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Sample records for dose rate ionizing

  1. Absorbed dose to mice in prolonged irradiation by low-dose rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, Akihiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saitou, Mikio; Kudo, Iwao [and others

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the dose absorbed by mice was evaluated as a preliminary study of the late effects of prolonged continuous irradiation of mice with low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Eight-week-old male and female SPF C3H/HeN mice in three irradiation rooms were exposed to irradiation at 8000, 400, and 20 mGy, respectively, using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-source. Nine racks were arranged in a circle approximately 2.5 m from the source in each room, and 10 cages were arranged on the 4 shelves of each rack. Dose distributions, such as in air at the source level, in the three rooms were estimated by using ionization chambers, and the absorbed dose distributions in the room and relative dose distributions in the cages in relation to the distance of the cage center were examined. The mean abdomen doses of the mice measured by TLD were compared with the absorbed doses in the cages. The absorbed dose distributions showed not only inverse-inverse-square-law behavior with distance from the source, but geometric symmetry in every room. The inherent scattering and absorption in each room are responsible for such behavior and asymmetry. Comparison of relative dose distributions revealed cage positions that are not suitable for experiments with high precision doses, but all positions can be used for prolonged continuous irradiation experiments if the position of the cages is rotated regularly. The mean abdomen doses of the mice were similar in each cage. The mean abdomen doses of the mice and the absorbed doses in a cage were almost the same in all cages. Except for errors concerning the positions of the racks and cages, the uncertainties in the exposure doses were estimated to be about {+-}12% for 8000 mGy group, 17% for 400 mGy group, and 35% for 20 mGy group. (K.H.)

  2. Spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter for precise measurement of environmental radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-05-01

    A spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter filled with 1 atm. nitrogen gas was arranged aiming at precise measurement of dose rate due to environmental gamma rays and cosmic rays. Ionization current-dose rate conversion factor for this ionization chamber was derived from careful consideration taking into account the attenuation by chamber wall, ionization current due to alpha particles and so on. Experiments at calibrated gamma ray fields and intercomparison with NaI(Tl) scintillation detector were also performed, which confirmed this ionization chamber using the conversion factor can measure the dose rate with an error of only a few percent. This ionization chamber will be used for measurement of environmental gamma ray and cosmic ray dose rate. (author)

  3. Characteristics of Noble Gas-filled Ionization Chambers for a Low Dose Rate Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Park, Se Hwan; Ha, Jan Ho; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Nam Ho; Kim, Jung Bok; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Cho, Seung Yeon

    2007-01-01

    An ionization chamber is still widely used in fields such as an environmental radiation monitoring, a Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) in nuclear facilities, and an industrial application due to its operational stability for a long period and its designs for its applications. Ionization chambers for RMS and an environmental radiation monitoring are requested to detect a low dose rate at as low as 10-2 mR/h and several 3R/h, respectively. Filling gas and its pressure are two of the important factors for an ionization chamber development to use it in these fields, because these can increase the sensitivity of an ionization chamber. We developed cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers for a low dose rate monitoring. Response of a cylindrical ionization chamber, which has a 1 L active volume, was compared when it was filled with Air, Ar, and Xe gas respectively. Response of a spherical ionization chamber was also compared in the case of 9 atm and 25 atm filling-pressures. An inter-comparison with a commercially available high pressure Ar ionization chamber and a fabricated ionization chamber was also performed. A High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) ionization chamber, which was configured with a shielding mesh to eliminate an induced charge of positive ions, was fabricated both for the measurement of an environmental dose rate and for the measurement of an energy spectrum

  4. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  5. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examining the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-radiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. It was concluded that oligodendrocytes in irradiated cultures had significantly lower functional capacity than did unirradiated controls. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. At DIC 14, the group irradiated in a single fraction had significantly lower oligodendrocyte counts than any group given split doses; all irradiated cultures had marked depression of MBP synthesis, but to significant differences referable to time interval between doses. At DIC 21, cultures irradiated at intervals of 0 h to 2 h had similar oligodendrocyte counts to one another, but these counts were significantly lower than in cultures irradiated at intervals of 4 h to 6 h; MBP levels remained depressed at DIC 21 for all irradiated cultures. The oligodendrocyte response to dose rate (0.03 to 1.97 Gy/min) was evaluated at DIC 14 and DIC 21. Exposure at 0.03 Gy/min suppressed oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 21 less than did higher dose rates in 5-Gy irradiated cultures

