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Sample records for dose x-ray radiology

  1. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.br [Faculty of Medicine. UNESP, Botucatu (FMB), SP (Brazil); Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L. [Institute of Biosciences of Botucatu. UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Nucleate Radiometry Ltd., Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Hospital. Radiology Service

    2011-07-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1{sup st} 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  2. Study of the variation of radiation dose in function of the radiological techniques used in X-ray diagnosis exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R.; Reis, Charlene O.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Lima, Marcelo A.F.; Dalaqua, Fernando L.D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper values the importance of the implantation of a quality control program in medical x-ray diagnosis services that it seeks mainly to the reduction of the radiation dose applied in the radiology exams, and attempt to the precepts of the Effective Legislation as for the Basic Guidelines of Radiological Protection (law decree MS no. 453 in June 1 st 1998). The study was accomplished Radiology Section of the Medicine Faculty - FMB (UNESP - Botucatu) and it consisted of the accomplishment of measures of the radiation dose applied in the radiological exams, taking as base the x-rays techniques realized by four technicians in radiology the service, using only one x-rays equipment. Was intended analyze the variation of the radiation dose in function of the different applied technical parameters, and this way, guide the professionals as for the possibility of obtaining of x-ray images of better quality and smaller patient exposition. For radiation dose measure a detector of solid state was utilized. During the accomplishment of the measures it was verified that there no a general consensus among the technicians of the section being observed differences of the order of 80% in the mAs. In terms of radiation dose measured, the largest value of verified was 4.752 mGy (exam of lateral lumbar column) and the smallest value of 0.165 mGy (child's thorax).The results showed that a standardization in the x-ray techniques executed by the professionals of the section will be able to reduce significantly the radiation exposition of the assisted patients. (author)

  3. X-ray absorbed doses evaluation on patients under radiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Daros, Kellen A.C.

    1996-01-01

    The skin absorbed doses were evaluated on patient submitted to the following x-ray exams : chest, facial sinus, lumbar spine. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used and a variety of irradiation techniques performed. The results shown considerable differences on the absorbed dose for the various alternative technical conditions

  4. The dose received by patients during dental X-ray examination and the technical condition of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekas, Marcin; Pachocki, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of X-ray dental examination is associated with the patients exposure to ionizing radation. The size of the exposure depends on the type of medical procedure, the technical condition of the X-ray unit and selected exposure conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the dose received by patients during dental X-ray examination and the assessment of the technical condition of medical equipment, The study included a total number of 79 dental X-ray units located in the region of Mazovia. The test methods for the assessment of the technical condition of dental X-ray units and measurement of radiation dose received by patients were based on the procedures elaborated in the Department of Radiation Hygiene and Radiobiology in the National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene (Warszawa, Poland) accredited for the certification of compliance with PN-EN 17025. The research found that 69.6% fully meets the criteria set out in the Polish legislation regarding the safe use of ionizing radiation in medicine, while 30.4% did not meet some of them. A tenfold difference in the size of the dose received by patients during dental X-ray examinations was discovered. For example, during a radiography of the canine teeth of a child, the recorded entrance surface dose (ESD) ranged from 72.8 to 2430 microGy with the average value of 689.1 microGy. Cases where the dose reference level defined in Polish legislation of 5 mGy was exceeded were also found. CONCKUSIONS: It is essential to constantly monitor the situation regarding the technical condition of X-ray units which affects the size of the population's exposure to ionizing radiation as well as raising dentists' awareness about the effects of X-rays on the human body.

  5. Radiation exposure of children in pediatric radiology, Pt. 8. Radiation doses during thoracoabdominal babygram and abdominal X-ray examination of the newborn and young infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Karl; Seidenbusch, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reconstruction of radiation doses for the thoracoabdominal babygram and the abdomen X-ray from radiographic settings and exposure data acquired at Dr. von Hauner's Kinderspital (children's hospital of the University of Munich, DvHK) between 1976 and 2007; comparison of these dose values with values reported in the literature; recommendation of a reference dose value for the thoracoabdominal babygram. Materials and Methods: The data from all X-ray examinations performed since 1976 at DvHK were stored electronically in a database. After 30 years of data collection, the database now includes 305 107 radiological examinations (radiographs and fluoroscopies), especially 1493 thoracoabdominal babygrams and 3632 abdomen X-rays of newborns and young infants. With the computer program PAeDOS, a specific dose reconstruction algorithm was developed. Results: the entrance dose values of thoracoabdominal babygrams and abdomen X-rays in DvHK could be reduced in the last 30 years by a factor of 5 to 8. They are far below the entrance dose values reported by other radiology departments in Europe. Nevertheless, a slight increase in the entrance doses that correlates with the introduction of a digital storage phosphor system could be observed in the last years. Conclusion: because nearly all radiosensitive body organs in early life are involved during a thoracoabdominal babygram and because of the high radiation sensitivity of newborns, thoracoabdominal babygrams should be performed in neonatology with caution. A dose value of 1.0 cGy cm 2 could serve as the actual reference dose value for the thoracoabdominal babygram of the newborn. (orig.)

  6. Radiation dose to infants, children and adults in X-ray diagnostic radiology-in the case of plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Sugimoto, Naruto; Fujii, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to infant, child and adult patients undergoing various types of plain radiography and to compare the doses among them. The doses were measured using newborn, 6-year-child and adult anthropomorphic phantoms, in which photodiode dosimeters were implanted at various tissue and organ positions. Measured doses were used to evaluate organ and effective doses. Organ doses obtained in various types of radiography were lower than 0.7 mGy for adults, 0.3 mGy for children and 0.2 mGy for infants, excepting lens dose of approximately 1 mGy in adult head radiography, where the doses for children and infants lowered to 1/2-1/3 of the doses for adults. Effective doses in various types of head radiography for adults, children and infants were in identical levels in a range of 5-30 μSv. In chest, abdomen and hip-joint radiography, effective doses of 0.02-0.11 mSv for children and 0.02-0.08 mSv for infants were identical to or in a fraction of the doses for adults of 0.06-0.15 mSv. In adult head and spinal radiography, effective doses by International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 60 lowered respectively to 1/6-1/9 and 1/3-1/9 of the doses listed in United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000. (author)

  7. X-raying with low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malevich, E.E.; Kisel, E.M.; Shpita, I.D.; Lazovsky, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of the improvement of diagnostics quality and reduction of beam load on a patient in modern x-ray devices pulse x-raying is applied. It is based on the using of radiation pulses with various frequencies of intervals between them instead of continuous radiation. At pulse x-raying with the net control the principle of filling of an interval is used, when the information about the image, received with the last pulse, get into memory and is displayed before occurrence of other pulse. It creates impression of the continuous image even at low frequency of pulses. Due to the unique concept of the simultaneous (double) control, all of 3 parameters, which define the quality of the image (pressure(voltage), force of a current and length of a pulse), are adjusted automatically at each pulse, thus optimum adaptation to varied thickness of object during dynamic researches occurs. At x-raying pulse the presence of a free interval from x-ray radiation between two pulses results in the decrease of a radiation dose. Pulsing occurs some times per one second with equal intervals between pulses. Thus, the degree of decrease irradiation dose depends on duration of a pause between pulses. On the screen the image of last pulse before occurrence of the following is kept and repeats. The principle of x-raying pulse was realized in system Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy by the firm 'Philips Medi zin Systeme'. In the x-ray tube of this system inclusion and de energizing of radiation occurs directly on a source. Electron cloud is broken off by the special grid, which is located between the cathode and the anode and operates as a barrier. Thus the tube continues to be energized. In usual devices for pulses formation is used generator pulsation system, which at increase and attenuation of a x-ray pulse results in occurrence of the increasing and fading radiation which are not participating in the formation of the image, but creating beam load on the patient and the personnel. Thus

  8. Dose levels in conventional X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra M, J. A.; Gonzalez G, J. A.; Pinedo S, A.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    2009-10-01

    There were a series of measures in the General Hospital of Fresnillo in the X-ray Department in the areas of X-1 and X-2-ray rooms and in the neonatal intensive care unit 2, was determined the dose surface entry in eyes, thyroid and gonads for patients undergoing to X-ray study of chest Tele by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Five dosemeters were used in each one of the scans; so find the following dose ranges 20 + - 23 mGy to 350 + - 41 mGy. With the results obtained we can conclude that the procedures used and the equipment calibration is adequate. (Author)

  9. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices - a comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissi, H D; Geibel, M A

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. ► Responsible use of digital intraoral radiology results in a significant

  10. X-ray beam qualities for dental radiology purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos; Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de F.; Lima, Ricardo de A.; Hazim, Clovis A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish characteristics or properties of equipment for diagnostic radiology, e.g. ion chambers and semiconductor detectors, calibration laboratories offer a set of well-defined radiation conditions, called X-ray qualities, which can be used for many Physics studies and medical purposes. The standardization of radiation qualities has been carried out in several fields of study, but little attention has been given to the area of dental radiology, mainly for medical and physical applications using single-phase units with half-wave rectification. For this reason, a single-phase dental unit with adjustable peak voltage and tube current, called 'variable potential X-ray equipment', was developed aiming to define X-ray beam qualities for test and calibrations purposes. X-ray spectra at 50, 60 and 70 kVp were determined by using a CdTe detector and compared with those obtained for ten commercial X-ray dental units. As a result of this study, a set of X-ray qualities for the variable potential X-ray equipment was determined. The X-ray qualities spectra were utilized as reference for determination of a new set of X-ray qualities characterized for a constant potential X-ray equipment. Thus, sets of X-ray qualities were standardized and implemented in two X-ray laboratories: one with the variable potential X-ray equipment and other with constant potential X-ray equipment. These reference X-ray beam qualities should be used for test and calibration purposes involving scientific studies and services. (author)

  11. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices. A comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anissi, H.D. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dentistry; Geibel, M.A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Surgery

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. Materials and Methods: 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). Results: 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Conclusion: Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. (orig.)

  12. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices. A comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anissi, H.D.; Geibel, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. Materials and Methods: 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). Results: 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Conclusion: Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. (orig.)

  13. Radiation doses for X-ray diagnosis teeth in dental medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direkov, Lyubomir

    2009-01-01

    X-rays are the first ionizing radiation, which are applied in medicine for diagnostic radiology and X-ray therapy. While in the beginning they are mainly used for X-ray photos of the chest /lungs and in severe fractures of the limbs, then in recent years they are widely applied in diagnostics of teeth in dental medicine. Considering that caries is a widespread disease, both in children and adults, and it requires repeated x-ray photographs of the damaged teeth for the individual, the total radiation doses, which reflect on people from the X-rays are at high values. In order to reduce external exposure to other organs /mainly thyroid gland/ by X-ray pictures of teeth, it should be used with special lead aprons with large coefficient of reduction. Keywords: doses of radiation, X-ray machines, dental, x-ray pictures of teeth, protection sources

  14. Required doses for projection methods in X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1992-01-01

    The ideal dose requirement has been stated by Cohen et al. (1981) by a formula basing on parallel beam, maximum quantum yield and Bucky grid effect depending on the signal to noise ratio and object contrast. This was checked by means of contrast detail diagrams measured at the hole phantom, and was additionally compared with measurement results obtained with acrylic glass phantoms. The optimal dose requirement is obtained by the maximum technically possible approach to the ideal requirement level. Examples are given, besides for x-ray equipment with Gd 2 O 2 S screen film systems for grid screen mammography, and new thoracic examination systems for mass screenings. Finally, a few values concerning the dose requirement or the analogous time required for fluorscent screening in angiography and interventional radiology, are stated, as well as for dentistry and paediatric x-ray diagnostics. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Patient dose measurement in common medical X-ray examinations and propose the first local dose reference levels to diagnostic radiology in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuli, Behrouz; Tabari Juybari, Raheleh; Forouzi, Meysam; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study was to investigate patient dose in pelvic and abdomen x-ray examinations. This work also provided the LDRLs (local diagnostic reference levels) in Khuzestan region, southwest of Iran to help establish the NDRLs (national diagnostic reference levels). Methods: Patient doses were assessed from patient's anatomical data and exposure parameters based on the IAEA indirect dosimetry method. With regard to this method, exposure parameters such as tube output, kVp, mAs, FFD and patient anatomical data were used for calculating ESD (entrance skin dose) of patients. This study was conducted on 250 standard patients (50% men and 50% women) at eight high-patient-load imaging centers. Results: The results indicate that mean ESDs for the both pelvic and abdomen examinations were lower than the IAEA and EC reference levels, 2.3 and 3.7 mGy, respectively. Mean applied kVps were 67 and 70 and mean FFDs were 103 and 109, respectively. Tube loadings obtained in this study for pelvic examination were lower than all the corresponding values in the reviewed literature. Likewise, the average annual patient load across all hospitals were more than 37000 patients, i.e. more than 100 patients a day. Conclusions: The authors recommend that DRLs (diagnostic reference levels) obtained in this region, which are the first available data, can be used as local DRLs for pelvic and abdomen procedures. This work also provides that on-the-job training programs for staffs and close cross collaboration between physicists and physicians should be strongly considered.

  16. X-ray scatter data for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, C.E.; Soares, C.G.; Motz, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio of the scattered to the total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) at the centre of the image plane for X-rays transmitted through polystyrene phantoms has been measured for X-ray energies of 32 and 69 keV, X-ray beam diameters from 4 to 40 cm, phantom thicknesses from 5 to 30 cm and phantom-to-image-plane separations from 0.3 to 40 cm. The experimental values for this ratio have less than a 10% variation for these two X-ray energies and the experimental data show good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations and available experimental results for low atomic number materials. Based on these results, simple curves are generated which give estimates (+ - 10%) of the scatter fraction for all combinations of the geometric parameters encountered in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  17. Dose Matters: FDA's Guidance on Children's X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates Dose Matters: FDA's Guidance on Children's X-rays Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... exposure during medical procedures. The level of ionizing radiation from X-ray imaging is generally very low, but can ...

  18. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  19. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  20. A survey of chest medical X-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomba, M.; Conha, P.G. da; Almeida, C.E. de

    1996-01-01

    The medical X-ray exposures due to radiological examinations are responsible for the largest contribution to the population collective dose as result of the normal use of artificial sources of radiation. The relative impact of the medical exposures to the total dose received by the population from all kinds of radiation sources varies from country to country and in some cases within the same country. The dose variations observed for a specific type of examination are in general associated to several factors i.e. the type of film-ecran combination, the choice of the appropriate physical parameters of the X-ray generator (Kvp, filament current, exposure time) and finally to the film processing conditions. At the present moment the data available in Brazil are scarce and scanty to allow a complete analyzis of this question so needed by the health authorities to justify the implementation of a quality assurance and dose reduction programs. In addition, it is desirable to establish a cost effective operation based on simple administrative concepts in order to reduce the number of films retake, then increasing the life expectancy of the equipment and the number of radiological procedures. The aim of this work was to assess the typical doses of an PA and LAT chest wall X-ray examinations in five different public hospitals (a University Hospital, a Cancer Hospital, a Navy Hospital, an Emergency Hospital and a State General Hospital), as representative of the city of Rio de Janeiro, and compare the results with the international data and recommendations available. (author)

  1. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  3. Dose enhancement effects of X ray radiation in bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Panxun

    1997-01-01

    The author has presented behaviour degradation and dose enhancement effects of bipolar transistors in X ray irradiation environment. The relative dose enhancement factors of X ray radiation were measured in bipolar transistors by the experiment methods. The mechanism of bipolar device dose enhancement was investigated

  4. Tissue doses in X-ray examinations of osteoarticular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Stavitskij, R.V.; Blinov, N.N.; Vasil'ev, Yu.D.

    1985-01-01

    The X-ray method in diagnosis of the osteoarticular system disease is described. Problems on tissue dose distribution in X-ray examinations of a skeleton, a skull, humeral articulation, cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, hip joint, hipbones are considered. The values of specific tissue doses in roentgenography of the osteoarticular system are given

  5. Comparative study of radiation dose between digital panoramic X-ray unit and general panoramic X-ray unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingshan; Duan Tao; Wang Xiaoyun; Zhao Li; Dong Jian; Wei Lei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the actual dose of patients who receive the same medical practice by either digital panoramic X-ray unit and general panoramic X-ray unit and give evidence for better selection of oral X-ray examination method. Methods: Round sheet lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used. The experiment was divided into natural background contrast group, general panoramic X-ray children group, general panoramic X-ray adults group, digital panoramic X-ray children group and digital panoramic X-ray adults group. The dosimeter of natural background radiation was placed at the office of the doctor, the dosimeters of general panoramic X-ray children group and general panoramic X-ray adults group were irradiated by different conditions according to the clinical application of panoramic X-ray to children and adults, the dosimeters of digital panoramic X-ray children group and digital panoramic X-ray adults group were irradiated by different conditions according to the clinical application of digital panoramic X-ray to children and adults. The thermoluminescent dosimeter was used to count and calculate the exposure doses in various groups. Results: The dose of children exposed in general panoramic X-ray unit was 1.28 times of that in digital panoramic X-ray unit, there was significant difference (t=6.904, P<0.01). The dose of adults exposed in general panoramic X-ray unit was 1.55 times of that in the digital panoramic X-ray unit, there also was significant difference (t=-11.514. P< 0.01). Conclusion: The digital panoramic X-ray unit can reduce the dose of patients, so the digital panoramic X-ray unit should be used as far as possible. (authors)

  6. Trends in x-ray photography and patient exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orito, Takeo; Sanada, Shigeru; Maekawa, Ryuichi; Koshida, Kichiro; Hiraki, Tatsunosuke

    1980-01-01

    The exposure doses of patients in X-ray photography are influenced by such technological factors as X-ray tube voltage, filter, sensitizing screen, film and grid. Survey by questionnnaire was made previously in 1973 on the above factors. The trends five years after were surveyed similarly, in connection with the exposure doses of patients. Questionnaires were sent to 200 radiation technicians, and 121 (60.5%) answered the survey in March, 1979. The results in the cases of simple X-ray photography and obstetric, infant and breast X-ray photographings are described. X-ray tube voltage is generally on the increase. In the sensitizing screens, exposure doses are fairly decreased due to the use of improved intensifying screen (LT-II). In the grid, the ratio 8 : 1 is used more than 5 : 1. In the usage of additional filters and in the distance of photography, improvements are desired. (J.P.N.)

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  8. Development of an international code of practice for dosimetry in X-ray diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.; Carlsson, G.A.; Dance, D.R.; DeWerd, L.A.; Kramer, H.-M.; Ng, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Medical x-ray examinations contribute greatly to the population dose from man-made radiation sources. There is a need to control this dose and therefore to optimise the design and use of x-ray imaging systems. A key stage in this process is the standardisation of the procedures for dose measurement in the clinic. The Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section of the IAEA has a number of activities to further advance the standards for x-ray diagnostics. One of these activities is the coordination of a working group to develop a code of practice, which will facilitate the IAEA calibration activities, TLD intercomparisons and audits, educational activities, and technical assistance to Member States. The code of practice will aid in the standardisation of various dosimetric techniques in x-ray diagnostic radiology. The CoP working group has had an initial meeting to review the current status of dosimetry for conventional radiology, fluoroscopy, mammography, computed tomography and dental radiology. The CoP will include the establishment of standards and calibrations at the SSDLs, phantom and patient measurements and procedures for dosimetry in the clinic. (author)

  9. Radiological protection program in x-ray diagnostic facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melara F, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a basic document to initiate a discussion which will originate a Unified Protocol in Latin America and the Caribbean for radiological protection in the installations of medical radiology. The following principal elements are considered an inherent part of radiology protection: 1. Quality control of equipment. 2. Conditions in the dark room which coincide in the quality of the image. Levels of patient exposure and the processes for the quality control of the processors are not discussed, and it is limited to the installation of radiographic medical x-ray equipment, stationary and mobile. Each point to be put into effect is presented in a diagram, frequency and criteria for acceptance. A detailed explanation of each point along with a clear explanation of the recommended method for each follows in the same order in which they are presented in the diagram. Finally adequate forms for easily acquiring data are presented. (author)

  10. Adult and child doses in standardised X ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallini, R.E.; Belletti, S.; Berna, V.; Giugni, U.

    1992-01-01

    Data are presented on patient doses measured during standard hospital routine in seven radiological departments in the Province of Brescia. This study is part of a Quality Assurance Programme, carried out to assess the possibility and validity of a regional protocol. Before collecting dose data, tests on the performance of the X ray units and processors were performed in every department according to a Quality Control Protocol. The following examinations were considered: chest, knee, lumbar spine, pelvis, skull and barium meal. The surface entrance doses of 314 adults and 216 children were measured. The sample size for barium meal was lower: 65 adults and only 10 children. The patients anthropometric data and the technical parameters used were collected at the same time. For adults the organ doses and effective dose equivalent (EDE) were calculated. A wide range of entrance doses were obtained both for adults and children. The reasons can be: patient size, performance of the equipment and processors, film-screen combination, use of AEC, use of fluoroscopy and grid, training and skill of the staff

  11. Adult and child doses in standardised X ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallini, R.E.; Belletti, S.; Berna, V.; Giugni, U.

    1992-01-01

    Data are presented on patient doses measured during standard hospital routine in seven radiological departments in the Province of Brescia, as part of a Quality Assurance Programme, carried out to assess the possibility and validity of a regional protocol. Before collecting dose data, tests on the performance of the X ray units and processors were performed in every department according to a Quality Control Protocol. The following examinations were considered: chest, knee, lumbar spine, pelvis, skull and barium meal. Surface entrance doses of 314 adults and 216 children were measured. The sample size for barium meal was lower: 65 adults and 10 children. The patients anthropometric data and technical parameters used were collected at the same time. For adults the organ doses and effective dose equivalent (EDE) were calculated. A wide range of entrance doses were obtained both for adults and children, due to patient size, performance of the equipment and processors, film-screen combination, use of AEC, use of fluoroscopy and grid, training and skill of the staff. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Sol Fernández, S.; García-Salcedo, R.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G.; Gaona, E.; León-Alfaro, M.A. de; Rivera-Montalvo, T.

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO_4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm"2 at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO_4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO_4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy - Highlights: • Low dose X-ray doses for personal dosimetry were measured. • Radiation dose (µGy ) for environmental dosimetry were determined. • Scattering radiation dose were measured by TLDs. • Linearity of pair TLD system was successful in the range of microgray. • Pair TLDs composed by CaSO_4:Dy and by LiF:Mg,Cu,P. is suggested for clinical dosimetry.

  13. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-01

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  14. X ray spectra and qualities for use in diagnostic radiology and equipment calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Karla Cristina de

    1996-12-01

    The goal of this work was the standardization of radiation qualities of diagnostic X ray equipment of the Assay Laboratory of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy, Brazil. X ray spectra were determined from pulse height distribution measured directly on the primary beam using a high pure planar Ge detector. A program was developed to convert pulse height distribution into radiation spectra in the range from 20 to 150 keV. X ray qualities based on those used by the 'Physikalish-Technish Bundesantalt' (PTB) primary laboratory were implanted in three radiological equipment of the Assay Laboratory. These qualities simulate radiation beams on patients submitted to typical radiological examinations. Besides the spectrometric system, a reference measurement system based on an ionization chamber calibrated in air kerma was used to establish parameters such as kilovoltage, first and second half-value layer, mean energy, effective energy and inherent filtration. Our data have shown that the implantation of these radiation qualities in the Assay Laboratory results on a metrological basis for calibration of dose measurement assemblies and kV-meters, like those used by IRD to evaluate the parameters of X ray equipment around the country. A catalogue of spectral data resulting from this work is a data bank that allows various applications like dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. (author)

  15. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, A U; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J V K; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V K; Pradhan, A S

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  16. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp, linearity of tube current (mA station and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model RAD/FLU-9001, dose Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model 6001, ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%, lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%, nonlinearity of mA station (16% and timer (9%, improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%, faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%, nonavailability of warning light (red light at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%, and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%. The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  17. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, A.U.; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J.V.K.; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V.K.; Pradhan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body. (author)

  18. Forensics, radiology, society. X-rays. Tool and document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Beatrice; Vogel, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    During the last years, the individual specialities of forensic medicine and diagnostic imaging have increasingly cooperated to create the interdisciplinary entity of forensic radiology. The book demonstrates the potential of this speciality: It has become evident that the combination of diagnostic imaging and forensic medicine solves more cases of death of unknown cause than each alone, and that a radiograph can be read like a document describing forces of modern time and its effects on current society. The posters of 6 exhibitions demonstrate the actual cause of death and its preceding violence. They aim at the medical as well as the interested lay-public: Causes of natural and of violent death become visible. For instance, stab- and gunshot wounds into a person's rear are contradictory of self-defence. Stab wounds with penetration of ribs indicate great force and, therefore, intentional homicide. The same is valid for multiple stabs, stabs through silicon prosthesis of a mammoplasty, and stabs into the breast cage of a defenceless toddler. X-rays of the living can indicate preceding torture. X-rays are part of the security technology employed at airports and countries' borders. They help to detect drugs, explosives, and human stow-aways. The x-ray examination of the deceased visualises success and failure of the preceding therapy. After reanimation, the position of a tracheal tube, the effects of a vascular puncture, and potential fractures of the breast cage can be evaluated. After cardiac and aortic interventions, the procedure of choice and its effects can be seen. Concerning general or intensive care, diagnostic imaging shows the position of urinary catheters, gastric tubes and vascular catheters. Prenatal diagnostic imaging can determine the sex of the foetus and possible malformations; and in peri- and postnatal death, it may show the effects of iatrogenic actions, and later on, of child-abuse.

  19. Forensics, radiology, society. X-rays. Tool and document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Beatrice; Vogel, Hermann [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Forensic Medicine

    2014-07-01

    During the last years, the individual specialities of forensic medicine and diagnostic imaging have increasingly cooperated to create the interdisciplinary entity of forensic radiology. The book demonstrates the potential of this speciality: It has become evident that the combination of diagnostic imaging and forensic medicine solves more cases of death of unknown cause than each alone, and that a radiograph can be read like a document describing forces of modern time and its effects on current society. The posters of 6 exhibitions demonstrate the actual cause of death and its preceding violence. They aim at the medical as well as the interested lay-public: Causes of natural and of violent death become visible. For instance, stab- and gunshot wounds into a person's rear are contradictory of self-defence. Stab wounds with penetration of ribs indicate great force and, therefore, intentional homicide. The same is valid for multiple stabs, stabs through silicon prosthesis of a mammoplasty, and stabs into the breast cage of a defenceless toddler. X-rays of the living can indicate preceding torture. X-rays are part of the security technology employed at airports and countries' borders. They help to detect drugs, explosives, and human stow-aways. The x-ray examination of the deceased visualises success and failure of the preceding therapy. After reanimation, the position of a tracheal tube, the effects of a vascular puncture, and potential fractures of the breast cage can be evaluated. After cardiac and aortic interventions, the procedure of choice and its effects can be seen. Concerning general or intensive care, diagnostic imaging shows the position of urinary catheters, gastric tubes and vascular catheters. Prenatal diagnostic imaging can determine the sex of the foetus and possible malformations; and in peri- and postnatal death, it may show the effects of iatrogenic actions, and later on, of child-abuse.

  20. Dosimetry measurements of X-Ray machine operating at ordinary radiology and fluoroscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, M.; Bakazi, A.; Elharby, H.

    2002-01-01

    An assessment of radiation dose levels inside diagnostic radiology rooms at King Khalid University Hospital was made. The measurements were taken using lithium Flouride detectors Also, an assessment of doses received by patients during some radiographic examinations especially at fluoroscopy has been measured. It has been noted that when rare-earth image intensifying screens were used the radiation dose received by the patient was reduced by 60%. It has been shown that a lead glass viewer caused a reduction of the radiation intensity by more than 50%. The variation of dose rate with the operating conditions of the X-ray tube has been studied, as well as the machine factor (P)

  1. National radiology standards in X-ray diagnostic incl. interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valek, V.; Kratochvil, P.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the Ministry of Health care started within the frame of the program for support of quality in health care a project consisting of 4 separate tasks: creating of standards for medical irradiation in radiodiagnostics, in radiotherapy , in nuclear medicine and creating of standards for patients dose assessment in radiophysics. This document continues with description of a part of the project aimed on X-ray radiodiagnostics. The authors of the project were chosen based on their bids to the public grant issued by the Ministry of Health care. The authors used recommendations, guidelines and instructions of international professional societies and IAEA, as well as the already existing procedures and practices while considering possibilities and state of the praxis in the Czech Republic. The outcome of authors work is now an interim version of a document that will be published in the bulletin of the Ministry of Health care. The document contains a set of standards that cover the whole range o fall complimentarily performed ways of patients irradiation in X-ray diagnostics and interventional radiology . The standards are divided to several categories according to the requirement of the Ministry of Health care based on the diagnostic appliances used for diagnostic irradiation i.e. radiography , fluoroscopy, mammography, stomatology, computer tomography, angiography, interventional radiography and cardiography. (authors)

  2. Analysis of Patients' X-ray Exposure in 146 Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Purpose  Analysis of patient´s X-ray exposure during percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies (PRG) in a larger population. Materials and Methods  Data of primary successful PRG-procedures, performed between 2004 and 2015 in 146 patients, were analyzed regarding the exposition to X-ray. Dose-area-product (DAP), dose-length-product (DLP) respectively, and fluoroscopy time (FT) were correlated with the used x-ray systems (Flatpanel Detector (FD) vs. Image Itensifier (BV)) and the necessity for periprocedural placement of a nasogastric tube. Additionally, the effective X-ray dose for PRG placement using fluoroscopy (DL), computed tomography (CT), and cone beam CT (CBCT) was estimated using a conversion factor. Results  The median DFP of PRG-placements under fluoroscopy was 163 cGy*cm 2 (flat panel detector systems: 155 cGy*cm 2 ; X-ray image intensifier: 175 cGy*cm 2 ). The median DLZ was 2.2 min. Intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe (n = 68) resulted in a significant prolongation of the median DLZ to 2.5 min versus 2 min in patients with an already existing probe. In addition, dose values were analyzed in smaller samples of patients in which the PRG was placed under CBCT (n = 7, median DFP = 2635 cGy*cm 2 ), or using CT (n = 4, median DLP = 657 mGy*cm). Estimates of the median DFP and DLP showed effective doses of 0.3 mSv for DL-assisted placements (flat panel detector 0.3 mSv, X-ray image converter 0.4 mSv), 7.9 mSv using a CBCT - flat detector, and 9.9 mSv using CT. This corresponds to a factor 26 of DL versus CBCT, or a factor 33 of DL versus CT. Conclusion  In order to minimize X-ray exposure during PRG-procedures for patients and staff, fluoroscopically-guided interventions should employ flat detector systems with short transmittance sequences in low dose mode and with slow image frequency. Series recordings can be dispensed with. The intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe

  3. Shield device for controlling the dose of x-rays applied in an x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrier, P.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides an improved shield for use with an x-ray machine. The shield can control the dose of x-rays applied by the machine in different areas without affecting the power of the x-rays. This is achieved with a shield especially designed and positioned to intercept with x-rays for longer or shorter periods in different areas during the taking of the picture, but not for the whole period of time necessary for taking this picture. Each area of the subject being x-rayed is exposed to full power x-rays. However, owing to the shield, the areas that require smaller dose receive these full power x-rays for a shorter portion of the time required to take the picture while the other areas that require larger dose of x-rays, receive the full power x-rays for a longer portion of the full period of time required to take the picture. To ensure this differential exposure, the shield is placed through the path of the x-rays and rotated about an axis which is generally transverse to the direction of travel of the x-rays to cut out some of said x-rays for different portions of the period of time necessary for taking the picture. The shield is preferably shaped to intercept x-rays for a longer period in some areas than in others depending on the required doses. A plurality of differently shaped shields can be provided to suit different picture taking situations

  4. Effects of X-rays spectrum on the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez I, J. L.; Hernandez A, P. L.; Vega C, H. R.; Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    The X-ray equipment for diagnosis comes in different sizes and shapes depending on the scan type to perform. The X-ray spectrum is the energy distribution of the beam photons and consists of a continuous spectrum of photons braking and discrete spectrum due to the characteristic photons. The knowledge of the X-rays spectrum is important to understand like they affect the voltage changes (k Vp), current (m A), time (s) and the type of filter in the interaction mechanisms between X-rays and patient's body, the image receptor or other material that gets in the beam. Across the spectrum can be estimated the absorbed dose in any point of the patient, the quality of the image and the scattered radiation (which is related to the dose received by the equipment operator). The Monte Carlo method was used by MCNP5 code to calculate the spectrum of X-rays that occurs when a monoenergetic electron beam of 250 keV interact with targets of Mo, Rh and W. The spectra were calculated with and without filter, and the values of ambient dose equivalent were estimated, as well as the air kerma. (Author)

  5. Assessment of patient radiation doses in chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, S.; Scribano, V.S.; Merluzzi, F.; Tosca, L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the initial results of a radioprotection programme for diagnostic radiology carried out in a major hospital in Milan. The data cover chest X-ray examinations. The dose values were obtained using different techniques, according to the specific diagnostic requirements in each departement. A wide radiation dose range was observed between the different techniques, with a ratio between maximum and minimum dose > 30 for the skin and the spine. The doses were however lower than those capable of inducing non-stochastic effects by about 10000 and were so low that the probability of a stochastics effect is minimal. Nevertheless, because chest X-rays are performed so frequently, it is recommended that radiologists take greater account of patient dose, as far as compatible with diagnostic requirements. Radiology technicians must strictly observe the regulations for radioprotection of the patient

  6. Computerized x-ray dose-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, R.H.; Wesenberg, R.L.; Amundson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An x-ray dose-monitoring system using a small digital computer is described. Initially, and for every 6 months afterward, the system is calibrated using an exposure meter. For each exposure, the computer receives values of x-ray technique and beam geometry from the x-ray generator through a specially designed electronic interface. Then, by means of calibration data, entrance exposure, area exposure product, and integral dose are obtained and printed for each patient examined. The overall accuracy of the system is better than +/-20%. Operation is semiautomatic, requiring minimum operator intervention. Over 2000 patients have been monitored with the device. Because the system is computer-based, it offers the opportunity for statistical analysis of the data base created, as the results for each patient are stored on computer disk

  7. Radiological safety research of food irradiation with 7.5 MeV X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bin; Tang Weidong; Zhang Yue; Xu Tao; Jin Jianqiao; Ye Mingyang

    2012-01-01

    China and America both have 7.5 MeV high energy X-ray accelerator. The radiological safety of food irradiated with 7.5 MeV X-rays (bremsstrahlung) has been investigated. Samples of meat and meat ash were located in a large volume of fresh meat at the position of the highest photoneutron fluence and irradiated to an X-ray dose of 15 kGy, twice the maximum dose allowed by the US FDA for meat irradiation. An evaluation of the corresponding radiation exposure from ingestion of the irradiated product has been compared to natural background radiation. The paper concludes that the risk to individuals from intake of food irradiated with X-rays from 7.5 MeV electrons, even with a broad energy spectrum, would be trivial. The common target materials are Au, Ta and W. The U.S, requires only Au and Ta can be used as food irradiation target materials and China has not yet relevant provisions. The first 7.5 MeV accelerator for food irradiation in China is under built, and will do the explore research for the choice of target material. (authors)

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  10. Additional radiation dose to population due to X-ray diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Discovery of X rays has revolutionised the medical diagnosis but the fact that the diagnostic radiological procedures contribute about 80 to 90 % of the radiation dose to population as compared to other man made radiation sources cannot be ignored especially when X ray diagnostic facilities are being made available to larger section of the society. The estimated frequency of radiological procedures in India is 12,000 procedures/ year/100,000 population, though it is quite less as compared to developed countries, its increasing day by day. As part of the project, a radiation protection survey of X ray installations and patient radiation dose measurement during various radiological procedures was undertaken. 193 X ray installations were surveyed and the radiation doses received by the patient during various radiological procedure was measured. For measurement of radiation doses, CaSO 4 : Dy thermoluminescence (T.L.) discs of size 13.3 mm diameter and 0.8 mm thickness were used. Pre annealed T.L. discs were fixed by adhesive tape on the patient skin at the center of entrance beam before the exposure. After exposure the T.L. discs were estimated f or entrance skin dose during that particular projection/ examination. 10,000 measurements at different centers during various radiological procedures were done. It was found that chest radiography accounts for 37 % of all radiological procedures and further it was observed that 70 % of the chest X rays were normal with out any pathology indicating scope for curtailing the unwarranted radiological procedures. The special investigations like barium swallow, barium meal and fallow through accounts for about 1.5 % of the total radiological procedures. The entrance skin dose [E.S.D.] during chest radiography was 0.3 + 0.1 mGy where as during K.U.B. and cervical spine radiography it was 6.2 + 1.1 mGy and 5.1 + 0.9 mGy respectively. The details of frequency of various radiological procedures and the

  11. Assessment of pediatrics radiation dose from routine x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Given the fact that children are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than adults,with an increased risk of developing radiation-induced cancer,special care should be taken when they undergo X-ray examinations. The main aim of the current study was to determine Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to pediatric ...

  12. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  13. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  14. Assessment of organ doses by standard X-ray procedures in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tautz, M.; Brandt, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A modern method has been described to assess the radiation burden by X-ray procedures with consideration of the standards of our Society for Medical Radiology in the GDR. The underlying methodology is a Monte Carlo computer technique, which simulates stochastically the energy deposition of X-ray photons in a mathematically described heterogeneous anthropomorphic phantom by Rosenstein (US Department of Health, Education and Welfare). To apply the procedure specific values for the following parameters must be determined for each dose estimation: projection and view, X-ray field size and location entrance exposure at skin surface, beam quality, source-to-image receptor distance. The base data are obtained in terms of tissue-air ratio. Organ doses were calculated for chest, urography, skull, cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, pelvis and lymphography. Concluding possibilities have been discussed for reduction of radiation burden. 9 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs. (author)

  15. Reduction of doses from diagnostic X-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudden, F.; Kuhn, H.

    1992-01-01

    More recent developments in the field of receiver systems for X-rays have made it possible for doses required in X-ray examinations to be gradually reduced to no more than 5% of the radiation patients were exposed to 30 years ago. Despite this fact, the image quality standards necessary to establish even considerably improved. The author suggests to repeat series of measurements carried out in the distant past to be able to make a population-based assessment of the current risk from the effective equivalence dose in one year. In all likelihood, such a survey would prove the quivalence dose to be much lower than the degree of environmental radiation exposure. (orig./DGD) [de

  16. The measurement of patient doses from diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.; Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    As part of the National Health and Medical Research Council survey to determine the genetic and mean bone-marrow doses to the Australian population from the medical, dental and chiropractic uses of radiation sources, doses to patients undergoing X-ray diagnostic procedures were evaluated. The doses were measured using capsules of LiF or CaF 2 :Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). The evaluation of the TLD measurements is described and the mean values of the skin doses for patients undergoing various radiographic examinations in Australia in 1970 are presented

  17. X-ray and radioiodine dose to thyroid follicular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation doses to the epithelial cells of thyroid follicles have been calculated for internal exposure by radionuclides of iodine and by secondary radiations created as a result of interactions of externally administered x rays with iodine naturally occurring in the thyroid. Calculations were performed for the thyroids of subjects ranging from the newborn to the adult male. Results for internal radionuclides are reported as the dose rate to follicular-cell nuclei per unit specific activity of the radionuclide in the thyroid as a whole, i.e., as the specific ''S value'' as used in the MIRD method for internal dosimetry. Results for x rays are reported as the response function, i.e., the absorbed dose per unit fluence of primary x rays. Dose rates are subdivided into internal and external components, the former from radiations emitted within the colloid volume of any one follicle, and the latter from radiations emitted throughout the thyroid in follicles surrounding that one follicle. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Forward and backscatter dose profile to diagnostic X-rays at gold/tissue interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Luiz A.R. da; Seidenbusch, Michael; Regulla, Dieter F.

    1997-01-01

    The radiological and clinical significance of dose distributions in the vicinity of media interfaces in radiotherapy and the complex nature of these dose distributions have long been recognised. A possible dosimetry method for dose profile assessment near interfaces is the use of the so-called thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) dosemeter. In this work the possibility of using Be O/TSEE dosimeters to assess the forward and backscatter dose profile at the interface soft tissue/gold was investigated for diagnostic heavily filtered X-rays spectrum A-60 of ISO Standard A-quality. Dose and range profiles are presented. (author). 14 refs., 3 figs

  19. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  20. Radiation Dose Measurements in Routine X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H.; Sulieman, A.; Suliman, I.I.; Sam, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of current study was to evaluate patients radiation dose in routine X-ray examinations in Omdurman teaching hospital Sudan.110 patients was examined (134) radiographs in two X-ray rooms. Entrance surface doses (ESDs) were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. The mean ESD for the chest, AP abdomen, AP pelvis, thoracic spine AP, lateral lumber spine, anteroposterior lumber spine, lower limb and for the upper limb were; 231±44 Gy,453± 29 Gy, 567±22 Gy, 311±33 Gy,716±39 Gy, 611±55 Gy,311±23 Gy, and 158±57 Gy, respectively. Data shows asymmetry in distribution. The results of were comparable with previous study in Sudan.

  1. Patient dose evaluations from medical X-ray exposure in Italy: an analysis of next data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, A.; Paganini, F.M.; Susanna, A.

    1980-01-01

    NEXT (Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends) is a program for the evaluation of patient exposure in X-ray diagnostic tests. The program is aimed at reducing patient exposure by pin-pointing poor radiological techniques and improving them. CNEN (Comitato Nazionale per l'Energia Nucleare) and ISS (Istituto Superiore di Sanita) have been developing such a program in Italy since 1976. Up to now two regional administrations applied the method and regional operators collected the needed data in all the medical institutions in their areas. The results show a wide spread of values for all the parameters studied in the 12 X-ray projections selected. Gonad dose and skin entrance exposure were found to be spread over a range up to about two orders of magnitude. (H.K.)

  2. Effects of low X-ray doses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, A.; Laskowski, W.

    1987-01-01

    Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different capacities for repair of radiation damage (RAD, rad18, and rad52) have been tested for their colony forming ability (CFA) and growth rates after application of small X-ray doses from 3.8 mGy to 40 Gy. There was no reproducible increase in CFA observable after application of doses between 3.8 mGy and 4.7 Gy.X-ray doses of 40 Gy causing an inactivation of CFA from 90% to 50%, depending on the repair capacity of the strains used, caused a reduced increase in optical density during 2 h buffer treatment in comparison to unirradiated cells. This reduction however, is reversible as soon as the cells are transferred into nutrient medium. One hour after transfer into growh medium the portions of cells with large buds (Gs and M phase) and cells with small buds (S phase) are drastically different in irradiated cells from those obtained in unirradiated cells. The time necessary for separation of mother and daughter cells is prolonged by X-ray irradiation and the formation of new buds is retarded. (orig.)

  3. X-rays individual dose assessment using TLD dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in Embalse NPP for measuring individual X-ray dose in dentists and radiologists, who work in areas near the plant. Personnel is provided with TLD personal dosimeters for thoracic use, as well as TLD ring dosimeters. This individual X-ray dosimetry is fundamental in order to know the effective energy coming from the radiation field, since the dosimetry factors depend on it. On the other hand, the response of the TLD crystals also depends of the effective energy; this accentuates the problem when assessing the individual dose. The X-ray dosimeter must simultaneously determine the value of the effective energy and the corresponding dose value. The basic principle for determining effective energy is by using at least two different TLD materials covered by filters of different thickness. The TLD materials used have totally energy responses. Therefore, different readouts from each of the crystals are obtained. The ratio between both readouts provides a factor that depends of the effective energy but that is 'independent' from the exposure values irradiated to the dosimeter. The Personal TLD dosimeter currently in use is Bicron-Harshaw. It comprises a carrier model 8807. This carrier contains a card model 2211 which groups two TLD 200 crystals and two TLD 100 crystals. It has internal filters at each side of the TLD 200 crystals. The periodical calibration of these dosimeters consists in the irradiation of some dosimeters with different X-ray energy beams in the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). This dosimeter was used, by the National Regulatory Authority (ARN) in several comparisons, always getting satisfactory results. (author)

  4. Assessment of patient doses and image quality in X-ray diagnostics in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olerud, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Results from other industrialized countries indicate that the annual number of diagnostic procedures approaches one for every member of the population, and in many cases the individual radiation doses are higher than from any other human activity. Furthermore, the doses to patients for the same type of examination differ widely from place to place, suggesting that there is a considerable potential for dose reduction. This motivated an investigation of the diagnostic use of X-rays in Norway. The trends in the number of X-ray examinations performed annually have been studied. The patient doses (all diagnostics) and image quality (mammography and computed tomography) have been assessed for various radiological procedures. This form the basis for the assessment of total collective effective dose (CED) from X-rays in Norway, and further risk estimates. The radiological practice has then been evaluated according to the radiation protection principles of justification and optimisation. Based on the 1993 examination frequency, the total CED was assessed to 3400 manSv (0.78 mSv/inhabitant). It is estimated that this radiation burden may cause about 100 excess cancer deaths annually. The frequency of CT examination has doubled every fifth year, and did in 1993 represent 7% of the total number of examinations and 30% of the total CED. 129 refs

  5. Assessment of patient doses and image quality in X-ray diagnostics in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olerud, H M

    1998-06-01

    Results from other industrialized countries indicate that the annual number of diagnostic procedures approaches one for every member of the population, and in many cases the individual radiation doses are higher than from any other human activity. Furthermore, the doses to patients for the same type of examination differ widely from place to place, suggesting that there is a considerable potential for dose reduction. This motivated an investigation of the diagnostic use of X-rays in Norway. The trends in the number of X-ray examinations performed annually have been studied. The patient doses (all diagnostics) and image quality (mammography and computed tomography) have been assessed for various radiological procedures. This form the basis for the assessment of total collective effective dose (CED) from X-rays in Norway, and further risk estimates. The radiological practice has then been evaluated according to the radiation protection principles of justification and optimisation. Based on the 1993 examination frequency, the total CED was assessed to 3400 manSv (0.78 mSv/inhabitant). It is estimated that this radiation burden may cause about 100 excess cancer deaths annually. The frequency of CT examination has doubled every fifth year, and did in 1993 represent 7% of the total number of examinations and 30% of the total CED. 129 refs.

