low bioavailability and wide inter-individual differences in absorption and metabolism in humans, which suggests a great need to develop novel methods for resveratrol delivery. We hypothesized that oral transmucosal delivery, using a lozenge composed of a resveratrol-excipient matrix, would allow resveratrol to be absorbed rapidly into the bloodstream. We pursued proof of concept through two experiments. In the first experiment, the solubility of trans-resveratrol (tRES in water and 2.0 M solutions of dextrose, fructose, ribose, sucrose, and xylitol was determined using HPLC. Independent t-tests with a Bonferroni correction were used to compare the solubility of tRES in each of the solutions to that in water. tRES was significantly more soluble in the ribose solution (p = 0.0013 than in the other four solutions. Given the enhanced solubility of tRES in a ribose solution, a resveratrol-ribose matrix was developed into a lozenge suitable for human consumption. Lozenges were prepared, each containing 146±5.5 mg tRES per 2000 mg of lozenge mass. Two healthy human participants consumed one of the prepared lozenges following an overnight fast. Venipuncture was performed immediately before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes following lozenge administration. Maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax for tRES alone (i.e., resveratrol metabolites not included were 325 and 332 ng⋅mL(-1 for the two participants at 15 minute post-administration for both individuals. These results suggest a resveratrol-ribose matrix lozenge can achieve greater Cmax and enter the bloodstream faster than previously reported dosage forms for gastrointestinal absorption. While this study is limited by small sample size and only one method of resveratrol

  3. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy 10 (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  4. Proof of Concept: Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor decreases inflammation and improves muscle insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frankwich Karen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a state of subclinical inflammation resulting in loss of function of insulin receptors and decreased insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of the inflammatory enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, for 6 months in rodent models restores insulin receptor function and insulin sensitivity. Methods This 12-week double-blind, randomized, placebo (PL-controlled proof-of-concept study was performed to determine if the MMP inhibitor (MMPI, doxycycline, decreased global markers of inflammation and enhanced muscle insulin sensitivity in obese people with type 2 diabetes (DM2. The study included non-DM2 controls (n = 15, and DM2 subjects randomized to PL (n = 13 or doxycycline 100 mg twice daily (MMPI; n = 11. All participants were evaluated on Day 1; MMPI and PL groups were also evaluated after 84 days of treatment. Results There was a significant decrease in inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (P  Conclusions This study demonstrated short term treatment of people with diabetes with an MMPI resulted in decreased inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity. Larger, longer studies are warranted to determine if doxycycline can improve glucose control in people with diabetes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01375491