  6. Dose calculation of X-ray in medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanmei; Xue Dingyu; Xu Xinhe; Chen Zhen; Dong Zaili

    2006-01-01

    The photon transportation in radiotherapy is studied based on Monte Carlo method. The dose calculation based on the MC simulation package DPM has been carried out, and the results have been visualized using MEX technology of Matlab. The dose results of X-ray in homogeneity and inhomogeneity medium have been compared with experimental data and those of other MC simulation package, and these results all agree. The calculation method we proposed has the advantage of high speed and good accuracy, therefore, is applicable in practice. (authors)

  7. Characterization of different qualities in X-rays, for instruments calibration in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejudo A, J.; Tovar M, V. M.; Vergara M, F.

    2010-09-01

    In the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration in Mexico was realized the qualities characterization of the series X-rays RQR reported in the International Code of Practices in Dosimetry and Diagnostic Radiology No. 457, using attenuator filters of high purity aluminum and ionizing radiation equipment of inherent filtration of 4 mm Be with and emergent X-radiation beam of 40 grades. For the attenuation was used a geometric arrangement with three beam limiters and a monitor camera prepared on the established form in the mentioned technical report, and a spherical ionization chamber with collection volume of 3.6 cm 3 , aligning its geometric center with the focus of X-rays tube to get that the incident radiation direction will be perpendicular to the ionization chamber. From the perspective of the radiological protection is important to know the X-radiation quality for the application dedicated to the instruments calibration and can to give to these the traceability to a reference laboratory, this way the quality combination and reference chamber can give as a result a procedure for the evaluation of the entrance in surface dose to estimate the dose orientate levels, specified in the basic standards of safety. (Author)

  8. Determination of Entrance Skin Doses and Organ Doses for Medical X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, C.J.; Cheng, C.Y.; Chao, T.C.; Tsai, H.Y.

    1999-01-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic X ray radiographs is planned in Taiwan. Entrance skin doses and organ doses for all installed X ray machines will be investigated. A pilot study has been carried out for the national survey to develop a protocol for the dose assessment. Entrance skin doses and organ doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several X ray examinations. The conversion factor from free air entrance absorbed dose to entrance skin dose was derived. A formula for the computation of entrance skin doses from inputs of kV p , mA.s, source to skin distance, aluminium filtration, and generator rectifying was constructed. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom. All data will be passed to the Atomic Energy Council for developing a programme of national survey and regulatory controls for diagnostic X ray examinations. (author)

  9. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; Monteiro de Souza, Edmilson; Silva, Ademir Xaxier da; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved. - Highlights: • Computational Model was developed to X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology. • The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. • The energy range was 40–100 kV. • Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the Dental Radiology and reference X-ray tubes

  10. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    There are two stages in the X-ray image forming process; first the irradiation of the patient to produce the X-ray pattern in space, known as the primary radiological image, and second, the conversion of this pattern into a visible form. This report discusses the first stage and its interrelation with image quality and patient dose

  11. Current aspects in the development of the quality control in the conventional X-ray diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeva, M.; Velkova, K.

    2004-01-01

    The role of the X-ray diagnostic radiology as one of the main factors forming the general public dose is indisputable. Following the requirement for justification of the application of X-rays for medical purposes, certain criteria for assessment of the parameters of the X-ray diagnostic equipment are formed and maximum permissible values defined. The latter are developed by the international and national radiation protection organizations and introduced both in the international and national legislation. The importance of the quality assurance concept for the radiation protection of the patient and staff in diagnostic radiology turned the quality control into main toll for obtaining high quality images with minimum dose to the patient and staff. X-ray diagnostics is one of the most common methods used in the medical practice. This is the main reason for the increase of the quality control protocols, winch makes their handling difficult. The latest developments in this area bring forward the idea for the development of specialized quality control software, which is capable of: 1) full or semi-automated calculation and assessment of the parameters of the X-ray diagnostic units; 2) tools for data handling and access; 3) tools for data analysis based on predefined procedures

  12. Trends in Radiation Doses to Patients from Medical X-ray Examinations in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olga Iacob; Irina Anca Popescu [Institute of Public Health, Iassy (Romania); Mihai Radu Iacob [University ' Al. I. Cuza' Iassy (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Even if the doses received by patients during 2005 survey are lower than those estimated in the 2000 national survey on diagnostic medical radiation exposure by 27 percent, on average, their values still indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimization activities for X ray examinations, especially in pediatrics radiology. The increasing attention given in last years to radiation protection for conventional examinations, with development of national patient dosimetry protocols and reference doses, new radiation protection legislation and norms have played a significant part in this substantial reduction in effective doses. (N.C.)

  13. Patient doses due to a diagnostic X-ray picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riet, A. van 't.

    1977-09-01

    The influence of technical parameters on patient doses in X-ray diagnostics has been investigated. During an X-ray picture (30 x 40 or 35 x 43 cm 2 ) for general survey in intraveneous pyelography (IVP), skin exposure measurements in the centre of the radiation beam were carried out at 650 adult female patients in 46 Dutch hospitals. In addition, the first half-value layer of the radiation was measured. In 15 of these hospitals, similar measurements were also carried out at a Rando phantom. Small LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters were used for all measurements. The results show a remarkable variation in the mean entrance- and exit-exposure per hospital. The variation in the mean entrance-exposure per hospital (factor 8) is mainly caused by differences in radiation quality. In some hospitals, no added filtration is used while others use a relatively heavy filtration. The variation in the mean exit-exposure per hospital could not be explained uniquely from technical parameters like grid, screen and film sensivity. From phantom measurements it was found that other parameters like adjustment of the automatic exposure timer and film density required by the radiographer are of importance. The measuring system used has shown to be an adequate and simple tool for a crude selection of those hospitals where skin exposures are relatively high. On the basis of the collected data some recommendations are given to promote dose reduction in X-ray diagnostics. The use of fast screen-film combinations is of great potential importance. However further investigation seems desirable, especially concerning patient dose during fluoroscopy 0

  14. Evaluation of quality control in the college of medical radiological sciences, conventional x-ray department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babiker, Esameldeen Mohamed Tom

    2002-02-01

    Quality control in diagnostic radiography aims to ensure continuous production of diagnostic images with optimum quality, using minimum necessary dose to the patients and staff. Therefore an ineffective quality control program can lead to poor quality images that can impair diagnosis, increase operating costs and contribute to unnecessary radiation exposure to both patients and staff. Apply basic quality control program is responsibility of each x-ray facility, and to achieve maximum benefits, all levels of management and technical staff must support and participate in operating the programme. The main parameters to be monitored during the quality control programme include: dose consistency, k Vp accuracy, k Vp variations, exposure timer accuracy, besides checking image receptors, recording system and processing conditions. The aims of this project is to evaluate the quality control in the x-ray department of the college of medical radiologic sciences. The evaluation was an experimental study done by checking the operational status of the radiographic equipment, beside data collection using questionnaires regarding quality control. In the applied experiments the results show that there is a noted variation in the accuracy of k Vp, exposure timer and also in the dose consistency. The obtained results from image receptors and processing system showed noted variations too. The results of the questionnaire and direct interviewing showed other causes of quality degradation such as absence of test tools, the status of the equipment, absence of regular quality control testing, in addition to absence of an organized team to deal with quality. (Author)

  15. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  16. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  17. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose

  18. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettunen, A.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose to a

  19. Quality assurance in X-ray diagnostic radiology - Report II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fosmark, H.; Rozycki, Z.

    1987-01-01

    In the context of an analysis of technical quality assurance in Norwegian X-ray departments, a survey has been carried out in 21 laboratories in 4 hospitals. The tests were restricted to equipment used in general radiography, and the parameters analysed were of kV (using an electronic penetrameter), exposure time, waveform, output and automatic exposure control systems. In addition, a trial to compare overall performance in radiography and fluoroscopy was performed with a PMMP test phantom (SPRI). The survey is presented in two reports. The first one covers details of procedures and equipment. In this second report results are given and discussed. The results show that most of the equipment does function satifactorily, but also demonstrate the need to introduce quality assurance in X-ray departments

  20. Survey of radiation doses and health effects in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Zhang Liangan; Liu Jinzhong; Zhang Jingyuan

    1984-01-01

    The results of a nationwide survey of radiation doses and health effects in 26983 medical diagnostic X-ray workers in 28 provinces of China were reported. The control group was composed of 25785 non-X-ray medical workers in the same hospitals where the investigated X-ray workers worked. Of the radiological workers surveyed 75.3% received cumulative radiation doses below 50 mGy, only 2.7% received doses greater than 500 mGy, the average cumulative dose being 45.0 mGy. The average length of service was 11 years. The main radiation effects relating to radiation doses were the increase of frequencies of both chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which were 0.362% and 0.0358% in the irradiated group, and 0.122% and 0.0138% in the control group, respectively. The incidence and mortality rate of leukemias increased significantly in the irradiated group. The incidence and standardized incidence of leukemias were 9.61 . 10 -5 and 9.67 . 10 -5 in the irradiated group and 2.74 . 10 -5 and 2.77 . 10 -5 in the control group. The leukemia mortality rates in the two groups were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.24 . 10 -5 respectively, and the standardized mortality rates were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.27 . 10 -5 respectively. (Author)

  1. Measurement of dose received in knee joint x-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashar, Basamat Musa Hajo

    2014-11-01

    Diagnostic x-rays examinations play an important role in the health care of the population. These examinations may involve significant irradiation of the patient and probably represent the largest man-made source of radiation exposure for the population. This study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital in period of January to June 2014. This study performed to assess the effective dose (ED) received in knee joint radiographic examination and to analyze dose (ed) received in knee joint radiographic examination and to analyze effective dose distribution among radiological departments under study. The study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, covering two x-ray units and a sample of 50 patients. The following parameters were recorded age, weight, height, body mass ines (BMI) derived from weight (Kg) and (Height (M)) and (height (m)) and exposure factors. The dose was measured for knee joint x-rays examination. For effective dose calculation, the entrance surface dose (ESD) values were estimated from the x-ray tube output parameters for knee joint Ap and lateral examinations. The ED values were then calculated from the obtained ESD values using IAEA calculation methods. Effective doses were then calculated from energy imparted using ED conversion factors proposed by IAEA. The results of ED values calculated showed that patient exposure were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were( 2.49 + 0.03) and (5.60 + 0.22) milli Grey for knee joint AP and lateral examinations, respectively, Further studies are recommended with more number of patients and using more two modalities for comparison.(Author)

  2. The study on clinical conditions and skin dose of upper-gastrointestinal x-ray fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Chul; Ahn, Sung Min; Jang, Sang Sup

    2007-01-01

    This study examined present conditions of upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy and patient skin dose. The authors elected 21 equipment to check the X-ray equipment and exposure factor of fluoroscopy and spot exposure in university hospitals, hospitals, and clinics where perform upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy more than five times every day in Incheon areas. The amount of patient's skin dose during upper-gastrointestinal X-ray fluoroscopy was measured by ionization chamber

  3. Patient dose simulation in X-ray CT using a radiation treatment-planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Yasuo; Oda, Masahiko; Minamoto, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    Medical irradiation dosage has been increasing with the development of new radiological equipment and new techniques like interventional radiology. It is fair to say that patient dose has been increased as a result of the development of multi-slice CT. A number of studies on the irradiation dose of CT have been reported, and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is now used as a general means of determining CT dose. However, patient dose distribution in the body varies with the patient's constitution, bowel gas in the body, and conditions of exposure. In this study, patient dose was analyzed from the viewpoint of dose distribution, using a radiation treatment-planning computer. Percent depth dose (PDD) and the off-center ratio (OCR) of the CT beam are needed to calculate dose distribution by the planning computer. Therefore, X-ray CT data were measured with various apparatuses, and beam data were sent to the planning computer. Measurement and simulation doses in the elliptical phantom (Mix-Dp: water equivalent material) were collated, and the CT irradiation dose was determined for patient dose simulation. The rotational radiation treatment technique was used to obtain the patient dose distribution of CT, and patient dose was evaluated through simulation of the dose distribution. CT images of the thorax were sent to the planning computer and simulated. The result was that the patient dose distribution of the thorax was obtained for CT examination. (author)

  4. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The report, Factors Affecting Patient Dose in Diagnostic Radiology is divided into three main sections. Part one is introductory and covers the basic principles of x-ray production and image formation. It includes discussion of x-ray generators and x-ray tubes, radiation properties and units, specification and measurement of x-ray beams, methods of patient dose measurement, radiation effects, radiation protection philosophy and finally the essentials of imaging systems. Part two examines factors affecting the x-ray output of x-ray machines and the characteristics of x-ray beams. These include the influence of heat ratings, kVp, waveform, exposure timer, filtration, focus-film distance, beam intensity distribution, x-ray tube age and focal spot size. Part three examines x-ray machine, equipment and patient factors which affect the dose received by individual patients. The factors considered include justification of examinations, choice of examination method, film/screen combinations, kVp, mAs, focus-film distance, collimation and field size, exposure time, projection, scatter, generator calibration errors, waveform, filtration, film processing and patient size. The patient dose implications of fluoroscopy systems, CT scanners, special procedures and mammography are also discussed. The report concludes with a brief discussion of patient dose levels in New Zealand and dose optimisation. 104 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs

  5. An experimental investigation on reduced radiological penumbra for intermediate energy x-rays: Implications for small field radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brian Michael

    Current day external beam radiation therapy typically uses x-ray energies in the megavoltage (6--18 MV) or in the superficial/orthovoltage (80--350 kVp) energy ranges. It has been found that intermediate energy x-rays (those greater than orthovoltage but sub-megavoltage) may offer an advantage in the field of high precision radiation therapy such as in radiosurgery. This advantage is a reduction in the radiological penumbra associated with small (less than about 3 cm) radiation dose fields. A consequence of reduced radiological penumbra is a more homogenous, conformal dose distribution in the patient with dose escalation and organ sparing made more feasible. The objectives of this thesis were as follows: to produce and to characterize an intermediate energy x-ray beam, to establish a method of accurate penumbra measurement at the micron level for millimeter size fields, to measure the radiological penumbra of single small intermediate energy x-ray fields, and to show the clinical consequences of a multiple beam irradiation in a stereotactic head phantom. A maximum photon energy of 1.2 +/- 0.1 MeV was determined for the intermediate energy x-ray spectrum at the expense of a low dose rate. A digital microscope with a computer controlled translation stage was investigated for its ability to resolve steep dose gradients in Gafchromic EBT film for field sizes as small as 1 mm and for photon energies as low as 100 kVp. The microscope-film system resolved gradients to within about 30 mum, limited by the inherent spatial resolution of the film, the noise of the system, and the uncertainties of measurement. Penumbra widths were compared for 1.2 MV versus 6 MV for identical irradiation conditions. In some instances, there was a five-fold reduction in the radiological penumbra of single 1.2 MV x-ray beams. A multiple beam arc irradiation demonstrated that the advantages seen with single beams carry over to multiple beams. The benefits of reduced radiological penumbra for

  6. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines

  7. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm 2 , varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  8. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report ...

  10. Determination of entrance skin dose from diagnostic X-ray of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient during x-ray examination in Federal Medical Centre, Keffi in Nasarawa state, Nigeria. Entrance skin doses (ESDs) for a common type of x-ray procedures, namely chest AP/PA (anterior/posterior) were measured. A total of 200 data were collected from patients who were exposed to diagnostic X-ray during their routine ...

  11. Physician-received scatter radiation with angiography systems used for interventional radiology: Comparison among many x-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Morishima, Y.; Inaba, Y.; Taura, M.; Ebata, A.; Takeda, K.; Shimura, H.; Zuguchi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation protection for interventional radiology (IR) physicians is very important. Current IR X-ray systems tend to use flat-panel detectors (FPDs) rather than image intensifiers (IIs). The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that there is no difference in physician-received scatter radiation (PRSR) between FPD systems and II systems. This study examined 20 X-ray systems in 15 cardiac catheterisation laboratories (11 used a FPD and 9 used an II). The PRSR with digital cine-angiography and fluoroscopy were compared among the 20 X-ray systems using a phantom and a solid-state-detector electronic pocket dosemeter. The maximum PRSR exceeded the minimum PRSR by ∼12-fold for cine-angiography and ∼9-fold for fluoroscopy. For both fluoroscopy and digital cine-angiography, the PRSR had a statistically significant positive correlation with the entrance surface dose (fluoroscopy, r = 0.87; cine-angiography, r = 0.86). There was no statistically significant difference between the average PRSR of FPDs and IIs during either digital cine-angiography or fluoroscopy. There is a wide range of PRSR among the radiography systems evaluated. The PRSR correlated well with the entrance surface dose of the phantom in 20 X-ray units used for IR. Hence, decreasing the dose to the patient will also decrease the dose to staff. (authors)

  12. Determination of Doses for X-Ray Examinations of Paranasal Sinuses of Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Beck, N; Zagar, I.

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the absorbed doses during X-ray examination is very important, especially in paediatric radiology in order to improve radiation protection. In childhood, the paranasal sinuses diseases are very frequent and the development of sinuses has some specialities which has to be taken into consideration in X-ray diagnostics. The aim of this work was the determination of the relative doses on the thyroid gland and eyes, in respect to the entrance dose on the anthropomorphic child phantom (CIRS). The entrance doses on the phantom to the entrance dose on patients of similar age. Simultaneously the influence of human working method was studied, i.e. the performance of the radiological technicians. The age of the patients varied from 7 to 15 years, the child phantom was equivalent to 10 years age. A protective lead apron on the necks of both children and phantom was used. Doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence (RPL) and thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters. The mean doses on the thyroid and the eyes measured in the phantom after 10 expositions were 0.20 ± 0.05 mSv, and 0.32 ± 0.02 mSv, respectively. Relative doses were calculated in relation to entrance dose of 9.96 mSv for 10 exposures, and the results were 0.02 and 0.03 for the thyroid gland and the eyes, respectively. The dosimetry results on 45 patients showed that there was a good correlation between measured doses and the body mass index (BMI). The mean entrance dose measured on the 45 patients was 0.97 ± 0.08 mSv.(author)

  13. Radiation dose response of N channel MOSFET submitted to filtered X-ray photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Filho, Luiz C.; Monte, David S.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Luiz A. P.

    2018-01-01

    MOSFET can operate as a radiation detector mainly in high-energy photon beams, which are normally used in cancer treatments. In general, such an electronic device can work as a dosimeter from threshold voltage shift measurements. The purpose of this article is to show a new way for measuring the dose-response of MOSFETs when they are under X-ray beams generated from 100kV potential range, which is normally used in diagnostic radiology. Basically, the method consists of measuring the MOSFET drain current as a function of the radiation dose. For this the type of device, it has to be biased with a high value resistor aiming to see a substantial change in the drain current after it has been irradiated with an amount of radiation dose. Two types of N channel device were used in the experiment: a signal transistor and a power transistor. The delivered dose to the device was varied and the electrical curves were plotted. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the power MOSFET response was made, by varying the tube potential of about 20%. The results show that both types of devices have responses very similar, the shift in the electrical curve is proportional to the radiation dose. Unlike the power MOSFET, the signal transistor does not provide a linear function between the dose rate and its drain current. We also have observed that the variation in the tube potential of the X-ray equipment produces a very similar dose-response.

  14. Measurements of X ray absorbed doses to dental patients in two dental X ray units in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Oni, O.M.; Balogun, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of absorbed doses from radiographic examinations to various anatomical sites in the head and neck of patients with an average age of 45 years using intra-oral dental radiography have been carried out. LiF (TLD-100) dosemeters were used for the measurements of the absorbed dose. The measured absorbed doses to the various anatomical sites in the two units are reported, discussed and compared with results from the literature. Quality control measurements were also performed using a Victoreen quality control test device on the X ray units. The tube voltage accuracies for the two units were found to be within acceptable limits (less than ±10%). On the other hand the exposure time accuracies for these units have large deviations (>20%). These results and those that have been reported in the literature may be an indication that high patient doses are common in most dental X ray centres and countries. As a result of this, regular compliance and performance checks of dental diagnostic X ray equipment are essential in order to ensure proper performance and to minimise unnecessary patient and operator doses. (author)

  15. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2008-01-01

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm 3 Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with 133 Ba, 241 Am and 57 Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of conversion coefficients and

  16. Estimation of dose to patients undergoing computed radiography x-ray examinations in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badri, Fatima Abulgasiem Abdulrhman

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma to the patient during x-ray examination to (chest PA, lumbar spine AP and Lat, pelvis AP) by using computed radiography (CR) in different three hospitals in Khartoum. Three x-ray machines were covered. A total of 135 patients were evaluated. The entrance surface air kerma was calculated for each patient from the exposure parameters using cal dose software version 3.5. The obtained results showed that, the entrance surface air kerma range founded to be (0.28-1.59) for chest PA, (1.98-2.62) for lumbar spine and (0.438-2.47) for pelvis AP. The higher entrance surface air kerma for all projections were observed in Center 1, except for pelvis it is higher in center 2. And the lower entrance surface air kerma were observed in center 3. This study recommends that CR operator must to be used to achieve optimize the patient dose by use the best strategies available for reducing radiation dose, computed radiography must be used with high level of training for medical staff to reduce the dose, each radiology department should implement a patient dose measurement quality assurance programme, doses to the patients should be regularly monitored and the proposed national DRLs should be taken as guidance for optimization.(Author)

  17. Response of the 'patient dose calibrator' chamber for incident positions and sizes of X-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio M.; Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio S.; Ferreira, Flavia C. Bastos; Lacerda, Marco A. de Souza; Alonso, Thessa C.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of patient doses is an important tool for optimizing radiodiagnostic medical procedures with conventional X-ray equipment and for improving the quality of the radiographic image. The Patient Dose Calibrator (PDC) chamber is a dosimetric instrument that is used in the evaluation of the air kerma-area product (P KA ) quantity aiming the reduction of patient doses. The objective this work was to study the P KA variation caused by different field incident positions and sizes of the X-ray beam on the PDC chamber. Results showed that the PDC chamber has repeatability lower than 0.6%, beam position dependence of 3% and linearity response within ± 6%; these characteristics are to be taken into account during evaluation of the radiological protection conditions of conventional x-ray equipment. (author)

  18. Evaluating X-ray absorption of nano-bismuth oxide ointment for decreasing risks associated with X-ray exposure among operating room personnel and radiology experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rashidi

    2015-12-01

      Conclusion: It seems that due to higher atomic number and lower toxicity, Bi2O3 nanoparticles have better efficiency in X-ray absorbtion, comparing to the lead. Cream and ointment of bismuth oxide nanoparticles can be used as X-ray absorbant for different professions such as physicians, dentists, radiology experts, and operating room staff and consequently increase health and safety of these employees.

  19. Commentary: progress in optimization of patient dose and image quality in x-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.; Chan, H.-P.

    1999-01-01

    X-ray diagnostics gives the largest contribution to the population dose from man-made radiation sources. Strategies for reduction of patient doses without loss of diagnostic accuracy are therefore of great interest to society and have been focussed in general terms by the ICRP (ICRP 1996) through the introduction of the concept of diagnostic reference levels. The European Union has stimulated research in the field, and, based on patient dose measurements and radiologists' appreciation of acceptable image quality, good radiographic techniques have been identified and recommended (EUR 1996a, b) for conventional screen-film imaging. These efforts have resulted in notable dose reductions in clinical practices (Hart et al 1996). In spite of 100 years of use of x-rays for diagnostics, the choice of technique parameters still relies to a great extent on experience. Scientific efforts to optimize the choice in terms of finding the parameter settings which yield sufficient image quality at the lowest possible cost in dose are still rare. True optimization requires (1) estimation of the image quality needed to make a correct diagnosis and (2) methods to investigate all possible means of achieving this image quality in order to be able to decide which of them gives the lowest dose. The paper by Tapiovaara, Sandborg and Dance published in this issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology (pages 537-559) addresses the optimization of paediatric fluoroscopy, a timely and important topic. Fluoroscopy procedures, used to guide x-ray examinations or interventional procedures, are little standardized and may result in high dose levels; radiation exposure in childhood is likely to result in a higher lifetime risk than the same exposure later in life. The authors represent an interesting mix of expertise within various scientific fields: the theory of medical imaging and assessment of image quality, the physics of diagnostic radiology and radiation dosimetry. They provide good insights

  20. Computerized method for X-ray angular distribution simulation in radiological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Marcio A.; Oliveira, Henrique J.Q. de; Frere, Annie F.; Schiabel, Homero; Marques, Paulo M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A method to simulate the changes in X-ray angular distribution (the Heel effect) for radiologic imaging systems is presented. This simulation method is described as to predict images for any exposure technique considering that the distribution is the cause of the intensity variation along the radiation field

  1. Estimation of the collective effective dose to the population from medical X-ray examinations in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenkanen-Rautakoskia, Petra; Jaervinen, Hannu; Bly, Ritva

    2008-01-01

    The collective effective dose to the population from all X-ray examinations in Finland in 2005 was estimated. The numbers of X-ray examinations were collected by a questionnaire to the health care units (response rate 100 %). The effective doses in plain radiography were calculated using a Monte Carlo based program (PCXMC), as average values for selected health care units. For computed tomography (CT), weighted dose length product (DLP w ) in a standard phantom was measured for routine CT protocols of four body regions, for 80 % of CT scanners including all types. The effective doses were calculated from DPL w values using published conversion factors. For contrast-enhanced radiology and interventional radiology, the effective dose was estimated mainly by using published DAP values and conversion factors for given body regions. About 733 examinations per 1000 inhabitants (excluding dental) were made in 2005, slightly less than in 2000. The proportions of plain radiography, computed tomography, contrast-enhanced radiography and interventional procedures were about 92, 7, 1 and 1 %, respectively. From 2000, the frequencies (number of examinations per 1000 inhabitants) of plain radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography have decreased about 8 and 33 %, respectively, while the frequencies of CT and interventional radiology have increased about 28 and 38 %, respectively. The population dose from all X-ray examinations is about 0.43 mSv per person (in 1997 0.5 mSv). About half of this is caused by CT (in 1997 only 20 %) although the relative number of CT examinations is only 7 %. The contribution by plain radiography is 19 %, interventional radiology 17 %, and contrast-enhanced radiology 14 %. It is concluded that CT examinations are the major source of the population dose, while interventional radiology gives about the same population dose as plain radiography. For plain radiography, body examinations cause the highest effective dose. (author)

  2. Evaluation of skin entrance radiation dose in pediatric patients undergoing chest X-rays exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabardo, Farly Piantini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the incident air kerma of lateral (LAT) and anterior-posterior (AP) together with posterior-anterior (PA) projection chest X-ray exams in one of the largest pediatric hospitals in Brazil. Dosimetric results are accompanied with the detailed analysis of patient characteristics and radiographer strategy. The exams of 225 (119 male and 106 female) patients were studied and 389 X-ray exams (200 AP/PA projections and 189 LAT projections) of pediatric patients were acquired. Patient thickness can be restored from age, height or weight with the uncertainty of ∼20-30%. Very slight correlation between the patient dose and thickness was observed with the difference in dose for patients of the same thickness reaching 4 times. By standardization of radiological protocols, it should be possible to keep dose within the intervals 50-100 μGy for LAT projection and 40-80 μGy for AP/PA projection. The dose values are lower than those recommended by major European guidelines to good practice. (author)

  3. Possible radiation dose reduction by using digital X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation load of population all over the world from medical examinations clearly demonstrates the importance of the introduction of the quality assurance and quality control programmes into the activities of radiology departments. The basic aim of quality assurance program is to ensure that the radiation dose is kept as low as reasonably practicable while still providing an adequate image quality. As many other fields, the rapid development of techniques brought change-over from the conventional analogue technique to the digital technique. In this process, the conventional X-ray film is being abandoned and images are being viewed on either laser film or monitor. The main advantages of using digital equipment lay in improved image quality and diagnostic accuracy through digital image processing, reduction in patients exposure, cost reduction by reduction of the film usage, more efficient storage and retrieval of radiographic images through picture archiving. Several studies that have been conducted for comparison of various diagnostic examinations show , that there is potential for dose saving in the digital image intensifier technique. The aim of this study was to compare measured values of dose-area product for colon investigations using different X-ray equipment types, two digital and two analogue. Our material consisted of 169 randomly selected patients, 115 of them were examined with digital equipment and 54 patients with the analogue equipment. The obtained results have confirmed the dose reduction and increase of diagnostic accuracy when using the digital equipment, with the added benefit of a good image quality. (authors)

  4. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon; Ureana, Cecilia Crane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers

  5. Patient and fetal dose in diagnostic x-rays and radiotherapy in Bangkok, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pataramontree, J.; Wangsuphachart, S.; Apaiphonlacharn, J.; Chaichan, P.; Sompradit, S.; Suteerakul, K.; Thamwerawong, W.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999 the multicenter study of the patient surface dose was conducted at Department of Radiology of Chulalongkorn Hospital, another two university hospitals and a hospital in the suburb. Adult female patients were selected to measure the entrance skin dose and accumulated dose by using the thermoluminescent dosimeters and the kerma area product meter, respectively. The fetal doses were calculated by Monte Carlo method using the computer program written by Le Heron J.C. The average fetal doses were studied for each diagnostic radiographic procedure. The fetus got 0.29, 0.35, 2.63 mGy when its mother had radiography of pelvis, lumbosacral spine, excretory urography respectively. The estimated fetal doses for barium meal, barium enema and renal angiography were 1.47, 33.5 and 3.68 mGy, respectively. The fetal dose varies so much about 2-3 times of the average fetal dose due to equipment and techniques. The study of lower abdomen by computed tomography gave 48.4 mGy on average to a fetus. The scattered dose level outside radiotherapeutic x-rays at fetal position in Random Phantom depends on the primary beam area rather than the energy of radiation. If the threshold dose for fetal malformation is 0.1 Gy, the minimum safety distance for him is 22 cm from beam edges for the tumor dose of 60 Gy. (author)

  6. Dose evaluation in paediatric patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantini, F.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Bunick, A. P.; Legnani, A.; Ledesma, J. A.; Filipov, D.; Paschuk, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to estimate the incident air kerma in chest X-ray examinations, for lateral (LAT) and anterior-posterior (AP) (together with posterior-anterior (PA)) projections, in one of the largest paediatric hospitals in Brazil, and to compare these with the results obtained in a general hospital of the same city. The dosimetric results were analysed along with the patient characteristics and radiographer strategies. The examinations of 225 (119 male and 106 female) patients were studied and 389 X-ray scans (200 AP/PA projections and 189 LAT projections) of paediatric patients were acquired. For analysis of the results, the patients were divided into the following age groups: 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. Patient's thickness can be determined from age, height or weight with an uncertainty of 20-30%. In different hospitals, the difference in patient's thicknesses between the same age groups can reach 25-55%. A minimal correlation between the patient dose and thickness was observed, with a 4-fold difference in the dose for patients of the same thickness. By standardizing radiological protocols, it should be possible to keep the dose within intervals of 50-100 μGy for LAT projection and 40-80 μGy for AP/PA projection.

  7. Radiologic technologists versus X-ray-assistance. The differences of an occupational family in health organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblattl, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an information for radiation protection experts. In Austria 2013, seven new jobs were enshrined in ''medical assistance law''. One is the X-ray assistant (Radiographic Assistant). The X-ray assistant may perform simple standardized radiographs. It represents the lowest common denominator to the profession ''Radiologic Technology''. This post will serve experts for radiation protection and employers to inform objectively about which profession has the competences and in which field of work X-ray assistants can be deployed. This article deals with the course content and the classification in the European Qualifications Framework and the legal anchorages.

  8. Study of hard X-ray dose enhancement effects for some kinds of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Hong Xia; Chen Yu Sheng; Zhou Hui; He Chao Hui; Xie Ya Ning; Huang Yu Ying; He Wei; Hu Tian Dou

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results of X-ray dose enhancement effects are given for CMOS4069 and floating gate ROMs irradiated in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility and in cobalt source. Shift of threshold voltage vs. total dose for CMOS4069 and the errors vs. total dose for 28f256 and 29c256 have been tested on line and the equivalent relation of total dose damage under the same accumulated dose is provided comparing the response of devices irradiated by X-ray and gamma-ray source. These results can be provided for X-ray radiation hardening technology as an effective evaluation data

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

  10. Monochromatic x-rays for low-dose digital mammography: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Kwon, Young Man; Choi, Byoung-Jung; Son, Hyun Hwa; Ryu, Cheol Woo; Chon, Kwon Su; Park, Seong Hoon; Juhng, Sun Kwan

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of using monochromatic x-ray imaging generated from an x-ray tube and a multilayer reflector for digital mammography with a low radiation dose was examined. A multilayer mirror was designed to select the x-ray peak with an energy of 21.5 keV generated from an x-ray tube with a tungsten target and was fabricated by the ion-beam sputtering deposition system. Monochromatic x-ray images were obtained from an experimental digital mammography setup with a scanning stage. The performance of the system was evaluated using a breast phantom, a spectrometer, and a radiation dosimeter. We measured the contrast-to-noise ratio and performed the 10% modulation function test to determine image quality and resolution. The monochromatic beam from the multilayer reflector had a full-width-at-half-maximum of 0.9 keV at 21.5 keV, and the reflectivity was 0.70, which was 90% of the designed value. The polychromatic and monochromatic x-rays showed radiation doses of 0.497 and 0.0415 mGy, respectively. The monochromatic x-ray image shows fibers, calcifications, and masses more clearly than the polychromatic x-ray images do. The image contrast of the monochromatic x-rays was 1.85 times higher than that of the polychromatic x-rays. The experimental mammography setup had a spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm with both x-rays. Monochromatic x-rays generated using a multilayer mirror may be a useful diagnostic tool for breast examination by providing high contrast imaging with a low radiation dose.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. ...

  12. Experimental study on x-rays dose enhancement effects for floating gate ROMs

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Hong Xia; Chen Yu Sheng; Han Fu Bin; He Chao Hui; Zhao Hui

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results of x-ray dose enhancement effects are given for floating gate read-only memory (ROMs) irradiated in the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The wrong byte numbers vs. total irradiation dose have been tested and the equivalent relation of total dose damage is provided compared the response of devices irradiated with sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-ray source. The x-ray dose enhancement factors for floating gate ROMs are obtained firstly in China. These results can be an effective evaluation data for x-rays radiation hardening technology

  13. From quality control to quality systems in x-ray radiology. Step by step approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendrutis Morkunas; Julius Ziliukas

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Quality systems in x-ray radiology as in any area of medical exposure is an important tool of optimization of radiation protection. Creation of these systems is related with a number of problems: limited resources, lack of knowledge and experience, negative attitude of hospitals staff and administration, lack of advice from outside. Problems related with transitionary period might be softened by the step by step approach. The following steps might be indicated: providing information on quality systems to hospital staff and administration, simple quality control procedures done by outside experts in hospitals, preparation of quality related procedures by hospital staff, practical implementation of quality control procedures done by hospital staff, preparation of quality manual by hospital staff, its integration into common quality system of hospital (if it is available) and constant development, measurements of performance indicators (e.g., patients' doses) and introduction of corrective measures if necessary, dissemination of experience by expert organizations and more advanced hospitals. These steps are to be discussed in the presentations based on Lithuanian experience since 1998.

  14. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez A, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  15. Radiological techniques in X-ray diagnosis and radiotherapy. 2. enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koecher, E.; Kriester, A.

    1990-01-01

    Since this textbook's first edition appeared in 1981 (INIS:14(13):764471, EDB:83(15):134474), there has been sweeping change in the field of radiological techniques. This is evident from the refinements made to visualisation techniques already used in the past, the development of further methods of imaging and the important role increasingly assumed by innovative computerized procedures. In view of this fact, the relevant curricula and the textbook were thoroughly revised, to keep abreast of the most recent trends. As a result, the new version offers additional contributions on numerous subject groups like 'Transportable X-Ray Units', 'X-Ray Units for Stomatology', 'Fundamentals of Digital Technique' and 'Ultrasound Tomography' as well as sections dealing with quality assurance and electric safety measures. On the other hand, physical and methodological aspects of radiology and radiotherapy, which had been given ample coverage in the first edition, were deliberately neglected here. (orig./HP) With 136 figs., 20 tabs [de

  16. The impact of diagnostic reference levels on patient doses from X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, W.; Almen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diagnostic reference levels (DRL). For this study patient doses for the years 1999 and 2006 were available. Patient doses on a national level for eleven specified X-ray examinations were assessed. For the conventional examinations DRL have been used after the first survey in 1999, for computed tomography no DRL were used and for mammography DRL have been used for more than 20 years. Whereas the patient doses for conventional examinations were 30% lower in 2006 compared to 1999 the doses remained essentially the same for computed tomography and mammography. The widths of the dose distributions had only slightly decreased for conventional examinations and remained the same for computed tomography and mammography. This study has shown that after implementation of DRL a considerable dose reduction can be expected. Practices exceeding DRL will perform remedial actions with the aim to reduce dose, as demonstrated for the conventional examinations. Despite the fact that practices for computed tomography could compare doses with others practices, in the absence of DRL no actions to reduce doses were performed. The margin for further dose reductions in mammography is small due to the long term use of DRL. The impact of DRL on patient doses is changing with time. When introduced large dose reductions can be expected. After long term use DRL will counteract the introduction of new technique with unjustified high patient doses. Despite the merits in terms of dose saving it must be recognized that DRL has its limits - it has to be amended with other radiological protection activities. Other means and measures have to be developed, for example by the authorities, in order to ensure that optimisation is continued even when the patient doses are below the DRL. (author)

  17. Status of X-ray CT photography in the radiology department of our school of dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokari, Seishi; Takahashi, Nobutoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Shirai, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Hiroshi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hidehiko; Okumura, Yasuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Aided by the significant increase in its performance and reduction in cost, the X-ray CT, which originated from the EMI scanner of the 1970's, has become an essential tool in the field of diagnostic X-ray images in medicine. To comprehend in detail the status of X-ray CT photography used in a special diagnostic situation of an adjust hospital of a school of dentistry is beneficial for evaluating the use of exploratory X-ray photography to obtain useful diagnostic information as well as routine photography format. Also, knowledge of its status is necessary to address the issues of justification and optimization of X-ray examinations. Therefore, we conducted research and evaluation on various items, such as the number of cases photographed, number of contrast enhanced, and male to female ratio, over a six-years period to assess the status of photography conducted with a Toshiba CT Scanner TCT-700S, which was introduced to the Radiology Department of our school in September 1991. The following are part of our findings; 1. Status of photography in total. 1) The total number of cases photographed was 5,346 cases. 2) The number of cases contrast enhanced was 903 cases. 3) Contrast enhanced cases ratio was 16.9%. 4) Male to female ratio was 55.4: 44.6%. 2. Status of case photography by different department was: dentistry, 73.3%; medicine, 26.7%. In order to descending case frequency was oral surgery, 53.0%; internal medicine, 19.4%; and radiology 15.0%. 3. Status of case photography by age was, in order of descending frequency, 50s, 40s, and 60s. (author)

  18. Training program for radiologic technologists for performing chest X-rays at inspiration in uncooperative children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, Heinz Jakob; Muras, S.; Kohlhauser-Vollmuth, C.; Stenzel, M.; Beer, M.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program was created to train technologists to perform chest X-rays in crying infants at maximum inspiration. Videos of 4 children were used. Using a computer program, the moment of deepest inspiration was determined in the video in the single frame view. During the normal running video, 14 technologists (3 with significant experience, 3 with little experience and 8 with very little experience in pediatric radiography) simulated a chest radiograph by pushing a button. The computer program stopped the video and the period of time to the optimal moment for a chest x-ray was calculated. Every technologist simulated 10 chest X-rays in each of the 4 video clips. The technologists then trained themselves to perform chest X-rays at optimal inspiration like playing a computer game. After training, the test was repeated. Changes were evaluated by t-test for unpaired samples (level of significance p < 0.05). Although the differences improved in all children, minimal deviation from the optimal moment for taking an X-ray at inspiration occurred in the periodically crying child (0.21 sec before and 0.13 sec after training). In a non-periodically crying infant, the largest differences were shown. The values improved significantly from 0.29 sec to 0.22 sec. The group with substantial experience in pediatric radiology improved significantly from 0.22 sec to 0.15 sec. The group with very little experience in pediatric radiology showed worse results (improvement from 0.29 sec to 0.21 sec). (orig.)

  19. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications.

  20. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhili; Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications

  1. Radiation doses to paediatric patients and comforters undergoing chest x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Vlychou, M.; Tsougos, I.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of hospital admission among children in the developed world and it is estimated to be responsible for 3-18 % of all paediatric admissions. Chest X ray is an important examination for pneumonia diagnosis and for evaluation of complications. This study aims to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD), organ, effective doses and propose a local diagnostic reference level. The study was carried out at the university hospital of Larissa (Greece). Patients were divided into three groups: organ and effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board software. The ESD was determined by thermoluminescent dosemeters for 132 children and 76 comforters. The average ESD value was 55±8 μGy. The effective dose for patients was 11.2±5 μSv. The mean radiation dose for comforter is 22±3 mGy. The radiation dose to the patients is well within dose constraint, in the light of the current practice. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  3. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms

  4. Optimum power of radiation dose in X ray television systems of flaw inspection in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denbnovetskii, S.V.; Troitskii, V.A.; Belyi, N.G.; Grom, V.S.; Kuz'micheva, N.V.; Leshchishin, A.V.; Mikhailov, V.N.; Shutenko, O.V.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the experimental dose characteristics of a x ray television system based on x ray vidicons with the diameter of the working field of 900 mm which operate in the continuous and pulsed conditions with the longer time of cumulation of radiation images on the target of the x ray vidicon. For each type of the inspected material, its thickness, and cumulation time, the dose characteristics were used to determine the optimum power of the exposure dose ensuring the maximum signal/noise ratio and detectability of the defects at the output of the system. (author)

  5. Exposure doses of the patient and the medical staff during urological X-ray examens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Loehr, H.; Haug, P.; Schuett, B.

    1977-01-01

    During 32 intravenous urografies and 48 angiografies of the kidney and the suprarenal glands the X-ray doses at the patient's skin and gonades were determined. During the angiografies the doses were mesured at the hands. the gonades and the front (eyes) of the medical staff. The results are discussed. Because the X-ray doses are relatively high, the number of the pictures and the exposure time is to be reduced to the minimum. Clinical experience and special knowledge is the best X-ray protection. (orig.) [de

  6. The development of a postal method to assess X-ray beam parameters and image quality in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    Intraoral radiographs are an extremely valuable diagnostic tool in dentistry. Radiography permits the early detection and diagnosis of dental disease and consequently is used extensively. However, public concern about radiation exposure has increased in recent times. This concern is reflected in national and international law, to the extent that, the basic principles of radiological protection, that is, justification, optimisation and dose limitation are written into law. Furthermore, in Ireland, the regulations, as outlined in the Code of Practice for Radiological Protection in Dentistry, require intraoral dental X-ray machines to perform to certain standards. A report of a direct survey of 164 intraoral dental X-ray machines is given in this study. The survey covered mechanical, electrical as well as radiation safety. Inadequacies with respect to focus to skin distance and timer accuracy were found in 45% and 42% of the machines surveyed. Ninety eight machines were assessed for electrical safety in which 48% were found to be unsafe. The results indicate that a complete assessment of the performance of dental X-ray units in Ireland is required. However, as there are in excess of 800 dental X-ray machines located throughout the country, such an assessment would be very costly for the regulatory authority. The development of a postal method for the assessment of the performance of dental X-ray machines is described in this study. This postal method provides information on the kV, total filtration, beam width and timer linearity and is undertaken by means of a penetrameter and film envelopes for exposure to the X-ray set under examination, together with a questionnaire that requests information on environment in which the machine is located. Using this method an accuracy of +-5% of the actual value was achieved in the measurement of kVp. The penetrameter was also used to assess whether or not the filtration of a particular machine complies with the regulations. This

  7. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which used Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input (i.e., the source routine) to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. Experimental work included the fabrication of child phantoms to match the existing mathematical models. These phantoms were constructed of molded lucite shells filled with differing materials to simulate lung, skeletal, and soft-tissue regions. The skeleton regions of phantoms offered the opportunity to perform meaningful measurements of absorbed dose to bone marrow and bone. Thirteen to fourteen sites in various bones of the skeleton were chosen for placement of TLDs. These sites represented important regions in which active bone marrow is located. Sixteen typical radiographic examinations were performed representing common pediatric diagnostic procedures. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms. For selected radiological exposures, the risk factors of leukemia, thyroid cancer, and genetic death are estimated for one-year- and five-year-old children

  8. DXRaySMCS. First user friendly interface developed for prediction of diagnostic radiology X-ray spectra produced by Monte Carlo (MCNP-4C) simulation in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Zare, H.; Moradi Faradanbe, H.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the output energy spectra of an x-ray tube is essential in many areas of radiological studies. It forms the basis of almost all image quality simulations and enable system designers to predict patient dose more accurately. Many radiological physics problems that can be solved by Monte Carlo simulation methods require an x-ray spectra as input data. Computer simulation of x-ray spectra is one of the most important tools for investigation of patient dose and image quality in diagnostic radiology systems. In this work the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP-4C) was used for the simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology, Electron's path in the target was followed until it's energy was reduced to 10 keV. A user friendly interface named 'Diagnostic X-ray Spectra by Monte Carlo Simulation (DXRaySMCS)' was developed to facilitate the application of MCNP-4C code for diagnostic radiology spectrum prediction. The program provides a user friendly interface for modifying the MCNP input file, launching the MCNP program to simulate electron and photon transport and processing the MCNP output file to yield a summary of the results (Relative Photon Number per Energy Bin). In this article the development and characteristics of DXRaySMCS are outlined. As part of the validation process, out put spectra for 46 diagnostic radiology system settings produced by DXRaySMCS were compared with the corresponding IPEM78. Generally, there is a good agreement between the two sets of spectra. No statistically significant differences have been observed between IPEM78 reported spectra and the simulated spectra generated in this study. (author)

  9. Effective dose calculations in conventional diagnostic X-ray examinations for adult and paediatric patients in a large Italian hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compagnone, G.; Pagan, L.; Bergamini, C.

    2005-01-01

    The effective dose E is an efficient and powerful parameter to study the radioprotection of the patient. In our hospital, eight radiological departments and more than 100 radiological X-ray tubes are present. The effective doses were calculated for adults and paediatric patients in 10 standard projections. To calculate E, first the entrance skin dose (ESD) was evaluated by a mathematical model that was validated by >400 direct measurements taken with an ionisation chamber on four different phantoms: the overall accuracy of the model was better than 12%. Second, to relate ESD to E, conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo techniques were used. The E-values obtained were of the same order as those presented in the literature. Finally, we analysed how the study of E distributions among the various radiological departments can help to optimise the procedures, by identifying the most critical examinations or sub-optimal clinical protocols. (authors)

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  11. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre; Dean, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial "pause" in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature.

  12. Evaluation of dose to tooth enamel from medical diagnostic X-ray examinations at Mayak PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, A., E-mail: wieser@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Vasilenko, E. [Mayak Production Association, 456780 Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Zankl, M.; Greiter, M.; Ulanovsky, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Sabayev, A.; Knyazev, V.; Zahrov, P. [Mayak Production Association, 456780 Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association had regular check-ups including medical diagnostic X-ray examinations since start of the production lines in 1948. Doses from diagnostic examinations need to be considered in reconstruction of occupational doses of the workers with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel. The numbers and types of examinations of an individual worker can be assessed from the Mayak PA archives but no information was available on doses delivered to teeth by a single specific examination. Of the twenty one applied examination procedures only three affected the teeth, these being X-ray examinations of teeth, skull and cervical spine. For these three kinds of examinations operational procedures and operating modes of X-ray units were compiled from the archive and photon spectra were obtained from a catalog of spectral data for diagnostic X-rays. Entrance doses in air kerma were calculated using the fluence of photon spectra and absorbed dose in tooth enamel for various tooth positions and exposure geometry was then calculated using dose conversion coefficients obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Doses were calculated for examinations in 1948-2000. Except for examination of the skull, absorbed doses in enamel of incisors were found to be about twice as large as in enamel of molars. In the period before 1970 the largest mean absorbed doses in tooth enamel were due to X-ray examination of teeth, with 64 mGy and 34 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively. In the same period the lowest mean doses were due to X-ray examination of the skull, with 11 mGy and 12 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively. In the period from 1970 to 2000, largest mean doses in enamel were due to X-ray examination of cervical spine, with 23 mGy and 12 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively.

  13. Development of a Reference System for the determination of the personal dose equivalent and the constancy of X- Ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivolo, Vitor

    2006-01-01

    A reference system for the determination of the personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), and a quality control program of X-ray equipment used In radioprotection require the periodic verification of the X-ray beams constancy. In this work, two parallel-plate ionization chambers were developed with inner electrodes of different materials, and inserted into PMMA slab phantoms. One ionization chamber was developed with inner carbon electrodes and the other with inner aluminium electrodes. The two ionization chambers can be used as a Tandem system. The different energy response of the two ionization chambers allowed the development of the Tandem system that is very useful for the checking of the constancy of beam qualities. Standard intermediary energy X-ray beams (from 48 keV to 118 keV), radioprotection level, were established through the development of a dosimetric methodology and the analysis of their physical parameters. The ionization chambers were studied in relation to their operational characteristics, and they were calibrated in X-ray beams (radioprotection, diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy levels) in accordance to international recommendations. They presented good performance. The determination procedure of personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), was established. (author)

  14. Radiation doses to patients in medical diagnostic x-ray examinations in New Zealand: a 1983-84 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Poletti, J.L.; Cartwright, P.H.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1993-06-01

    A survey of doses to patients undergoing diagnostic x-ray examinations was performed in 1983-84. Developments since 1983-84 were reviewed and estimates made of the frequency of x-ray examinations, and doses to patients, as at 1992. The collective effective dose from general medical diagnostic radiology in 1983-84 was estimated to have been about 443 μSv per capita per annum. The figure excluded computed tomography which was estimated to have contributed about 5.6 μSv per capita per annum and mammography gave 0.3 μSv per annum. The total per capital effective dose from all medical diag over the whole period from 1983-84 to 1992. The highest dose examinations in 1983-84 were the fluoroscopic procedures barium enema and meal. Over the whole period 1983-84 to 1992 the genetically significant dose (GSD) to the population of New Zealand from medical diagnostic radiology was estimated to have been in the range 200-250 μSv per capita per annum. The two opposing tendencies noted for effective dose, viz, the fall in frequency of some examination types and the rise of Computed tomography, acted also upon this dose index. 43 refs., tabs., figs., ills

  15. Measurement and monitoring of entrance exposure dose rate in X-ray image intensifier television with dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J [Bezirkskrankenhaus Brandenburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1981-03-01

    For X-ray image intensifier television operation very low entrance dose rates (about 5.2 nA/kg) are stated and demanded, respectively. These required values are often manifold exceeded in practice so that a check seems to be necessary. It is shown and proved how these measurements can be performed with simple, generally available means of measurement in the radiological practice. For ZnCdS-image intensifiers should be considered that about 13 nA/kg for the large entrance size are not to be exceeded; for the CsI type lower values (factor 1.5) are practicable because of the twofold quantum absorption efficiency. Furthermore, some tests for a semiquantitative function check of the automatic dose rate control are proposed.

  16. An investigation of dose changes for therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beams with underlying lead shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Baldock, Clive

    2007-01-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used to treat cancer on or close to the skin surface. Many clinical cases use high atomic number materials as shielding to reduce dose to underlying healthy tissues. In this work, we have investigated the effect on both the surface dose and depth doses in a water phantom with lead shielding at depth in the phantom. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the water phantom and to calculate the surface doses and depth doses using primary x-ray beam spectra derived from an analytical model. The x-ray beams were in the energy range of 75-135 kVp with field sizes of 2, 5 and 8 cm diameter. The lead sheet was located beneath the water surface at depths ranging from 0.5-7.5 cm. The surface dose decreased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface and as the field size was increased. The variation in surface dose as a function of x-ray beam energy was only small but the maximum reduction occurred for the 100 kVp x-ray beam. For the 8 cm diameter field with the lead at 1 cm depth and using the 100 kVp x-ray beam, the surface dose was reduced to 0.898 of the surface dose in the water phantom only. Measured surface dose changes, using a Farmer-type ionization chamber, agreed with the Monte Carlo calculated doses. Calculated depth doses in water with a lead sheet positioned below the surface showed that the dose fall-off increased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface as compared to the depth dose in the water phantom only. Monte Carlo calculations of the total x-ray beam spectrum at the water surface showed that the total fluence decreased due to a reduction in backscatter from within the water and very little backscatter from the lead. The mean energy of the x-ray spectrum varied less than 1 keV, with the lead at 1 cm beneath the water phantom surface. As the Monte Carlo calculations showed good agreement with the measured results, this method can be used to verify surface dose changes in clinical situations

  17. The reduction methods of operator's radiation dose for portable dental X-ray machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Han, Won-Jeong

    2012-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the methods to reduce operator's radiation dose when taking intraoral radiographs with portable dental X-ray machines. Two kinds of portable dental X-ray machines (DX3000, Dexcowin and Rextar, Posdion) were used. Operator's radiation dose was measured with an 1,800 cc ionization chamber (RadCal Corp.) at the hand level of X-ray tubehead and at the operator's chest and waist levels with and without the backscatter shield. The operator's radiation dose at the hand level was measured with and without lead gloves and with long and short cones. The backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the hand level of X-ray tubehead to 23 - 32%, the lead gloves to 26 - 31%, and long cone to 48 - 52%. And the backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the operator's chest and waist levels to 0.1 - 37%. When portable dental X-ray systems are used, it is recommended to select X-ray machine attached with a backscatter shield and a long cone and to wear the lead gloves.

  18. Radiation doses from paediatric x-ray examinations in some hospitals in Khartoum Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshiekh, E.H.A.

    2007-10-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the entrance surface doses (ESDs) and the effective dose (ED) to patients undergoing some common diagnostic x-ray examinations in large paediatric public hospitals in Khartoum State. ESD per examination was estimated from x-ray tube parameters in three hospitals comprising three units and sample of 449 radiographs. The entrance surface dose (ESD) and the effective dose (ED) were evaluated for chest, skull, abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis in antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections. For each examination, four age groups 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 years were studied. The DoseCal software was used to calculate these doses. In comparison between Sudanese hospitals with NRPB reference levels, all hospitals showed lower doses than reference levels except for the case of chest in A. Gasim and Khartoum hospitals. Wide variations for the chest examination have been detected. These variation were evident, in Sudan, from previous work. ESDs at Omdurman Hospital meet the reference levels for all years range. ESDs at Omdurman hospital were found to be 41μGy and 62 μGy for range 0-1 year, and 1-5 years, respectively, ESDs at A. Gasim Hospital was found found to be 65 μGy and 100 μGy for range 0-1 year, and 1-5 years, respectively. These values are above NRPB reference levels but lower than CEC1996 reference levels, and meet NRPB reference dose levels in range 5-10 years. In Khartoum Hospital the results present higher ESD than NRPB and CEC reference levels. The high ESDs reflect that ALARA principle is not being applied in chest examinations in Sudan. From comparison between results in this work with previous performed for chest cases in these Sudanese Hospitals at 2004, the ESDs in A. Gasim Hospital were above the previous result but meet the reference levels only range 5-10 years. Omdurman Hospital result but meet the reference levels for all years ranges and are lower than 2002 results. Khartoum Hospital

  19. Photoelectronic radiology 1983; X-ray imaging with the computer-assisted technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaoui, J.; Sylvestre, J.; Robillard, P.; Dussault, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the discipline of radiology has continued to progress from initial images depicting the structure of organs, to the exploration of dynamic and physiologic phenomena, improvements in the power of X-ray generators and with the refinement of non-toxic contrast media. Until the early part of the 1970s, radiology consisted in extrapolations from a two-dimensional image of a three-dimensional organ, and advances in diagnostic quality related chiefly to improvements in spatial resolution of the flat image. With the advent of cross-sectional imaging using computer reconstruction the emphasis has shifted to contrast resolution, to the acquisition of ''pure'' images in the XY plane and to an area-related approach in diagnosis, rather than to the traditional organ-oriented method. This new trend has only been made possible because of the influence of recent developments in the digital and electronics industry. This history of diagnostic radiology up to 1972 is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the major areas of interaction between X-ray and the computer, as represented by the major leading edge technologies that have already received broad acceptance by the health care profession. (author)

  20. Edge enhancement algorithm for low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Seok; Park, Chul Hee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy has continually evolved to reduce radiation risk to patients during clinical diagnosis and surgery. However, the reduction in dose exposure causes quality degradation of the acquired images. In general, an X-ray device has a time-average pre-processor to remove the generated quantum noise. However, this pre-processor causes blurring and artifacts within the moving edge regions, and noise remains in the image. During high-pass filtering (HPF) to enhance edge detail, this noise in the image is amplified. In this study, a 2D edge enhancement algorithm comprising region adaptive HPF with the transient improvement (TI) method, as well as artifacts and noise reduction (ANR), was developed for degraded X-ray fluoroscopic images. The proposed method was applied in a static scene pre-processed by a low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy device. First, the sharpness of the X-ray image was improved using region adaptive HPF with the TI method, which facilitates sharpening of edge details without overshoot problems. Then, an ANR filter that uses an edge directional kernel was developed to remove the artifacts and noise that can occur during sharpening, while preserving edge details. The quantitative and qualitative results obtained by applying the developed method to low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images and visually and numerically comparing the final images with images improved using conventional edge enhancement techniques indicate that the proposed method outperforms existing edge enhancement methods in terms of objective criteria and subjective visual perception of the actual X-ray fluoroscopic image. The developed edge enhancement algorithm performed well when applied to actual low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images, not only by improving the sharpness, but also by removing artifacts and noise, including overshoot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of dose enhancement effect of X-ray at Au/Si interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhengxin; He Chengfa; Lu Wu; Guo Qi; Yu Xin; Zhang Lei; Deng Wei; Zheng Qiwen; ARKIN Abulim

    2013-01-01

    Background: The dose enhancement factor of X-ray was found in 1970s, because of its bad damage to electronic devices. Purpose: This paper is mainly to calculate the dose-enhancement factor at Au/Si interfaces. Methods: The gradient distribution of dose with X-rays has been studied at and near the interface of Au/Si by Monte-Carlo simulation of particle transportation. The mechanism of dose enhancement is discussed based on the principles of interaction of photon with matter. A 3D Au/Si model has been established by MCNP5 program and the dose-enhancement factors of different thicknesses Au/Si interfaces were calculated by Monte Carlo method. Results: The calculated results demonstrate that there exists a stronger dose-enhancement in the Si side near the interface when the energy of X-ray is 30-300 keV. Conclusions: When the thickness of Au is 0-10 μm, dose-enhancement factor of X-ray increases along with the increase of the thickness of Au, when the thickness of Au exceeds 10 μm, dose-enhancement factor of X-ray decreases along with the increase of the thickness of Au. (authors)

  2. Characterization of X-ray fields at the center for devices and radiological health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerra, F. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This talk summarizes the process undertaken by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) for establishing reference x-ray fields in its accredited calibration laboratory. The main considerations and their effects on the calibration parameters are discussed. The characterization of fields may be broken down into two parts: (1) the initial setup of the calibration beam spectra and (2) the ongoing measurements and controls which ensure consistency of the reference fields. The methods employed by CDRH for both these stages and underlying considerations are presented. Uncertainties associated with the various parameters are discussed. Finally, the laboratory`s performance, as evidenced by ongoing measurement quality assurance results, is reported.

  3. Estimation of effective doses in pediatric X-ray computed tomography examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Hideki; Takahashi, Midori; Kudou, Kazuya; Mariya, Yasushi; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2017-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) images are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines. In Japan, the number of facilities that own diagnostic CT equipment, the number of CT examinations and the number of CT scanners increased by ~1.4-fold between 2005 and 2011. CT operators (medical radiological technologists, medical physicists and physicians) must understand the effective doses for examinations at their own institutions and carefully approach each examination. In addition, the patients undergoing the examination (as well as his/her family) must understand the effective dose of each examination in the context of the cumulative dose. In the present study, the numbers of pediatric patients (aged 0-5 years) and total patients who underwent CT at Hirosaki University Hospital (Hirosaki, Japan) between January 2011 and December 2013 were surveyed, and effective doses administered to children aged 0, 1 and 5 years were evaluated. Age- and region-specific conversion factors and dose-length products obtained from the CT scanner were used to estimate the effective doses. The numbers of CT examinations performed in 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 16,662, 17,491 and 17,649, respectively, of which 613 (1.2%) of the overall total involved children aged 0-5 years. The estimated effective doses per examination to children aged 0, 1 and 5 years were 6.3±4.8, 4.9±3.8 and 2.7±3.0 mSv, respectively. This large variation was attributed to several factors associated with scan methods and ranges in actual setting. In conclusion, the requirement for individual patient prospective exposure management systems and estimations of low-dose radiation exposure should be considered in light of the harmful effects of exposure.

  4. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  5. Study on the quality assurance of diagnostic X-ray machines and assessment of the absorbed dose to patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, G. M.; Rabie, N.; Mustafa, K. A.; Abdel-Khalik, S. S.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology provide a clear understanding of the relationship between the radiation dose delivered to a patient and image quality in optimizing medical diagnostic radiology. Because a certain amount of radiation is unavoidably delivered to patients, this should be as low as reasonably achievable. Several X-ray diagnostic machines were used at different medical diagnostic centers in Egypt for studying the beam quality and the dose delivered to the patient. This article studies the factors affecting the beam quality, such as the kilo-volt peak (kVp), exposure time (mSc), tube current (mAs) and the absorbed dose in (μGy) for different examinations. The maximum absorbed dose measured per mAs was 594±239 and 12.5±3.7 μGy for the abdomen and the chest, respectively, while the absorbed dose at the elbow was 18±6 μGy, which was the minimum dose recorded. The compound and expanded uncertainties accompanying these measurements were 4±0.35% and 8±0.7%, respectively. The measurements were done through quality control tests as acceptance procedures.

  6. Determination of doses and cancer risk to patients undergoing digital x-ray examinations at the Tamale Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweligiba, S.A.

    2015-07-01

    Entrance surface and effective doses as well as cancer risk to patients for three common radiological examinations were estimated at the radiology department of the Tamale Teaching Hospital. The quality control assessment indicated that the digital x-ray equipment used, performed self-consistently in line with acceptable performance criteria. The study included eighty-two (82) adult patients undergoing three x-ray imaging modalities; Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis Examinations. From the study the mean entrance dose to abdomen and pelvis were found to be 0.6 ± 0.2 mGy whiles that of chest was found to be 0.2 ± 0.1 mGy. These were found to be lower than results of studies carried out elsewhere. The effective dose to patient was computed using PCXMC 2.0 software. The results shows an average effective dose of 0.036 mSv, 0.084 mSv and 0.067 mSv for chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations respectively. The risk of radiation induced cancer as a result to entrance surface dose was found to be 5.68 x 10-5 %, 1.58 x 10-4 % and 1.49 x 10-4 % for Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis examinations respectively. The third quartile values of the entrance surface dose were found to be lower than recommended diagnostic reference levels published by NRPB, UK and the IAEA for the examinations under study. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of X-ray spectrum with human tissue, in the energies range of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayllahua Q, L. F.; Apaza V, G.; Vega R, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: This paper is an approach to an increasingly complete knowledge about the nature of the processes that occur during a simple examination of radiological diagnosis; know as X-rays are produced and how they will put their energy into the tissue of patients when they are subjected to an examination of radiological diagnosis. First, using the MCNP code an X-rays tube was simulated, where electrons are emitted from a filament (cathode) which travel a certain distance with a certain kinetic energy and then be stopped suddenly in the tungsten target. The X-rays emitted as a result of this interaction, are previously filtered through the inherent filter of Pyrex glass and then by a thin aluminum foil before quantification as an X-rays spectrum. 6 spectra (for 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 KeV) were obtained. Second, using the Penelope code was simulated the interaction of the X-rays spectrum, obtained in the first part with human tissue, putting as simile of human tissue water phantoms of different thicknesses. As final result: dose of energy deposited (in 2 and 3-dimensional) and reflected, absorbed and transmitted photons spectra. (Author)

  8. Estimation of the population dose from medical X-ray diagnostic examination in Shandong province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xieming

    1985-01-01

    The exposure doses on the examinated body surface for verious types of X-ray diagnostic examanition in Shandong Province were surveyed. The collective effective dose equivalent in per million population were calculated with the measured results, the ratios of orga absorbed doses to irradiated surface exposure doses and the frequencies of X-ray examination in Shandong Province. The result was 326 man.Sv per million total population in 1980, of which chest fluoroscopies. lumbar spine radiographies and G.I. examination were estimated to be about 78, 9 and 5 precent, respectively

  9. Radiation doses of patients undergoing abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine x-ray examinations in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Uche, C.Z.; Balogun, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) have been used to measure the entrance surface doses (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic x-ray examinations in Pelvis, Abdomen and Lumbar Spine in Nigeria. A total of 4 randomly selected public hospitals and 240 patients were included in this investigation. Age of the patients used is from 45 years and above. Mean, median, first and third quartiles of ESDs are reported. The results showed that in most cases, for each of the examinations, the mean ESDs are higher than the published reference doses and their corresponding values from other countries. Nevertheless the ESD of each of the patients fall within the ranges of ESDs that have been reported from other countries as quoted by UNSCEAR. The distribution of the ESDs was also found to be negatively skewed. This suggests that radiographic departments need to review their radiographic practices in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. Effective doses were also calculated from the ESD values. The importance of good regulatory activities and trained personnel is stressed in this work It is therefore suggested that further dose reduction program, while still having in focus ways of optimizing the various radiological parameters in order for patient to receive least dose and the radiologist having an acceptable image, should include emphasis on good regulatory control and use of well-trained personnel. Apart from the fact that the data provided in this work will be useful for the formulation of national guidance levels, it also provides patient dosimetry information on healthcare level IV countries

  10. The influence of x-ray energy on lung dose uniformity in total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth; Greven, Kathryn; Wu Qingrong

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examine the influence of x-ray energy on the uniformity of the dose within the lung in total-body irradiation treatments in which partial transmission blocks are used to control the lung dose. Methods and Materials: A solid water phantom with a cork insert to simulate a lung was irradiated by x-rays with energies of either 6, 10, or 18 MV. The source to phantom distance was 3.9 meters. The cork insert was either 10 cm wide or 6 cm wide. Partial transmission blocks with transmission factors of 50% were placed anterior to the cork insert. The blocks were either 8 or 4 cm in width. Kodak XV-2 film was placed in the midline of the phantom to record the dose. Midplane dose profiles were measured with a densitometer. Results: For the 10 cm wide cork insert the uniformity of the dose over 80% of the block width varied from 6.6% for the 6 MV x-rays to 12.2% for the 18 MV x-rays. For the 6 cm wide cork insert the uniformity was comparable for all three x-ray energies, but for 18 MV the central dose increased by 9.4% compared to the 10 cm wide insert. Conclusion: Many factors must be considered in optimizing the dose for total-body irradiation. This study suggests that for AP/PA techniques lung dose uniformity is superior with 6 MV irradiation. The blanket recommendation that the highest x-ray energy be used in TBI is not valid for all situations

  11. Survey results of output measurements in diagnostic X ray equipments using glass dosimeter and the questionnaire. Aichi association of radiological technologists 50 year anniversary memorial work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yuji; Hirofuji, Yoshiaki; Saiga, Osamu; Ishibashi, Kazuto

    2003-01-01

    The Aichi Association of Radiological Technologists executed the survey according to the task of radiation control in Aichi prefecture. The survey investigated the number of clinics/hospitals who own radiation dosimeters. The association also measured outputs using glass dosimeter (GD-450) manufactured by Chiyoda Technical in diagnostic X ray. The purpose and significance of the survey are: to illustrate that the radiation control task is not involved as routine maintenance work, to examine why the task is not routinely performed, to investigate the number of clinics/hospitals who own diagnostic X ray radiation dosimeters, to inform that the use of dosimeter is essential to achieve accurate measurement for exposed dose, and to motivate the significance of radiation control in routine work. The result of the survey clearly indicated the necessity of radiation control, and suggested the information needed for the Aichi Association of Radiological Technologists to determine the guideline for the medical radiation exposed dose. (author)

  12. Collective effective dose in Europe from x-ray and nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bly, R.; Jaervinen, H.; Jahnen, A.; Olerud, H.; Vassileva, J.; Vogiatzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547 500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605 000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30 700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31 100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput. (authors)

  13. Skin Entrance dose to patients from routine P-A chest X-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Radiation of any amount is potentially hazardous and it should be minimized as much as possible during health care delivery. Objective: To determine and assess the variation of the dose received by patients undergoing chest x-ray examination, and to provide a useful baseline data to evaluate the dose to the ...

  14. Health risk assessment of doses to patients\\' eyes from dental X-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The skin entry dose to patients\\' eyes during dental x-ray examination was carried out on one hundred and ten patients comprising infants and adult of both sexes. The dose measurements was performed at Alpha dental centre, Ibadan, using Lithium fluoride thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLD). The results of the study ...

  15. Collective radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray examination in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical x-ray exposures have the largest man made source of population exposure to ionizing radiation in different countries. Recent developments in medical imaging have led to rapid increases in a number of high dose xray examinations performed with significant consequences for individual patient doses ...

  16. PATIENT RADIATION DOSE FROM CHEST X-RAY EXAMINATIONS IN THE WEST BANK-PALESTINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahham, Adnan; Issa, Ahlam; ALMasri, Hussein

    2018-02-01

    Radiation doses to patients resulting from chest X-ray examinations were evaluated in four medical centers in the West Bank and East Jerusalem-Palestine. Absorbed organ and effective doses were calculated for a total of 428 adult male and female patients by using commercially available Monte Carlo based softwares; CALDOSE-X5 and PCXMC-2.0, and hermaphrodite mathematical adult phantoms. Patients were selected randomly from medical records in the time period from November 2014 to February 2015. A database of surveyed patients and exposure factors has been established and includes: patient's height, weight, age, gender, X-ray tube voltage, electric current (mAs), examination projection (anterior posterior (AP), posterior anterior (PA), lateral), X-ray tube filtration thickness in each X-ray equipment, anode angle, focus to skin distance and X-ray beam size. The average absorbed doses in the whole body from different projections were: 0.06, 0.07 and 0.11 mGy from AP, PA and lateral projections, respectively. The average effective dose for all surveyed patients was 0.14 mSv for all chest X-ray examinations and projections in the four investigated medical centers. The effect of projection geometry was also investigated. The average effective doses for AP, PA and lateral projections were 0.14, 0.07 and 0.22 mSv, respectively. The collective effective dose estimated for the exposed population was ~60 man-mSv. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Gui Ah Auu; Husaini Salleh; Idris Besar; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Shaharuddin Mohd; Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Mohamed Ali Abdul Khader; Mahalatchimi Dave; Mohd Fazly Abdul Rahim; Ng Chee Moon; Ram Piari; Teoh Hoon Heng; Lee Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  18. Low Dose X-Ray Speckle Visibility Spectroscopy Reveals Nanoscale Dynamics in Radiation Sensitive Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwohlt, Jan; Reiser, Mario; Randolph, Lisa; Matic, Aleksandar; Medina, Luis Aguilera; Madsen, Anders; Sprung, Michael; Zozulya, Alexey; Gutt, Christian

    2018-04-01

    X-ray radiation damage provides a serious bottleneck for investigating microsecond to second dynamics on nanometer length scales employing x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. This limitation hinders the investigation of real time dynamics in most soft matter and biological materials which can tolerate only x-ray doses of kGy and below. Here, we show that this bottleneck can be overcome by low dose x-ray speckle visibility spectroscopy. Employing x-ray doses of 22-438 kGy and analyzing the sparse speckle pattern of count rates as low as 6.7 ×10-3 per pixel, we follow the slow nanoscale dynamics of an ionic liquid (IL) at the glass transition. At the prepeak of nanoscale order in the IL, we observe complex dynamics upon approaching the glass transition temperature TG with a freezing in of the alpha relaxation and a multitude of millisecond local relaxations existing well below TG . We identify this fast relaxation as being responsible for the increasing development of nanoscale order observed in ILs at temperatures below TG .

  19. Radiological protection problems associated with parasitic X-ray emission from electronic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amlinger, G.; Anger, K.; Billaudelle, H.; Ehlers, J.; Fendt, H.W.; Festag, J.G.; Haug, R.; Herrmann, K.H.; Klein, H.; Kossel, F.; Krebs, A.; Lauterbach, U.; Leibssle, H. Fa.; Lustig, H.; Maushart, R.; Milde, K.G.; Peter, F.; Ritter, J.; Riecke, W.D.; Rosenbaum, O.; Schiekel, M. Fa.; Schleich, F.; Schmidt, Th.; Speyer, K.; Teschke, L.; Tzschaschel, R.; Wagner, H.; Wehner, G.; Wendel, W.; Zehender, E.; Aiginoer, H.; Zakovsky, J.; Blom, G.; De backer, J.; Delhove, J.; Hublet, P.; Lejeune, P.; Misslin, A.; Nuyts, R.; Popovitch, I.; Hjardemaal, O.; Oehlenschlaeger, N.; Gonzalez Del Campo, R.; Becker, S.; Elder, R.L.; Matthews, J.D.; Sheldon, J.L.; Viitaniemi, T.J.; Aouizerate, H.; Aymeric, H.; Barthe, J.; Bermann, F.; Berthaud, Madeleine; Blanc, D.; Bory, P.; Bourrieau, J.; Bouville, A.; Bovagne, H.; Bresson, G.; Casanovas, J.; Cassanhiol, E.; Cassanhiol, E.; Chambragne, J.; Chanteur, J.; Choquet, R.; Cluchet, J.; Commanay, L.; Commanay, P.; Cros, J.L.; Dana, M.; Danna, J.; Decossas, J.L.; Delpla, M.; Destame, D.; Dieval, M.; Drouet, J.; Dubec, A.; Galy, J.; Garnier, A.; Gouerne, R.; Gras, M.; Grob, R.; Guelfucci, J.P.; Guevenoux, J.; Guichardiere, R.; Hamard, J.; Hardy, J.; Haym, J.P.; Hionette, J.; Jacob, G.; Lavie, J.M.; Levy, L.; Logre, P.; Manquene, J.; Martin, H.; Mathieu, J.; Odievre, Monique; Oustrin, J.; Palluel, P.; Patau, J.P.; Penotet, H.; Perrot, A.; Petel, M.; Peyrelavigne, A.; Peyrelavigne, Monique; Provincial, M.; Raedersdorff, J.; Renard, Cl.; Roche, L.; Roche, R.; Schaeffer, R.; Soubiran, J.; Soudain, G.; Stern, J.C.; Terrissol, M.; Tixier, M.; Vialettes, H.; Wauquier, J.M.; Casbolt, P.N.; Ciuciura, A.; Goodhew, E.G.; Jones, I.S.; O'riordan, M.C.; Speight, D.L.; Ward, P.R.; Williams, K.F.; Biro, T.; Vago, G.; Rosental, N.; Argiero, L.; Belli, M.; Boggio, M.; Carfi, N.; Garretti, S.; Loppa, A.; Parisi, A.; Susanna, A.; Ogawa, I.; Koren, K.; Aten, J.B.Th.; Barendsen, G.W.; Den Boer, A.M.; De Pijper, M.A.; Hekman, H.; Julius, H.W.; Strackee, L.; Van daatselaar, G.; Lorentzon, L.; Hadzi-Pealo, M.; Jeremio, M.; Stevanovio, Marija; Oosterkamp, W.J.; Shalmon, E.; Doyen, Diana; Goetschalkx, J.; Puel, R.

    1971-03-01

    During the past few decades there has been an increase in the production of many types of electronic devices such as rectifying tubes, thyratrons, klystrons, magnetrons, etc., containing elements capable of emitting undesirable X-radiation. These components are not only found in equipment used in industry and research laboratories, but also in devices of a more domestic nature, such as colour television sets, usually low in energy, this radiation may nevertheless constitute a health hazard for many users of such devices and may affect not only workers but even the population as a whole. The Commission of the European Communities (Euratom) felt it was desirable to review the state of the art with regard to problems of radiological protection arising in the manufacture, repair and use of such electronic equipment and to seek suitable technical and administrative solutions. In conjunction with the Centre Physique Atomique et Nucleaire of the Paul Sabatier University, the Commission held an International Symposium in Toulouse on 3-6 November 1970, which was attended by manufacturers of electronic equipment, officials of technical inspection bodies and representatives of public health and occupational safety authorities. The following items were discussed: classification and identification of sources of parasitic X-rays, methods of measuring soft X-rays, biological aspects of exposure to soft X-rays, performance standards and methods for testing and inspecting electronic equipment. The Symposium was followed attentively by 180 delegates from 21 countries and international organizations, and was concluded by a round table discussion at which the chairmen of the different sessions, assisted by experts, drew conclusions from their sessions and from the discussions, pointing up the problems which needed most urgently to be studied. This document contains the texts, in their original versions, of the papers presented at the meetings, together with the minutes of the

  20. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Jayasri

    1996-01-01

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  1. The survey of the surface doses of the dental x-ray machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variability of doses with same exposure parameters and evaluate radiographic density according to the variability of doses. Twenty-eight MAX-GLS (Shinhung Co, Seoul, Korea), twenty-one D-60-S (DongSeo Med, Seoul, Korea), and eleven REX-601 (Yoshida Dental MFG, Tokyo, Japan) dental x-ray machines were selected for this study. Surface doses were measured under selected combinations of tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, and constant distance 42 cm from the focal spot to the surface of the Multi-O-meter (Unfors Instrument, Billdal, Sweden). Radiographic densities were measured on the films at maximum, minimum and mean surface doses of each brand of x-ray units. With MAX-GLS, the maximum surface doses were thirteen to fourteen times as much as the minimum surfaces doses. With D-60-S, the maximum surface doses were three to eight times as much as the minimum surface doses. With REX-601, the maximum surface doses were six to ten times as much as the minimum surface doses. The differences in radiographic densities among maximum, mean, and minimum doses were significant (p<0.01). The surface exposure doses of each x-ray machine at the same exposure parameters were different within the same manufacturer's machines.

  2. Genetic effects of low x-ray doses. Progress report, October 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Meyer, H.U.

    1976-09-01

    Experiments on dose-kinetics of x-ray induced sexlinked lethal mutations in Drosophila oogonia were continued. A wide range of doses was tested, with special emphasis on the low-dose range (20 to 500R). This year more data were added for O R, 200, 500, 1500R and some high doses. Oogonia of adult females were irradiated, and only one daughter from each experimental parent-female was analyzed for a new lethal in her maternal X-chromosome. Thus no clusters of mutations of identical origin are encountered. The extensive accumulated data do not support the linearity principle, firmly established for recessive mutations induced in mature spermatozoa for high doses down to very low x-ray doses. A mathematical model describing the mutational yield is included that suggests that recessive mutations, like chromosome aberrations, result from both one-track and two-track events, with the latter playing an increasingly important role at higher doses

  3. Magnitudes and units in the X-ray dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar M, V. M.; Cejudo A, J.; Vergara M, F.

    2009-10-01

    The dosimetry objective in the radiological image is the quantification from the exposition to the radiation with a commitment of optimizing the image quality to the reason of the absorbed dose. The dosimetry has the meaning of avoiding excessive dose that could imply a significant risk of deterministic effects induction. The dosimetric magnitudes and dosimetry protocols in the radiological image, are those that are related to the risks for the patient. Exist in diagnostic radiology two fundamentals reason to measure or to estimate the patient radiation dose. First, the mensurations are a means to verify the good practices and an aid to the optimization of the patient protection. Second, the absorbed dose estimation to tissues and organs in the patient are necessary to determine the risks, and this way to indicate that the radiological techniques employees can be justified and in investigated cases of over exposition. (Author)

  4. Low-dose multiple-information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentian; Huang Zhifeng; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Jiang Xiaolei; Kang Kejun; Yin Hongxia; Wang Zhenchang; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The present work proposes a low dose information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based multiple-information imaging (GB-MII) method, which can retrieve the attenuation, refraction and scattering information of samples by only three images. This algorithm aims at reducing the exposure time and the doses delivered to the sample. The multiple-information retrieval problem in GB-MII is solved by transforming a nonlinear equations set to a linear equations and adopting the nature of the trigonometric functions. The proposed algorithm is validated by experiments both on conventional X-ray source and synchrotron X-ray source, and compared with the traditional multiple-image-based retrieval algorithm. The experimental results show that our algorithm is comparable with the traditional retrieval algorithm and especially suitable for high Signal-to-Noise system.

  5. Patient and population doses of x-ray diagnostics in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannikko, S; Karila, K T.K.; Toivonen, M

    1997-09-01

    Periodic surveys of patient and population doses are important because of the large contribution of x-ray diagnostics to the artificial population dose. Measured entrance surface doses and dose-area products are the main quantities used for monitoring patient doses in hospitals, and most population dose studies have been derived from these quantities and from the frequences of x-ray examinations. This study is based on the radiation, exposure geometry, and patient parameters recorded by experienced radiographers and postgraduated students. The software used in the work (ODS-60 of Rados Technology) suits the determination of effective and organ doses from such detailed data using a human-like patient phantom which can be adapted for sex and size. The program, together with the very detailed input data, made it possible to determine organ equivalent and effective doses for complicated dynamic x-ray examinations and interventions in more detail than in previous studies. Collective organ and effective doses were derived for 50 examination types. The annual collective dose from diagnostic x-ray examinations in 1994 was 0.5 mSv per capita in Finland. The five groups of examinations or examinations that had greatest contributions to the collective dose were CT, barium enema: double contrast, lumbar spine, carotid angiography, and intestinal transit. Together they represented for about 60 % of the total dose. The highest dose-area products (about 2000 Gy cm{sup 2}) were obtained from certain angiographic and interventional examinations. A literature survey showed that Finland patient doses are at the same average level as in other countries of a high standard of health care. (orig.). 125 refs.

  6. Patient and population doses of x-ray diagnostics in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannikko, S.; Karila, K.T.K.; Toivonen, M.

    1997-09-01

    Periodic surveys of patient and population doses are important because of the large contribution of x-ray diagnostics to the artificial population dose. Measured entrance surface doses and dose-area products are the main quantities used for monitoring patient doses in hospitals, and most population dose studies have been derived from these quantities and from the frequences of x-ray examinations. This study is based on the radiation, exposure geometry, and patient parameters recorded by experienced radiographers and postgraduated students. The software used in the work (ODS-60 of Rados Technology) suits the determination of effective and organ doses from such detailed data using a human-like patient phantom which can be adapted for sex and size. The program, together with the very detailed input data, made it possible to determine organ equivalent and effective doses for complicated dynamic x-ray examinations and interventions in more detail than in previous studies. Collective organ and effective doses were derived for 50 examination types. The annual collective dose from diagnostic x-ray examinations in 1994 was 0.5 mSv per capita in Finland. The five groups of examinations or examinations that had greatest contributions to the collective dose were CT, barium enema: double contrast, lumbar spine, carotid angiography, and intestinal transit. Together they represented for about 60 % of the total dose. The highest dose-area products (about 2000 Gy cm 2 ) were obtained from certain angiographic and interventional examinations. A literature survey showed that Finland patient doses are at the same average level as in other countries of a high standard of health care. (orig.)

  7. X-ray dose training: are we exposed to enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, K.; Vivian, G.; Steel, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study knowledge of radiation exposure among doctors of various grades and specialties in a large district general hospital. METHODS: A multiple-choice format questionnaire with a total of 11 questions was distributed amongst doctors at Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK. Doctors of various grades and specialties completed 240 questionnaires which tested knowledge of terrestrial and medical radiation exposure. RESULTS: With a pass mark of only 45% and a generous marking scheme, only 66 (27.5%) doctors passed. Only 15.4-25.8% of doctors knew the doses relative to a chest radiograph of various more complex procedures involving ionizing radiation and only 12.5% of doctors were aware of the one in 2000 risk of induction of fatal carcinoma from CT of the abdomen. Only 56.7% of practitioners who, under Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposures) Regulations 2000, have responsibility for justifying procedures, passed the test. The proportion of practitioners correctly identifying the relative dose of a test to a chest radiograph varied from 30 to 56.7%, depending on the exam type. Only 20% in this group were aware of the risk of inducing a fatal cancer from a CT of the abdomen. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated an urgent need to improve knowledge of radiation exposure amongst doctors in clinical practice

  8. Retrospective Dose Reconstruction for Medical Diagnostic X Ray Workers in China using Stable Chromosome Aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Li, J.; Wang, Q.; Tang, S.; Sun, M.; Wang, L.; Aoyama, T.; Sugahara, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chromosome rearrangements in medical diagnostic X ray workers were analysed using the G-banding technique and evaluated collectively in accumulated doses. A total of 9102 metaphase spreads from 84 medical diagnostic X ray workers and 17 controls were scored. The results showed that: (1) the frequencies of translocation, stable chromosome aberration and total aberration in X ray workers were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.05 γ 0.005), unstable chromosome aberrations (including dicentric and acentric aberration) tended upwards; (2) the main aberration in stable aberrations was reciprocal translocation; (3) the stable aberration predominated strikingly in total aberrations. The medical diagnostic X ray workers were divided into three groups according to calendar year of entry. The data showed that the frequencies of translocation, stable aberration and total aberration increased with earlier year of entry, especially in two groups who started working before 1970. According to the equation recommended by Straume et al, linear coefficient (α) in the linear quadratic model provided by Fernandez's experiment, their collective accumulation doses calculated were 0.53, 0.26 and 0.06 Gy for calendar year of entry before 1960, 1960-1969, and after 1970, in X ray workers, respectively. (author)

  9. MONITORING OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES FOR MEDICAL WORKERS OF DENTAL POLYCLINIC’S X-RAY ROOMS IN DUSHANBE, THE REPUBLIC OF TADJIKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Hakimova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data and analyses of personnel’s average annual external exposure doses monitoring via the thermoluminescent dosimetry method used for X-ray radiological personnel in dental polyclinics of Dushanbe, Tadjikistan Republic over a 5-year period ( 2010–2014 . Out of 42 registered medical institutions dental polyclinics amounted up to only just 14%. For this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used ( with LiF: Mg, Ti with the thermoluminescent dosimetric installation “ Harshaw – 4500” as the reader device. Monitoring results comparison of individual dose equivalent Hp ( 10 values was conducted for two groups of medical workers: medical doctors and X-ray lab technicians. It is demonstrated that radiological technicians’ professional exposure doses are on the average by 23% higher than those for medical doctors.The average individual exposure doses over the above indicated period amount to 0,93 mSv and 1,3 mSv for doctors and X-ray lab technicians, respectively, and are in the range from 0,45 mSv to 2,39 mSv. The doses include contribution from the natural background. The values of doses recorded for the personnel in dental polyclinic correspond to those recorded for the workers in the routine X-ray rooms.

  10. Dose reduction by x-ray beam filtration in screen-film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koedooder, C.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical aspects of dose reduction by x-ray beam filtration in screen-film radiography. The thesis deals mainly with dose reduction under the constraint of constant image quality; an analytical approach is chosen. Therefore, part of the thesis deals with the development of an algorithm to calculate patient dose and exposure for different filter materials and different tube load conditions, under the constraint of constant contrast and constant optical density. (Auth.)

  11. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Michael W.M.; Dearnley, Megan K.; Riessen, Grant A. van; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Tilley, Leann

    2014-01-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging

  12. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W.M., E-mail: michael.jones@latrobe.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Dearnley, Megan K. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Riessen, Grant A. van [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Abbey, Brian [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Putkunz, Corey T. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Junker, Mark D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Vine, David J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Centre for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nugent, Keith A. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Tilley, Leann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging.

  13. Entrance skin dose on patients undergoing X-ray examinations at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    survey was conducted on the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) in patients undergoing X-ray examinations [Skull Postero-Anterior (PA), Skull Lateral (LAT), Chest Postero-Anterior (PA), Chest Lateral (LAT), Abdomen Antero-Posterior (AP) and Pelvis Antero-Posterior (AP)] in five hospitals/Xray centres in Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria ...

  14. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  15. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  16. Differential dose albedo for high-energy X-rays on concrete slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    We computed the differential dose albedo (α D ) for high-energy X-rays on a concrete slab when the incident angle, reflection angle, and azimuth angle were changed, by means of Monte Carlo simulation. We found that α D changed with incident, reflection, and azimuth angles to the concrete slab. On the whole, the larger the incident angle, the larger α D tended to become. If the incident angle and reflection angle were the same, the larger the azimuth angle, the smaller α D tended to become. When the incident, reflection, and azimuth angles were the same, the smaller the X-ray energy was, the larger α D became, in the order of 10 MV, 6 MV, and 4 MV X-rays. (author)

  17. Dose corrections for field obliquity for 45-MV x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Clanton, A.; Downes, B.; Nuskind, J.

    1983-01-01

    The degree of dose perturbation produced by a 25.7-cm-diam circular water phantom was determined for a 45-MV x-ray beam by direct measurement. Data obtained in a circular and a cubical water phantom was utilized to test three accepted techniques (isodose shift, TAR method, and effective SSD method) for the correction of isodose levels to account for patient curvature. In general, the effective SSD method yielded the most accurate results for all depth including the buildup region. An isodose shift factor of 0.8 was found for the 45-MV x-ray beam. Key words: curvature corrections, 45-MV x ray, isodose shift, TAR, effective SSD method

  18. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  19. Radiation doses to patients from x-ray examinations - development from 2005 to 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, Wolfram; Almen, Anja

    2010-04-01

    Data has been compiled and analyzed and compared with the earlier reports. Radiation doses were tested for possible links with various parameters (eg type of x-ray equipment, image recording systems, different technique factors). In conventional x-ray examinations radiation doses were, for equipment with direct digital image receivers, in average 30% lower than for those with photo plates. Mammography doses were, with one exception, the same for all types of equipment and video receivers. The CT-examinations had a small trend for higher doses for new equipment as compared to earlier. Use of exposure automation did not affect radiation doses. Compared with 2006, the doses of conventional surveys decreased by an average of 21%. One third of this dose reduction can be attributed the introduction of direct digital system whose use grew by about 30%. Most of the dose reduction can be attributed to the actions carried out to lower the dose of the reference level. Doses for the CT scan showed only a weak downwards trend. Mammography Doses decreased by an average of just over 10% a large part dependent on increased number of Sectra equipment. The system of diagnostic reference levels have again shown to have positive influence on the radiation level at the x-ray examinations, this is most pronounced for conventional radiography. There is still a large potential for dose reduction, and a measure to achieve this is to reduce the current reference levels. Very few diagnostic Standard doses are higher than the reference level. A reduction of the reference levels corresponding to the third quartile of dose distribution could lead further dose decrease of 10-20%. The corresponding reduction in dose should be done also for the DT and mammograms when lowering the reference level, there are few standard doses higher than the current reference levels

  20. Calculation of organ doses in X-ray examinations of premature babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, K.

    2009-01-01

    As ionizing radiation has enabled great progress in the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of medicine, its use is in most cases easily justifiable. General radiation protection principles require additionally that radiation doses of the patients should be as low as reasonably achievable within the medical purposes. In Europe this is stipulated in the directive 97/43/Euratom. This directive also requires that special attention should be given to the patient doses in pediatric examinations, of which premature babies constitute an important sub-group. All babies born before 37 weeks of gestation are defined as being prematurely born. Newborn and prematurely born babies are particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of X-rays. Risk of cancer induction is believed to be 2 to 3 times higher than that of the average population and 6 to 9 times higher than the risk from an exposure at 60 years of age, for equal dose. A premature born child may be exposed to a large number of diagnostic X-ray examinations. Several of these infants may have underdeveloped lungs, which may lead directly to the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or to (lethal) lunghypoplasia/hypertension. Diagnosis and follow-up of the respiratory distress syndrome by means of chest radiography is justified. Risks associated with X-ray examinations are low compared to the other medical risks that these patients face, but even in this case the radiation dose should be kept as low as possible. Knowledge of the radiation dose is a first step in the optimization process. A recent study on 255 premature children in the University Hospital of Gasthuisberg found that they undergo 10 X-ray examinations, on the average. In this sample, the maximum was 78 X-ray examinations

  1. X-ray conditions and response characteristics of automatic dose control in cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Hiroaki

    1997-01-01

    X-ray characteristics including subject thickness (copper plate), tube voltage, tube current and irradiation time were measured at stability, with an automatic dose control x-ray generator for cineangiography. Regardless of subject thickness, it is possible that the energy input to the x-ray tube in one frame may be decreased. The automatic control response was measured after rapid fluctuation in subject thickness. Two inverter-type x-ray generators with different automatic control units were studied. The older control unit changes exposure dose by tube voltage and tube current, while the newer one changes exposure dose by tube voltage, tube current and irradiation time. The maximum rate of change in tube voltage is greater with the newer control unit. In addition, the actual tube current response of the newer control unit in increasing nominal value is faster than the older one. In the new control unit, for each pulse, irradiation is cut off by means of a signal that the exposure has reached the proper value. Thus given the same differential in subject thickness, the newer control unit resumed stability faster than the older one. (author)

  2. X-ray conditions and response characteristics of automatic dose control in cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Hiroaki [Cardiovascular Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    X-ray characteristics including subject thickness (copper plate), tube voltage, tube current and irradiation time were measured at stability, with an automatic dose control x-ray generator for cineangiography. Regardless of subject thickness, it is possible that the energy input to the x-ray tube in one frame may be decreased. The automatic control response was measured after rapid fluctuation in subject thickness. Two inverter-type x-ray generators with different automatic control units were studied. The older control unit changes exposure dose by tube voltage and tube current, while the newer one changes exposure dose by tube voltage, tube current and irradiation time. The maximum rate of change in tube voltage is greater with the newer control unit. In addition, the actual tube current response of the newer control unit in increasing nominal value is faster than the older one. In the new control unit, for each pulse, irradiation is cut off by means of a signal that the exposure has reached the proper value. Thus given the same differential in subject thickness, the newer control unit resumed stability faster than the older one. (author)

  3. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 {mu}Gy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry.

  4. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 μGy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry

  5. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  6. A study of gonad doses in X-ray radiographic examinations of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A phantom study has been made in an attempt to redetermine gonad dose associated with routine X-ray diagnostic procedures. Over a range of voltages between 60 kVp and 130 kVp, TLD measurements of skin, ovary, a standardised cassette dose of 1 mrad, and testicle doses were obtained for AP, PA and lateral radiographs. Whilst exact numerical results depended greatly on the characteristics of the film-screen combination used, the contrast required in the final radiograph and the efficiency of the Bucky grid, results of this redetermination did not support the view that a reduction in population genetic dose would follow any general increase in the typical operating potential used for abdominal x-ray examinations. (U.K.)

  7. Effect of low X-ray dose irradiation on properties triglycine sulfate doped by chromium

    CERN Document Server

    Kamysheva, L N; Golitsyna, O M

    2002-01-01

    One studied effect of X-ray low dose on pulse re-polarization in triglycine sulfate crystals (TGS) with various concentration of chromium ions. It is shown that within 20.0 deg C-T sub c temperature range alpha activation field values depend unambiguously on radiation dose for various polarity switching current pulses. One detected decrease of unipolarity of TGS crystal caused by chromium ions due to interaction of radiation defects with impurity ones

  8. A study of changes in the primary dose penetrating the protective apron on SID in x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to figure out the amount of primary X-ray generated in SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m penetrating protective aprons in X-ray radiography for hands, skull, and lumbar spine. Results are as follows: Firstly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is low such as that of hand X-ray may be reduced by 270 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still slightly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Secondly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is moderate such as that of skull X-ray may be reduced by 22 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still fairly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Thirdly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is very high such as that of lumbar spine X-ray may be reduced b y 13 times if protective aprons a re worn, but it still penetrates a lot 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Therefore, people in X-ray room should not only wear protective aprons at any spaces that the primary X-ray can reach, but also need to stand behind the thick Pb shield to protect the body if it is inevitable to stay in the room

  9. A study of changes in the primary dose penetrating the protective apron on SID in x-ray radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong Kwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study is to figure out the amount of primary X-ray generated in SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m penetrating protective aprons in X-ray radiography for hands, skull, and lumbar spine. Results are as follows: Firstly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is low such as that of hand X-ray may be reduced by 270 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still slightly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Secondly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is moderate such as that of skull X-ray may be reduced by 22 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still fairly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Thirdly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is very high such as that of lumbar spine X-ray may be reduced b y 13 times if protective aprons a re worn, but it still penetrates a lot 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Therefore, people in X-ray room should not only wear protective aprons at any spaces that the primary X-ray can reach, but also need to stand behind the thick Pb shield to protect the body if it is inevitable to stay in the room.

  10. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-01

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width ΔE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As ΔE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For ΔE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d max . Although increasing ΔE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d max by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude. (note)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation on hard X-ray dose produced in interaction between high intensity laser and solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Qiu Rui; Li Junli; Zhang Hui

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray dose produced in the interaction between high intensity laser and solid target was studied by simulation using Monte Carlo code. Compared with experimental results, the calculation model was verified. The calculation model was used to study the effect on X-ray dose with different electron temperatures, target materials (including Au, Cu and PE) and thicknesses. The results indicate that the X-ray dose is mainly determined by the electron temperature, and will be affected by the target parameters. X-ray dose of Au is about 1.2 times that of Cu, and is about 5 times that of PE (polyethylene). In addition, compared with other target thickness, when target thickness is the mean range of electron in the target, X-ray dose is relatively large. These results will provide references on evaluating the ionizing radiation dose for laser devices. (authors)

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography using MCNP4C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ay, M R [Department of Physics and Nuclear Sciences, AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahriari, M [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, S [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Adib, M [TPP Co., GE Medical Systems, Iran Authorized Distributor, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zaidi, H [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2004-11-07

    The general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C) was used for the simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography. The electrons were transported until they slow down and stop in the target. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were considered in this work. We focus on the simulation of various target/filter combinations to investigate the effect of tube voltage, target material and filter thickness on x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges. The simulated x-ray spectra were compared with experimental measurements and spectra calculated by IPEM report number 78. In addition, the anode heel effect and off-axis x-ray spectra were assessed for different anode angles and target materials and the results were compared with EGS4-based Monte Carlo simulations and measured data. Quantitative evaluation of the differences between our Monte Carlo simulated and comparison spectra was performed using student's t-test statistical analysis. Generally, there is a good agreement between the simulated x-ray and comparison spectra, although there are systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra especially in the K-characteristic x-rays intensity. Nevertheless, no statistically significant differences have been observed between IPEM spectra and the simulated spectra. It has been shown that the difference between MCNP simulated spectra and IPEM spectra in the low energy range is the result of the overestimation of characteristic photons following the normalization procedure. The transmission curves produced by MCNP4C have good agreement with the IPEM report especially for tube voltages of 50 kV and 80 kV. The systematic discrepancy for higher tube voltages is the result of systematic differences between the corresponding spectra.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography using MCNP4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, M. R.; Shahriari, M.; Sarkar, S.; Adib, M.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-11-01

    The general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C) was used for the simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography. The electrons were transported until they slow down and stop in the target. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were considered in this work. We focus on the simulation of various target/filter combinations to investigate the effect of tube voltage, target material and filter thickness on x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges. The simulated x-ray spectra were compared with experimental measurements and spectra calculated by IPEM report number 78. In addition, the anode heel effect and off-axis x-ray spectra were assessed for different anode angles and target materials and the results were compared with EGS4-based Monte Carlo simulations and measured data. Quantitative evaluation of the differences between our Monte Carlo simulated and comparison spectra was performed using student's t-test statistical analysis. Generally, there is a good agreement between the simulated x-ray and comparison spectra, although there are systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra especially in the K-characteristic x-rays intensity. Nevertheless, no statistically significant differences have been observed between IPEM spectra and the simulated spectra. It has been shown that the difference between MCNP simulated spectra and IPEM spectra in the low energy range is the result of the overestimation of characteristic photons following the normalization procedure. The transmission curves produced by MCNP4C have good agreement with the IPEM report especially for tube voltages of 50 kV and 80 kV. The systematic discrepancy for higher tube voltages is the result of systematic differences between the corresponding spectra.

  15. A Computer Program Method for Estimation of Entrance Skin Dose for some Individuals Undergoing X-ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Allehyani, S.

    2012-01-01

    A computer program depends on practical measurements of entrance skin dose patients undergoing radiological examinations. Physical parameters such as field size, half value layer, backscatter factor, dose output, focal film distance, focal skin distance, normal operating conditions were taken into consideration for calculation entrance skin dose. It was measured by many techniques such as Thermo-luminescence dosimeters, ionization chambers. TLD technique characterized by high precision and reproducibility of dose measurement is checked by addressing pre-readout annealing, group sorting, dose evaluation, Fifty TLD chips were annealed for 1 hour at 400 degree C followed by 2 h at 100 degree C. After exposure to constant dose from X-ray generator. 0.6 cc Ionization chamber was located at surface of water chest phantom that has dimensions of 40 cm x 40 cm x 20 cm and connected with farmer dose master. Entrance Skin Dose was calculated using the generated software by changing the physical parameters and using the measured output doses. The obtained results were compared with the reference levels of International Atomic Energy Authority. The constructed computer program provides an easy and more practical mean of estimating skin dose even before exposure. They also provide the easiest and cheapest technique can be employed in any entrance skin dose measurement

  16. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R. G.; Lozano, E.; Valente, M.

    2013-01-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  17. Assessment of dose to patients undergoing computed radiography and film screen x-ray examinations in some Khartoum Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Khair, Haiffa Daffa Allah Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Medical ionizing radiation sources give by far the largest contribution to the population dose from man made sources and most of the contribution comes from diagnostic x-rays. The optimization principle of radiation protection requires the minimization of radiation dose to patients while acquiring diagnostic quality images in radiology. In radiography, the extent of patient dose reduction is limited by the characteristics of the system used and the quality (or penetrating ability) of the x-ray beam. In this study, the entrance surface air kerma doses (ESA Ks) to patients undergoing 7 selected x-ray examinations were estimated. The study was conducted in eight hospitals in Khartoum State, comprising nine x-ray units and a total of 1200 patients were involved. Four of the hospitals involved in this study use computed radiography (CR) technology while the other four use film screen (FS) technology. The selected examinations were, abdomen (AP), chest (PA), pelvis (AP), skull (AP/PA), skull (LAT), thoracic spine (AP) and thoracic spine (LAT). The entrance surface air kerma was calculated by two methods, utilizing software CAL Dose X-3.5 and a mathematical model. Average ESAK values calculated using the two methods for hospitals using (CR) technology in mGy were 2.99 and 2.98, 0.34 and 0.31, 2.79 and 2.58, 0.76 and 0.71, 0.94 and 0.79, 3.4 and 3,2 and 5.9 and 5.03, for the above mentioned selected investigations respectively. And average ESAK values calculated using two methods for hospital using FS technology in mGy were found 4.98 and 4.19, 0.37 and 0.34, 4.15 and 3.95, 2.2 and 2. 1.3 and 1.1, 3.9 and 3.9, 9.4 and 8.3 for the above mentioned selected investigations respectively. Average ESAK values obtained by two methods for FS were higher values than the obtained by CR by 37 and 29%, 50 and 25%, 8%, 32 and 34%, 65 and 64%, 27 and 28%, 12% and 73% and 39% for the above mentioned selected investigations, respectively. This shows that CR technique allows diagnostically

  18. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18x7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186±8 mm and 147±8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209±40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of ∼60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is ∼20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors

  19. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kVp to 125 kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    1997-01-01

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the K air and Φ to H * (d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author)

  20. Response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, L.

    1982-01-01

    The response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays was studied by the yields of dicentrics in first division metaphases. For both species, the dose-response curve was best fitted to the linear-quadratic model with a linear component predominating up to 67 and 42 rad respectively for man and rabbit. A calibration curve (5-400 rad) was obtained by combining the present results on man with previous data at higher doses. On the other hand, it appears that, at low doses, the radiosentivity of human lymphocytes is significantly higher than that of rabbit lymphocytes [fr

  1. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  4. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R

    2006-06-07

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  5. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic (registered) XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R [Struttura Complessa fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Corso Bramante 88, 10126 Turin (Italy)

    2006-06-07

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic (registered) films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  6. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk; Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Munro, P. R. T. [Optical + Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia and Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation, and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  7. Division delay after low x-ray doses and treatment with cyclohexionide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiderman, M.H.; Braby, L.A.; Roesch, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation-induced division delay of Chinese hamster ovary cells located in G 2 , and in G 2 between the cycloheximide and x-ray transition points, was measured by the mitotic cell selection technique. The mitotic yield (number of mitotic cells after treatment expressed as a fraction of the control) decreased with increasing radiation dose (4.5 to 34 rad). However, either because some cells were not delayed or because delayed cells recovered rapidly, the mitotic yield did not fall to zero. When cycloheximide was combined with radiation to prevent repair of the radiation damage, only cells which were past the cycloheximide transition point and not delayed by the radiation were selected. The location of the transition points determined from the combined drug plus low-dose radiation (4.5 to 34 rad) experiments indicate a dose-dependent relationship, with more cells delayed as the dose was increased. In addition, the transition point for cells treated with cycloheximide plus 150 rad of x rays was closer to division than the 150 rad of x rays alone. These results are discussed in light of a recent model for radiation-induced division delay proposed by Dewey and Highfield

  8. Optimizing abdominal CT dose and image quality with respect to x-ray tube voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the x-ray tube voltage that results in optimum performance for abdominal CT imaging for a range of imaging tasks and patient sizes. Theoretical calculations were performed of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for disk shaped lesions of muscle, fat, bone and iodine embedded in a uniform water background. Lesion contrast was the mean Hounsfield Unit value at the effective photon energy, and image noise was determined from the total radiation intensity incident on the CT x-ray detector. Patient size ranging from young infants (10 kg) to oversized adults (120 kg), with CNR values obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Patients of varying sizes were modeled as an equivalent cylinder of water, and the mean section dose (D) was determined for each selected x-ray tube kV value at a constant mAs. For each patient size and lesion type, we identified an optimal kV as the x-ray tube voltage that yields a maximum value of the figure of merit (CNR2/D). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV reduced lesion contrast by 11% for muscle, 21% for fat, 35% for bone and 52% for iodine, and these reductions were approximately independent of patient size. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased a muscle lesion CNR relative to a uniform water background by a factor of 2.6, with similar trends observed for fat (2.3), bone (1.9) and iodine (1.4). The improvement in lesion CNR with increasing x-ray tube voltage was highest for the largest sized patients. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the patient dose by a factor of between 5.0 and 6.2 depending on the patient size. For small sized patients (10 and 30 kg) and muscle lesions, best performance is obtained at 80 kV; however, for adults (70 kg) and oversized adults (120 kg), the best performance would be obtained at 140 kV. Imaging fat lesions was best performed at 80 kV for all patients except for oversized adults

  9. A nanovehicle developed for treating deep-seated bacteria using low-dose X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Lin; Chen, Ming-Hong; Tung, Fu-I; Liu, Tse-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Many non-antibiotic strategies, such as photocatalysis and photodynamic therapy, have been proposed to inhibit and/or kill bacteria. However, these approaches still have drawbacks such as insufficient bacterial specificity and the limited penetration depth of ultraviolet and near-infrared light. To overcome these limitations, we developed a bacteria-specific anti-bacterial technique via using low-dose X-ray. Graphene oxide quantum dots (GQDs, a multifunctional vehicle) conjugated with vancomycin (Van, a bacteria-targeting ligand) were assembled with Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a photo/radiation sensitizer) to yield a novel Van-GQDs/PpIX complex that specifically attached to Escherichia coli and efficiently generated intracellular reactive oxygen species following X-ray activation. Delivery using GQDs increased the PpIX/Van ratio in the target bacterial cell, damaged bacterial cell wall, and enhanced X-ray-induced PpIX activation. Hence, this approach allowed for the use of a low-dose X-ray to efficiently activate the Van-GQDs/PpIX complex to exert its bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli without damaging normal cells. Furthermore, the E. coli did not develop resistance to the proposed approach for at least 7 rounds of repeated administration during one week. Thus, this proposed vehicle exhibiting bacteria-specific X-ray-triggered toxicity is a promising alternative to antibiotics for treating serious bacterial infections occurring in deep-seated tissues/organs (e.g., osteomyelitis and peritonitis). Administration of antibiotics is the most common treatment modality for bacterial infections. However, in some cases, patient attributes such as age, health, tolerance to antibiotics do not allow for the use of high-dose antibiotics. In addition, some bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics because of improper and long-term use of these agents. Therefore, non-antibiotic strategies to treat deeply situated bacterial infections, such as osteomyelitis, are urgently

  10. Analysis of patients' X-ray exposure in 146 percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies; Analyse der Strahlenexposition fuer Patienten bei 146 perkutanen radiologischen Gastrostomien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael [Univ. Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    Analysis of patient's X-ray exposure during percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies (PRG) in a larger population. Data of primary successful PRG-procedures, performed between 2004 and 2015 in 146 patients, were analyzed regarding the exposition to X-ray. Dose-area-product (DAP), dose-length-product (DLP) respectively, and fluoroscopy time (FT) were correlated with the used x-ray systems (Flatpanel Detector (FD) vs. Image Itensifier (BV)) and the necessity for periprocedural placement of a nasogastric tube. Additionally, the effective X-ray dose for PRG placement using fluoroscopy (DL), computed tomography (CT), and cone beam CT (CBCT) was estimated using a conversion factor. The median DFP of PRG-placements under fluoroscopy was 163 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2} (flat panel detector systems: 155 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}; X-ray image intensifier: 175 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}). The median DLZ was 2.2min. Intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe (n=68) resulted in a significant prolongation of the median DLZ to 2.5min versus 2min in patients with an already existing probe. In addition, dose values were analyzed in smaller samples of patients in which the PRG was placed under CBCT (n=7, median DFP=2635 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}), or using CT (n=4, median DLP=657mGy{sup *}cm). Estimates of the median DFP and DLP showed effective doses of 0.3mSv for DL-assisted placements (flat panel detector 0.3mSv, X-ray image converter 0.4mSv), 7.9mSv using a CBCT - flat detector, and 9.9mSv using CT. This corresponds to a factor 26 of DL versus CBCT, or a factor 33 of DL versus CT. In order to minimize X-ray exposure during PRG-procedures for patients and staff, fluoroscopically-guided interventions should employ flat detector systems with short transmittance sequences in low dose mode and with slow image frequency. Series recordings can be dispensed with. The intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe significantly extends FT, but has little effect on the overall dose of the

  11. Absorbed dose determination in water in medium energy x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisevic, G.; Spasic-Jokic, V.

    1998-01-01

    Absorbed dose determination in water phantom in medium energy X-ray beam, according to IAEA recommendations is given. This method is applied on Radiotherapy department of Military Academy Hospital in Belgrade. Reference points of measurements are on depth of 5 cm and 2 cm as it recommended in ref. Experimental results are shown in aim to introduce new dosimetric concept based on air kerma calibration factor recommended for application in our radiotherapy centers (author)

  12. Regularity of wound healing in rats irradiated locally with different doses of soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianzhong; Zhou Yuanguo; Cheng Tianmin; Zhou Ping; Liu Xia; Li Ping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the regular patter of wound healing in rats irradiated locally with different doses of soft X-rays. Methods: Rats were locally irradiated, and wounded immediately thereafter. Gross observation, histopathology and immunohistochemistry examinations, and image analysis were used to study the wound healing process. Results: The authors found that the delayed time of wound healing induced by soft X-ray irradiation of 0.50, 1.01, 1.96, 3,26, 4.00, 5.21 Gy was 1.6, 4.2, 5.4, 6.6, 8.2 and 9.4 days, respectively. Irradiation with 7.0 and 10.0 Gy caused failure of wound healing (up to 40 days). Compared to the non-irradiated wounds, the healing rates of irradiation-impaired wounds were lower during the whole healing process. From day 3 to day 9 after irradiation, the healing rates decreased along with increasing of the radiation dose, indicating the key phase of wound healing was delayed. After irradiation, the collagen synthesis was decreased, its arrangement was disordered, and the structure of granulation tissue was irregular. Conclusion: Soft X-rays irradiation may cause a delay of wound healing in a dose-dependent manner, and irradiation with 7.0 and 10.0 Gy cause failure of wound healing

  13. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  14. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, F.R.A. [Centro regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Rua Conego Barata, 999, Tamarineira, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J. [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, DEN/UFPE, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  15. Genetic effects of low x-ray doses. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Meyer, H.U.

    1977-09-01

    A linear-quadratic model of dose-kinetics is proposed for x-ray induced recessive lethal mutations in oogonia of Drosophila. From this it should follow that at higher total doses fractionation treatments should give a lower yield of mutations than an equivalent acute exposure. A dose of 6000 R, given acutely and in 3 different fractionation regimes gave results in the expected direction for 2 x 3000 R, and a significant decrease for 3 x 2000 R and for 4 x 1500 R fractionations

  16. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  17. Surface dose of X rays to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Qingqi; Weng Zhigeng; Feng Ming; Wang Guomin.

    1990-01-01

    During extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), the fluoroscopy must be made to show the location and size of the stone thus the patient has to be exposed to X rays. The surface dose to patients during ESWL was measured in an investigation on 134 cases of renal lithiasis admitted in a certain hospital of Shanghai. The results show that the average skin dose equivalent for these patients was 162 mSv and the magnitude of doses was depended upon some factors such as the size and location of the stone

  18. Implementation of a patient dose monitoring system in conventional digital X-ray imaging: initial experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmaier, Christina; Zuber, Niklaus; Weishaupt, Dominik [Stadtspital Triemli Zurich, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose was to report on the initial experience after implementation of a patient dose-monitoring system in conventional X-ray imaging. A dose-monitoring system collected dose data relating to different radiographs (one projection) and studies (two or more projections). Images were acquired on digital X-ray systems equipped with flat-panel detectors. During period 1, examinations were performed in a routine fashion in 12,614 patients. After period 1, technical modifications were performed and radiographers underwent training in radiation protection. During period 2, examinations were performed in 14,514 patients, and the radiographers were advised to read dose data after each radiograph/study. Dose data were compared by means of kerma area product (KAP, gray x centimetre squared) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK, milligray). During period 1, 13,955 radiographs and 8,466 studies were performed, and in period 2 16,090 radiographs and 10,389 studies. In period 2, KAP values for radiographs were an average of 25 % lower and for studies 7 % lower, and ESAK values for radiographs were 24 % lower and for studies 5 % lower. The reduction in KAP was significant in 8/13 radiographs and in 6/14 studies, and the reduction in ESAK was significant in 6/13 radiographs and 5/14 studies. Implementation of a patient dose-monitoring system in conventional X-ray imaging allows easy data collection, supports dose reduction efforts, and may increase radiographers' dose awareness. (orig.)

  19. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  20. A model of parametric X-ray radiation for application to diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, G.; Cardarelli, P.; Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Taibi, A.; Comandini, A.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric X-ray Radiation (PXR) is well known as an intense, tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source. From the very first work of Ter-Mikaelian, who proposed the interaction phenomenon for Parametric X-rays many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated the characteristics of such a novel X-ray source. Within the framework of classical electrodynamics, we have thoroughly studied the physical implications of electrons moving through a medium at relativistic speed and then developed an analytical model of X-ray diffraction based on the PXR phenomenon. The model has been used to obtain information on the characteristics of PXR diffracted beam in terms of X-ray intensity, energy spectrum and angular distribution. Several crystals have been studied both in Bragg and Laue geometry and their relative yield has been compared. Preliminary results on the diagnostic potential of PXR have shown that, at a distance from the crystal which produces a size of the X-ray field useful for an imaging application, the photon yield of PXR is higher than that produced by a conventional X-ray tube, provided that a similar electron current is available.

  1. Radiation dose to the patient in several diagnostic X-ray examinations performed with conventional radiographic equipment in 3 major centers in Israel, a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Schlesinger, T.; Kushilevsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this survey we determined the effective dose to the patient in specific x-ray diagnostic procedures performed in the radiology Department and emergency rooms in 3 major hospitals (A, B, and C) in Israel. In each hospital we measured the dose area product (DAP) in a number of several major diagnostic procedures. In each hospital we carried out measurements in two X-ray departments (A1, A2. B1, B2, C1, C2). The DAP measurements were carried out using a Diamentor Dose Area Product meter (DAP). The entrance dose was obtained using calibration measurements relating the exposure at a reference distance to the imaging parameters (kVp, mAs, filtration and distance) that were recorded in the examinations. The results will be presented and compared to the reference international guidance values (authors)

  2. Radiation dose to the patient in several diagnostic X-ray examinations performed with conventional radiographic equipment in 3 major centers in Israel, a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Schlesinger, T [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center; Kushilevsky, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel) Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    In this survey we determined the effective dose to the patient in specific x-ray diagnostic procedures performed in the radiology Department and emergency rooms in 3 major hospitals (A, B, and C) in Israel. In each hospital we measured the dose area product (DAP) in a number of several major diagnostic procedures. In each hospital we carried out measurements in two X-ray departments (A1, A2. B1, B2, C1, C2). The DAP measurements were carried out using a Diamentor Dose Area Product meter (DAP). The entrance dose was obtained using calibration measurements relating the exposure at a reference distance to the imaging parameters (kVp, mAs, filtration and distance) that were recorded in the examinations. The results will be presented and compared to the reference international guidance values (authors).

  3. Toxicological and radiological safety of chicken meat irradiated with 7.5 MeV X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Ha-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Chang-Jong; Kang, Il-Jun

    2018-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicological and radiological safety of chicken meat that had been irradiated at 30 kGy with 7.5 MeV X-rays. In a sub-chronic toxicity study, ICR mice were fed X-ray-irradiated chicken meat at 2500 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days, and no mortality or abnormal clinical signs were observed throughout the study period. However, several hematological and serum biochemical parameters of the ICR mice differed significantly from those in the control group; nevertheless, the observed values were all within the normal range for the respective parameters. In addition, no toxicological effects were determined in male or female mice. Furthermore, no differences in gamma-ray spectrometric patterns were detected between the non-irradiated and irradiated samples, indicating that the radioactivity induced by 7.5 MeV X-ray irradiation was below the detection limit. These results tentatively suggest that chicken meat irradiated with 7.5 MeV X-rays would be safe for human consumption in terms of toxicology and radiology.

  4. Effect of low dose X-ray irradiation on apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) with different doses of X-rays on the apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of male Kunming mouse testes. The time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in the different stages of spermatogenic cell cycles of mouse testis after LDR with different doses of X-rays were studied with light microscope using the methods of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and HE staining. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR had a remarkable regularity in cell types. When the dose was 0.025 Gy, spermatogonium apoptosis was taken as main. With the dose increase of irradiation (0.025-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic rate of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after irradiation with low dose. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR has a regular change, which provides a further experimental evidence for the mechanism study of hormesis by LDR

  5. Scatter and transmission doses from several pediatric X-ray examinations in a nursery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, John W.; Rampant, Peter L.; Beeson, Brendan P.

    2003-01-01

    While several studies have investigated the dose from scattered radiation from X-ray procedures in a pediatric nursery, they examined scatter from chest procedures only, or the types of examination were not specified. The aim of this study was to collect scatter and transmission data from several types of X-ray examinations. Using a ''newborn'' anthropomorphic phantom and an ion chamber, a series of scatter and transmission dose measurements were performed using typical exposure factors for chest, chest and abdomen, skull, skeletal long bone and spine procedures. The phantom was inside a crib for all exposures. The maximum scatter dose measured at 1 m from the field center was about 0.05 μGy per exposure for lateral skulls. Transmission doses for lateral exams were around 0.1 μGy per exposure at 1 m from the isocenter. The study demonstrated that scatter dose to other patients in a neonatal unit is not significant, assuming the distance between adjacent cribs is in the order of 1 m. Transmission doses are also low provided the beam is fully intercepted by the cassette. For an average workload the dose received by imaging technologists would be small. (orig.)

  6. Effect Of Small Doses On THE Thymus In Pediatric Chest X - Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, Dj.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Anzic, S. A.; Zagar, I.

    2015-01-01

    The thymus, pyramid-shaped lymphoid organ is immediately beneath the breastbone at the level of the heart, therefore chest X-ray covers the position of thymus. The thymus is divided into two lobes, lying on either side of the midline of the body. Unlike most other lymphoid structures, the thymus grows rapidly and attains its greatest size relative to the rest of the body during fetal life and the first years after birth. The thymus is a specialized organ of the immune system. It has big responsibility helping the body protect itself against autoimmunity diseases. It is well known from literature data that thymus size reduced at radiotherapy irradiation. After many years of experience in X-ray chest diagnostics with children a fairly regular thymus size reduction after exposure to diagnostic low doses was noticed. Therefore it was analysed at what percentage of children patients their control radiograms would exhibit a thymus shade decrease compared to the primary image taken at the illness out-set. In the Children Hospital Srebrnjak in one year 1972 children in the age group 0 - 5 years underwent X-ray exam. In our earlier study at PA and profile projections of lung examinations of this age group 0.15 mSv and 0.11 mSv average doses were measured on the back and on the chest, respectively. From this group the radiograms of those 119 children were analysed who were exposed, according to medical indication, to control examinations. 58 of the investigated patients showed enlarged thymus at the first exam. It could be seen from the control radiogram that 52 children of these 58 patients had significant or discrete decrease in size of thymus. Taking into account that thymus has very important role in maturity of T-lymphocytes and development of immunology tolerance these empiric statements are important for radiation protection of children in X-ray diagnostic of chest. (author).

  7. The radiological protection in the practice of industrial X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez C, I.; Carrasco C, R.

    2010-09-01

    The kindness of this technique of non destructive assays is very appreciative when the protection standards and radiological protection are completed faithfully, this work show in a succinct way the development through the years where have improved the equipment s, the procedures, the training and the regulation. This development has allowed reduce the dose to the occupational exposed personnel, to the public, but mainly the accidents incidence with loss of fingers, hands, legs and worker lives, children and the people in general. (Author)

  8. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  9. Radiation doses from some common paediatric X-ray examinations in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Elshiekh, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation doses to patients from some common paediatric X-ray examinations were studied in three hospitals in Khartoum state (Sudan)). Entrance surface dose (ESD) was determined from exposure settings using DosCal software. Totally, 459 patients were included in this study. Mean ESDs obtained from anteroposterior projection for chest, skull, abdomen and pelvis for neonates falls in the range of 52-100, 115-169, 145-183, 204-242 μGy, respectively. For a 1-y-old infant, mean ESD range was 80-114, 153-202, 204-209, 181-264 μGy, respectively. Some doses for neonates and infants were exceeding the reference doses by >20%. The results highlighted that a good technique has to adhere to guidelines necessarily. As demonstrated elsewhere, patients' doses were high in departments using single-phase generators compared with those using constant potential. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving reference doses for paediatric X-ray examinations in Sudan. (authors)

  10. Quality control and patient dose from X-ray examinations in some hospitals in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Rannikko, S.; Parviainen, T.; Holmberg, P.; Kuus, E.; Mueuersepps, T.; Jaerv, V.

    1995-01-01

    Quality control measurements of X ray diagnostic units were carried out in four hospitals in Estonia. Measurements were focused on the unit's technical performance, on image quality and on patient dose and film processing. The main problems are in the areas of image receptors and film processing: image receptors are of low speed type causing high patient doses and manual film processing results in low contrast and high base plus fog. Spatial resolution, both in film imaging and in image intensifiers, is reasonably good. It is recommended that quality assurance programmes be established, that basic measuring equipment be acquired and personnel assigned to perform such measurements be trained. (Author)

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  12. A review of radiology staff doses and dose monitoring requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of radiation doses received during X-ray procedures by radiology, cardiology and other clinical staff have been reviewed. Data for effective dose (E), and doses to the eyes, thyroid, hands and legs have been analysed. These data have been supplemented with local measurements to determine the most exposed part of the hand for monitoring purposes. There are ranges of 60-100 in doses to individual tissues reported in the literature for similar procedures at different centres. While ranges in the doses per unit dose-area product (DAP) are between 10 and 25, large variations in dose result from differences in the sensitivity of the X-ray equipment, the type of procedure and the operator technique, but protection factors are important in maintaining dose levels as low as possible. The influence of shielding devices is significant for determining the dose to the eyes and thyroid, and the position of the operator, which depends on the procedure, is the most significant factor determining doses to the hands. A second body dosemeter worn at the level of the collar is recommended for operators with high workloads for use in assessment of effective dose and the dose to the eye. It is proposed that the third quartile values from the distributions of dose per unit DAP identified in the review might be employed in predicting the orders of magnitude of doses to the eye, thyroid and hands, based on interventional operator workloads. Such dose estimates could be employed in risk assessments when reviewing protection and monitoring requirements. A dosemeter worn on the little finger of the hand nearest to the X-ray tube is recommended for monitoring the hand. (authors)

  13. The effect of dose enhancement near metal interfaces on synthetic diamond based X-ray dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamoudi, D.; Lohstroh, A.; Albarakaty, H.

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of dose enhancement on the photocurrent performance at metallic interfaces in synthetic diamond detectors based X-ray dosimeters as a function of bias voltages. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the BEAMnrc code were carried out to simulate the dose enhancement factor (DEF) and compared against the equivalent photocurrent ratio from experimental investigations. The MC simulation results show that the sensitive region for the absorbed dose distribution covers a few micrometers distances from the interface. Experimentally, two single crystals (SC) and one polycrystalline (PC) synthetic diamond samples were fabricated into detectors with carbon based electrodes by boron and carbon ion implantation. Subsequently; the samples were each mounted inside a tissue equivalent encapsulation to minimize unintended fluence perturbation. Dose enhancement was generated by placing copper, lead or gold near the active volume of the detectors using 50 kVp and 100 kVp X-rays relevant for medical dosimetry. The results show enhancement in the detectors' photocurrent performance when different metals are butted up to the diamond bulk as expected. The variation in the photocurrent measurement depends on the type of diamond samples, their electrodes' fabrication and the applied bias voltages indicating that the dose enhancement near the detector may modify their electronic performance.

  14. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better understanding of the effects of radiation on osteoprogenitor cell populations could lead to more effective therapeutic interventions that protect bone integrity for individuals exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  15. Investigation of organ dose difference of age phantoms for medical X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Ran; Lee, Jai Ki; Lee, Choon Sik

    2003-01-01

    Methodology for calculating the organ equivalent doses and the effective doses of pediatric and adult patients undergoing medical X-ray examinations were established. The MIRD-type mathematical phantoms of 4 age groups were constructed with addition of the esophagus to the same phantoms. Two typical examination procedures, chest PA and abdomen AP, were simulated for the pediatric patients as well as the adult as illustrative examples. The results confirmed that patients pick up approximate 0.03 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.4 to 1.7 mSv from an abdomen AP examination depending on the ages. For dose calculations where irradiation is made with a limited field, the details of the position, size and shape of the organs and the organ depth from the entrance surface considerably affect the resulting doses. Therefore, it is important to optimize radiation protection by control of X-ray properties and beam examination field. The calculation result, provided in this study, can be used to implement optimization for medical radiation protection

  16. Dose evaluation for digital X-ray imaging of premature neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkels, T.J.M.; Jeukens, C.R.L.P.N.; Andriessen, P.; Van der Linden, A.N.; Dam, A.J.; Van Straaten, H.L.M.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; Van Pul, C.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a commonly used diagnostic method for premature neonates. However, because of higher radiosensitivity and young age, premature neonates are more sensitive to the detrimental effects of ionising radiation. Therefore, it is important to monitor and optimise radiation doses at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The number of X-ray examinations, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses are evaluated for three Dutch NICUs using digital flat panel detectors. Thorax, thorax abdomen and abdomen protocols are included in this study. Median number of examinations is equal to 1 for all three hospitals. Median DAP ranges between 0.05 and 1.02 μGy m2 for different examination types and different weight categories. These examinations result in mean effective doses between 4 ± 4 and 30 ± 10 μSv per examination. Substantial differences in protocols and doses can be observed between hospitals. This emphasises the need for up-to-date reference levels formulated specifically for premature neonates. (authors)

  17. Method of estimating patient skin dose from dose displayed on medical X-ray equipment with flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Koshida, Kichiro; Togashi, Atsuhiko; Matsubara, Kousuke

    2004-01-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has stipulated that medical X-ray equipment for interventional procedures must display radiation doses such as air kerma in free air at the interventional reference point and dose area product to establish radiation safety for patients (IEC 60601-2-43). However, it is necessary to estimate entrance skin dose for the patient from air kerma for an accurate risk assessment of radiation skin injury. To estimate entrance skin dose from displayed air kerma in free air at the interventional reference point, it is necessary to consider effective energy, the ratio of the mass-energy absorption coefficient for skin and air, and the backscatter factor. In addition, since automatic exposure control is installed in medical X-ray equipment with flat panel detectors, it is necessary to know the characteristics of control to estimate exposure dose. In order to calculate entrance skin dose under various conditions, we investigated clinical parameters such as tube voltage, tube current, pulse width, additional filter, and focal spot size, as functions of patient body size. We also measured the effective energy of X-ray exposure for the patient as a function of clinical parameter settings. We found that the conversion factor from air kerma in free air to entrance skin dose is about 1.4 for protection. (author)

  18. Measurement of the gonad dose of infants during X-ray examination of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, N.; Krepler, P.; Harranek, C.

    1977-01-01

    To protect the gonads during X-ray examination of the hip joints a special lead shield of 1,5 mm Pb with a fenestration can be used. This window allows the delineation of all parts of the skeleton to make a correct diagnosis while all other parts, especially the gonads, are safely shielded. To check the effectiveness of this gonad protection direct dosimetric studies on the infants were performed with LiF and CaF 2 :Dy TL-dosimeters at different adjustments of the x-ray machine and with various screen-film combinations. To correct the energy response of the LiF and CaF 2 :Dy dosimeters in the energy range below 100 keV tandem dosimeters were used. From the ratio of indications by TLD-200/TLD-100 the effective energy of the x-ray spectrum can be estimated and therefrom the response of the high sensitive TLD-200 dosimeters determined. To measure the ovary dose the dosimeters were placed in the rectum on the tip of a tube. The lowest exposure values were registrated using rare earth intensifying screens and generator adjustment of 60 kV and 1 mAs: 0,12 mrad for the ovary and 0,03 - 0,07 mR for the testes

  19. Dose distribution in head and neck during dental x-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.W.; Goepp, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies, notably by Franklin (Angle Ortho., 43:53-64, 1973), have shown significant exposures during cephalometric dental procedures and ways in which these exposures can be reduced. Skin dose over thyroid tissue has been measured by Alcox (J. Am. Dent. Assoc., 88:568-579, 1974), and others. This study is an expansion of thyroid dose measurements by Block, Goepp, and Mason (Angle Ortho., 47:17-24, 1977). The internal dose distribution in the head and neck area due to cephalometric and panoramic dental x-ray procedures is shown along with the dependence of orbit and thyroid dose on patient positioning. Higher doses can be delivered to deep tissue by panoramic machines since tissue at the axis of rotation is exposed during the entire procedure. (author)

  20. Cytogenetic adaptive response of cultured fish cells to low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Etoh, Hisami; Rienkjkarn, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptive response was examining chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus in cultured fish cells, ULF-23 (mudminnow) and CAF-31 (gold fish). When cultured fish cells were first irradiated with small doses of X-rays, they became less sensitive to subsequent exposures to high doses. The effective adaptive dose was 4.8 cGy-9.5 cGy. Adaptive doses given cells in the G1 phase were more effective than when given in the S phase. The adaptive response was maximal at 5 hours and disappeared at 10 hours after the adaptive dose. The expression of the response was inhibited by treatment with 3-aminobenzamide, as reported for mammalian cells, and with arabinofuranoside cytosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. Caffeine, an inhibitor of post-replicational repair, had no effect on the response. (author)

  1. Cytogenetic adaptive response of cultured fish cells to low doses of X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Etoh, Hisami (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Rienkjkarn, M.

    1992-12-01

    The adaptive response was examining chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus in cultured fish cells, ULF-23 (mudminnow) and CAF-31 (gold fish). When cultured fish cells were first irradiated with small doses of X-rays, they became less sensitive to subsequent exposures to high doses. The effective adaptive dose was 4.8 cGy-9.5 cGy. Adaptive doses given cells in the G1 phase were more effective than when given in the S phase. The adaptive response was maximal at 5 hours and disappeared at 10 hours after the adaptive dose. The expression of the response was inhibited by treatment with 3-aminobenzamide, as reported for mammalian cells, and with arabinofuranoside cytosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. Caffeine, an inhibitor of post-replicational repair, had no effect on the response. (author).

  2. Exposure of patients and creation of system of quality assurance in conventional x-ray radiology in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.; Ziliukas, J.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important sources of exposure is medical application of ionizing radiation. X-ray examination comprise a significant part of medical exposure. Doses received by patients and quality of diagnostic images are to be optimized. Measurements of these doses were started by the Radiation Protection Centre in 1997. These measurements are performed in randomly selected x-ray departments all around Lithuania during examinations of chest and lumbar spine. Dose and parameters related to exposure and patient are registered. Quality control measurements by PMX-III are being performed on each x-ray machine used for examination. The results show that in many cases the guidance levels are of entrance surface dose for standard patient determined by the Basic Radiation Protection Standard of Lithuania are exceeded. Quality control of x-ray machines performed in 1997-1999 shows that more than 30% of these machines did not comply with the requirements though in many cases shortcomings are minor and easily removed. (au)

  3. Calculating patient specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. When estimating the radiation dose of an individual patient, patient specific calculation methods must be used. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3 % with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients

  4. Measurement and Analysis of Output Radiation Dose on X-Ray Device over 10 Years at Hospitals in Medan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herty Afrina Sianturi

    2018-01-01

    Adhikari, Suraj Raj. 2012. Effect And Application      Of Ionization Radiation (X-Ray In Living  Organism. Kaski: Volume 3.The Himalaya  Physics. Badan Pengawas Tenaga Nuklir, Peraturan Kepala BAPETEN No. 8 Tahun 2011  tentang Keselamatan Radiasi dalam Penggunaan Pesawat Sinar-X Radiologi Diagnostik dan Intervensional, 2011. BAPETEN, 1999, Surat Keputusan Kepala Bapeten nomor 01/Ka-Bapeten/V-99 tentang Kesehatan terhadap radiasi pengion, Jakarta BATAN, 2005, Disain Penahan Ruang Sinar – X, Pusdiklat, BATAN, Jakarta Bushong, Steward C. 2013. Radologic Science for Technologists. 10th edition.United State of  America : CV. Mosby Company. Kramer, H. M., dan Selbach, H. J. 2008. Extension of the Range of Definition of the Practical Peak Voltage up to 300 kV. The British Journal of  Radiologhy (81:693-698. Rassad, S. dkk, Radiologi Diagnostik, Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Indonesia Rumah Sakit Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo, Jakarta (2000. Suryanto, Sigit Bachtiar. 2011. Analisis Pembentukan Gambar Dan Batas Toleransi Uji Kesesuaian Pada Pesawat Sinar-X Diagnostik. Prosiding Seminar Penelitian Dan Pengelolaan Perangkat Nuklir. Trikasjono, T. dkk. 2009. Analisis Keselamatan Pesawat Sinar-X di Instalasi Radiologi Rumah Sakit Umum daerah Sleman Yogyakarta. Prosiding Seminar Nasional Sains dan Teknologi Nuklir PTNBR – BATAN. Vassileva, J. 2004. A Phantom for Dose Image Quality Optimization in Chest Radiography. The British Journal of Radiologhy 75:837-842. Wadianto, Azis Muslim. 2017. Uji Akurasi Tegangan Tinggi Alat Rontgen Radiography Mobile. INOVASI, Volume XIX Nomor 1,Januari 2017

  5. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-01-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 μm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10 5 electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 μm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at ∼0.44 μC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to structured CsI:Tl can

  6. Variations in 6MV x-ray radiotherapy build-up dose with treatment distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW; Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Dose in the build up region for high energy x-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator is affected by the x-ray source to patient surface distance (SSD). The use of isocentric treatments whereby the tumour is positions 100cm from the source means that depending of the depth of the tumour and the size of the patient, the SSD can vary from distances of 80cm to 100cm. To achieve larger field sizes, the SSD can also be extended out to 120cm at times. Results have shown that open fields are not significantly affected by SSD changes with deviations in percentage dose being less than 4% of maximum dose for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm SSD. With the introduction of beam modifying devices such as Perspex blocking trays, the effects are significant with a deviation of up to 22% measured at 6MV energy with a 6mm Perspex tray for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm. These variations are largest at the skin surface and reduce with depth. The use of a multi leaf collimator for blocking removes extra skin dose caused by the Perspex block trays with decreasing SSD. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  7. SSD effects on high energy x-ray surface and build up dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Dose in the build up region for high energy x-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator is affected by the x-ray source to patient surface distance (SSD). The use of isocentric treatments whereby the tumour is positions 100cm from the source means that depending of the depth of the tumour and the size of the patient, the SSD can vary from distances of 80cm to 100cm. To achieve larger field sizes, the SSD can also be extended out to 120cm at times. Results have shown that open fields are not significantly affected by SSD changes with deviations in percentage dose being less than 4% of maximum dose for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm SSD. With the introduction of beam modifying devices such as Perspex blocking trays, the effects are significant with a deviation of up to 22% measured at 6MV energy with a 6mm Perspex tray for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm. These variations are largest at the skin surface and reduce with depth. The use of a multi leaf collimator for blocking removes extra skin dose caused by the Perspex block trays with decreasing SSD. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L; Mistry, T; Starritt, H

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%-55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children.

  9. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Mistry, T; Starritt, H; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%–55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children. (paper)

  10. A method for describing the doses delivered by transmission x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, T.B.; Gagne, R.M.; Johnson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for describing the absorbed dose delivered by x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is proposed which provides a means to characterize the dose resulting from CT procedures consisting of a series of adjacent scans. The dose descriptor chosen is the average dose at several locations in the imaged volume of the central scan of the series. It is shown that this average dose, as defined, for locations in the central scan of the series can be obtained from the integral of the dose profile perpendicular to the scan plane at these same locations for a single scan. This method for estimating the average dose from a CT procedure has been evaluated as a function of the number of scans in the multiple scan procedure and location in the dosimetry phantom using single scan dose profiles obtained from five different types of CT systems. For the higher dose regions in the phantoms, the multiple scan dose descriptor derived from the single scan dose profiles overestimates the multiple scan average dose by no more than 10%, provided the procedure consists of at least eight scans

  11. Calculation of electron contamination doses produced using blocking trays for 6 MV X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    Calculation of electron contamination doses whilst using blocking trays in radiotherapy is achieved by comparison of measured absorbed dose within the first few centimeters of a water phantom. Electron contamination of up to 28% of maximum dose is produced at the central axis of the beam whilst using a 6 mm Perspex blocking tray for a 30 cmx30 cm field. The electron contamination is spread over the entire field reducing slightly towards the edge of the beam. Electron contamination from block trays is also present outside the primary collimated X-ray beam with more than 20% of the maximum dose deposited at the surface, 5 cm outside the primary collimated beam at a field size of 40 cmx40 cm. The electron contamination spectrum has been calculated from measured results.

  12. Trends and the determination of effective doses for standard X-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.M.; Neduzak, C.; Gallet, J.; Sandeman, J.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the entrance skin exposures (air kerma) for standard x-ray imaging procedures are reported for the Province of Manitoba, Canada. Average annual data per procedure using standard phantoms and standard ion chambers have been recorded since 1981. For example, chest air kerma (backscatter included) has decreased from 0.14 to 0.09 mGy. Confounding factors may negate the gains unless facility quality control programs are maintained. The data were obtained for a quality assurance and regulatory compliance program. Quoting such data for risk evaluation purposes lacks rigor hence a compartment model for organ apportioning, using organ absorbed doses and weighting factors, has been applied to determine effective dose per procedure. The effective doses for the standard procedures are presented, including the value of 0.027 mSv (1999) calculated for the effective dose in PA chest imaging. (author)

  13. A survey in Portuguese X-ray fluoroscopy equipment: dose rates and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Nuno G.; Cunha, Gilda R.; Coutinho, Guilherme M.; Trindade, Hugo R.; Carvoeiras, Pedro P.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray fluoroscopy is essential in both diagnosis and medical intervention, although it may contribute to significant radiation doses to patients that have to be optimised and justified. Therefore, it is crucial to the patient to be exposed to the lowest achievable dose without compromising the image quality. The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of the quality control measurements, particularly dose rates, contrast and spatial resolution of Portuguese fluoroscopy equipment and also to provide a contribution to the establishment of reference levels for the equipment performance parameters. Measurements carried out between 2007 and 2013 on 143 fluoroscopy equipment distributed by 34 nationwide health units were analysed. The measurements suggest that image quality and dose rates of Portuguese equipment are congruent with other studies, and in general, they are as per the Portuguese law. However, there is still a possibility of improvements intending optimisation at a national level. (authors)

  14. Summary of the dose assessment tool for diagnostic X-ray CT, WAZA-ARIv2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    WAZA-ARIv2 is the web-based open system for the dose assessment for diagnostic X-ray CT. Amid growing interest about the dose assessment for medical exposure, WAZA-ARIv2 is opened to the public from January 2015 and attracts rising attention. Using WAZA-ARIv2 system, users can calculate exposure dose to consider patient's age and body shape, and can register the calculation results on WAZA-ARIv2 server for checking as histogram statistics. This paper reviews the background of development of WAZA-ARI system, the comparison of characteristics between WAZA-ARIv2 and other tools, and the calculation method of organ dose in WAZA-ARIv2. (author)

  15. Estimation of population dose from medical X-ray diagnosis and in vivo nuclear medicine examinations in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.H.; Kusama, T.; Kai, M.; Aoki, Y.; Wada, O.; Chen, F.D.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of radiation exposure had been conducted in Taiwan from May 3 to May 9, 1993, to establish the population dose. We investigated the frequency, type of examination, age and sex distribution of the X-ray diagnosis examination. We investigated 9 medical centers (75% of the total), 15 area hospitals (34% of the total) and 52 local hospitals (10.3% of the total) in Taiwan,. Details of 54,000 X-ray examinations were collected. Total numbers of 5162 X-ray examinations were performed annually per 10,000 inhabitants in Taiwan. The chest examination was the largest contribution, 45%, of all X-ray examinations, Different types of hospitals showed different frequencies and different distributions of age and sex of X-ray diagnosis. (3 figs., 3 tabs.)

  16. An estimation of doses received by patients in a diagnostic X-ray department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, S.C.; Naylor, E.

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a method of estimating the effective dose equivalent received by patients undergoing (non-fluoroscopic) diagnostic x-ray examinations. This allows those clinically or physically directing exposures to comply with the requirement, item 3, in the core knowledge contained in the schedule of the health and safety document number 778. The method described can be carried out without the use of expensive equipment or time consuming procedures and is based on the data contained in the publication NRPB R200. (author)

  17. Single cell low dose studies of bystander cell killing with targeted ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettino, G.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Michael, B.D.; Wu, L.; Held, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Bystander responses have attracted considerable interest in the recent years and several investigations have reported a binary behavior with the effect triggered by very small doses and immediately reaching a plateau. The Ultrasoft X-ray Microprobe in operation at the GCI is a facility designed to precisely assess the biological response of individual cells in vitro irradiated with a sub-micron size X-ray beam . Although recent improvements have upgrade the facility with AlK and TiK X-rays, most of the bystander studies have been performed using CK X-rays of 278 eV. The high sensitivity and the accurate irradiation and revisiting of the individual samples allowed us to investigate specific characteristics of the bystander phenomenon. In particular, evidences of a dose dependency of cell killing by bystander effect have been found at doses below 0.2 Gy where no differences is observed between all cell and single cell irradiation. Recent improvements have also allowed us to individually identify the phase of the cell cycle of all samples exposed. Although the G2-S phase have been found the most sensitive in responding to the bystander signal (a factor of 1.3), cells in the G1 phase also respond significantly while the phase of the irradiated cell doesn't seem to play a critical role. The time scale of the bystander effect has also been investigated by irradiating the same sample(s) twice with a few hours gap between exposures. Results indicate that the bystander signal is transmitted within a few minutes from the irradiation as replacing the medium immediately after irradiation does not influence the response, and it doesn't depend on the number of cells irradiated (up to 5). However, after a resting time of a few hours (3 h), the system seems to reset itself and a second irradiation has been shown to trigger a further bystander effect. Finally, by considering the total amount of energy deposited in to the sample population as critical parameter (instead

  18. Strategy of image-information-guided dose rate adjustment in digital X-ray television

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliva, K.

    1992-01-01

    The experiments were so designed and carried out that it was even possible for extremely overexposed or underexposed displays to be ascertained within the framework of this study. They were based on observations in phantoms suitable to simulate situations encountered in actual practice. These permitted variations in patient volume (using different water volumes) just as well as the creation of any desired organ constellation (by insertion of bone material, etc.). It is one requirement of this experimental procedure that the X-ray unit used can be operated without automatic dose rate adjustment. A computer equipped with Frame-Grabber card may serve as an image memory. (orig.) [de

  19. Effect of low doses of X-rays on grain and straw yield of Setaria italica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fendrik, I.

    1976-01-01

    Dry or pre-soaked seeds were irradiated with 250-1,500 R/h of X-rays at a dose rate of 1,000 R/h and sown into pots. Till harvest normal cultural practices were employed. A stimulation of grain and straw yield was only obtained by irradiation of dry seeds. Irradiation of pre-soaked seeds was ineffective or somewhat harmful. The absence of any effects in post-soaked seeds indicated that early hydration of seeds after irradiation results in a stabilization of the damage. (MG) [de

  20. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose rate in a didactic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Phelipe Amaral Ferreira; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed in order to create a new didactic experiment in the X-ray apparatus of PHYWE, where the saturation current was obtained through a free air ionization chamber. The values of saturation currents were obtained in two ways. Initially, the anodic DDP was kept constant and the anodic current was varied. In the second way, the anodic current was kept constant while the anodic DDP was varied. Therefore, we were able to evaluate the dependence of the absolved dose rate in relation to the DDP and the tube current. (author)

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  2. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, J N M; McAuley, K B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Schreiner, L J, E-mail: kim.mcauley@chee.queensu.ca [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, K7L 5P9 (Canada)

    2011-04-07

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range ({approx}0.88 H Gy{sup -1}) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent ({approx}0.80 H Gy{sup -1}). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution ({approx}0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  3. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, J N M; McAuley, K B; Jirasek, A; Schreiner, L J

    2011-01-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (∼0.88 H Gy -1 ) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (∼0.80 H Gy -1 ). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (∼0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  5. Studies on the gonad dose in x-ray examination for the two day human dock at Nissei Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shozo; Muraoka, Tsutomu; Ishigaki, Naoya; Ono, Toshio; Nakai, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    The gonad dose in x-ray examination should be reduced to the minimum extent. The purpose of this study is to estimate the gonad dose in x-ray examination for the two day-human dock at Nissei Hospital. The gonad dose to 40 males and 60 females was measured on cholecystography and gastrointestinal radiography. Dose measurement was performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The results were as follows: Mean gonad dose is 6.9 mR to male and 44.2 mR to female, so that gonad dose to female is 6.4 times greater than that to male. (author)

  6. Radiation doses and image quality in pediatric chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia in selected Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, P.; Fleitas, I.; Cotelo, E.; Estevan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pneumonia and acute lower respiratory infections in general, is the leading cause of child death in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 4 millions of children die annually due to this disease. Despite the growing use of vaccination as an alternate approach to reduce mortality, the increasing antimicrobial resistance and the high costs of vaccines remain important obstacles in the global struggle against the disease. The usual treatment strategy begins with a clinical examination of the patient followed by the prescription of a chest X-ray. Radiography would appear as the best available method for diagnosing pneumonia only if radiologists (and other health professionals such as pediatricians) knew how to interpret the images showed in the radiographs, and these meeting the standards of quality (anatomic structures, image contrast and optical density, and patient dose among other factors). On the other hand, special attention should be paid on patient doses due to children's specific radiosensitivity, repeated and extended use of chest x-ray in all Radiology Departments, and high rejection rate due to both equipment malfunction and to human skills shortcomings. Patient doses of chest X-ray performed to children less than 5 years old in PAHO Sentinel Hospitals for surveillance of bacterial pneumonias in various Latin American countries were estimated using technical parameters and equipment specifications. Image quality was compared to WHO criteria for chest X-rays quality. Results showing differences in patient doses translates on one hand the impact of specific characteristics of the radiological equipment, including equipment limitations and performance of the radiographs and on the other various and divers levels of health professionals skills and training on image quality interpretation and dose optimization. The study concludes that professionals' training and education on chest radiographs image quality constitutes

  7. Survey on the frequency of typical X-Ray examinations and estimation of associated population doses in the Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershan, V.; Stikova, E.

    2013-01-01

    effective doses were estimated using literature data for values of the mean effective dose per typical examination procedure. Finally, normalization of the total collective effective dose from all TOP 20 X-ray procedures for the whole population in the Republic of Macedonia was performed. Results: 67% of X-ray departments present in the Republic of Macedonia at the time the survey was initiated provided data on the number of TOP20 X-ray examination procedures performed in 2010. On the basis of the data gathered, a total of 322039 TOP20 X-ray examination procedures were performed in 2010 for both adult and pediatric patients. Plain radiography examination procedures (dental excluded) were the most commonly performed procedures in the Republic of Macedonia that year and the plain radiography of chest/thorax had the highest frequency of examinations (64 examinations) per 1000 population. The Ba meal examination procedure with an annual frequency of 2.93 per 1000 population has the highest contribution to the annual collective effective dose of all other procedures. Still, in total, the contribution of X-ray examinations in the plain radiography modality to the collective effective dose is the highest. The total collective dose from TOP 20 X-ray examination procedures in 2010 is 507 man Sv, while the normalized collective dose to the population is 249.7 mSv/1000 population.Conclusions: The most common type of examination in the Republic of Macedonia for 2010 is X-ray projection of lungs. The contribution to the collective effective dose from X-ray examinations in the plain radiography modality is the highest, followed by contributions from fluoroscopy procedures, computer tomography and interventional radiology procedures. Comparison of the estimated collective dose from TOP20 X-ray examination procedures in other countries suggests possible underestimation in the estimated doses comparing to actual doses. A more comprehensive survey and analysis are needed to be carried out in

  8. Ambient and personal dose assessment of a container inspection site using a mobile X-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.Y., E-mail: fyhsu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuangfu Rd., 300 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lee, W.F., E-mail: 005679@webmail.customs.gov.tw [Taichung Customs Office, Ministry of Finance, 2, Sec. 3, Chung-Chie Rd., Sha Lu, 435 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tung, C.J., E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, 333 Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Peitou, 112 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.H., E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Peitou, 112 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, S.M., E-mail: smhsu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Rd., 404 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Su, H.T., E-mail: edwardsu1027@hotmail.com [School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, T.R., E-mail: trchen@csmu.edu.tw [School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Image, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 402 Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Ambient monitor and phantom studies of absorbed and effective doses by TLDs were carried out in a non-intrusive inspection station for containers, Terminal I, of Taichung harbor, Taiwan. The doses from the X-ray scan in the control room and driver waiting room, located outside of the radiation control area, were quite small and could not be distinguished from the natural background radiation. The doses in the driver cab and the inspector cab of the X-ray scan car were also within background radiation levels. The protection wall, a 40-cm thick concrete barrier, can effectively attenuate the intensity of the primary X-ray scan. The possible effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3.15{+-}0.23 {mu}Sv/scan and 2.31{+-}0.38 {mu}Sv/scan. This dose is below the annual background dose. If someone was to be scanned by the X-ray, the effective dose would be at an acceptable level. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used TLDs to evaluate the dose in the environment and in the Rando phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absorbed dose in the container Terminal showed a natural background level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protection wall effectively lowers the X-ray intensity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3 {mu}Sv/scan.

  9. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.poirier@cancercare.mb.ca [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tambasco, Mauro, E-mail: mtambasco@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  10. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique has been used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 5 1/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment

  11. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique was used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 51/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment. (author)

  12. Radiological assessment of the placement of Essure® in order to reduce hysterosalpingography: Pelvic X-ray versus combined pelvic X-ray and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, C; Vernet, T; Verpillat, P; Rubod, C; Cosson, M; Giraudet, G

    2017-10-01

    Three months after hysteroscopic sterilisation with Essure ® , a confirmation test is required to evaluate the correct location of the inserts. The test may be conducted using a pelvic ultrasound (2D or 3D) or an abdominal X-ray. Should the location not look satisfactory on these tests, a follow-up hysterosalpingography (HSG) would be required. The objective of our study is to assess whether the Essure ® 3-month confirmation test using a single X-ray or a combination of X-ray and ultrasound could reduce the use of HSG. This retrospective study examined patients who underwent birth control Essure ® procedure between 2009 and 2015 in the Gynaecological Surgery Department at the Regional University Hospital Centre (CHRU) in Lille. We divided patients into two groups based on the imaging tests performed: single X-ray (2009-2010) versus X-ray and pelvic ultrasound (2014-2015). We then compared the results of the imaging tests and the use of HSG between the two groups. One hundred and thirty-four patients were tested, of which 60 (44.8%) using a single X-ray and 74 (55.2%) using a combination of X-ray and ultrasound. We note that the combined X-ray/ultrasound test reduces significantly the number of HSG performed (26.7% versus 12.2%, P=0.04). Compared to a single X-ray, the combination of X-ray and ultrasound enables to significantly limit the use of HSG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of different qualities in X-rays, for instruments calibration in radiological protection; Caracterizacion de diferentes calidades en rayos X, para calibracion de instrumentos en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejudo A, J.; Tovar M, V. M.; Vergara M, F., E-mail: jesus.cejudo@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration in Mexico was realized the qualities characterization of the series X-rays RQR reported in the International Code of Practices in Dosimetry and Diagnostic Radiology No. 457, using attenuator filters of high purity aluminum and ionizing radiation equipment of inherent filtration of 4 mm Be with and emergent X-radiation beam of 40 grades. For the attenuation was used a geometric arrangement with three beam limiters and a monitor camera prepared on the established form in the mentioned technical report, and a spherical ionization chamber with collection volume of 3.6 cm{sup 3}, aligning its geometric center with the focus of X-rays tube to get that the incident radiation direction will be perpendicular to the ionization chamber. From the perspective of the radiological protection is important to know the X-radiation quality for the application dedicated to the instruments calibration and can to give to these the traceability to a reference laboratory, this way the quality combination and reference chamber can give as a result a procedure for the evaluation of the entrance in surface dose to estimate the dose orientate levels, specified in the basic standards of safety. (Author)

  14. Dose distribution at junctional area abutting X-ray and electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kwang Mo

    2004-01-01

    For the head and neck radiotherapy, abutting photon field with electron field is frequently used for the irradiation of posterior neck when tolerable dose on spinal cord has been reached. Using 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron beams of Clinac1800(Varian, USA) linear accelerator, we performed film dosimetry by the X-OMAT V film of Kodak in solid water phantom according to depths(0 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron(1 Gy) were exposes to 8 cm depth and surface(SSD 100 cm) of phantom. The dose distribution to the junction line between photon(10 x 10 cm field with block) and electron(15 cm x 15 cm field with block) fields was also measured according to depths(0 cm, 0.5 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). At the junction line between photon and electron fields, the hot spot was developed on the side of the photon field and a cold spot was developed on that of the electron field. The hot spot in the photon side was developed at depth 1.5 cm with 7 mm width. The maximum dose of hot spot was increased to 6% of reference doses in the photon field. The cold spot in the electron side was developed at all measured depths(0.5 cm-3 cm) with 1-12.5 mm widths. The decreased dose in the cold spot was 4.5-30% of reference dose in the electron field. When we make use of abutting photon field with electron field for the treatment of head and neck cancer we should consider the hot and cold dose area in the junction of photon and electron field according to location of tumor.

  15. Low-dose x-ray phase-contrast and absorption CT using equally sloped tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Cloetens, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projections is often desirable in transmission CT modalities for purposes of low-dose tomography and fast acquisition imaging. However under such conditions, due to the violation of the Nyquist sampling criteria and the presence of noise, reconstructions with acceptable accuracy may not be possible. Recent experiments in transmission electron tomography and coherent diffraction microscopy have shown that the technique of equally sloped tomography (EST), an exact tomographic method utilizing an oversampling iterative Fourier-based reconstruction, provides more accurate image reconstructions when the number of projections is significantly undersampled relative to filtered back projection and algebraic iterative methods. Here we extend this technique by developing new reconstruction algorithms which allow for the incorporation of advanced mathematical regularization constraints, such as the nonlocal means total variational model, in a manner that is consistent with experimental projections. We then evaluate the resulting image quality of the developed algorithm through simulations and experiments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility on image quality phantoms using the x-ray absorption and phase contrast CT modalities. Both our simulation and experimental results have indicated that the method can reduce the number of projections by 60-75% in parallel beam modalities, while achieving comparable or better image quality than the conventional reconstructions. As large-scale and compact synchrotron radiation facilities are currently under rapid development worldwide, the implementation of low-dose x-ray absorption and phase-contrast CT can find broad applications in biology and medicine using these advanced x-ray sources.

  16. Printable organometallic perovskite enables large-area, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Churl; Kim, Kwang Hee; Son, Dae-Yong; Jeong, Dong-Nyuk; Seo, Ja-Young; Choi, Yeong Suk; Han, In Taek; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Medical X-ray imaging procedures require digital flat detectors operating at low doses to reduce radiation health risks. Solution-processed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have characteristics that make them good candidates for the photoconductive layer of such sensitive detectors. However, such detectors have not yet been built on thin-film transistor arrays because it has been difficult to prepare thick perovskite films (more than a few hundred micrometres) over large areas (a detector is typically 50 centimetres by 50 centimetres). We report here an all-solution-based (in contrast to conventional vacuum processing) synthetic route to producing printable polycrystalline perovskites with sharply faceted large grains having morphologies and optoelectronic properties comparable to those of single crystals. High sensitivities of up to 11 microcoulombs per air KERMA of milligray per square centimetre (μC mGyair-1 cm-2) are achieved under irradiation with a 100-kilovolt bremsstrahlung source, which are at least one order of magnitude higher than the sensitivities achieved with currently used amorphous selenium or thallium-doped cesium iodide detectors. We demonstrate X-ray imaging in a conventional thin-film transistor substrate by embedding an 830-micrometre-thick perovskite film and an additional two interlayers of polymer/perovskite composites to provide conformal interfaces between perovskite films and electrodes that control dark currents and temporal charge carrier transportation. Such an all-solution-based perovskite detector could enable low-dose X-ray imaging, and could also be used in photoconductive devices for radiation imaging, sensing and energy harvesting.

  17. Printable organometallic perovskite enables large-area, low-dose X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Churl; Kim, Kwang Hee; Son, Dae-Yong; Jeong, Dong-Nyuk; Seo, Ja-Young; Choi, Yeong Suk; Han, In Taek; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-10-04

    Medical X-ray imaging procedures require digital flat detectors operating at low doses to reduce radiation health risks. Solution-processed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have characteristics that make them good candidates for the photoconductive layer of such sensitive detectors. However, such detectors have not yet been built on thin-film transistor arrays because it has been difficult to prepare thick perovskite films (more than a few hundred micrometres) over large areas (a detector is typically 50 centimetres by 50 centimetres). We report here an all-solution-based (in contrast to conventional vacuum processing) synthetic route to producing printable polycrystalline perovskites with sharply faceted large grains having morphologies and optoelectronic properties comparable to those of single crystals. High sensitivities of up to 11 microcoulombs per air KERMA of milligray per square centimetre (μC mGy air -1 cm -2 ) are achieved under irradiation with a 100-kilovolt bremsstrahlung source, which are at least one order of magnitude higher than the sensitivities achieved with currently used amorphous selenium or thallium-doped cesium iodide detectors. We demonstrate X-ray imaging in a conventional thin-film transistor substrate by embedding an 830-micrometre-thick perovskite film and an additional two interlayers of polymer/perovskite composites to provide conformal interfaces between perovskite films and electrodes that control dark currents and temporal charge carrier transportation. Such an all-solution-based perovskite detector could enable low-dose X-ray imaging, and could also be used in photoconductive devices for radiation imaging, sensing and energy harvesting.

  18. X-ray anatomy - radiological imaging, radiation protection. For auxiliary medical personnel, technicians, physicists. 3. rev. and enlarged ed. Roentgenanatomie - radiologische Darstellung, Strahlenschutz. Fuer aerztliches Hilfspersonal, Techniker, Physiker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frik, W; Goering, U

    1988-01-01

    This third edition as the result of a complete revision of the second edition reflects the current state of the art and includes topical information on a variety of advances hitherto achieved, as for instance information on novel imaging techniques in diagnostic radiology that have been included in the chapters on physical fundamentals or examination methods, as well as in all chapters discussing the anatomy and the relevant radiological imaging methods. As practice has shown that the application of the latest standards on radiation doses and units still poses problems, the authors decided to add a section explaining dose concepts, terminology and units. The two chapters dealing with contrast media and with radiological examination methods have been updated and supplemented. The anatomy chapters, written for readers who are not doctors, and the survey of the relevant diagnostic radiology still form the core of the book, but all in all this third edition now puts equal emphasis on all three aspects concerned, namely X-ray anatomy, radiological imaging, and radiation protection. (orig./MG) With 96 figs.

  19. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Relationship between radiation dose and changes of blood cells in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenzheng

    1984-01-01

    The hematological changes of 2867 cases of medical X-ray workers and 1152 cases of non-X-ray medical workers were compared. It was shown that the total number of leukocytes, the numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets were significantly lower in X-ray workers than those in controls. However, the percentages of monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and the concentration of hemoglobin were higher in the irradiated group. the difference between the two groups was statistically significant. The degree of changes in the number of blood cells was dose-dependent. A negative correlation could be found between the changes of leukocyte and neutrophil counts and cumulative dose (<250 mGy), annual dose (<15 mGy/a) and length of service of the X-ray workers; and a positive correlation existed between the percentages of basophils, eosinophils and monocytes, and the radiation dose. The abnormality rate of blood picture in the irradiated group was higher than that in the control group. Most X-ray workers with abnormal blood picture were distributed in low-dose group. The data also showed that radiation effect on male X-ray workers was greater than that on female workers. (Author)

  1. Impact of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose calculated with Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanqun; Li Jie; Wu Liping; Wang Pei; Lang Jinyi; Wu Dake; Xiao Mingyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To calculate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose. Methods: The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo Code system, designed especially for computer simulation of radioactive sources, was performed to evaluate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose.Thermoplastic mask came from our center with a material density of 1.12 g/cm 2 . The masks without holes, with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm, and with holes size of 0. 1 cm x 0.2 cm, and masks with different depth (0.12 cm and 0.24 cm) were evaluated separately. For those with holes, the material width between adjacent holes was 0.1 cm. Virtual masks with a material density of 1.38 g/cm 3 without holes with two different depths were also evaluated. Results: Thermoplastic mask affected X-rays surface dose. When using a thermoplastic mask with the depth of 0.24 cm without holes, the surface dose was 74. 9% and 57.0% for those with the density of 1.38 g/cm 3 and 1.12 g/cm 3 respectively. When focusing on the masks with the density of 1.12 g/cm 3 , the surface dose was 41.2% for those with 0.12 cm depth without holes; 57.0% for those with 0. 24 cm depth without holes; 44.5% for those with 0.24 cm depth with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.2 cm;and 54.1% for those with 0.24 cm depths with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm.Conclusions: Using thermoplastic mask during the radiation increases patient surface dose. The severity is relative to the hole size and the depth of thermoplastic mask. The surface dose change should be considered in radiation planning to avoid severe skin reaction. (authors)

  2. Dose fractionation in synchrotron radiation x-ray phase micro-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frachon, Thibaut; Weber, Loriane; Hesse, Bernhard; Rit, Simon; Dong, Pei; Olivier, Cecile; Peyrin, Françoise; Langer, Max

    2015-01-01

    Phase sensitive x-ray imaging expands the applicability of standard attenuation based techniques by offering several orders of magnitude of increase in sensitivity. Due to the short wavelength, x-ray phase is not directly measurable, but has to be put in evidence by the use of phase contrast techniques. The phase can then be reconstructed from one or several phase contrast images. In this study, we consider synchrotron x-ray phase micro-computed tomography (μCT) based on free space propagation for heterogeneous and strongly absorbing objects. This technique generally relies on acquiring several scans of the sample at different detector distances. It is also generally believed that multi-distance phase μCT needs a higher dose input than single distance phase μCT. The purpose of this work is to study the impact of different means of dose fractionation on the reconstructed image quality. We define different acquistion schemes in multi-distance in-line phase μCT. Previously, the exposure time at each sample-to-detector distance was usually kept the same. Here, we let not only the number of distances vary but also the fraction of exposure time at each distance, the total exposure time being kept constant. Phase retrieval is performed with the mixed approach algorithm. The reconstructed μCT images are compared in terms of accuracy, precision and resolution. In addition, we also compare the result of dose fractionated multi distance phase μCT to single distance phase μCT using the same total radiation dose. In the multi-distance approach, we find that using different exposure times on each distance improves the image quality in the reconstructed image. Further, we show that, despite having the same total dose delivery, the multi distance imaging method gives better image quality than the single distance method, at the cost of an additional overhead from camera displacements and reference images. We show that by optimizing the acquistion parameters in terms of

  3. Personnel and patient doses: Are there ethical consequences to the use of X-rays?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has witnessed a period of great technological change. The introduction of new dedicated cardiology X-ray equipment, as well as advances in catheter and stent design, has revolutionised clinical practice in cardiology. As a consequence, the number, range and complexity of procedures have increased. This has meant that patients can be treated as outpatients without requiring hospitalisation for surgery. The public are aware of these benefits and demand greater access. However, these changes have had an impact on patient and staff doses and these are reviewed. Simple approaches to dose reduction for patients and staff are illustrated. There are a number of ethical issues concerning both patients and staff. For patients, these are related to informed consent. For staff, the ethical issues are associated with dose control. These issues will be discussed. (authors)

  4. Differential response of two cell lines sequentially irradiated with low X-ray doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güerci, A M; Dulout, F N; Grillo, C A; Seoane, A I

    2005-05-01

    An experiment was designed to compare the effect of repeated low doses of X-rays in two different cell lines: one transformed, epithelial like and aneuploid Chinese hamster ovary K-1 (CHO-K1); the other originated from a human primary culture, fibroblast, diploid and non-transformed, MRC-5. CHO and MRC-5 cells were cultured for 14 or eight passages, respectively. Irradiation was performed once per passage when cells were in the quiescent state (90 - 95% in G1/G0). Cells were exposed to 10.0 mSv X-ray doses. Ionizing radiation did not induce apoptosis or necrosis in the exposed CHO cell population. Significant increases of low-level damaged cells (degrees 1 and 2) were found for the 14 cycles of radiation when compared with controls, except for the first irradiation cycle. No significant increases in the frequency of cells with severe damage were observed. The frequency of MRC-5 cells with low-level damage increased significantly when compared with controls for radiation cycles seven and eight. Significant increases of apoptosis, necrosis and severe damage were found only for the highest dose. Transformed and non-transformed cell types responded differently to direct and indirect damage using low-dose repeat exposures to ionizing radiation. Though more investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms of radiation effects in chronic low-dose-exposed cell populations, cellular type should be taken into account in the design of in vitro experiments for understanding low-dose-irradiation effects.

  5. Spectra transmitted by mortar barite in X-Ray qualities applied in diagnostic radiology as shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T., E-mail: airton.almeida@fundacentro.gov.br [Fundacaoo Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho (FUNDACENTRO), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Araujo, F.G.S. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (REDEMAT/UFOP), MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M.S., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Santos, M.A.P. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Concrete which contains water, cement and aggregate, is widely used in building construction such as medical hospitals. The CdZnTe spectrometry system was used to acquire the transmitted spectra in the RQR qualities and the stripping procedure was performed by taking into account both the contributions of efficiency and x-ray escape fraction, experimentally determined. The samples were prepared in rectangular plate format with dimensions of (5 x 5) cm with thicknesses varying from 0.2cm to 2cm and exposed to x-ray beams generated. The HVL and the mean energy in this energy range was determined. (author)

  6. Effect of area x-ray beam equalization on image quality and dose in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jerry; Xu Tong; Husain, Adeel; Le, Huy; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2004-08-21

    In mammography, thick or dense breast regions persistently suffer from reduced contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) because of degraded contrast from large scatter intensities and relatively high noise. Area x-ray beam equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to under-penetrated regions without increasing the exposure to other breast regions. Optimal equalization parameters with respect to image quality and patient dose were determined through computer simulations and validated with experimental observations on a step phantom and an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Three parameters important in equalization digital mammography were considered: attenuator material (Z = 13-92), beam energy (22-34 kVp) and equalization level. A Mo/Mo digital mammography system was used for image acquisition. A prototype 16 x 16 piston driven equalization system was used for preparing patient-specific equalization masks. Simulation studies showed that a molybdenum attenuator and an equalization level of 20 were optimal for improving contrast, CNR and figure of merit (FOM = CNR{sup 2}/dose). Experimental measurements using these parameters showed significant improvements in contrast, CNR and FOM. Moreover, equalized images of a breast phantom showed improved image quality. These results indicate that area beam equalization can improve image quality in digital mammography.

  7. An examination of the distribution of patient doses from diagnostic x-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1983-02-01

    An examination was made of the distribution of patient doses from diagnostic radiology. The data were derived from an Australia wide survey carried out during the 1970's. There was a large range of doses to which patients were exposed. If establishments can reduce doses to below the most common value, the total dose to the population will be reduced to less than 60% of the present value

  8. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs

  9. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  10. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  11. Reduction of patient dose delivered by CHR diagnostic x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.D.; Schlenker, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Three changes in technique have been made which reduce the x-ray dose delivered by diagnostic examinations of patients of the Center for Human Radiobiology (CHR): Kodak Lanex Regular screens and Kodak Ortho G film have been substituted for DuPont Cronex Parspeed screens and DuPont Cronex 4 film for five projections in the MIT examinations; 3 mm Al added filtration is now used in place of 1 mm Al added filtration in the ANL examination; improvements in collimation for the ANL examination have been made. Use of the new screen-film combination at MIT has reduced the mean dose to the active marrow of the female RANDO phantom from 606 +- 69 mrad to 235 +- 16 mrad; it has reduced the ovary dose from 606 +- 40 mrad to 291 +- 19 mrad and has left the breast dose unchanged at 333 +- 103 mrad. The change from 1 mm Al to 3 mm Al added filtration at ANL, without changes in collimation, would reduce the mean marrow dose in the phantom from 232 +- 14 mrad to 175 +- 26 mrad, reduce the ovary dose from 243 +- 25 mrad to 162 +- 38 mrad and reduce the breast dose from 388 +- 35 mrad to 226 +- 9 mrad. The changes in collimation at ANL should reduce these doses even further but the quantitative effect has not been ascertained

  12. Radiation dose to procedural personnel and patients from an X-ray volume imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Mbalisike, Emmanuel C.; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the radiation dose received by procedural personnel and patients from an X-ray volume imaging (XVI) system during interventional procedures. Forty patients were examined using catheter angiography (group A), digital subtraction angiography (group B) and cone-beam CT (CBCT, group C). Doses to procedural personnel (using thermo-luminescent dosimeters, TLDs) and patients were estimated. Image quality and lesion delineation were assessed using objective and subjective methods. Shapiro-Wilk, two-sided Student's t and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used to test statistical significance. Doses (milligrays) measured in the hands and left knee of the interventionist were higher than those in an assistant physician (P < 0.05). Doses (dose-area product and skin entry dose) were lower in group A and higher in C compared with other groups; moreover, comparison among the groups were significant (all P = 0.0001). Subjective and objective lesion delineation showed significant results (all P < 0.05) among the tumour types considered. Image quality estimation showed the opposite results for objective and subjective analysis. More doses were obtained for hands of the procedural personnel compared to other anatomical regions measured. Catheter angiography showed lower dose compared with other imaging groups examined. Lesion delineation was clearly possible using CBCT. Objective and subjective analysis showed the opposite results regarding image quality because of higher noise levels and artefacts. (orig.)

  13. Quality assurance and image improvement in diagnostic radiology with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Basic quality assurance tests for x-ray sets are considered (tube potential, timing, output, H-V layer, focal-spot size, alignment and perpendicularity of the light-beam diaphragm) together with more specific quality-assurance tests such as tomographic tests, image intensifier and mammographic tests. (UK)

  14. Dose characterization of the rad sourceTM 2400 X-ray irradiator for oyster pasteurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Jennifer Koop; Dillon, Jeff A.; Blythe, Eugene K.; Ford, John R.

    2009-01-01

    The RS 2400's cylindrical X-ray source yields dose rates high enough to allow the irradiator to replace widely used gamma irradiators. Except for the leftmost 5 cm, beam uniformity is within 10% at the tube surface. At maximum operating parameters, the beam has HVL 1 =13.66 mm aluminum, HC=0.47, and hν eq =88.5 keV. Maximum dose rates to tissue are 65 Gy min -1 ±3.1% at tube surface, 37 Gy min -1 ±3.1% at center of canisters, 14.1 Gy min -1 ±6.5% for thin-shelled oysters, and 12.3 Gy min -1 ±6.2% for thick-shelled oysters

  15. Dose Measurement and Calculation of Asymmetric X-Ray Fields from Therapeutic Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Attar, A. L.; Abdel-Wanees, M. E.; Hashem, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Linear accelerators with x-ray collimators that move independently are becoming increasingly common for treatment with asymmetric fields. In this paper we present a simplified approach to the calculation of dose for asymmetric fields. A method is described for calculating the beam profiles, depth doses and output factors for asymmetric fields of radiation produced by linear accelerators (siemens mevatron M2) with independent jaws. Values are calculated from data measured for symmetric fields. Symmetric field data are modified using opened off-axis factors (OAFs) and primary off-centre ratios (POCRs) which are obtained from in air measurements of the largest possible opened field. Beam hardening occurring within the flattening filter is taken into account using of attenuation coefficients for opened field and used to generate the opened POCR at different depths. A full investigation to compare measured and calculated profiles demonstrates favorable agreement.

  16. In-line phase-contrast stereoscopic X-ray imaging for radiological purposes: An initial experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegbahn, E.A.; Coan, P.; Zhou, S.-A.; Bravin, A.; Brahme, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report results from a pilot study in which the in-line propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique is combined with the stereoscopic method. Two phantoms were imaged at several sample-detector distances using monochromatic, 30 keV, X-rays. High contrast- and spatial-resolution phase-contrast stereoscopic pairs of X-ray images were constructed using the anaglyph approach and a vivid stereoscopic effect was demonstrated. On the other hand, images of the same phantoms obtained with a shorter sample-to-detector distance, but otherwise the same experimental conditions (i.e. the same X-ray energy and absorbed radiation dose), corresponding to the conventional attenuation-based imaging mode, hardly revealed stereoscopic effects because of the lower image contrast produced. These results have confirmed our hypothesis that stereoscopic X-ray images of samples with objects composed of low-atomic-number elements are considerably improved if phase-contrast imaging is used. It is our belief that the high-resolution phase-contrast stereoscopic method will be a valuable new medical imaging tool for radiologists and that it will be of help to enhance the diagnostic capability in the examination of patients in future clinical practice, even though further efforts will be needed to optimize the system performance.

  17. Variation in Depth Dose Data between Open and Wedge Fields for 6 MV X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U, Hong; Ryu, M. S. Samuel; Park, In Kyu

    1989-01-01

    Central axis depth dose data for 6 MV X-rays, including tissue maximum ratios, were measured for wedge fields according to Tatcher equation. In wedge fields, the differences in magnitude which increased with depth, field size, and wedge thickness increased when compared with the corresponding open field data. However, phantom scatter correction factors for wedge fields differed less that 1% from the corresponding open field factors. The differences in central axis percent depth dose between two types of fields indicated beam hardening by the wedge filter. The deviation of percent depth doses and scatter correction factors between the effective wedge field and the nominal wedge field at same angle was negligible. The differences were less than 3.26% between the nominal or effective wedge fields and the open fields for percent depth doses to the depth 7cm in 6cm x 6cm field. For larger (10cm x 10cm) field size, however, the deviation of percent depth doses between the nominal or effective wedge fields and the open fields were greater-dosimetric errors were 3.56% at depth 7cm and nearly 5.30% at 12cm. We suggest that the percent depth doses of individual wedge and wedge transmission factors should be considered for the dose calculation or monitor setting in the treatment of deep seated tumor

  18. Doses to patients from medical X-ray examinations in the UK. 2000 review

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, D; Wall, B F

    2002-01-01

    In 1992 NRPB established a National Collation Centre for measurements of doses to patients made by x-ray departments throughout the UK. This report is the second in a series of five-yearly reviews of the national patient dose database and analyses the information collected during the period January 1996 to December 2000. It includes the results of 28,000 entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements and 13,000 dose-area product (DAP) measurements for single radiographs, and 140,000 DAP measurements and 128,000 records of the fluoroscopy time for complete examinations, collected from 371 hospitals throughout the UK. Information on the patient dose distributions and exposure conditions for over 30 types of examination and radiograph is presented. National reference doses based on the rounded third quartile values of these dose distributions are recommended and are seen to be about 20% lower than corresponding values in the previous (1995) review. They have approximately halved since the original UK national referenc...

  19. Patient doses from x-ray examinations in Sweden - follow-up of remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, Helene; Leitz, W.

    2002-03-01

    In early 1999 the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) requested data about patient doses etc. for a number of specified x-ray examinations. The aim was on one hand to get a basis for planned regulations on diagnostic reference levels (DRL) and on the other hand to obtain an overview of how the situation is in the country with respect to patient doses. The licensees who reported dose values exceeding (provisional) DRL were asked to perform investigations about the grounds for the high dose and to take remedial actions for reducing the dose. In this report the outcome is presented. The dose reductions were large: on average between 35 and 60 % for the various examinations. A large proportion of the measures taken were simple and cheap, such as increase of radiation quality, improved examination methodology (smaller radiation fields, use of compression, reduced number of images or fluoroscopy time) and optimising the film processing. This is indicating that the planned regulations on diagnostic reference levels have a good chance to succeed with a large reduction of the patient doses in Sweden

  20. Patient's dose assessment during sinus X-rays radiography at 'Hopital du Point G'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidibe, S.; Sacko, B.Y.; Doucoure, M.; Traore, B.; Traore, I.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the patient's X-rays dose during head radiography for sinusitis; To precise the influence of source-image distance on the patient's dose. Material and method: From May 1997 to January 1999, 83 patients with clinical suspicious sinusitis have been included in this study. Skull radiography in 3 positions (posterior, lateral and Blondeau view) have been achieved for each patient on 24x30 centimeters size films. These radiographies were realised on a Diagnost 7 Masio Philip X-rays machine. Three TLD dosimeters were pasted against every patient target organs (thyroid, right and left eyes). The source-image distance (SID) was 100 centimeters for the first group (35 patients) and 125 centimeters for the second group (48 patients). The selected parameters (high voltage and charge) were as follows: Skull postero-anterior view: 65 to 85 kV, 80 mAs; Skull lateral view: 60 to 75 kV, 80 mAs; Blondeau view (paranasal sinuses): 90 to 95 kV, 100 mAs. Results: All the radiographies were analysed by the same radiologist who didn't know the SID. All the films were of good quality. The patient's dose in millisievert for each target organ were: Group I (SID = 100 cm): Left eye 3,2 (+ ou - 0,66); Right eye 3, 0 (+ ou - 0,82); Thyroid 0,62 (+ ou - 0,09). Group II (SID = 125 cm): Left eye 1,9 (+ ou - 0,48); Right eye 1, 86 (+ ou - 0,50); Thyroid 0,39 (+ ou - 0,08). In conclusion, the increase of SID from 100 to 125 centimeters allows patient's dose reduction by a factor of 1.6 without the alteration of the films quality, hence the reliability of the diagnosis. (author)

  1. Assessment of Brain absorbed X-ray dose during CT- Scan using ImPACT software in Tehran Univeristy hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalilpour M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: CT scan was first introduced into clinical practice in 1972, and since then has grown into one of the predominant diagnostic procedures. In 1998, the UK National Radiological Protection Board reported that 20% of the national collective dose from medical X-ray examinations derived from CT-scans, although it represented only 2% of all X- ray examinations the aim of this study was to determine the X-ray dosage received by patients in brain CT scan."n"n Methods: In this work, we have estimated patient dose arising from CT examination of brain in five hospitals in Tehran. Organ and effective doses were estimated for 150 patients who underwent CT examination of brain. "ImPACT" version 0.99v was used to estimate organ and effective dose. Brain examinations were performed with fixed Kvp, mAs and T (slice thickness for each scanner. "n"n Results: Patients, who were scanned by CT of emam Khomeini center (Toshiba Xvision /EX Scanner, received maximum organ dose (brain and minimum organ dose was delivered to patients who were scanned by CT of amir alam center (Toshiba Xvision /EX Scanner. Maximum effective dose was 1.7 mSv acquired in this study for emam Khomeini haspital, smaller than

  2. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2000-12-01

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO{sub 4}: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin

  3. Doses from Hiroshima mass radiologic gastric surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, S; Sawada, S; Russell, W J [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1980-05-01

    Doses to examinees from mass radiologic surveys of the stomach in Hiroshima Perfecture were estimated by surveying for the frequency of the examinations, and for the technical factors used in them, and by phantom dosimetry. The average surface, active bone marrow and male and female gonad doses per examination were 5.73 rad, 231 mrad, and 20.6 and 140 mrad, respectively. These data will be used in estimating doses from medical X-rays among atomic bomb survivors. By applying them to the Hiroshima population, the genetically significant, per caput mean marrow, and leukemia significant doses were 0.14,8.6 and 7.4 mrad, respectively. There was a benefit-to risk ratio of about 50 for mass gastric surveys performed in 1976. However, the calculated risk was greater than the benefit for examinees under 29 years of age because of the lower incidence of gastric cancer in those under 29 years.

  4. Dose distributions of x-ray fields as shaped with multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Boyer, A.L.; Desobry, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLC) with various blade widths were simulated using standard cerrobend blocks, and three-dimensional dose computations were carried out to study the resultant radiation field edges. The study suggests that multileaf collimation to the outside of the desired field edge will lead to overdose outside the field, whereas multileaf collimation to the inside of the desired field edge will lead to underdose inside the field. When the direction of travel of the leaves with respect to the field edge is near 45 o , the 50% isodose of a multileaf-collimated beam will fall close to the desired edge with no underdose when the leaf corners are allowed to insert into the desired field edge by 1.2 mm for 6 MV x-rays and 1.4 mm for 18 MV x-rays using a 1 cm wide leaf. These blade offsets account for the scattering of photons and electrons in the medium within the penumbral region. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the composition of filters additional of equipment radiological intraoral by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Alana Caroline; Torres, Catarina A.M.P.; Rocha, Ana S.S.; Deniak, Valeriy; Lara, Alessandro L.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Fernandes, Angela; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique

    2013-01-01

    The need for high quality standards for radiographic images in order to make a diagnosis assertive, and being the additional filtration required in the intraoral X-ray equipment show the need of evaluating these filters. This study aims to examine the influence of the elemental composition of the filters of X-ray of dental intraoral equipment in the radiographic images quality. The filters analysis were performed by using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method (EDXRF). Ten conventional filters were analysed. In this study, 33 radiographic exposures were performed using films: twenty radiographs in the incisor region and ten in the molar region, three exposures were also made in the same regions with same conditions without using filter. After radiographs development, optical density was measure and all radiographs were submitted to subjective evaluation by dental radiologists. Data obtained were correlated to effects evaluation of the elemental composition of all filters in the quality of the radiographic images. The elements found were: aluminum, cobalt, copper, sulfur, iron, manganese, titanium, zinc, and zirconium. The images obtained were identified in groups: Molars to 0.3 s; Incisors to 0.2 s; Incisors to 0.3 s, and for the group without filters. From the results obtained it was concluded that both unclear radiographs and ideal radiographs were produced by using filters of elementary common. Therefore, conventional filters evaluated were an acceptable option to produce quality images in dental radiology, despite differences in the composition of the alloys. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the composition of filters additional of equipment radiological intraoral by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Alana Caroline; Torres, Catarina A.M.P.; Rocha, Ana S.S.; Deniak, Valeriy; Lara, Alessandro L.; Paschuk, Sergei A., E-mail: alanacarolinef@gmail.com, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (CPGEI/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial; Fernandes, Angela; Westphalen, Fernando Henrique, E-mail: angelafernandes@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Setor de Ciencias da Saude

    2013-07-01

    The need for high quality standards for radiographic images in order to make a diagnosis assertive, and being the additional filtration required in the intraoral X-ray equipment show the need of evaluating these filters. This study aims to examine the influence of the elemental composition of the filters of X-ray of dental intraoral equipment in the radiographic images quality. The filters analysis were performed by using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method (EDXRF). Ten conventional filters were analysed. In this study, 33 radiographic exposures were performed using films: twenty radiographs in the incisor region and ten in the molar region, three exposures were also made in the same regions with same conditions without using filter. After radiographs development, optical density was measure and all radiographs were submitted to subjective evaluation by dental radiologists. Data obtained were correlated to effects evaluation of the elemental composition of all filters in the quality of the radiographic images. The elements found were: aluminum, cobalt, copper, sulfur, iron, manganese, titanium, zinc, and zirconium. The images obtained were identified in groups: Molars to 0.3 s; Incisors to 0.2 s; Incisors to 0.3 s, and for the group without filters. From the results obtained it was concluded that both unclear radiographs and ideal radiographs were produced by using filters of elementary common. Therefore, conventional filters evaluated were an acceptable option to produce quality images in dental radiology, despite differences in the composition of the alloys. (author)

  7. [Examination of patient dose reduction in cardiovasucular X-ray systems with a metal filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuyoshi; Kato, Kyouichi; Tanabe, Nobuaki; Sakiyama, Koushi; Uchiyama, Yushi; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    In interventional X-ray for cardiology of flat panel digital detector (FPD), the phenomenon that exposure dose was suddenly increased when a subject thickness was thickened was recognized. At that time, variable metal built-in filters in FPD were all off. Therefore, we examined whether dose reduction was possible without affecting a clinical image using metal filter (filter) which we have been conventionally using for dose reduction. About 45% dose reduction was achieved when we measured an exposure dose at 30 cm of acrylic thickness in the presence of a filter. In addition, we measured signal to noise ratio/contrast to noise ratio/a resolution limit by the visual evaluation, and there was no influence by filter usage. In the clinical examination, visual evaluation of image quality of coronary angiography (40 cases) using a 5-point evaluation scale by a physician was performed. As a result, filter usage did not influence the image quality (p=NS). Therefore, reduction of sudden increase of exposure dose was achieved without influencing an image quality by adding filter to FPD.

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  9. Analysis of Dose and Dose Distribution for Patients Undergoing Selected X-Ray Diagnostic Procedures in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schandorf, C.; Tetteh, G.K

    1998-07-01

    The levels of dose and dose distributions for adult patients undergoing five selected common types of X ray examination in Ghana were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) attached to the skin where the beam enters the patient. To assess the performance of each X ray room surveyed, the mean of the entrance surface dose for patients whose statistics were close to a standard patient (70 kg weight and 20 cm AP trunk thickness) were compared to the Commission of the European Communities guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP examinations. The third quartiles dose values were 1.3 mGy, 14.5 mGy, 12.0 mGy and 7.9 mGy for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP respectively. Analysis of the data show that 86%, 58%, 37.5% and 50% of radiographic rooms delivered a mean dose greater than the CEC guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen and skull AP respectively. This suggests that radiographic departments should undertake a review of their radiographic practice in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. (author)

  10. Analysis of Dose and Dose Distribution for Patients Undergoing Selected X-Ray Diagnostic Procedures in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schandorf, C.; Tetteh, G.K.

    1998-01-01

    The levels of dose and dose distributions for adult patients undergoing five selected common types of X ray examination in Ghana were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) attached to the skin where the beam enters the patient. To assess the performance of each X ray room surveyed, the mean of the entrance surface dose for patients whose statistics were close to a standard patient (70 kg weight and 20 cm AP trunk thickness) were compared to the Commission of the European Communities guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP examinations. The third quartiles dose values were 1.3 mGy, 14.5 mGy, 12.0 mGy and 7.9 mGy for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP respectively. Analysis of the data show that 86%, 58%, 37.5% and 50% of radiographic rooms delivered a mean dose greater than the CEC guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen and skull AP respectively. This suggests that radiographic departments should undertake a review of their radiographic practice in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. (author)

  11. Rapid detection of chromosome rearrangement in medical diagnostic X-ray workers by using fluorescence in situ hybridization and study on dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiquan; Sun Yuanming; Li Jin

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Biological doses were estimated for medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: Chromosome rearrangements in X-ray workers were analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with composite whole chromosome paintings number 4 and number 7. Results: The frequency of translocation in medical diagnostic X-ray workers was much higher than that in control group (P<0.01). The biological doses to individual X-ray workers were calculated by their translocation frequency. The translocation frequencies of both FISH and G-banding were in good agreement. Conclusion: The biological doses to X-ray workers are estimated by FISH first when their dosimetry records are not documented

  12. Estimation of doses to patients from ''complex'' conventional X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzado, A.; Vano, E.; Moran, P.; Ruiz, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Castellote, C.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed to estimate organ doses and effective dose-equivalent for patients undergoing three 'complex' examinations (barium meal, barium enema and intravenous urography). The separation of radiological procedures into a set of standard numerical views is based on the use of Monte Carlo conversion factors and measurements within a Remab phantom. Radiation doses measured in a phantom for such examinations were compared with predictions of the ''numerical'' method. Dosimetric measurements with thermoluminescent dosemeters attached to the patient's skin along with measurements of the dose-area product during the examination have enabled the derivation of organ doses and to estimate effective dose-equivalent. Mean frequency weighted values of dose-area product, energy imparted to the patient, doses to a set of organs and effective dose-equivalent in the area of Madrid are reported. Comparisons of results with those from similar surveys in other countries were made. (author)

  13. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of high dose carbon-implanted steel and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviente, J. L.; García, A.; Alonso, F.; Braceras, I.; Oñate, J. I.

    1999-04-01

    A study has been made of the depth dependence of the atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy implanted with 75 keV C + at very high doses (above 10 18 ions cm -2), by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an Ar + sputtering. A Gaussian-like carbon distribution was observed on both materials at the lowest implanted dose. More trapezoidal carbon depth-profiles were found with increasing implanted doses, and a pure carbon layer was observed only on the titanium alloy implanted at the highest dose. The implanted carbon was combined with both base metal and carbon itself to form metallic carbides and graphitic carbon. Furthermore, carbon-enriched carbides were also found by curve fitting the C 1s spectra. The titanium alloy showed a higher carbidic contribution than the steel implanted at the same C + doses. A critical carbon concentrations of about 33 at.% and 23 at.% were measured for the formation of C-C bonds in Ti-6Al-4V and steel samples, respectively. The carbon atoms were bound with metal to form carbidic compounds until these critical concentrations were reached; when this C concentration was exceeded the proportion of C-C bonds increased and resulted in the growth of carbonaceous layers.

  15. Study of the contribution of X-ray and gamma photons to the measured exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriampanarivo, H.L.H.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the contribution of X-rays and gamma radiation to the measured dose in the city of Antananarivo. The annual indoor absorbed dose was studied as well. Measurements were carried out in twelve sites, namely public schools and churches. The mean dose rate lies between (0.34±0.03)μSv/h and (0.38±0.04)μSv/h for most of the sites. Two of them showed values between (0.40±0.04)μSv/h and (0.30±0.03)μSv/h. Mean indoor dose rate is of (0.36±0.04)μSv/h and the annual absorbed dose is (3.16±0.32)mSv/person. Indoor measurements showed mean integral values ranging from (277.22±0,22)cps to (733.66±0,37)cps. The lowest mean count rate is (277.22±0,22)cps, measured in the AMARO site, whereas the highest are (733,66±0,37)cps, (697,81±0,36)cps and (689,32±0,36)cps measured in ALO0 , AKELY, and MASINA respectively. [fr

  16. Skin dose from radiotherapy X-ray beams: the influence of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Metcalfe, P.E.; University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW; Mathur, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    Skin-sparing properties of megavoltage photon beams are compromised by electron contamination. Higher energy beams do not necessarily produce lower surface and basal cell layer doses due to this electron contamination. For a 5x5 cm field size the surface doses for 6 MVp and 18 M)p X-ray beams are 10% and 7% of their respective maxima. However, at a field size of 40 x 40cm the percentage surface dose is 42% for both 6 MVp and 18 MVp beams. The introduction of beam modifying devices such as block trays can further reduce the skin-sparing advantages of high energy photon beams. Using a 10 mm perspex block tray, the surface doses for 6 MVp and 18 MVp beams with a 5 x 5 cm field size are 10% and 8%, respectively. At 40 x 40cm, surface doses are 61% and 63% for 6 MVp and 18 MVp beams, respectively. This trend is followed at the basal cell layer depth. At a depth of 1 mm, 18 MVp beam doses are always at least 5% smaller than 6 MVp doses for the same depth at all field sizes when normalized to their respective Dmax values. Results have shown that higher energy photon beams produce a negligible reduction of the delivered dose to the basal cell layer (0.1 mm). Only a small increase in skin sparing is seen at the dermal layer (1 mm), which can be negated by the increased exit dose from an opposing field. (authors)

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  19. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: rinderknecht1@llnl.gov; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C. [State University of New York at Geneseo, Geneseo, New York 14454 (United States); Steidle, Jeffrey A. [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  20. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant

  1. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  2. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses. Minimizing X-ray exposure with spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Wolfgang [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192 x 0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 x 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDI{sub vol} 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. (orig.)

  3. Medical imaging: Material change for X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, John A.

    2017-10-01

    The X-ray sensitivity of radiology instruments is limited by the materials used in their detectors. A material from the perovskite family of semiconductors could allow lower doses of X-rays to be used for medical imaging. See Letter p.87

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  5. X-ray fluorescence analysis in environmental radiological surveillance using HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera Peraza, E.; Renteria Villalobos, M.; Montero Cabrera, M.E.; Munoz Romero, A.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been proven to be a valuable tool for determining trace quantities of heavy metals, such as uranium and lead, in different types of samples. The present paper demonstrates the applicability of XRF spectrometry to measure the concentrations of these heavy metals in samples from natural ore and soil. The values of uranium concentrations in rock from the Pena Blanca uranium ore, in Chihuahua, Mexico, were calculated for the purpose of precertifying the rock powders samples. The comparison with other techniques, such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and electron microscopy, was used to complete the precertification process, so that the sample powders may be used as secondary standards. The source-sample-detector geometry and the incident angle are the most important factors for obtaining low detection limits. The selected system uses a 57 Co source of about 0.1 mCi to excite the K X-rays from uranium and lead. X-rays were recorded on a CANBERRA HPGe coaxial detector. The comparative results for two incident angles (90 deg and 180 deg ) performed previously by other authors show that the best geometry is the backscattering geometry. In the present paper, using EGS4 code system with Monte Carlo simulation, it was possible to determine the location and distribution of background produced by the Compton edge in the optimized geometry. This procedure allowed to find the minimum detectable concentration of uranium and lead, which was experimentally calculated using standards. The possibility of performing in vivo measurements rapidly and easily, as well as the factors affecting accuracy and the minimum detectable concentration in several samples are also discussed

  6. X-ray fluorescence analysis in environmental radiological surveillance using HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera Peraza, E. [Department of Environmental Radiological Surveillance, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), P.O. Box 31109, Miguel de Cervantes no. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: eduardo.herrera@cimav.edu.mx; Renteria Villalobos, M. [Department of Environmental Radiological Surveillance, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), P.O. Box 31109, Miguel de Cervantes no. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Montero Cabrera, M.E. [Department of Environmental Radiological Surveillance, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), P.O. Box 31109, Miguel de Cervantes no. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Munoz Romero, A. [Department of Environmental Radiological Surveillance, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), P.O. Box 31109, Miguel de Cervantes no. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2004-10-08

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been proven to be a valuable tool for determining trace quantities of heavy metals, such as uranium and lead, in different types of samples. The present paper demonstrates the applicability of XRF spectrometry to measure the concentrations of these heavy metals in samples from natural ore and soil. The values of uranium concentrations in rock from the Pena Blanca uranium ore, in Chihuahua, Mexico, were calculated for the purpose of precertifying the rock powders samples. The comparison with other techniques, such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and electron microscopy, was used to complete the precertification process, so that the sample powders may be used as secondary standards. The source-sample-detector geometry and the incident angle are the most important factors for obtaining low detection limits. The selected system uses a {sup 57}Co source of about 0.1 mCi to excite the K X-rays from uranium and lead. X-rays were recorded on a CANBERRA HPGe coaxial detector. The comparative results for two incident angles (90 deg and 180 deg ) performed previously by other authors show that the best geometry is the backscattering geometry. In the present paper, using EGS4 code system with Monte Carlo simulation, it was possible to determine the location and distribution of background produced by the Compton edge in the optimized geometry. This procedure allowed to find the minimum detectable concentration of uranium and lead, which was experimentally calculated using standards. The possibility of performing in vivo measurements rapidly and easily, as well as the factors affecting accuracy and the minimum detectable concentration in several samples are also discussed.

  7. Analysis of X-ray radiation doses from different types of intervention for cardiovascular patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jun; Cheng Jinglin; Guo Jie; Wang Ailing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the X-ray radiation dose to patients from different cardiovascular interventional procedures and analyze the dose-affecting factors. Methods: In accordance with the A, B, C operators, 442 patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional procedures were collected, including single coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA), congenital heart disease intervention (CHD) and permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation (PCPI), to observe dose area product (DAP), cumulative radiation dose (CD), fluoroscopy time. Results: CD values of patients in groups of CAG, PCI, RFCA, CHD, PCPI were (0.34 ±0.23), (1.33 ±0.76), (0.71 ±0.43), (0.27 ±0.22) and (0.92±0.42) Gy and DAP values were (34.18 ±23.33), (135.92 ±81.14), (79.79 ±50.66),(27.93 ±23.66), and (94.60 ±48.11 ) Gy·cm 2 , respectively. Fluoroscopy time were (4.82 ±3.73), (16.64 ±9.01), (17.04 ± 15.29), (9.60 ±5.97) and (7.31 ±6.45) min. DAP values and fluoroscopy time were highly correlated (r=0.84, P<0.05). Conclusions: There is significant difference in radiation dose for cardiovascular interventional procedures. Radiation dose and fluoroscopy time are directly related to surgeons' proficiency in operations. Improvement of operation proficiency should be carried out to reduce the patients' radiation dose. (authors)

  8. Radiological protection of the patient in the diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.M.C. de

    1983-01-01

    Measures and procedures are given in relation to the radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology. Technical and physical factors of the patient protection are discussed, as radiation beam properties, size of the irradiation field, shieldings, control of the scattered radiation that reaches the imaging record system, films, ecrans and radiographic film processing. General recommendations about the radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology are given. (M.A.) [pt

  9. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Huaidong; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Huang, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ∼1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  10. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Qingjie; Xiao, Tiqiao; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ˜1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  11. Effects of X-rays spectrum on the dose; Efectos del espectro de rayos X sobre la dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez I, J. L.; Hernandez A, P. L.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: johann_greenday@hotmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The X-ray equipment for diagnosis comes in different sizes and shapes depending on the scan type to perform. The X-ray spectrum is the energy distribution of the beam photons and consists of a continuous spectrum of photons braking and discrete spectrum due to the characteristic photons. The knowledge of the X-rays spectrum is important to understand like they affect the voltage changes (k Vp), current (m A), time (s) and the type of filter in the interaction mechanisms between X-rays and patient's body, the image receptor or other material that gets in the beam. Across the spectrum can be estimated the absorbed dose in any point of the patient, the quality of the image and the scattered radiation (which is related to the dose received by the equipment operator). The Monte Carlo method was used by MCNP5 code to calculate the spectrum of X-rays that occurs when a monoenergetic electron beam of 250 keV interact with targets of Mo, Rh and W. The spectra were calculated with and without filter, and the values of ambient dose equivalent were estimated, as well as the air kerma. (Author)

  12. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Huaidong, E-mail: hdjiang@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huang, Qingjie [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ∼1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  13. Survey of doses and frequency of X-ray examinations on children at the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa de Azevedo, Ana Cecilia; Osibote, Adelaja Otolorin; Bastos Boechat, Marcia Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This work aims to evaluate the entrance surface dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) resulting from pediatric radiological procedures with the use of portable X-ray equipments. Materials and methods: The software DoseCal was used to evaluate the doses imparted to patients. The children were classified according to their weight and age groups, and the study included three sectors of the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Results: A total of 518 radiographs have been performed (424 for chest and 94 for abdomen). The statistical data were compared with previously published results. The BOD is presented for the most exposed organs. Conclusion: The mean value of ESD and E varied widely among neonates. The highest number of radiographs per infant peaked 33 for chest examination in the age group 0-1 year

  14. The feasibility of 10 keV X-ray as radiation source in total dose response radiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruoyu; Li Bin; Luo Hongwei; Shi Qian

    2005-01-01

    The standard radiation source utilized in traditional total dose response radiation test is 60 Co, which is environment-threatening. X-rays, as a new radiation source, has the advantages such as safety, precise control of dose rate, strong intensity, possibility of wafer-level test or even on-line test, which greatly reduce cost for package, test and transportation. This paper discussed the feasibility of X-rays replacing 60 Co as the radiation source, based on the radiation mechanism and the effects of radiation on gate oxide. (authors)

  15. Applying the PCXMC software for dose assessment in patients submitted to abdomen and pelvis X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, V.L.S.; Silva, T.A. da

    2009-01-01

    The PCXMC R computational methodology was applied as a evaluation tool of the organ doses in patients submitted to different X-ray conventional diagnoses examinations. Simulations were made based in x-ray parameters and exposure geometry of three patient of same age group in an Emergency Hospital of the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte city. Contributions to the effective dose from critical organs were evaluated and analyzed in terms of patient height and weight for the examinations of abdomen and pelvis. (author)

  16. Relationship between source-surface distance and patient dose in fluoroscopic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Asada, Yasuki; Nishi, Kazuta; Mizuno, Emiko; Hara, Natsue; Orito, Takeo; Kamei, Tetsuya; Koga, Sukehiko

    2000-01-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC provided in its standard IEC 60601-1-3 (1994) to prevent the use during radioscopic irradiation of focal spot to skin distances less than 20 cm if the X-RAY EQUIPMENT is specified for RADIOSCOPY during surgery or 30 cm for other specified applications. This standard was reflected in the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS Z 4701-1997, which provided the minimum distance from focal spot to skin to be 30 cm for the use of a fluoroscopic and radiographic table (Under-table type). However, JIS had formerly provided the minimum distance to be 40 cm and so does the current Medical Treatment Law. The draft revision for the Medical Treatment Law currently discussed has consideration to adopt the value 30 cm in accordance with the current JIS. Our research intended to investigate the impact on the entrance surface dose for the change of the focal spot to skin distance from 40 cm to 30 cm. The result was 20-30% increase of the entrance surface dose for the focal spot to skin distance 30 cm. Taking patient exposure dose into account, we need further and more sufficient discussion with this result before adopting this value to the Medical Treatment Law. (author)

  17. Determinations of dose mean of specific energy for conventional x-rays by variance-measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, B.; Jensen, M.; Lindborg, L.; Samuelson, G.

    1978-05-01

    The dose mean value (zeta) of specific energy of a single event distribution is related to the variance of a multiple event distribution in a simple way. It is thus possible to determine zeta from measurements in high dose rates through observations of the variations in the ionization current from for instance an ionization chamber, if other parameters contribute negligibly to the total variance. With this method is has earlier been possible to obtain results down to about 10 nm in a beam of Co60-γ rays, which is one order of magnitude smaller than the sizes obtainable with the traditional technique. This advantage together with the suggestion that zeta could be an important parameter in radiobiology make further studies of the applications of the technique motivated. So far only data from measurements in beams of a radioactive nuclide has been reported. This paper contains results from measurements in a highly stabilized X-ray beam. The preliminary analysis shows that the variance technique has given reasonable results for object sizes in the region of 0.08 μm to 20 μm (100 kV, 1.6 Al, HVL 0.14 mm Cu). The results were obtained with a proportional counter except for the larger object sizes, where an ionization chamber was used. The measurements were performed at dose rates between 1 Gy/h and 40 Gy/h. (author)

  18. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  19. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  20. Information from the National Institute of Radiation Protection about radiation doses and radiation risks at x-ray screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a specification of data concerning radiation doses and risks at x-ray investigations of lungs. The dose estimations are principally based on measurements performed in 1974 by the National Institute of Radiation Protection. The radiation doses at x-ray screening are of that magnitude that the risk for acute radiation injuries is non-existent. At these low doses it has not either been able to prove that the radiation gives long-range effects as changes in the genes or cancer of late appearance. At considerable higher doses, more than tens of thousands of millirads, a risk of cancer appearance at a small part of all irradiated persons has been proved, based on the assumption that the cancer risk is proportional to the radiation dose. Cancer can thus occure at low radiation doses too. Because of the mass radiography in Sweden 1974 about twenty cases of cancer may appear in the future. (M.S.)

  1. Chromosome aberrations induced by low doses of X-rays in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemba-Zoltowska, B.; Bocian, E.; Rosiek, O.; Sablinski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Curves derived from the dose-response data for the yield of aberrations in human lymphocytes can be represented by a quadratic equation at all but low dose ranges. A calibration curve has therefore been determined at a low dose range of X-radiation (11.5 to 57.5 rad). The frequencies of dicentrics plus centric rings, and of acentrics were better fitted by linear dose-response models than quadratic. The linearity of the relationship indicated that asymmetrical chromosome exchanges at low doses of radiation are produced predominantly by a single track mechanism. A dose-response curve for dicentrics plus centric rings (5 to 60 rad) has also been derived by pooling published data with the results of this study. This calibration curve is relevant to cytogenetic dosimetry in radiological protection. (UK)

  2. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  3. X-ray diagnostic installation with an image intensifier TV chain and a dose rate control device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duemmling, K; Schott, O

    1977-04-28

    The person performing the examination can key up the dose rate briefly via the X-ray tube current, e.g., if the movement of a contrast medium is to be observed on the video screen and only certain phases in this movement, which are of diagnostic significance, are to be viewed more closely. The upward change necessary to reduce quantum noise by a certain factor is made by means of a switch. This at the same time results in a reduction of brightness (over-exposure) of the X-ray image on the video screen by actuating an aperture system between the image intensifier, and the TV camera. To prevent the X-ray tube from being overloaded during key-up of the dose rate, a time limit switch is installed in the control system.

  4. Changes in the electrical properties of pure and doped polymers under the influence of small doses of X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, S. A.; Madi, N. K.; Kassem, M. E.; El-Khatib, A.

    A study has been made of the temperature dependence of the d.c. conductivity of pure and borated low density polyethylene LDPE (4% and 8% borax). The above calculations were carried out before and after X-ray irradiation. The irradiation dose was varied from 0 to 1000 rad. The d.c. electrical conductivity of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and perspex was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 20°C to 100°C. These samples were irradiated with X-rays of dose 200 rad. The variation of the d.c. conductivity of the treated samples versus temperature was investigated. The results reveal that the d.c. conductivity of LDPE is highly affected by radiation and/or dopant. In addition, the sensitivity of the explored polymers to X-ray irradiation is strongly dependent on its chemical nature.

  5. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2007-01-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were inter compared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 99m Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  6. Intercomparison of ionization chambers in standard X-ray beams, at radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana Carolina Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Since the calibration of radiation measurement instruments and the knowledge of their major characteristics are very important subjects, several different types of ionization chambers were intercompared in terms of their calibration coefficients and their energy dependence, in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radioprotection standard beams. An intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine was performed, using three radionuclides: 67 Ga, 201 Tl and 99m Tc; the results obtained were all within the requirements of the national standard CNEN-NE-3.05. In order to complete the range of radiation qualities of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, standard radiation beam qualities, radiation protection and low energy radiation therapy levels, were established, according international recommendations. Three methodologies for the calibration of unsealed ionization chambers in X-ray beams were studied and compared. A set of Victoreen ionization chambers, specially designed for use in laboratorial intercomparisons, was submitted to characterization tests. The performance of these Victoreen ionization chambers showed that they are suitable for use in radioprotection beams, because the results obtained agree with international recommendations. However, these Victoreen ionization chambers can be used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams only with some considerations, since their performance in these beams, especially in relation to the energy dependence and stabilization time tests, did not agree with the international recommendations for dosimeters used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology beams. This work presents data on the performance of several types of ionization chambers in different X-ray beams, that may be useful for choosing the appropriate instrument for measurements in ionizing radiation beams. (author)

  7. European Guidelines for AP/PA chest X-rays: routinely satisfiable in a paediatric radiology division?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschauner, Sebastian; Marterer, Robert; Gübitz, Michael; Kalmar, Peter I; Talakic, Emina; Weissensteiner, Sabine; Sorantin, Erich

    2016-02-01

    Accurate collimation helps to reduce unnecessary irradiation and improves radiographic image quality, which is especially important in the radiosensitive paediatric population. For AP/PA chest radiographs in children, a minimal field size (MinFS) from "just above the lung apices" to "T12/L1" with age-dependent tolerance is suggested by the 1996 European Commission (EC) guidelines, which were examined qualitatively and quantitatively at a paediatric radiology division. Five hundred ninety-eight unprocessed chest X-rays (45% boys, 55% girls; mean age 3.9 years, range 0-18 years) were analysed with a self-developed tool. Qualitative standards were assessed based on the EC guidelines, as well as the overexposed field size and needlessly irradiated tissue compared to the MinFS. While qualitative guideline recommendations were satisfied, mean overexposure of +45.1 ± 18.9% (range +10.2% to +107.9%) and tissue overexposure of +33.3 ± 13.3% were found. Only 4% (26/598) of the examined X-rays completely fulfilled the EC guidelines. This study presents a new chest radiography quality control tool which allows assessment of field sizes, distances, overexposures and quality parameters based on the EC guidelines. Utilising this tool, we detected inadequate field sizes, inspiration depths, and patient positioning. Furthermore, some debatable EC guideline aspects were revealed. • European Guidelines on X-ray quality recommend exposed field sizes for common examinations. • The major failing in paediatric radiographic imaging techniques is inappropriate field size. • Optimal handling of radiographic units can reduce radiation exposure to paediatric patients. • Constant quality control helps ensure optimal chest radiographic image acquisition in children.

  8. Evaluation of build-up dose from 6 MV X-rays under pelvic and abdominal patient immobilisation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, M.J.Martin J. E-mail: mbutson@usa.netmbutson@guessmail.com; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-06-01

    The use of pelvic and abdominal immobilisation devices in radiotherapy is required for accurate positioning and repositioning of patients during their fractionated treatment delivered normally over a period of 5-6 weeks. 6 MV X-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator have a skin sparing effect whereby the skin dose delivered is considerably less than that received by the tumour. The treatment through a vacuum compressed immobilisation device (Vacbag) however increases the dose delivered to the skin by interactions of the X-rays within the Vacbag material. For example, the basal layer doses increased from 16% for an open field to 52% of maximum with a bag thickness of 2.5 cm for a 10 cmx10 cm field at 6 MV X-ray energy. At the same field size the dermal skin layer (1 mm depth) doses increased from 44% (no bag) to 60% for a bag thickness of 2.5 cm at 6 MV X-rays. The Vacbag should be placed outside the treatment field whenever possible to keep skin dose to a minimum level.

  9. Evaluation of build-up dose from 6 MV X-rays under pelvic and abdominal patient immobilisation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, M.J.Martin J.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    The use of pelvic and abdominal immobilisation devices in radiotherapy is required for accurate positioning and repositioning of patients during their fractionated treatment delivered normally over a period of 5-6 weeks. 6 MV X-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator have a skin sparing effect whereby the skin dose delivered is considerably less than that received by the tumour. The treatment through a vacuum compressed immobilisation device (Vacbag) however increases the dose delivered to the skin by interactions of the X-rays within the Vacbag material. For example, the basal layer doses increased from 16% for an open field to 52% of maximum with a bag thickness of 2.5 cm for a 10 cmx10 cm field at 6 MV X-ray energy. At the same field size the dermal skin layer (1 mm depth) doses increased from 44% (no bag) to 60% for a bag thickness of 2.5 cm at 6 MV X-rays. The Vacbag should be placed outside the treatment field whenever possible to keep skin dose to a minimum level

  10. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnav R. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s. The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1 and dynamic (group 2 modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3, digital intraoral radiography (group 4, and CBCT scan (group 5 using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α=0.01 in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future.

  11. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  12. Effect of field size on the reaction of pig skin to single doses of X rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopewell, J W; Young, C M.A. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford (UK)

    1982-05-01

    The importance of the size of the treatment area for the response of the skin to radiation has been studied in the pig. The responses of skin areas of 16 cm/sup 2/ (4 x 4 cm) and 64cm/sup 2/ (16 x 4 cm) were compared after single doses of X rays. In the initial 3-9-week period after irradiation the severity of the erythema reaction, which is associated with epidermal cell death, was not influenced by the area of skin irradiated. For the later dermal response (10-16 weeks) a similar result was obtained. The dose required to produce dermal necrosis in 50% of the fields treated (ED/sub 50/) was approximately 2070 cGy for both field sizes. Additional studies have shown that the ED/sub 50/ for dermal necrosis was not influenced by the age of animals at the time of irradiation. This was despite considerable differences in the vascular density and blood flow in pig skin with increasing age. The apparent contradiction between the results of this experimental study in the pig, which shows no effect of field size, and currently accepted clinical practice is discussed.

  13. Evaluation of the entrance skin dose due to paediatric chest X-rays examinations carried out at a great hospital in Rio de Janeiro city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadain, K.E.M.; Azevedo, A.C.P.; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Mota, H.C.; Goncalves, O.D.; Guebel, M.R.N.

    2001-01-01

    A dosimetric survey in paediatric radiology is currently being carried out at the paediatric unit of a great hospital in Rio de Janeiro city, aiming the assessment of patient doses and image quality. The aim of this work was to estimate the entrance skin dose for frontal and lateral chest X-rays exposure to paediatric patients. Three examination techniques were investigated, namely PA, AP and lateral positions. For entrance skin dose evaluation, two different TL dosimeters were used, namely LiF:Mg,Ti and CaSO4:Dy. The age intervals considered were 0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. The results obtained with both dosimeters are similar and the entrance skin dose values evaluated for the different age intervals considered are compared with previous values found in Brazil and also in Europe. (author)

  14. Measurement of X-ray for the dose area product and spectrum by the added filtration in Rando phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Woong; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The most important point in the medical use of radiation is to minimize the patient entrance dose while maintaining the diagnostic information. Low-energy photons (long-wave X-ray) are unnecessary among diagnostic X-ray because they are mostly absorbed and increase the patient's entrance dose. The most effective method to eliminate the low-energy photon is use of a filtering plate. Using a filter appropriate for the image will maintain diagnostic value. Obtaining an effective image allows comparison of the resulting images in a logical objective way. This experiment was performed to determine the quality of image dosimeter when there is no filter, and when 2 mm Al, 0.1 mm Cu + 1 mm Al, 0.2 mm Cu + 1 mm Al filters are used. Using TORECK PD-8100 dose area products meter placed on top of an abdominal phantom, we measured the dose when the filter changes in this condition 85 kVp, 40 mAs, anode angle 13, source image distance 100 cm, 20 cm × 20 cm. We used the SRS-78 program for accurate comparison because we could not evaluate the difference in the image optically. The spectrum changed due to the emission of X-rays as the filter changed. We observed that the use of a filter eliminated the low-energy photons and revealed continuous X-ray and special X-ray. Therefore, the experiment highlighted the advantages of filters and confirmed that there are no changes in the quality of image through signal to noise ratio, peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error comparison. We found that the use of filter did not lead to distortions in the image or drop in diagnostic value while minimizing the radiation dose. This means that it can help manage long-term patient dose. We conclude that we need to recommend the use of the filter as it reduces the area of dose.

  15. European Guidelines for AP/PA chest X-rays: routinely satisfiable in a paediatric radiology division?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschauner, Sebastian; Marterer, Robert; Guebitz, Michael; Weissensteiner, Sabine; Sorantin, Erich [Medical University of Graz, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Kalmar, Peter I. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Talakic, Emina [Medical University of Graz, Division of General Radiological Diagnostics, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    Accurate collimation helps to reduce unnecessary irradiation and improves radiographic image quality, which is especially important in the radiosensitive paediatric population. For AP/PA chest radiographs in children, a minimal field size (MinFS) from ''just above the lung apices'' to ''T12/L1'' with age-dependent tolerance is suggested by the 1996 European Commission (EC) guidelines, which were examined qualitatively and quantitatively at a paediatric radiology division. Five hundred ninety-eight unprocessed chest X-rays (45 % boys, 55 % girls; mean age 3.9 years, range 0-18 years) were analysed with a self-developed tool. Qualitative standards were assessed based on the EC guidelines, as well as the overexposed field size and needlessly irradiated tissue compared to the MinFS. While qualitative guideline recommendations were satisfied, mean overexposure of +45.1 ± 18.9 % (range +10.2 % to +107.9 %) and tissue overexposure of +33.3 ± 13.3 % were found. Only 4 % (26/598) of the examined X-rays completely fulfilled the EC guidelines. This study presents a new chest radiography quality control tool which allows assessment of field sizes, distances, overexposures and quality parameters based on the EC guidelines. Utilising this tool, we detected inadequate field sizes, inspiration depths, and patient positioning. Furthermore, some debatable EC guideline aspects were revealed. (orig.)

  16. Scattered fractions of dose from 18 and 25 MV X-ray radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobe, J.; Rodgers, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Jackson, J.; Popescu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, measurements have been made at a few energies to estimate the scattered fraction of dose from the patient in medical radiotherapy operations. This information has been a useful aid in the determination of shielding requirements for these facilities. With these measurements, known characteriztics of photons, and various other known parameters, Monte Carlo codes are being used to calculate the scattered fractions and hence the shielding requirements for the photons of other energies commonly used in radiotherapeutic applications. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) acquired a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (linac) which was previously located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. This linac provides an X-ray beam of 25 MV photons and electron beams with energies up to 32 MeV. The housing on the gantry was permanently removed from the accelerator during installation. A Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator was used to produce the 18 MV photons at the Frederick Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Therapy Center in Frederick, MD. This paper represents a study of the photon dose scattered from a patient in typical radiation treatment situations as it relates to the dose delivered at the isocenter in water. The results of these measurements will be compared to Monte Carlo calculations. Photon spectral measurements were not made at this time. Neutron spectral measurements were made on this Sagittaire machine in its previous location and that work was not repeated here, although a brief study of the neutron component of the 18 and 25 MV linacs was performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) to determine the isotropy of the neutron dose. (author)

  17. Survival of V79 cells after low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Fowler, J.F.; Hodgkiss, R.J.; Jones, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    Doses of X-rays of the order 1-3 Gy are used in clinical multifraction regimes. Reduction in oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) and sensitizer enhancement ratios have been reported for CHO cells. The errors in determining low levels of cell kill are largely influenced by sampling and dilution errors. The authors have aimed to reduce these errors by increasing the sample size and reducing dilutions. To further assess the uncertainties involved in these experiments the data were pooled from three independent series of experiments. Asynchronous log phase Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells have been irradiated attached to glass Petri dishes in Eagle's MEM + 10% fcs at a dose rate of 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ under air + 5% CO/sub 2/ or nitrogen + 5% CO/sub 2/ at 18 0 C. Survival in the range 10/sup -1/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ surviving fraction (SF) was identical at 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ and 3.93 Gy min/sup -1/. Many previous experiments have given an OER = 3.1 at 10/sup -2/-10/sup -3/ survival. Least squares fit to the linear quadratic function log S = -(αD + βD/sup 2/) gave an OER≅3.2 at SF = 10/sup -2/. Below 6 Gy air dose (>0.2 SF) OER was reduced, but was still ≅ 2.4 at 2 Gy. The linear quadratic function gave an OER for a ≅ 1.5 (the limiting low-dose OER) and √β≅3.2

  18. Comparison of the dose surface product in patients with X-ray contrast examinations of the stomach with intermittent and continuous radiographic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porzel, C.

    1975-01-01

    After commenting on the proplems of radiation exposure during X-raying and a brief survey of the development of image storage systems, the author explains the pulsed storage system used for X-raying the stomach instead of conventional X-raying. Applying the intermittent X-raying method, the exposure dose could be reduced by 75%, especially in patients with a strong abdominal girth. Advantages and disadvantages and possible ways to use the method for angiography, angiocardiography and X-raying in connection with bone operations are discussed. (ORU) [de

  19. Numerical variation of cell lysosomes of the proximal convoluted tubules of mice Kidneys submitted to different X-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Lapa, R. de C.R. da; Pacheco, I.P.; Segreto, C.

    1984-01-01

    The number of cell lysosomes of the proximal convoluted tubules of mice Kidneys (Mus musculus) before and after whole-body irradiation with different X-ray doses is confronted. The mice were sacrificed after 72 hours and the cortex fragments were conduct to electron microscopy. A statistically significant numerical reduction of the lysosomas was observed in 72 hours. (M.A.C.) [pt

  20. Establishment of radiation doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in a large pediatric hospital in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olgar, T.; Sahmaran, T.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients are more sensitive to ionizing radiation when compared with adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses for some common pediatric x-ray examinations performed with various digital radiography systems. Quality control tests of the digital radiography systems were carried out according to international published protocols before the pediatric dose measurements. Radiation dose measurement was performed by using the x-ray tube outputs and thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement methods. In the present study, radiation doses were assessed for 247 chest, 230 pelvis, 194 skull and 73 abdomen x-ray examinations and in total 744 pediatric patients doses were measured. Pediatric patients were classified into four age groups 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 years as given by European Commission guidance. Effective doses were determined for each examination using a PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo program. The mean measured entrance skin doses for the age interval 1-5 years and AP projection by using tube output measurement methods were 149 μGy for chest, 304 μGy for pelvis, 387 μGy for skull and 199 μGy for abdomen examinations. The radiation dose results obtained in this study were in the range of the published results in the literature. (authors)

  1. Validation of dose-response calibration curve for X-Ray field of CRCN-NE/CNEN: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laís Melo; Mendonç, Julyanne Conceição de Goes; Andrade, Aida Mayra Guedes de; Hwang, Suy F.; Mendes, Mariana Esposito; Lima, Fabiana F.; Melo, Ana Maria M.A.

    2017-01-01

    It is very important in accident investigations that accurate estimating of absorbed dose takes place, so that it contributes to medical decisions and overall assessment of long-term health consequences. Analysis of chromosome aberrations is the most developed method for biological monitoring, and frequencies of dicentric chromosomes are related to absorbed dose of human peripheral blood lymphocytes using calibration curves. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that each biodosimetry laboratory sets its own calibration curves, given that there are intrinsic differences in protocols and dose interpretations when using calibration curves produced in other laboratories, which could add further uncertainties to dose estimations. The Laboratory for Biological Dosimetry CRCN-NE recently completed dose-response calibration curves for X ray field. Curves of chromosomes dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings were made using Dose Estimate. This study aimed to validate the calibration curves dose-response for X ray with three irradiated samples. Blood was obtained by venipuncture from healthy volunteer and three samples were irradiated by x-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses (0,5Gy, 1Gy and 2Gy). The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN Metrology Service with PANTAK X-ray equipment, model HF 320. The frequency of dicentric and centric rings chromosomes were determined in 500 metaphases per sample after cultivation of lymphocytes, and staining with Giemsa 5%. Results showed that the estimated absorbed doses are included in the confidence interval of 95% of real absorbed dose. These Dose-response calibration curves (dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings) seems valid, therefore other tests will be done with different volunteers. (author)

  2. Validation of dose-response calibration curve for X-Ray field of CRCN-NE/CNEN: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laís Melo; Mendonç, Julyanne Conceição de Goes; Andrade, Aida Mayra Guedes de; Hwang, Suy F.; Mendes, Mariana Esposito; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mendes_sb@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares, (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Ana Maria M.A., E-mail: july_cgm@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Vitória de Santo Antão, PE (Brazil). Centro Acadêmico de Vitória

    2017-07-01

    It is very important in accident investigations that accurate estimating of absorbed dose takes place, so that it contributes to medical decisions and overall assessment of long-term health consequences. Analysis of chromosome aberrations is the most developed method for biological monitoring, and frequencies of dicentric chromosomes are related to absorbed dose of human peripheral blood lymphocytes using calibration curves. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that each biodosimetry laboratory sets its own calibration curves, given that there are intrinsic differences in protocols and dose interpretations when using calibration curves produced in other laboratories, which could add further uncertainties to dose estimations. The Laboratory for Biological Dosimetry CRCN-NE recently completed dose-response calibration curves for X ray field. Curves of chromosomes dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings were made using Dose Estimate. This study aimed to validate the calibration curves dose-response for X ray with three irradiated samples. Blood was obtained by venipuncture from healthy volunteer and three samples were irradiated by x-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses (0,5Gy, 1Gy and 2Gy). The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN Metrology Service with PANTAK X-ray equipment, model HF 320. The frequency of dicentric and centric rings chromosomes were determined in 500 metaphases per sample after cultivation of lymphocytes, and staining with Giemsa 5%. Results showed that the estimated absorbed doses are included in the confidence interval of 95% of real absorbed dose. These Dose-response calibration curves (dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings) seems valid, therefore other tests will be done with different volunteers. (author)

  3. Dose measurements in chest diagnostic X rays: Adult and paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M. B.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    This survey was carried out in the state of Sao Paulo (Brazil)). The health services located in the state perform approximately 321 radiological examinations per 1000 inhabitants. A representative sample of 200 health services was selected using sampling techniques, and a postal dosimetric kit was sent to each one who agreed to participate. The kit evaluates entrance surface dose (ESD), making use of thermoluminescence dosemeters attached to the skin of patients. The radiographic technique employed and some physical data of patients were also gathered. In this stage of the survey, only chest examinations, projections AP, PA and LAT, were evaluated. A total of 917 ESD values were measured, which correspond to 588 patients and 74 examination rooms. The ESD to patients were analysed according to weight and age. Groups of standard patients (children and adults) were selected, and reference doses were determined. Large variations of ESD were observed, indicating that much can be done in order to reduce the patient doses by changing the technical parameters. Moreover, the results of ESD in paediatric radiology point to the necessity of special attention in the practice of radiological examinations in this age group. (authors)

  4. Quality control of diagnostic x-ray units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, O.; Milacic, S.; Jovicic, D.; Tanaskovic, I.

    2001-01-01

    The quality control program for diagnostic x-ray units has started at the Institute of Occupational and Radiological Health during 1990. It includes, among other measurements, reproducibility of dose, high voltage and exposure time. Dose reproducibility was less than 5% for 70% of tested x-ray units. The exposure time and high voltage reproducibility were less than 5% in 60% cases. The cassettes with amplifying foils made from components of rare earth are used in 10% of all x-ray departments. It is very important to work as much as it is possible to modernize general infrastructure as the radiological protection of patients would be better. (author)

  5. Methodology for calibration of ionization chambers for X-ray of low energy in absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.T.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The beams of low energy X-ray (10 to 150 kV) are used in several places in the world to treat a wide variety of surface disorders, and between these malignancies. As in Brazil, at this moment, there is no calibration laboratory providing the control service or calibration of parallel plate ionization chambers, the aim of this project was to establish a methodology for calibration of this kind of ionization chambers at low energy X-ray beams in terms of absorbed dose to water using simulators in the LCI. (author)

  6. Experimental determination of foetal doses received during conventional X rays explorations of troncus. Influence of the lead apron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pifarre, X.; Brualla, L.; Ruiz, J.; Escalada, C.; Planes, D.; Paredes, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the real doses received by pregnant women during some X rays conventional explorations of thorax and abdomen. The procedure that has been used is the measurement of doses by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters located on the uterus position of a Random Phantom, and simulating different conventional X rays explorations. The results of such measurements are compared with other data published in ICRP 34, which were our reference. We have obtained smaller doses with the measurements than those derived from ICRP 34. The causes of these differences are analysed. The influence of the use of lead apron to protect abdomen during thorax examination is also analysed, computing the real value of this protection. We conclude that it seems interesting to obtain measurements of theses doses with our own equipment and techniques, because it offers a more realistic approximation to real doses received by patients. (author)

  7. Development of a head simulator for exposure dose estimation on patients exposed by odontological X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, Francisco N.; Batista, Eutropio V.; Santos, Adriano M.

    2009-01-01

    In the obtaining a odontological radiography, the individual is exposed to te radiation and part of that radiation will be absorbed by his organism. The estimative of absorbed dose can be accomplished through calculations where are considered: the distance from the source to the individual, the energy of the emitted X-ray at the moment of the exposure and the bode region exposed; and as that option does not possess great precision, alternative forms are seek for the quantification such doses. This work proposes the construction of a head simulator to be used in the estimative of absorbed dose in patients, during the accomplishment of the odontological radiographic examinations. As a perspective of work, it is intended to use the phantom to help in the absorbed doses for obtainment of parameters in X-ray odontological devices, contributing of image obtainment with more quality and less radiation dose in the patient

  8. Notes on the history of the radiological study of Egyptian mummies: from X-rays to new imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmacini, P; Piacentini, P

    2008-08-01

    A few centuries after the practice of mummification was finally abolished in the seventh century A.D., mummies began to capture the collective imagination, exerting a mysterious fascination that continues to this day. From the beginning, the radiological study of Egyptian mummies permitted the collection not only of medical data but also of anthropological and archaeological evidence. The first radiological study of an Egyptian mummy was performed by Flinders Petrie shortly after the discovery of X-rays in 1895, and since then, radiology has never stopped investigating these special patients. By the end of the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) scanning permitted more in-depth studies to be carried out without requiring the mummies to be removed from their cartonnage. CT images can be used to obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of the mummy that provides important new information, in part thanks to the virtual endoscopy technique known as "fly through". Moreover, starting from CT data and using sophisticated graphics software, one can reconstruct an image of the face of the mummified individual at the time of his or her death. The history of imaging, from its origins until now, from the simplest to the most sophisticated technique, allows us to appreciate why these studies have been, and still are, fundamental in the study of Egyptian mummies.

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  10. Response to challenging dose of x-rays as a predictive assay for molecular epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Human biomonitoring, as a tool to identify or quantify the potential risk from genotoxic exposures, has gained increasing interest especially in the areas of cancer risk assessment and diseases treatment. Chromosome aberrations resulting from direct DNA breakage or from inhibition of DNA repair or synthesis, measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used in occupational health surveillance programs in order to assess risks from exposures. Many results in our human monitoring studies have shown influence of the environmental or occupational exposure on the cytogenetic damage detected in lymphocytes, confirming both, the association with adverse health outcome and the influence of life style related confounding factors. Susceptibility to the environmental agent actions was also evaluated in lymphocytes in the studies of variation between responses to the challenging dose of UV or X-rays followed by the evaluation of the repair capacity of the DNA damage induced by a challenging dose. The induced and residual DNA damage was analyzed with the use of SCGE assay. Susceptibility and repair capacities of healthy donors and cancer patients were compared. Studies have shown a good correlation between DNA damage induced in vivo or in vitro and cytogenetic measures. Results from studies on susceptibilities and repair competence performed in occupationally exposed and unexposed 475 healthy donors and patients with diagnosed cancer are discussed. Significantly lower efficiency of repair process was observed in cancer patients. The possible effects on repair competency of various occupational exposures and influence of the diet and other confounding factors is shown. Although in our preliminary studies comet assay failed to detect DNA damage repair disorders in a teratoma immature infant, though, prospective use of a challenging dose of radiation combined with the comet assay as a predictive assay is suggested and limitation discussed

  11. Determination of mean glandular dose on patients and phantom in X-ray mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Vassileva, J.

    2008-01-01

    The statistics of breast cancer rate in Bulgaria show a tendency towards increase of the morbidity from this disease. Last years campaigns against breast cancer are organized yearly. This leads to an increased number of screening and diagnostic mammograms that are made in the country. The dose associated with the examination is very low but not slightingly small. The glandular tissue in the breast is considered to be the most sensitive in relation to the radiation exposure. Several publications propose different methods, measurement set up or conversion coefficients for the calculation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) delivered to the breast during the X-ray examination. The question about the standardization of the measurement procedures arises since the differences in the results obtained using different methodologies may be quite big. The aim of this work is to develop a standard procedure for the measurement of MGD based on the recommendations mentioned in the European protocol on dosimetry in mammography, the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening and the Code of practice: TRS 457 of the IAEA. Five contemporary film-screen mammography units were included in this study. Attention should be paid to the measurement set up. The reference point is chosen 6 cm from the chest wall edge laterally centered. If an ionization chamber is used for dose measurements the compression plate should be placed in close contact with it. If solid state detectors are used the compression plate should be put away from the detector and the output recalculated like if the plate is near the detector. The conversion coefficients for age dependence are not used in this study as not appropriate for the population included in it. PMMA measurements for the determination of diagnostic reference levels could be used but more correct results would be obtained with patient measurements

  12. A Study on the Neutron Dose Distribution in Case of 10 MV X-rays Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Soo; Shin, Seong Soo; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang

    2008-01-01

    This study is to measure the radiation dose of neutrons generated by the particle accelerator during X-ray (photon) treatment with a neutron detection method by using CR-39, and to research how the generation of neutrons may incur problems associated with radiation doses for patient treatment when using high energy photons for cancer treatment as a clinical application. The findings are summarized as follows : The results showed that average 0.35 mSv was measured with exposure of 1 Gy photon in case of fast neutron, 0.65 mSv with exposure of 2 Gy photon, 1.82 mSv exposure of 5 Gy, 0.26 mSv with exposure of 1 Gy photon in case of thermal neutron, 0.56 mSv with exposure of 2 Gy photon, and 1.23 mSv with exposure of 5 Gy of photon. By measuring the occurrence of neutron by using Wedge Filter, it has been confirmed that the occurrence of neutrons increased when using Wedge Filter. The results also showed that more neutrons were detected over the existing experiments when using an SRS Cone requiring high doses of radiation. Total 2.85 mSv neutrons were found on the average with exposure of 5 Gy photon in case of fast neutron and 1.37 mSv neutrons were found on the average with exposure of 5 Gy photon in case of thermal neutron. During the general treatment, about 1.6 times more neutrons over 5 Gy photon were found in case of fast neutron and about 1.12 time more neutrons over 5 Gy photon were found in case of thermal neutron.

  13. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng [Nambu Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Bae [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10{sup 6}, 13.901 x 10{sup 6}, 14.153 x 10{sup 6}, 13.831 x 10{sup 6}, 14.137 x 10{sup 6}, 14.677 x 10{sup 6} respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body.

  14. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng; Park, Jong Bae

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10 6 , 13.901 x 10 6 , 14.153 x 10 6 , 13.831 x 10 6 , 14.137 x 10 6 , 14.677 x 10 6 respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body

  15. Performance assessment of patient dosimetry services and X-ray quality assurance instruments used in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, S.; Palethrope, J.E.; Peach, D.; Bradley, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiences of the Regional Radiation Physics and Protection Service (RRPPS) in performance assessment of diagnostic X-ray QA instrumentation and on-patient dosemeters are recounted. Issues relating to the provision of realistic and reproducible reference conditions for calibrated X-irradiations are considered and summary statistics from test measurements of dose and kVp meters are provided. For both dose and kVp meters it is indicated that as many as 25% of instruments used in routine use in the U.K. may require some adjustment before they can truly be said to be performing as the manufacturer intended. Results from intercomparison exercises for patient dosimetry services are also discussed. It is apparent that, for those centres participating in the exercise, dose assessments are generally being obtained to within a bias and a relative standard deviation of less then 10%

  16. Hard X-ray dose intensity and spatial distribution in a plasma focus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roomi et al [17] studied the effect of applied voltage and nitrogen gas pressure ... optimum conditions for X-ray production; their results showed that at each discharge ..... [23] G Foldiak, Industrial application of radioisotopes (Elsevier Science, ...

  17. Estimation of population doses from diagnostic medical examinations in Japan, 1974. IV. Dose estimation of fetus exposed in utero to diagnostic x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Kumamoto, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1976-07-01

    In fetus exposed in utero to diagnostic x rays for the medical examinations of the mother, the absorbed dose has been estimated on the basis of a 1974 nation wide radiological survey. The results of the survey showed that the number of radiographs per year connected with pregnant women was 0.32 million for chest examination excluding mass surveys. 0.29 million for obstetrical examinations including pelvimetry, and 0.21 million for abdominal and pelvic examinations with a total of 0.82 million. The dose absorbed in the fetus was measured with an ionization chamber placed at the hypothetical center of the fetus in an ''average woman'' Rando phantom in which a maternal body was simulated by adding MixDp materials. ''The collective dose'' to the fetus in the pregnant women receiving a given type of examination was calculated from the number of radiographs per year connected with the pregnant women and the fetal doses. The percapita mean marrow dose (CMD), the leukemia significant dose (LSD) and the genetically significant dose (GSD) for the fetus were determined from the collective dose, taking into account the birth expectancy, the child expectancy, life expectancy and significant factor for the fetus. The collective dose to the fetus was estimated to be 9.3 x 10/sup 4/ man rad per year. The resultant values of CMD, LSD and GSD were 0.81 mrad per year, 0.79 mrad per person per year and 1.44 mrad per person per year, respectively.

  18. The DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Zoulian; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Song Xiujun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detect the DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Evaluation the level of DNA damage of human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm after high doses of X-ray. Methods: Using human peripheral blood with normal blood routine and normal sperm,give the dose of 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy, 6 Gy, 8 Gy, 10 Gy X-ray radiation with energy of 6MU. Detect the percentage of comet-like tail, tail length and content of DNA in tail of whole blood cell's DNA and sperm's DNA by SCGE technique in 1 hour. Results: The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were 1.00±0.10%, 2.1±1.5%, respectively, have an evidently variance in 0 Gy group (υ=18, t=2.31>1.734, P 1.734, P 1.734, P<0.05). The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were all 100%, 100%, have no-statistical significance in 8 Gy, 10 Gy group. Conclusion: The evidence is powerful enough. That the sperm's SCGE is more sensitive than peripheral blood nucleated cell's SCGE in reflect the X-ray damage in a certain extent (2-6 Gy). (authors)

  19. Frequency and doses of diagnostic and interventional X-ray applications. Trends between 2007 and 2014; Haeufigkeit und Dosis diagnostischer und interventioneller Roentgenanwendungen. Trends zwischen 2007 und 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekolla, E.A. [BfS - Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung Medizinischer und Beruflicher Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany); Schegerer, A.A.; Griebel, J.; Brix, G.

    2017-07-15

    In Germany, approximately 95% of man-made radiation exposure of the population results from diagnostic and interventional X-ray procedures. Thus, radiation protection of patients in this field of application is of great importance. Quantification and evaluation of current data on the frequency and doses of X-ray procedures as well as temporal trends for the years 2007-2014. For outpatients the frequency of X-ray procedures was estimated using reimbursement data from health insurances and for inpatients by means of hospital statistics. For the years under review, representative values for the effective dose per X-ray application were determined mainly from data reported by X-ray departments to the competent authorities. In 2014 approximately 140 million X-ray procedures were performed in Germany with some 40% from dental examinations. On average 1.7 procedures per inhabitant and year were almost constantly carried out between 2007 and 2014. Besides dental diagnostics, X-ray examinations of the skeleton and thorax were performed most frequently. The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations increased by approximately 40%. The increase in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was even more pronounced with approximately 55% but overall CT examinations were still performed more often than MRI. The doses per X-ray procedure were only slightly reduced, despite the various dose reduction approaches established in recent years; therefore, the mean effective dose per inhabitant increased from approximately 1.4 mSv in 2007 to 1.6 mSv in 2014, mainly due to the increasing frequency of CT examinations. The principles of justification and optimization of radiological procedures are to be consistently applied in each individual instance, especially in the case of CT examinations. (orig.) [German] In Deutschland resultieren etwa 95 % der zivilisatorischen Strahlenexposition der Bevoelkerung aus diagnostischen und interventionellen Roentgenanwendungen, sodass dem Strahlenschutz

  20. Analysis of radiological examination request forms in conjunction with justification of X-ray exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, Ch.; Tsalafoutas, I.; Maniatis, P.; Papavdis, D.; Raios, G.; Siafas, I.; Velonakis, S.; Koulentianos, E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the adequacy of patient data and clinical information transmitted to the radiological departments by the referring clinicians in view of the justification demands concerning the radiological examinations, as those are described in the Radiation Protection Regulations of the European Union Nations. Materials and methods: Request forms for 1708 patients referred to radiology department and 410 referred to the CT department were evaluated concerning the proper completion of the form fields. Furthermore, for CT examinations a more detailed evaluation was carried out, to assess the rationalistic use of CT within the diagnostic algorithm. Results: Not properly completed request forms to both departments were observed, however, the omissions were more prominent for the referrals to the radiology department, where the age and the probable clinical diagnosis was not given in 81.5 and 46% of the forms, respectively. Furthermore, the emergency indication was less cautiously used compared to the CT requests. For the CT department 33.3% of requests were justified and the final diagnosis was included in the referring doctor's probable clinical diagnosis. U/S was the examination of choice in 51% of the cases where an examination should have been performed before CT and in 70.6% of the cases where an alternative examination was proposed. Conclusions: The inadequate transmission of clinical information and the large number of not fully justified CT requests observed in this study are typical examples of the various problems that radiologists have to face in order to apply the justification directives

  1. Pregnancy x-rays and childhood cancers: effects of exposure age and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, E.A.; Kneale, G.W.; Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Using data from the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers this paper examines the effect of foetal age and number of films used on the subsequent risk of childhood cancer associated with prenatal x-rays. X-rays early in pregnancy were taken for different reasons and required more films when compared with those taken in late pregnancy. Therefore, Mantel-Haenszel techniques were used to estimate the independent effects of (a) exposure age and (b) number of films. Age at exposure had a clearly significant effect; x-rays taken in the first trimester of pregnancy were 2.69 times as effective as x-rays taken in the third trimester. First trimester exposures were often the result of maternal illnesses, so these maternal illnesses were then included among the controlling factors. When this was done the first trimester x-rays were 2.73 times as effective as later exposures. First trimester x-rays were most strongly associated with the cancers which were diagnosed between 4 and 5 years of age. Although the number of films had no detectable effect upon relative risk calculated over all ages, multiple exposures were demonstrably associated with early age at diagnosis. (author)

  2. Impact of digital imaging on radiation doses to the patient during X-ray examination of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, B; Geijer, H; Persliden, J

    2005-10-01

    To compare radiation doses given to patients undergoing IVU (intravenous urography) before and after digitalization of our X-ray department. IVU examinations were monitored with dose area product meters before and after the X-ray department changed to digital techniques. The first step was a change from film-screen to storage phosphor plates, while the second step involved changing to a flat panel detector. Forty-two patients were included for the film-screen situation, 69 when using the storage phosphor plates, and 70 using the flat panel detector. A dose reduction from 41.8 Gycm2 to 31.5 Gycm2 was achieved with the first step when the film-screen system was replaced with storage phosphor plates. A further reduction to 12.1 Gycm2 was achieved using the flat panel detector. The introduction of the flat panel detectors made a considerable dose reduction possible.

  3. Sensitivity of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes to various X-ray doses and subsequent storage in Plexiglass or glass containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Geogieva, I.

    1979-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether chromosomal aberrations produced in vitro by various X-ray doses in human lymphocytes were affected by post-irradiation storage of the blood in plastic or glass containers. Following X-ray doses of up to 400 R, the yields of cells with aberrations and the incidence of dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetrical changes and chromosome fragments increased with dose. After storage of the irradiated lymphocytes in either Plexiglass or glass, the values for exchange aberrations, deletions and aberrant cells were compared. The only statistically significant difference was a slight increase in the percentage of aberrant cells stored in the plastic containers at the 400 R dose level. It was concluded that plastics appear to have a sensitizing effect on the genetic structure of the peripheral lymphocyte and thus the use of this material to store blood in biological dosimetry studies should be discouraged. (U.K.)

  4. A threshold in the dose-response relationship for X-ray induced somatic mutation frequency in drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, Takao; Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, M.O.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds for a long time. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays using germ cells of male fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, cancer-causing activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. In this paper, we examined the dose-response relationship of X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation in drosophila, and found a threshold at approximately 1 Gy in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was five times steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (author)

  5. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-01-01

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle.Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended

  6. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yoon, Sungwon [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Krishna, Ganesh [Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Mountain View, California 94040 (United States); Wilfley, Brian [Triple Ring Technologies, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle.Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVELS (DRL OF PATIENTS X-RAY EXPOSURE IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vodovatov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a system of Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs for patients medical exposure for national health care practice implementation. DRLs are an effective way of the patient radiation protection through the optimization of the medical exposure. The paper discusses and compares different methods of determining the DRLs based on measured and/or calculated quantities of patient’s dose: dose area product (DAP, entrance surface dose (ESD and an effective dose. Distributions of different dose quantities in different Saint-Petersburg clinics are shown on the example of chest PA examinations. The results are compared with the data from other sources. Regional DRLs for Saint-Petersburg are proposed.

  8. Dose absorbed in x-rays toraxicas executed in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.B.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the contribution of radiography exams in the dose received by the population of the city of Sao Paulo (Brazil), we made mensurations of the doses absorbed in toraxicas x-rays (projections PA and LAT) taken in several teams of rays X used in hospitals. The work is supplemented with demography data and the knowledge of the quantity of exams executed in each team

  9. PCXMC. A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Lakkisto, M.; Servomaa, A.

    1997-02-01

    The report describes PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and the effective dose in medical x-ray examinations. The organs considered are: the active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), gall bladder, heats, kidneys, liver, lungs, muscle, oesophagus, ovaries, pancreas, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testes, thymes, thyroid, urinary bladder, and uterus. (42 refs.)

  10. Using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) to determine the gonadal dose of patients under-going chest X-ray examinations at NKST hospital, Mkar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agba, E.H.; Akaagerger, N.B.; Kungur, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    The doses absorbed by the gonads of patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations at NKST Christian Hospital, Mkar was determined using the Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Technique of measurement. Also, the direct X-ray dose to the chest of patients undergoing the routine examinations was also determined using the Thermolumnescence Dosimetry technique of measurement. The mean gonadal dose and the X-ray dose to the patients were found to be 0.03±0.02μSv and 0.04±0.03mSv respectively after exposure. These X-ray doses to the patients is seen to be within the acceptable recommended X -ray dose limits of 1mGy recommended by ICRP.

  11. The influence of temperature and X-ray dose on the deprotonation of lyophilized phenylalanine during X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Juan F. [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)]. E-mail: juan.cardenas@kjemi.uio.no; Groebner, Gerhard [Biophysical Chemistry, Umea University, 90187 Umea (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Lyophilized phenylalanine (LP) samples were prepared from aqueous solutions at pH {approx} 1.3 and subsequently analysed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in combination with cryogenics. When samples are measured at temperatures above {approx}0 deg. C deprotonation occurs, which gradually proceeds with X-ray bombardment. In addition, deprotonation scales linearly with the difference between the Cl and the Na concentration, which strongly suggests that HCl sublimates from the sample.

  12. Variation in X-ray dose quantity using an amorphous selenium based flat-panel detector - a study on the dose reduction rate up to the limit of diagnostical utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, T.; Wohlers, J.; Manegold, K.; Wetter, A.; Jacobi, V.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Streng, W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic quality and minimum required dose to obtain acceptable images for diagnostic purposes in the field of musculoskeletal radiology. Materials and methods: A critical comparison of the image quality produced by a novel flat panel detector and the conventional screen/film system using a contrast-detail phantom was performed in phase I. Images from both systems were obtained with the same dose and displayed with similar contrast and density. In phase II images of significant anatomical structures in cadaver extremities obtained using the digital detector system and the standard film/screen system were critically evaluated. After a successive reduction in the X-ray dose for 84 patients in phase III, eight independent radiologists compared the image quality of the screen/film system to that of the novel flat panel detector. Results: Phases I and II revealed a difference in the image quality achieved by the standard screen/film system and the digital detector system to the advantage of the digital detector system. In 77 of 84 patients (91.7%), phase III showed equal image quality after a 50% reduction in the X-ray dose. In 3 cases (3.6%) the image quality and the level of contrast were better. No unified statement could be made for 4 patients (4.7%). Conclusion: Digital imaging of skeletal disorders using the novel flat panel detector makes it possible to reduce the X-ray dose by 50% with equal or even better image quality. (orig.)

  13. Absolute dose calibration of an X-ray system and dead time investigations of photon-counting techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentieri, C; Ludwig, J; Ashfaq, A; Fiederle, M

    2002-01-01

    High precision concerning the dose calibration of X-ray sources is required when counting and integrating methods are compared. The dose calibration for a dental X-ray tube was executed with special dose calibration equipment (dosimeter) as function of exposure time and rate. Results were compared with a benchmark spectrum and agree within +-1.5%. Dead time investigations with the Medipix1 photon-counting chip (PCC) have been performed by rate variations. Two different types of dead time, paralysable and non-paralysable will be discussed. The dead time depends on settings of the front-end electronics and is a function of signal height, which might lead to systematic defects of systems. Dead time losses in excess of 30% have been found for the PCC at 200 kHz absorbed photons per pixel.

  14. Simple method to estimate mean heart dose from Hodgkin lymphoma radiation therapy according to simulation X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, Frederika A; Cutter, David J; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D G; Janus, Cécile P M; Darby, Sarah C; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2015-05-01

    To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case-control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor-intensive representative CT-based method. This simpler method may produce a

  15. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cutter, David J. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schaapveld, Michael [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Annemarieke [Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooijman, Karen [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Krol, Augustinus D.G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Janus, Cécile P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Darby, Sarah C. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Leeuwen, Flora E. van [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aleman, Berthe M.P., E-mail: b.aleman@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... CT Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology ...

  17. [Development of an attitude-measurement questionnaire using the semantic differential technique: defining the attitudes of radiological technology students toward X-ray examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Naomi; Terashita, Takayoshi; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2014-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to objectively evaluate the results of an educational program. The semantic differential (SeD) technique, a methodology used to measure the connotative meaning of objects, words, and concepts, can, however, be applied to the evaluation of students' attitudes. In this study, we aimed to achieve an objective evaluation of the effects of radiological technology education. We therefore investigated the attitude of radiological students using the SeD technique. We focused on X-ray examinations in the field of radiological technology science. Bipolar adjective scales were used for the SeD questionnaire. To create the questionnaire, appropriate adjectives were selected from past reports of X-ray examination practice. The participants were 32 senior students at Hokkaido University at the Division of Radiological Technology at the School of Medicine's Department of Health Sciences. All the participants completed the questionnaire. The study was conducted in early June 2012. Attitudes toward X-ray examination were identified using a factor analysis of 11 adjectives. The factor analysis revealed the following three attitudes: feelings of expectation, responsibility, and resistance. Knowledge regarding the attitudes that students have toward X-ray examination will prove useful for evaluating the effects of educational intervention. In this study, a sampling bias may have occurred due to the small sample size; however, no other biases were observed.

  18. Problems of radiation protection and their solution in afterloading therapy performed in a X-ray deep therapy chamber of the Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauh, G.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle got the first afterloading therapy unit DECATRON in December 1973. After preceding physical measurements the first patient was irradiated in August 1974. At this time there was no experience with the afterloading therapy in the GDR. The afterloading therapy was performed in a former X-ray deep therapy chamber. The occuring problems of radiation protection are considered and the ways of solution are described. Radiation protection calculations were carried out, values of local dose measurements are given, interpreted and compared with the values of personal dosimetry. Also the terms 'incorporated activity' and 'threading out activity' ('effective activity') are discussed, which led to differences in dose measurements formerly. The special situation required to discuss radiation protection problems of X-ray deep therapy simultaneously. (author)

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  2. Dose contributions due to radiation scattered by air (skyshine) in the case of X-ray machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahre, P.; Kaden, M. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany). Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf; Schoenmuth, T.; Naumann, B. [Hochschule fuer Technik, Wirtschaft und Sozialwesen Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany); Pawelke, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay, Dresden (Germany); Reichelt, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Radiation transport simulations had to be done in preparation of operation of the X-ray tube ISOVOLT 320 kV/13mA in a special laboratory. At first simulation was done without shielding the roof of the laboratory, showing a dose rate maximum of more than 100 mSv/h. This dose rate results in a skyshine dose rate of at most 2 {mu}Sv/h in the surrounding of the building without shielding the roof. For similar geometries the skyshine is negligible for dose rates at the unshielded roof of less than 3 mSv/h (exclusion area). (orig.)

  3. A survey of costs incurred in U.K. X-ray diffraction research laboratories as a consequence of proposed regulations for radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blow, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    A small survey of British X-ray diffraction laboratories was undertaken, with the aim of discovering the effects of the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) and the draft regulations on radiological protection and ionising radiations (1978) on the practice of X-ray crystallography. The responses lead to the conclusion that the average cost incurred in bringing X-ray diffraction equipment to a safety standard compatible with the draft regulations (as judged by the respondents) will exceed Pound2,000 per X-ray generator. The safety costs will represent an overhead charge of at least 15-18% on the purchase of an X-ray generator, requiring additional capital outlay of over Pound5m to maintain the current level of X-ray diffraction activity in the U.K. There seems to be no evidence of a high accident rate with diffraction equipment, and the cost of the safety precautions bears no relation to the risks involved. (author)

  4. Performing Chest X-Rays at Inspiration in Uncooperative Children: The Effect of Exercises with a Training Program for Radiology Technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, H.J.; Sengenberger, C.; Bielmeier, J.; Jocher, R.; Kohlhauser-Vollmuth, Ch.; Eschmann, M.

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to acquire a chest X-ray of a crying infant at maximum inspiration. A computer program was developed for technician training. Method. Video clips of 3 babies were used and the moment of deepest inspiration was determined in the single-frame view. 12 technicians simulated chest radiographs at normal video speed by pushing a button. The computer program stopped the video and calculated the period of time to the optimal instant for a chest X-ray. Demonstration software can be tested at website online. Every technician simulated 10 chest X-rays for each of the 3 video clips. The technicians then spent 40 minutes practicing performing chest X-rays at optimal inspiration. The test was repeated after 5, 20, and 40 minutes of practice. Results. 6 participants showed a significant improvement after exercises (collective 1). Deviation from the optimal instant for taking an X-ray at inspiration decreased from 0.39 to 0.22 s after 40 min of practice. 6 technicians showed no significant improvement (collective 2). Deviation decreased from a low starting value of 0.25 s to 0.21 s. Conclusion. The tested computer program improves the ability of radiology technicians to take a chest X-ray at optimal inspiration in a crying child

  5. A deep convolutional neural network using directional wavelets for low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunhee; Min, Junhong; Ye, Jong Chul

    2017-10-01

    Due to the potential risk of inducing cancer, radiation exposure by X-ray CT devices should be reduced for routine patient scanning. However, in low-dose X-ray CT, severe artifacts typically occur due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and other causes, all of which decrease the reliability of the diagnosis. Thus, a high-quality reconstruction method from low-dose X-ray CT data has become a major research topic in the CT community. Conventional model-based de-noising approaches are, however, computationally very expensive, and image-domain de-noising approaches cannot readily remove CT-specific noise patterns. To tackle these problems, we want to develop a new low-dose X-ray CT algorithm based on a deep-learning approach. We propose an algorithm which uses a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) which is applied to the wavelet transform coefficients of low-dose CT images. More specifically, using a directional wavelet transform to extract the directional component of artifacts and exploit the intra- and inter- band correlations, our deep network can effectively suppress CT-specific noise. In addition, our CNN is designed with a residual learning architecture for faster network training and better performance. Experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm effectively removes complex noise patterns from CT images derived from a reduced X-ray dose. In addition, we show that the wavelet-domain CNN is efficient when used to remove noise from low-dose CT compared to existing approaches. Our results were rigorously evaluated by several radiologists at the Mayo Clinic and won second place at the 2016 "Low-Dose CT Grand Challenge." To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first deep-learning architecture for low-dose CT reconstruction which has been rigorously evaluated and proven to be effective. In addition, the proposed algorithm, in contrast to existing model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods, has considerable potential to benefit from

  6. Radiation dose and image quality of X-ray volume imaging systems: cone-beam computed tomography, digital subtraction angiography and digital fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jijo; Jacobi, Volkmar; Farhang, Mohammad; Bazrafshan, Babak; Vogl, Thomas J; Mbalisike, Emmanuel C

    2013-06-01

    Radiation dose and image quality estimation of three X-ray volume imaging (XVI) systems. A total of 126 patients were examined using three XVI systems (groups 1-3) and their data were retrospectively analysed from 2007 to 2012. Each group consisted of 42 patients and each patient was examined using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and digital fluoroscopy (DF). Dose parameters such as dose-area product (DAP), skin entry dose (SED) and image quality parameters such as Hounsfield unit (HU), noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were estimated and compared using appropriate statistical tests. Mean DAP and SED were lower in recent XVI than its previous counterparts in CBCT, DSA and DF. HU of all measured locations was non-significant between the groups except the hepatic artery. Noise showed significant difference among groups (P < 0.05). Regarding CNR and SNR, the recent XVI showed a higher and significant difference compared to its previous versions. Qualitatively, CBCT showed significance between versions unlike the DSA and DF which showed non-significance. A reduction of radiation dose was obtained for the recent-generation XVI system in CBCT, DSA and DF. Image noise was significantly lower; SNR and CNR were higher than in previous versions. The technological advancements and the reduction in the number of frames led to a significant dose reduction and improved image quality with the recent-generation XVI system. • X-ray volume imaging (XVI) systems are increasingly used for interventional radiological procedures. • More modern XVI systems use lower radiation doses compared with earlier counterparts. • Furthermore more modern XVI systems provide higher image quality. • Technological advances reduce radiation dose and improve image quality.

  7. Impact of quality control radiation doses received by patients undergoing abdomen x-ray examination in ten hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghahadi, B.; Zhang, Z.; Zareh, S.; Sarkar, S.; Tayebi, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray machines used for radiodiagnosis should meet certain quality assurance programmes. These are necessary to have good quality radiographs at reasonably low exposure to patients. Materials and Methods: Dose reduction methods in abdomen X-ray examination were carried out in 10 hospitals in Tehran. This paper presents the work, which was implemented on 200 patients and evaluated using the entrance skin dose in the Anterior-Posterior abdomen projection measured directly at the center of the X-ray field. In addition, the machine room, and dark room parameters, as well as work practices and repeat rates were studied. Results: The quality control parameters and the entrance skin dose were evaluated utilizing an anthropologic phantom to define the optimal exposure condition at all hospitals before and after quality control . Results show that after using the quality control parameters and optimization of the exposure conditions, the mean of mAs and entrance skin dose can be decreased by 62% and 65% respectively. Conclusion: The quality of the radiographs generally increased. The reported method is easily implemented in any clinical situation where optimization of abdomen radiography is necessary

  8. Absorbed Doses to Embryo from Intravenous Urography at Selected Radiological Departments in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkus, R.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2003-01-01

    Actual legislation used in radiological protection requires quality assurance program for decreasing radiation load of patients from radiological examinations. The information about irradiation of pregnant women is very important, because the embryo is more radiosensitive as adult organism. On the basis of absence of unified calculations or measurements of absorbed doses to embryo from various radiological examinations in Slovakia we present in this study the values of absorbed doses to embryo from intravenous urography at selected radiological departments in Slovakia. Absorbed doses to embryo were obtained by measurement and calculation using the simulation of irradiation of pregnant woman by intravenous urography. The results of our study indicate, that absorbed doses to embryo were at various radiological departments considerably different, depending on type of X-ray machine and different settings of technical parameters of X-ray machine. In accordance with worldwide trend it is necessary to decrease radiation load of patients as low as possible level. Differences in radiation load between radiological departments indicate, that it is necessary to continue in solving of this problem and perform measurements and calculations of absorbed doses to embryo at different types of X-ray machines and at different examinations, where the embryo is in direct beam of X-ray. (author)

  9. Dose and absorption spectra response of EBT2 Gafchromic film to high energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Alnawaf, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: With new advancements in radiochromic film designs and sensitivity to suit different niche applications, EBT2 is the latest offering for the megavoltage radiotherapy market. New construction specifications including different physical construction and the use of a yellow coloured dye has provided the next generation radiochromic film for therapy applications. The film utilises the same active chemical for radiation measurement as its predecessor, EBT Gafchromic. Measurements have been performed using photo spectrometers to analyse the absorption spectra properties of this new EBT2 Gafchromic, radiochromic film. Results have shown that whilst the physical coloration or absorption spectra of the film, which turns yellow to green as compared to EBT film, (clear to blue) is significantly different due to the added yellow dye, the net change in absorption spectra properties for EBT2 are similar to the original EBT film. Absorption peaks are still located at 636 n m and 585 n m positions. A net optical density change of 0.590 ± 0.020 (2SD) for a 1 Gy radiation absorbed dose using 6 MV x-rays when measured at the 636 n m absorption peak was found. This is compared to 0.602 ± 0.025 (2SD) for the original EBT film (2005 Batch) and 0.557 ± 0.027 (2009 Batch) at the same absorption peak. The yellow dye and the new coating material produce a significantly different visible absorption spectra results for the EBT2 film compared to EBT at wavelengths especially below approximately 550 n m. At wavelengths above 550 n m differences in absolute OD are seen however, when dose analysis is performed at wavelengths above 550 n m using net optical density changes, no significant variations are seen. If comparing results of the late production EBT to new production EBT2 film, net optical density variations of approximately 10 % to 15 % are seen. As all new film batches should be calibrated for sensitivity upon arrival this should not be of concern.

  10. Paediatric dose measurements for chest X-ray examinations at Maternity and Children Hospital in Najran - Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.K.; Al-Qahtani, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The entrance skin dose (ESD) of chest X-ray examinations for AP and PA projections of paediatric patients at Maternity and Children Hospital in Najran, Saudi Arabia have been obtained using DoseCal software. The majority of the results obtained show low measured ESD for chest X-ray examinations. The mean of ESD for the AP projection was found to be 37.5, 40.5, 41.3, and 52.3μGy for age groups 0−1, >1−5, >5−10, and >10−15 years respectively. However, the ESD for PA projection was found to be 50.7 and 56.7μGy for age groups >5−10, and >10−15 years respectively.

  11. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  12. The relative biological effectiveness of 60Co γ-rays, 55 kVp X-rays, 250 kVp X-rays, and 11 MeV electrons at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadinger, I.; Palcic, B.

    1992-01-01

    The RBE of selected low-LET radiation modalities (55 kVp X- rays, 250 kVp X-rays, 60 Co γ-rays, and 11 MeV electrons) was investigated for survival of two cell lines (V79 and CHO). Detailed measurements were made in the 0 to 3 Gy dose range using an image cytometry device to accurately determine the number of cells assayed at each dose point. Data were also collected in the high dose range (0 to 10 Gy) using conventional counting and plating techniques. RBE values (#+- #1 SE) varied from 1.0±0.07 (V79 cells) and 1.2± 0.05 (CHO cells) at high doses to 1.3±0.07 (V79) and 1.4±0.1 (CHO) at low doses for 55 kVp X-rays, from 1.1±0.05 (V79) and 1.1±0.04 (CHO) at high doses to 1.1±0.06 (V79) and 1.2±0.2 (CHO) at low doses for 250 kVp X-rays, and from 1.1±0.08 (V79) and 1.0±0.04 (CHO) at high doses to 1.0±0.06 (V79) and 0.9±0.1 (CHO) at low doses for 11 MeV electrons. Only the low and high dose RBEs for 55 kVp X-rays relative to 60 Co γ-rays were significantly different. (author)

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  16. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray; Dosimetria citogenetica: curva dosis-respuesta para bajas dosis de rayos-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon, E-mail: venovall.15@hotmail.com, E-mail: wrpineda@misena.edu.co, E-mail: vmpabonr@udistrital.edu.co [Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas (UD), Bogota (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear; Ureana, Cecilia Crane, E-mail: cecicrane@yahoo.com [Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS), Bogota (Colombia). Laboratorio de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers.

  17. Estimation of dose challenge in radiological exams policontuses patients in public hospital in Santiago with digital radiology equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Munoz Ihmaidan, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    lonizing radiation is always present in our natural environment and with the development of new technologies in diagnostic radiology we have elevated the exposure to radiation with an increased dose to both patient and professionals. This is of great importance for secondary stochastic effects that could be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation. There are different x-ray entrance dose studies in patients with radiological examinations in conventional radiology equipment, but not in trauma patients examinated with digital radiology equipment where there is a supposed greater exposure to radiation because of the increase of the number of radiological examinations requested. This study determined the doses received by trauma patients in a direct digital x ray equipment (in a ER in Santiago, Chile) and see if the doses are within the ones recommended by international societies. We used thermoluminescent crystals which were first properly calibrated and located in the center of the radiation beam. The results obtained show that using good practice we can obtain acceptable dose levels, independently of the digital equipment used where it is presumed that could give a higher dose of ionizing radiation exposure than conventional x-ray equipment

  18. Experimental determination of blurring in x-ray fluoroscopy last image hold due to patient movement and its repercussion to patient doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibelalde, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Alberdi, J.; Molinero, A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant dose reduction can be achieved in fluoroscopy and interventional radiology by using the last image hold (LIH). This feature in modern digital fluoroscopy x-ray units usually works with frame or temporal averaging techniques to reduce noise. This image quality works quite well for objects without motion but it could be a serious limitation in presence of motion blur. With an in-house developed robotic device, the authors have experimentally determined the image quality degradation introduced by normal physiological movements (i.e., respiratory and cardiac pulse movements). FAXIL test objects TO.10 and 18FG from Leeds University have been used for spatial resolution limit and threshold contrast detail detectability. Seven X-ray equipment with last image hold features from three different manufacturers were analysed. Although results show that motion blur affects LIH to different extends depending on equipment, magnification, entrance dose and detail size, it can be estimated that, on average for all equipment and analysed conditions, it represents 30% degradation in image quality parameters in comparison with static images. (author)

  19. The patient dose survey and dose reduction in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thanh Luong; Duong Van Vinh; Ha Ngoc Thach

    2000-01-01

    This paper presented the results of the patient dose survey in some hospitals in Hanoi from 1995 to 1997. The main investigated types of the X-ray examination were: Chest PA, LAT; Skull PA/AP, LAT; Lumbar spine AP, LAT; and Pelvis AP. The fluctuation of the entrance surface doses (ESD) was too large, even in the same type of X-ray examination and X-ray facility. It was found that the ratio of maximum and minimum ESD were ranged from 1.5 to 18. The mean values of ESD for chest and skull were higher than CEC recommended values, while the mean values of lumbar spine and pelvis were smaller than that of CEC recommended values. The result of dose intercomparison was also reported. Some methods of dose reduction were applied for improving the patient dose in X-ray departments such as a high kV technique, high sensitive screen-film combination. (author)

  20. Biochemical and molecular study of genetic stability in tomatoes plants rom seeds treated with low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R; Gonzalez, LM; Chavez, Licet; Camejo, Yanelis; Gonzalez, Maria C; Fernandez, Arais

    2008-01-01

    For the extensive agricultural exploitation of vegetable radio stimulation, it is indispensable to study the genetic stability of treated varieties, having in mind X ray potentialities of inducing not only physiological but genetic changes as well. Therefore, biochemical and molecular markers were employed in tomato plants derived from irradiated seeds at low doses of X rays. For the biochemical analysis, peroxidases, polyphenoloxidases and dismutase superoxide isoenzymes were determined whereas the Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used for the molecular analysis. When comparing the electrophoretic patterns from the control and irradiated treatments applied to the three enzymatic systems, there were not appreciable variations on the number of bands and their intensities, indicating the little variability induced in these systems by the low X ray doses. Also, from the molecular viewpoint, electrophoretic patterns showed a clear amplification of DNA by generating a total of 155 bands in all varieties studied. This molecular marker showed a high monomorphism independently of the treatments applied, with values ranging between 86 and 97 %, indicating that irradiation at low doses did not induce an important genetic variability and confirming its possible practical usefulness for stimulating some physiological processes without causing. (Author)

  1. Investigation of the chemical composition-changes in horticultural plants as a function of x-ray stimulation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, A.S.; Tejeda, M.A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the low dose experiments of radish, lettuce, tomato, paprika, pea and bean the presowing stimulation does not influence the chemical parameters (e.g. protein, fat, fibre, ash, macro and trace elements) of the edible parts of the plants. Stimulation has a favourable effect on vitamin C content of the horticultural vegetables. The irradiation of the seeds was performed using 5-15 Gy dose and a mobile X-ray generator, GIGANT-18, with dose of 2 Gy/min. (author) 11 refs.; 3 tabs

  2. Dose and induction to cancer risk evaluation associated to use of X ray body scanners by transmission at airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Ademir Xavier da

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses the Monte Carlo MCNPX and the phantoms in male voxel and female voxel to evaluate the absorbed doses effective doses and the induction risk and the mortality due to cancer associated to exposures of individual submitted to X ray body scanners by transmission at various projections. The values of effective dose were calculated according to the recommended by the new ICRP 103 and the values of induction risks and mortality due to cancer were estimated through the document BEIR VII. (author)

  3. X-ray exposure dose for the gonadal gland by the examination of computerized tomography and its protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriuchi, Iwao; Kaiya, Hisanori; Hirata, Toshifumi; Asada, Shuichi

    1978-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is very useful for neuroradiological examination, and so it may possibly be used for screening tests. But x-ray exposure dose by a examination of CT is considerable, especially for the male gonadal gland. This study showed that the dose from a complete CT examination of 10 - 15 scans for a male gonadal gland was about 1,800 times more than a single plain neuroradiography. But by only a 0.07 mm lead equivalent protecter, the exposure dose resulting from CT for a gonadal gland could be reduced to 0.0 mrad. (auth.)

  4. Establishing the standard X-ray beam qualities for calibration of dosimeters used in diagnostic radiology following IAEA-TRS457

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Trieu; Ho Quang Tuan; Bui Duc Ky

    2014-01-01

    The determination of the patient dose needs to provide a reference dose for the patient that reference dose levels to assess the relative risk during X- ray diagnostic. This mission, We had established a number of standard beam qualities to perform calibrations of diagnostic dosimeters and methods of measuring patient dose in X-ray diagnostic. At radiation dosimetry room, we had establish RQR2, RQR3, RQR4, RQR5, RQR6 beam qualities based on IAEA-TRS457 documentation with homogeneity coefficient (h) for each beam quality in the range 0.7 - 0.8, and haft-value layers HVL1, HVL2 of experimental and IAEA is different about 10%. Established calibration method for diagnostic dosimeters as KAP meters, UNFORS dosimeters, and the TLD dosimeters, practical measurements of entrance surface air kerma on Shimadzu X-ray machines used phantom. (author)

  5. First-principles X-ray absorption dose calculation for time-dependent mass and optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Rubinstein, Boris; Melo, Lis G A; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2018-05-01

    A dose integral of time-dependent X-ray absorption under conditions of variable photon energy and changing sample mass is derived from first principles starting with the Beer-Lambert (BL) absorption model. For a given photon energy the BL dose integral D(e, t) reduces to the product of an effective time integral T(t) and a dose rate R(e). Two approximations of the time-dependent optical density, i.e. exponential A(t) = c + aexp(-bt) for first-order kinetics and hyperbolic A(t) = c + a/(b + t) for second-order kinetics, were considered for BL dose evaluation. For both models three methods of evaluating the effective time integral are considered: analytical integration, approximation by a function, and calculation of the asymptotic behaviour at large times. Data for poly(methyl methacrylate) and perfluorosulfonic acid polymers measured by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy were used to test the BL dose calculation. It was found that a previous method to calculate time-dependent dose underestimates the dose in mass loss situations, depending on the applied exposure time. All these methods here show that the BL dose is proportional to the exposure time D(e, t) ≃ K(e)t.

  6. Calculation of Absorbed Glandular Dose using a FORTRAN Program Based on Monte Carlo X-ray Spectra in Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Average glandular dose calculation in mammography with Mo-Rh target-filter and dose calculation for different situations is accurate and fast. Material and Methods: In this research, first of all, x-ray spectra of a Mo target bombarded by a 28 keV electron beam with and without a Rh filter were calculated using the MCNP code. Then, we used the Sobol-Wu parameters to write a FORTRAN code to calculate average glandular dose. Results: Average glandular dose variation was calculated against the voltage of the mammographic x-ray tube for d = 5 cm, HVL= 0.35 mm Al, and different value of g. Also, the results related to average glandular absorbed dose variation per unit roentgen radiation against the glandular fraction of breast tissue for kV = 28 and HVL = 0.400 mmAl and different values of d are presented. Finally, average glandular dose against d for g = 60% and three values of kV (23, 27, 35 kV with corresponding HVLs have been calculated. Discussion and Conclusion: The absorbed dose computational program is accurate, complete, fast and user friendly. This program can be used for optimization of exposure dose in mammography. Also, the results of this research are in good agreement with the computational results of others.

  7. Trends in x-ray photography and patient exposure dose. Questionnaire survey results compared with those in 1973. [questionnaire survey in 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orito, T; Sanada, S; Maekawa, R; Koshida, K; Hiraki, T [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Paramedicine

    1980-04-01

    The exposure doses of patients in X-ray photography are influenced by such technological factors as X-ray tube voltage, filter, sensitizing screen, film and grid. Survey by questionnnaire was made previously in 1973 on the above factors. The trends five years after were surveyed similarly, in connection with the exposure doses of patients. Questionnaires were sent to 200 radiation technicians, and 121 (60.5%) answered the survey in March, 1979. The results in the cases of simple X-ray photography and obstetric, infant and breast X-ray photographings are described. X-ray tube voltage is generally on the increase. In the sensitizing screens, exposure doses are fairly decreased due to the use of improved intensifying screen (LT-II). In the grid, the ratio 8 : 1 is used more than 5 : 1. In the usage of additional filters and in the distance of photography, improvements are desired.

  8. Diagnoses accuracy in the detection of abnormalities in the thorax x-ray: Teleradiology vs. conventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron, Fanny Emilia; Melendez, Patricia; Martinez, Carlos Eli

    1998-01-01

    Background: introduction of teleradiology in Colombia is very recent and its operative characteristics and reliability are unknown. Objective: to evaluate intra and interobserver concordance in the interpretation of digitized chest x-ray films and to compare diagnostic Accuracy of teleradiology and film screen interpretation. Design: cross-sectional study for evaluation or concordance and operative characteristics of a diagnostic test. Patients and methods: convenience sample of 40 chest films. Independent lecture of digitized images for each radiologist to evaluate interobserver concordance: second lecture of digitized images for evaluation of intraobserver concordance. Generation of a gold standard diagnosis with a consensus interpretation of film screens, comparison of operative characteristics of teleradiology and conventional interpretation, using as a reference the gold standard (consensus lectures) and comparison of diagnostic precision using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC curves). Results: agreements and concordance were significant higher than expected in both evaluations (inter and intraobserver). Sensitivity of teleradiology was similar to sensitivity of film screen interpretation and areas under ROC curves were not statistically different. Conclusions: concordance in the interpretation of chest radiological studies are significant in a teleradiology system and diagnostic utility of teleradiology is the same as conventional film screen interpretation. Accuracy and reliability of teleradiology are optimal

  9. Evaluation of rate of unstable chromosomal changes in human blood irradiated by X-rays: establishment of dose-response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, J.C.G.; Mendes, M.E.; Melo, A.M.M.A.; Silva, L.M.; Andrade, A.M.G.; Hwang, S.F.; Lima, F.F.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of ionizing radiation, and consequently of its properties, there has been an increasing in its use, which in turn has raised concerns about the biological damage that it could cause in exposed individuals. As a result, cytogenetic dosimetry has emerged: a method that can be used as a complement or, in the absence of physical dosimetry, relating the frequency of chromosomal changes found in the blood of the exposed individual and the dose absorbed through dose-response calibration curves. This work aimed to verify the frequencies of the unstable chromosomal changes in human blood lymphocytes irradiated by X-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses and later establish the dose-response calibration curves. The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE, Brazil metrology service on a PANTAK X-ray machine, model HF 320. The blood samples had their lymphocytes cultured in culture media and, after the processing, the metaphases were obtained. The chromosomal alterations analyzed were chromosomes dicentric, ring and isolated actinic fragments. There was an increase in frequencies of all chromosomal changes with increased absorbed dose. The calibration curves of dicentric and dicentric + rings presented good adjustments with the values of the coefficients Y = 0.0013 + 0.0271D + 0.0556D 2 (X 2 = 10.36 / GL = 6) and Y = 0.0013 + 0.0263D + 0.0640D 2 (X 2 = 7.43 / GL = 6), respectively. The establishment of these curves enables the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry of the CRCN/NE/CNEN-PE to estimate the dose absorbed by occupationally exposed individuals and in cases of radiological accidents

  10. A conversion method of air-kerma from the primary, scatter and leakage radiations to ambient dose equivalent for calculating the mamography x-ray shielding barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, H.

    2005-01-01

    The primary, scatter, and leakage doses(in Gy), which constitute the data base for calculating shielding requirements for x-ray facilities, are often converted to the equivalent dose (in sievert) by using a constant of conversion of 1.145Sv/Gy. This constant is used for diagnostic radiology as well as for mammography spectra, and is derived by considering an exposure of 1 R corresponds to an air kerma of 8.73 m Gy, which renders by tradition an equivalent dose of 10 mSv. However, this conversion does not take into account the energy dependence of the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the equivalent dose as described in ICRU report. Moreover, current radiation protection standards propose the use of the quantity ambient dose equivalent in order to qualify the efficiently of given radiation shielding. Therefore, in this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation ambient dose equivalent from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to ambient dose equivalent for mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium (NMi), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA) laboratories. The calculation has been performed by the means of two methods which show a maximum deviation less than 10%2 for the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations. The results show that the conversion coefficients vary from 0.242 Sv/ Gy to 0.692 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.436 Sv/Gy for the primary and the scatter radiations, and form 0.156 Sv/Gy to 1.329 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.98 Sv/Gy for the leakage radiation. Simpkin et al. using an empirical approach propose a conversion value of 0.50 Sv/Gy for the mammography x-ray spectra. This value approximately coincides with the average conversion value of 0.436 Sv/Gy obtained in this work for

  11. The bio-positive effects of diagnostic doses of X-rays on growth of phaseolus-vulgaris plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Mehdipour, L.A.; Behnejad, B.B. [Rafsanjan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Objective: Plants absorb radioactive elements from phosphate fertilizers, and also from naturally occurring radiation in the soil, air and water. It has long been known that low doses of ionizing radiation evoke stimulatory effects in a wide variety of living organisms. However, as far as we know, there is no published report on the bio-positive effects of diagnostic doses of X-rays on plant growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bio-effects of low doses of diagnostic X-rays on growth rate of Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto) plants. Materials and Methods: Before cultivation, Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto) seeds were soaked in tap water for 2 days followed by another 2 days of covering under a wet cloth. Four hundred newly cultivated seeds were randomly divided into two groups of 200 plants each. In this experiment, two seeds were cultivated in each dish (100 dishes for irradiation group and 100 for sham-irradiation group). Fifteen days after starting cultivation, newly grown plants were irradiated with X-rays. Plants were exposed to a single dose of X-ray (80 kVp, 80 mAs) for 6 days. On day 29, plants were pulled out from the ' soil. Length of plant stem, length of root, number of leaves and plant weight were measured. Results: The stem length in irradiated and sham-irradiated plants was 296.5{+-}13.57 and 223.96{+-}15.02 mm respectively. This difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). Although the number of leaves in irradiated plants was higher than that of sham-irradiated plants (7.05{+-}0.18 and 6.74{+-}0.19 respectively), the difference was not statistically significant. The stem diameter in irradiated and sham-irradiated plants were 3.52{+-}0.12 and 3.35{+-}0.09 mm respectively, but the difference again was not statistically significant (P<0.00 1). Plant weight in irradiated samples was less than that of non-irradiated plants but it was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The overall results indicate that diagnostic doses of X-rays can

  12. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  13. Estimation of population dose and risk to holding assistants from veterinary X-ray examination in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Suganuma, Tunenori; Shida, Takuo

    1989-01-01

    For the estimation of the population doses and risks of stochastic effects to assistants who hold animals during veterinary X-ray examination, a random survey of hospitals and clinics was carried out concerning age distribution of such assistants by groups of facilities. The average organ and tissue dose per examination was evaluated from the experimental data using mean technical factors such as X-ray tube voltage, tube current and field size based on the results of a nationwide survey. The population doses to the assistants were calculated to be about 14 nSv per person per year for the genetically significant dose, 3.5 nSv per person per year for per caput mean marrow dose, 3.3 nSv for the leukemia significant dose and 4.5 nSv for the malignant significant dose, respectively. The total risk of stochastic effects to the Japanese population from holding assistants was estimated using population data and it was estimated to be less than one person per year, but the cancer risks to a number of the assistants were estimated to be more than 4 x 10 -5 . (author)

  14. Dose conversion factors and linear energy transfer for irradiation of thin blood layers with low-energy X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Seuntjens, J.

    1994-01-01

    For irradiation of thin samples of biological material with low-energy X rays, conversion of measured air kerma, free in air to average absorbed dose to the sample is necessary. In the present paper, conversion factors from measured air kerma to average absorbed dose in thin blood samples are given for four low-energy X-ray qualities (14-50 kVp). These factors were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of a practical sample holder. Data for different thicknesses of the blood and backing layer are presented. The conversion factors are found to depend strongly on the thicknesses of the blood layer and backing layer. In radiobiological work, knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) values for the radiation quality used is often required. Track-averaged LET values for low-energy X rays are presented in this work. It is concluded that the thickness of the sample does not influence the LET value appreciably, indicating that for all radiobiological purposes this value can be regarded as a constant throughout the sample. Furthermore, the large difference between the LET value for a 50 kV spectrum found in this work and the value given in ICRU Report 16 is pointed out. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Stage sensitivity and dose response of meiotic chromosomes of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T H; Kontos, Jr, G J; Anderson, V A [Western Illinois Univ., Macomb (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1980-05-01

    Chromosome damage induced by physical and chemical mutagens can be quantitated by the frequencies of micronuclei (MCN) produced in tetrads of the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, i.e. the 'MCN-in-Tetrad' test. The stage sensitivity and dose response of these meiocytes to low exposures of X-rays was studied to improve the efficiency and reliability of this test. Stage sensitivity was determined by observing, at 3 hr intervals, the frequencies of X-ray (35 rads)-induced MCN in tetrads from a series of 16 fixations of tetrad-containing inflorescences. Late stages of meiosis (3-9 hr post-irradiation fixation groups) were insensitive (5-14 MCN/100 tetrads). Relatively high sensitivity was exhibited in the early stages of meiosis. The first and second sensitive peaks (62 and 61 MCN/100 tetrads) centered around the 21 and 39 hr post-irradiation fixation groups respectively. Control groups yielded around 3-4 MCN/100 tetrads. A dose-response relation for MCN was determined by treating early stages of meiotic pollen mother cells with X-ray exposures ranging from 9.5 to 57.5 rads. A linear regression line was established with about 20 MCN/100 tetrads per 10 rad increment.

  16. Stage sensitivity and dose response of meiotic chromosomes of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.-H.; Kontos, G.J. Jr.; Anderson, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome damage induced by physical and chemical mutagens can be quantitated by the frequencies of micronuclei (MCN) produced in tetrads of the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, i.e. the 'MCN-in-Tetrad' test. The stage sensitivity and dose response of these meiocytes to low exposures of X-rays was studied to improve the efficiency and reliability of this test. Stage sensitivity was determined by observing, at 3 hr intervals, the frequencies of X-ray (35 rads)-induced MCN in tetrads from a series of 16 fixations of tetrad-containing inflorescences. Late stages of meiosis (3-9 hr post-irradiation fixation groups) were insensitive (5-14 MCN/100 tetrads). Relatively high sensitivity was exhibited in the early stages of meiosis. The first and second sensitive peaks (62 and 61 MCN/100 tetrads) centered around the 21 and 39 hr post-irradiation fixation groups respectively. Control groups yielded around 3-4 MCN/100 tetrads. A dose-response relation for MCN was determined by treating early stages of meiotic pollen mother cells with X-ray exposures ranging from 9.5 to 57.5 rads. A linear regression line was established with about 20 MCN/100 tetrads per 10 rad increment. (author)

  17. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice modulates oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Zakaria, Ainul Mardhiyah; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure.

  18. Real-time, ray casting-based scatter dose estimation for c-arm x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnewaini, Zaid; Langer, Eric; Schaber, Philipp; David, Matthias; Kretz, Dominik; Steil, Volker; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Dosimetric control of staff exposure during interventional procedures under fluoroscopy is of high relevance. In this paper, a novel ray casting approximation of radiation transport is presented and the potential and limitation vs. a full Monte Carlo transport and dose measurements are discussed. The x-ray source of a Siemens Axiom Artix C-arm is modeled by a virtual source model using single Gaussian-shaped source. A Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation determines the radiation transport from the source to compute scatter from the patient, the table, the ceiling and the floor. A phase space around these scatterers stores all photon information. Only those photons are traced that hit a surface of phantom that represents medical staff in the treatment room, no indirect scattering is considered; and a complete dose deposition on the surface is calculated. To evaluate the accuracy of the approximation, both experimental measurements using Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of dose depositing for different tube angulations of the C-arm from cranial-caudal angle 0° and from LAO (Left Anterior Oblique) 0°-90° are realized. Since the measurements were performed on both sides of the table, using the symmetry of the setup, RAO (Right Anterior Oblique) measurements were not necessary. The Geant4-Monte Carlo simulation agreed within 3% with the measured data, which is within the accuracy of measurement and simulation. The ray casting approximation has been compared to TLD measurements and the achieved percentage difference was -7% for data from tube angulations 45°-90° and -29% from tube angulations 0°-45° on the side of the x-ray source, whereas on the opposite side of the x-ray source, the difference was -83.8% and -75%, respectively. Ray casting approximation for only LAO 90° was compared to a Monte Carlo simulation, where the percentage differences were between 0.5-3% on the side of the x-ray source where the highest dose

  19. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  20. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Paixão

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods: Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results: Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion: The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography.

  1. Effect of seed treatment using low doses of X-rays in peppers plants (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Fonseca, Alexander; Chavez Suarez, Licet; Ramirez Fernandez, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The influence of seed treatment with X-rays radiation on the growth and yield of peppers plants of the California Wonder variety was studied. The seeds were irradiated with X- rays irradiation source of low potency (11.47 Gy/min), with doses of 5, 10, 20 y 30 Gy, using untreated seeds as controls. Plant height (mm), root length (mm), stem diameter (mm), polar average diameter (mm) ecuatorial mean diameter (mm), mean fruit mass (g) and yield per plant (kg.plant''1 ) were evaluated. The results showed a significant improvement (p≤ 0.001) in the indicators of plants height (15%), root length (12%), stem diameter (7%), equatorial mean diameter (47%), mean fruit mass (16%) and yield per plant (107%), compared to control

  2. Studies of the dose distribution for patients undergoing various examinations in x-ray diagnosis and methods optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schandorf, Cyril

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the status of x-ray diagnosis in Ghana revealed that Ghana is in the health care Category III, since there are about 4,2000 people to each physicians-ray departments have no quality management and quality control system in place for monitoring the quality of diagnostic images. Education and training in radiation protection and cost-effective use of x-rays are needed as part of the educational programme for radiologists, radiographers, x-ray technical officers and darkroom attendants. The dose and dose distribution for adult patients undergoing chest PA, lumber spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP, and Skull AP examinations were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters and compared with Commission of the European Communities guideline values. Analysis of the data show that 86%, 58% and 50% of the radiographic room delivered doses to patients compared the CEC value for Chest PA, lumber spine AP, pelvis/Abdomen AP and Skull AP respectively. Radiographic departments therefore should review their radiographic procedures to bring their does to optimum levels. Three methods were investigated for use as dose reduction optimization options. With the establishment of administrative procedures for the control of indiscriminate requests and referral criteria for x-ray examinations, patient dose can be averted. It is estimated about 10man.Sv can be averted annually. Authorized exposures can be minimized by standardizing the parameters which have significant influence on patient dose, taking into account screen-film system and film processing. By optimization the techniques factors, entrance surface dose and effective dose can be reduced. For chest PA examination the reduction factors are 4 and 3 respectively. Corresponding values for lumber spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP are 2 and 1.8, 1.4 and 1.4, 2.0 and 1.8 respectively. Three local materials, Ghanaian Anum Serpentine (SGA), Ghanaian Peki-Dzake Serpentine (SGP) and Ghanaian Golokwati Serpentine (SGG

  3. Use of the VIP-Man model to calculate energy imparted and effective dose for x-ray examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark; Huda, Walter; Xu, X George; Chao, T C; Shi, C Y; Ogden, Kent M; Scalzetti, Ernest M

    2004-02-01

    A male human tomographic model was used to calculate values of energy imparted (epsilon) and effective dose (E) for monoenergetic photons (30-150 keV) in radiographic examinations. Energy deposition in the organs and tissues of the human phantom were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Values of E/epsilon were obtained for three common projections [anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), and lateral (LAT)] of the head, cervical spine, chest, and abdomen, respectively. For head radiographs, all three projections yielded similar E/epsilon values. At 30 keV, the value of E/epsilon was approximately 1.6 mSv J(-1), which is increased to approximately 7 mSv J(-1) for 150 keV photons. The AP cervical spine was the only projection investigated where the value of E/epsilon decreased with increasing photon energy. Above 70 keV, cervical spine E/epsilon values showed little energy dependence and ranged between approximately 8.5 mSv J(-1) for PA projections and approximately 17 mSv J(-1) for AP projections. The values of E/epsilon for AP chest examinations showed very little variation with photon energy, and had values of approximately 23 mSv J(-1). Values of E/epsilon for PA and LAT chest projections were substantially lower than the AP projections and increased with increasing photon energy. For abdominal radiographs, differences between the PA and LAT projections were very small. All abdomen projections showed an increase in the E/epsilon ratio with increasing photon energy, and reached a maximum value of approximately 13.5 mSv J(-1) for AP projections, and approximately 9.5 mSv J(-1) for PA/lateral projections. These monoenergetic E/epsilon values can generate values of E/epsilon for any x-ray spectrum, and can be used to convert values of energy imparted into effective dose for patients undergoing common head and body radiological examinations.

  4. X-ray ‘ghost images’ could cut radiation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sophia

    2018-03-01

    On its own, a single-pixel camera captures pictures that are pretty dull: squares that are completely black, completely white, or some shade of gray in between. All it does, after all, is detect brightness. Yet by connecting a single-pixel camera to a patterned light source, a team of physicists in China has made detailed x-ray images using a statistical technique called ghost imaging, first pioneered 20 years ago in infrared and visible light. Researchers in the field say future versions of this system could take clear x-ray photographs with cheap cameras—no need for lenses and multipixel detectors—and less cancer-causing radiation than conventional techniques.

  5. The impact of x-ray tube configuration on the eye lens and extremity doses received by cardiologists in electrophysiology room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J; Zmyślony, M; Bissinger, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of the x-ray tube configuration on the radiation doses to eye lens and extremities of cardiologists performing pacemaker implantation procedures in electrophysiology laboratory. The measurements were performed on one, widely used, portable C-arm system, first with x-ray tube mounted above the patient table and image intensifier below it and then on a reinstalled (but essentially the same) system with under-table x-ray tube configuration. Thermoluminescent dosimeters, placed in various positions near the eye lens, on the hands and ankle, were used during every procedure. The comparison of doses received by cardiologists after changing the x-ray tube configuration from over- to under-table shows statistically significant dose reduction (p < 0.009) for the eye lens closest to the x-ray tube, left finger, left wrist, while for the ankle a dose increase is observed. The corresponding over- to under-table x-ray tube median dose ratios are 4.1 for the right eye, 4.8 for the left finger, 3.0 for left wrist and, finally, 0.13 for the right ankle. Systems with under-table x-ray tube are preferable from a radiation protection point of view. The observed significant increase in doses to the legs should be partially compensated by the use of a protective lead curtain. (note)

  6. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  7. SU-D-209-02: Percent Depth Dose Curves for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Qualities Incorporating Copper Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to quantify percent depth dose (PDD) curves for fluoroscopic x-ray beam qualities incorporating added copper filtration. Methods: A PTW (Freiburg, Germany) MP3 water tank was used with a Standard Imaging (Middleton, WI) Exradin Model 11 Spokas Chamber to measure PDD curves for 60, 80, 100 and 120 kVp x-ray beams with copper filtration ranging from 0.0–0.9 mm at 22cm and 42cm fields of view from 0 to 150 mm of water. A free-in-air monitor chamber was used to normalize the water tank data to fluctuations in output from the fluoroscope. The measurements were acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope. The fluoroscope was inverted from the typical orientation providing an x-ray beam originating from above the water tank. The water tank was positioned so that the water level was located at 60cm from the focal spot; which also represents the focal spot to interventional reference plane distance for that fluoroscope. Results: PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with 0 mm of copper filtration compared well to previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)] for those beam qualities given differences in fluoroscopes, geometric orientation, type of ionization chamber, and the water tank used for data collection. PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with copper filtration were obtained and are presented, which have not been previously investigated and published. Conclusion: The equipment and processes used to acquire the reported data were sound and compared well with previously published data for PDDs without copper filtration. PDD data for the fluoroscopic x-ray beams incorporating copper filtration can be used as reference data for estimating organ or soft tissue dose at depth involving similar beam qualities or for comparison with mathematical models.

  8. Estimation of dose to the unborn child at diagnostic X-ray examinations based on data registered in RIS/PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, Ebba; Pettersson, Haakan; Sandborg, Michael; Alten, Jonas Nilsson

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine mean absorbed doses to the unborn child in common conventional X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations and to find an approach for estimating foetal dose based on data registered in the Radiological Information System/Picture Archive and Communication System (RIS/PACS). The kerma-area product (KAP) and CT dose index (CTDI vol ) in common examinations were registered using a human-shaped female dosimetry phantom. Foetal doses, D f , were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed inside the phantom and compared with calculated values. Measured foetal doses were given in relation to the KAP and the CTDI vol values, respectively. Conversion factor D f /KAP varies between 0.01 and 3.8 mGy/Gycm 2 , depending on primary beam position, foetus age and beam quality (tube voltage and filtration). Conversion factors D f /CTDI vol are in the range 0.02 - 1.2 mGy/mGy, in which the foetus is outside or within the primary beam. We conclude that dose conversion factors based on KAP or CTDI vol values automatically generated by the RIS/PACS system can be used for rapid estimations of foetal dose for common examination techniques. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose measurements of an on-board imager X-ray unit using optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Leon; Haque, Mamoon; Hill, Robin; Morales, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is now widely used to image radiotherapy patients prior to treatment for the purpose of accurate patient setup. However each CBCT image delivered to a patient increases the total radiation dose that they receive. The measurement of the dose delivered from the CBCT images is not readily performed in the clinic. In this study, we have used commercially available optically stimulated luminescence (OSLD) dosimeters to measure the dose delivered by the Varian OBI on a radiotherapy linear accelerator. Calibration of the OSLDs was achieved by using a therapeutic X-ray unit. The dose delivered by a head CBCT scan was found to be 3.2 ± 0.3 mGy which is similar in magnitude to the dose of a head computed tomography (CT) scan. The results of this study suggest that the radiation hazard associated with CBCT is of a similar nature to that of conventional CT scans. We have also demonstrated that the OSLDs are suitable for these low X-ray dose measurements.

  10. Clastogenic effects in human lymphocytes exposed to low and high dose rate X-ray irradiation and vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacka, M; Rogolinski, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we investigated the ability of vitamin C to modulate clastogenic effects induced in cultured human lymphocytes by X-irradiation delivered at either high (1 Gy/min) or low dose rate (0.24 Gy/min). Biological effects of the irradiation were estimated by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay including the analysis of the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and apoptotic cells as well as calculation of nuclear division index (NDI). The numbers of micronucleated binucleate lymphocytes (MN-CBL) were 24.85 ± 2.67% and 32.56 ± 3.17% in cultures exposed to X-rays (2 Gy) delivered at low and high dose rates, respectively. Addition of vitamin C (1-20 μg/ml) to the medium of cultures irradiated with the low dose rate reduced the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes with multiple MN in a concentration-dependent manner. Lymphocytes exposed to the high dose rate radiation showed a U-shape response: low concentration of vitamin C significantly reduced the number of MN, whereas high concentration influenced the radiation-induced total number of micronucleated cells insignificantly, although it increased the number of cells with multiple MN. Addition of vitamin C significantly reduced the fraction of apoptotic cells, irrespective of the X-ray dose rate. These results indicate that radiation dose rate is an important exposure factor, not only in terms of biological cell response to irradiation, but also with respect to the modulating effects of antioxidants. (authors)

  11. Effects of single doses of X-rays on renal function in the pig after the irradiation of both kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, M.E.C.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation of a single kidney in the pig with relatively low doses of X-rays, in the order of 8 Gy, produces a pronounced reduction in both glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). This apparent high radiosensitivity may be due, in part, to the compensatory hypertrophy displayed by the contralateral unirradiated kidney. This could suppress any potential for recovery by the irradiated kidney. To test this hypothesis, both kidneys of 14-week-old Large White pigs were sequentially irradiated with single doses of 250 kV X-rays, in the range 8.8 to 12.6 Gy. Two weeks after irradiation, GFR and ERPF increased markedly in all irradiated kidneys; levels then declined in a dose-dependent manner. Following a dose of 8.8 Gy renal haemodynamics returned to control values within 4 weeks of irradiation. After higher doses, GFR and ERPF decreased markedly and remained below control values up to 24 weeks after irradiation. At all doses the mean functional status of irradiated kidneys in animals in which both kidneys were irradiated was significantly greater than that previously observed in the irradiated kidney of pigs in which only one kidney was irradiated. The findings support the above hypothesis, and indicate that individual kidneys in the same animal may differ in their response to a similar nephrotoxic insult. 35 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. SU-E-J-23: Characteristics of X-Rays From ExacTrac and Patient Dose From Imaging Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is 1) provide the beam characteristics of x-rays produced by a Novalis TX ExacTrac system; 2) present a method to commission such beams, 3) present radiation dose to patients resulting from the imaging procedures. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the characteristics of kV beams and validated by measurements. The calculated beam HVLs, profiles and depth-dose curves were benchmarked against measurements. Twelve different image acquisition protocols were studied. The x-ray tube voltage ranges from 70 - 145 kV and milliampere-second (mAs) ranges from 8 - 80 mAs depending on the selection of Cranium, Head & Neck, Thorax or Abdomen imaging protocols. The beam output of each image acquisition protocol was determined by using an ionization chamber. The air kerma calibration factors of the ion chamber were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for specified HVLs. Results: The agreements between measured and simulated results were within the uncertainties for HVLs, dose profiles and depth-dose curves. When %dd was normalized at 1 cm depth, its values at depth of 5 cm ranged from 45% to 66% of in water for kV beams range from 70 kVp to 145 kVp respectively. For head images, a typical dose to eye resulting from single projection ranged from 0.008 cGy to 0.025 cGy depending on the cranial image protocols selected. For a single pelvic image the skin dose could reach up to 0.1 cGy from an abdominal protocol. Conclusion: Although multiple pairs of x-ray images are commonly acquired during a daily patient treatment, the imaging doses to patients resulting from the sum of these projected x-rays are generally much less than 0.5 cGy. The knowledge obtained from this investigation can be used to estimate the image dose and optimize the used of the system.

  13. X-ray equipment for dental diagnostics with a dose-rate controller influencing the exposure voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, K.

    1980-01-01

    If a synoptic picture is taken of teeth or jaw the X-ray tube and the film carrier with the film and a radiation detector are moving around the patient's head. The detector signal is connected to the input of the actual value of the dose-rate controller containing a scanning and stop circuit with a storing time roughly corresponding to the exposure of three teeth. After the shot the actual value of the dose rate is adjusted to the desired value, thus a constant quality of the following pictures being achieved. (RW) [de

  14. Variations in depth-dose data between open and wedge fields for 4-MV x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewchand, W.; Khan, F.M.; Williamson, J.

    1978-01-01

    Central-axis depth-dose data for 4-MV x rays, including tissue-maximum ratios, were measured for wedge fields. Comparison with corresponding open-field data revealed differences in magnitude which increased with depth, field size, and wedge thickness. However, phantom scatter correction factors for the wedge fields differed less than 1% from corresponding open-field factors. The differences in central-axis percent depth doses between the two types of fields indicate beam hardening by the wedge filter. This study also implies that the derivation of tissue-maximum ratios from central-axis percent depth is as valid for wedge as for open fields

  15. Dose inspection and risk assessment on radiation safety for the use of non-medical X-ray machines in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing

    2017-11-01

    The subject of this study is the on-site visits and inspections of facilities commissioned by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) in Taiwan. This research was conducted to evaluate the possible dose and dose rate of cabinet-type X-ray equipment with nominal voltages of 30-150 kV and open-beam (portable or handheld) equipment, taking both normal operation and possibly abnormal operation conditions into account. Doses and dose rates were measured using a plastic scintillation survey meter and an electronic personal dosimeter. In total, 401 X-ray machines were inspected, including 139 units with nominal voltages of 30-50 kV X-ray equipment, 140 units with nominal voltages of 50-150 kV, and 122 open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment. The investigated doses for radiation workers and non-radiation workers operating cabinet-type X-ray equipment under normal safety conditions were all at the background dose level. Several investigated dose rates at the position of 10 cm away from the surface of open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment were very high, such X-ray machines are used by aeronautical police for the detection of suspected explosives, radiation workers are far away (at least 10 m away) from the X-ray machine during its operation. The doses per operation in X-ray equipment with a 30-50 kV nominal voltage were less than 1 mSv in all cases of abnormal use. Some doses were higher than 1 mSv per operation for X-ray equipment of 50-150 kV nominal voltage X-ray. The maximum dose rates at the beam exit have a very wide range, mostly less than 100 μSv/s and the largest value is about 3.92 mSv/s for open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray devices. The risk induced by operating X-ray devices with nominal voltages of 30-50 kV is extremely low. The 11.5 mSv dose due to one operation at nominal voltage of 50-150 kV X-ray device is equivalent to the exposure of taking 575 chest X-rays. In the abnormal use of open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment, the

  16. An audit of rejected repeated x-ray films as a quality assurance element in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, K C; Omodia, N; Okegbunam, B; Adewonyi, T; Nzotta, C C

    2008-12-01

    To find out the causes, number, percentage and sizes of rejected radiographic films with a view of adopting measures that will reduce the rate and number of rejected films. Radiology Department of a University Teaching Hospital. Over a two-year period (1st April 2002 to 31st March 2004), the total number of x-ray films utilized for radiographic examinations, rejected films and sizes of rejected films were collected retrospectively from the medical record of radiology department. All the rejected films were viewed by a radiologist and three radiographers for the causes of the rejects which was arrived at by consensus. The data was analysed. A total of 15,095 films were used in the study period and 1,338 films (8.86%) were rejected or wasted. The rate of rejected films varied from 7.69% to 13.82% with average of 8.86%. The greatest cause of film rejects was radiographers' faults 547 (40.88%), followed by equipments faults 255 (19.06%), and patients' faults 250 (18.90%). The highest reject rate (13.82%) was for films used for examination of the spine (15 x 30) cm size. This is followed by 9.92% for skull (18 x 24) cm films and 8.83% for small sized films (24 x 30) cm used for paediatric patients. Of a total of 1,338 rejected films, 1276 (95.37%) additional exposure were done to obtain the basic desired diagnostic information involving 1151 patients; 885 (76.89%) of these patients needed at least one additional hospital visit to take the repeat exposure. Rejected films are not billable; patients receive additional radiation and may even come to hospital in another day for the repeat. Radiographer's work is increased as well as that of the support staff. The waiting room may be congested and waiting time increased. The cost of processing chemical and films are increased, thus if work is quantified in monetary terms, the cost of repeats is high. Rejected-repeated film analysis is cheap, simple, practicable, easy to interpret and an effective indictor of quality assurance

  17. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients

  18. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm 2 , calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 ± 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising

  19. Evaluation of conventional x-ray diagnostic equipment and radiological protection systems of hospitals and clinics installed in Recife city, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Robson Silva

    1999-05-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the main contributor to the man-made exposure of general population. Since Quality Assurance (QA) programs ensure high quality diagnostic images with the lowest possible radiation dose to the patient, it has been recommended that all introduce QA programs for their radiological facilities. Consequently it is important to check the adequacy of equipment operating parameters in diagnostic radiography facilities, to ensure that a high quality of service is delivered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the operating conditions of diagnostic units installed in Recife, Pernambuco. The study included 31 X-ray units from both public and private diagnostic services. The following parameters were evaluated: coincidence between the luminous and radiation fields; alignment of the radiation beam; agreement between the real and preset values of kVp and exposure time; filtration; half value lower (HVL); luminance of the view box; uniformity of the luminance; illuminance of the environment. The results showed that 20% of the equipment surveyed exhibited discrepancies between the luminous and radiation fields greater than 2% of the source to skin distance. The test of kilovoltage showed that 48% of the units do not fulfill the acceptability criteria, presenting discrepancies higher than ± 10% between the measured and preset values. The results of the accuracy of the timer indicated that 81% of the equipment surveyed present a discrepancy greater than ± 10% between the time selected in the control panel and actual exposure time.The test of the filtration shown that, in 20% of the equipment, this was inferior to 2,5 mm Al. The test of the luminance of view box shown that 96% of the equipment, shown a luminance lower of 2.000 cd/m 2 . Related to the test of the uniformity of the luminance, 81 % of the equipment shown a variation of the uniformity higher then 10%. The test of the iluminancy of the environment shown that 61 % of the equipment presented

  20. Adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis selectively induced by low dose X-ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Dong Lihua; Liu Yang; Lv Zhe; Liu Shuchun; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis induced by whole-body X-ray irradiation at low doses was studied in mice. Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with an inductive dose (D1:75 mGy) and/or a challenging dose (D2:1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 Gy). Different kinds of spermatogenic cells were separated using density gradient centrifugation and their apoptotic percentages were analysed using flow cytometry (FCM). Results: When the mice were irradiated with D1 6 h before irradiation with D2, the apoptotic percentages of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes declined rapidly as compared with those in the groups irradiated with D2 only, and those of spermatids and spermatozoa showed no significant changes. When the interval times between D1 and D2 was 3, 6, 12 or 24 h, the apoptotic percentages in spermatogonia and spermatocytes reduced early, significantly and continued for a longer duration after smaller D2(1.0 and 2.0 Gy) irradiation, while the apoptotic percentages did not change after larger D2(3.0 Gy) irradiation. Conclusion: The adaptive response of apoptosis in spermatogonia and spermatocytes could be selectively induced by low dose X-ray irradiation. The adaptive response could be closely related to the D2 dose and interval time between D1 and D2

  1. The effect of fractionating 100 R hard X-ray doses on the hemogram and proteinogram of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alix, D.

    1965-01-01

    Eighty one rabbits 'Fauve de Bourgogne' received total exposure of 100 R X-rays, by fractional doses of 5 - 10 - 25 - 50 and 100 R per irradiation. Blood count and protein dosage were practised before, during and after the irradiation session. Seventeen controls were subjected to the same investigations with the same periodicity. Statistical analysis of experimental data permitted to infer from the exposures of X-rays, that irradiation induces drop in leucocytes count, resulting from a drop in mononuclear cells. On the other hand, it is more difficult to clear up its action on the protein profiles, because the observed changes were likewise observed on the controls, although at a lesser degree. Nevertheless, the authors think that it may be concluded to an increase of albumin concentration and to some instability of the gamma-globulins concentration. Then they discuss the possible mechanisms of X-rays effects: either perturbations of protean metabolism following loss of mitotic activity or histolysis. (author) [fr

  2. Assessment of entrance skin doses for patients undergoing diagnostic X-ray examinations in some major hospitals of Uttarakhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniyal, S.C.; Prasad, V.; Chaturvedi, V.; Raghuvanshi, S.; Sharma, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) was calculated based on the X-ray beam output, the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and the standard value of backscatter factor. Descriptive statistics were generated from the data by using Microsoft Excel 2010. The third quartile values of ESDs obtained in this study for different X-ray projections of chest anterior-posterior (AP), chest posterior-anterior (PA), cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumber spine AP, lumber spine lateral, abdomen, KUB, pelvis, skull and knee joint were 0.79, 0.28, 1.20, 2.80, 4.26, 9.82, 2.68, 3.21, 2.69, 2.21 and 0.55 mGy respectively. The ratio of maximum to minimum ESD values ranges from 5.2 for thoracic spine to 19.76 for chest AP X-ray examinations. In general, the obtained ESD values were found to be either lower than or in agreement with the reported national/international values

  3. Dose-response for X-ray induction of myeloid leukaemia in male CBA/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, R H; Papworth, D G; Corp, M J [Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit

    1983-02-01

    The form of the dose-response for induction of malignant diseases in vivo by ionizing radiation is not yet established in spite of its scientific interest and its practical importance. Considerably extended observations have confirmed that the dose-response for acute myeloid leukaemia induced in male CBA/H mice by X-ray exposure is highly curvilinear. The dose-response was well fitted by the expression aD/sup 2/esup(-..gamma..D) (D = dose) in agreement with induction at the cellular level in proportion to D/sup 2/ over the whole dose range 0.25-6.0 Gy. The factor esup(-..gamma..D) accounts for the inescapable concomitant inactivating action of the inducing irradiation. The quantitative aspects of induction of myeloid leukaemia by ionizing radiation are unlike the induction of genetic mutation or cell inactivation and suggest that interaction of two adjoining cells is an essential element in radiation leukaemogenesis.

  4. Scattered radiation dose to radiologist's cornea, thyroid and gonads while performing some x-ray fluoroscopic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougle, Arun

    1993-01-01

    The mankind has been immensely benefited from discovery of X-ray and it has found wide spread application in diagnosis and treatment. Radiation is harmful and can produce somatic and genetic effects in the exposed person. International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended a system of dose limitation based on principle of ALARA. All the efforts should be made to keep the radiation dose to the radiation worker as low as possible. Fluoroscopy gives maximum dose to the patient and staff and hence we have attempted to quantify the scattered radiation dose to the cornea, thyroid and gonads of the radiologist performing fluoroscopic examinations such as barium meal, barium swallow, barium enema, myelography, histerosalpingography and fracture reduction. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method using CaSO 4 :Dy TLD disc was employed for these measurements. Use of lead apron has reduced the dose to radiologist's gonad. (author). 3 refs., 4 tabs