  6. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  7. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  8. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in bone marrow was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases of the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. However, there were no remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells. (author)

  9. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of CFU-S colonies on day 12, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  10. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  11. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain

  12. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Richard P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  13. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  14. Dose rate effects of low-LET ionizing radiation on fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Nguyen T.K. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin B.; Mothersill, Carmel E. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Department of Biology, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2017-11-15

    Radiobiological responses of a highly clonogenic fish cell line, eelB, to low-LET ionizing radiation and effects of dose rates were studied. In acute exposure to 0.1-12 Gy of gamma rays, eelB's cell survival curve displayed a linear-quadratic (LQ) relationship. In the LQ model, α, β, and α/β ratio were 0.0024, 0.037, and 0.065, respectively; for the first time that these values were reported for fish cells. In the multi-target model, n, D{sub o}, and D{sub q} values were determined to be 4.42, 2.16, and 3.21 Gy, respectively, and were the smallest among fish cell lines being examined to date. The mitochondrial potential response to gamma radiation in eelB cells was at least biphasic: mitochondria hyperpolarized 2 h and then depolarized 5 h post-irradiation. Upon receiving gamma rays with a total dose of 5 Gy, dose rates (ranging between 83 and 1366 mGy/min) had different effects on the clonogenic survival but not the mitochondrial potential. The clonogenic survival was significantly higher at the lowest dose rate of 83 mGy/min than at the other higher dose rates. Upon continuous irradiation with beta particles from tritium at 0.5, 5, 50, and 500 mGy/day for 7 days, mitochondria significantly depolarized at the three higher dose rates. Clearly, dose rates had differential effects on the clonogenic survival of and mitochondrial membrane potential in fish cells. (orig.)

  15. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  16. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  17. Dose-rate effects on mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the life cycle and on cell survival was studied for a range of different dose rates. Log phase, plateau phase and synchronized cultures of different mammalian cells were used. Cell cycle redistribution during the radiation exposure was found to be a very important factor in determining the overall dose-rate effect for log phase and synchronized cells. In fact, cell cycle redistribution during the exposure, in some instances, resulted in a lower dose rate being more effective in cell killing per unit dose than a higher dose rate. For plateau phase cultures, where cell cycle times are greatly lengthened, the effects of redistribution in regard to cell killing was virtually eliminated. Both fed and unfed plateau phase cultures exhibited a dose-rate effect, but it was found that below dose rates of 154 rad/h there is no further loss in effectiveness

  18. Physiological and immunological changes following exposure to low versus high-dose ionizing irradiation; comparative analysis with dose rate and cumulative dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesun, Kim; Heewon, Jang; Soungyeon, Song; Shinhye, Oh; Cukcheul, Shin; Meeseon, Jeong; Chasoon, Kim; Kwnaghee, Yang; Seonyoung, Nam; Jiyoung, Kim; Youngwoo, Jin; Changyoung, Cha

    2008-01-01

    Full text: While high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms some reports suggest low-dose of radiation may not be as damaging as previously thought. Despite increasing evidence regarding the protective effect of low-dose radiation, no studies have directly compared the exact dose-response pattern by high- and low-dose of radiation exposed at high-and low-dose rate. This study aims to explore the cellular and molecular changes in mice exposed to low- and high-dose of radiation exposed at low- and high-dose rate. When C57BL/6 mice (Female, 6 weeks) were exposed at high-dose rate, 0.8 Gy/min, no significant change on the level of WBC, RBC, or platelets was observed up to total dose of 0.5 Gy. However, 2 Gy of radiation caused dramatic reduction in the level of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets. This reduction was accompanied by increased DNA damage in hematopoietic environments. The reduction of WBC was mainly due to the reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. CD8+ T cells and NK cells appeared to be relatively resistant to high-dose of radiation. This change was also accompanied by the reduction of T- and B- progenitor cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, no significant changes of the number of CD4+ T, CD8+ T, NK, and B cells were observed in the spleen of mice exposed at low-dose-rate (0.7 m Gy/h or 3.95 mGy/h) for up to 2 Gy, suggesting that low-dose radiation does not alter cellular distribution in the spleen. Nevertheless, mice exposed to low-dose radiation exhibited elevation of VEGF, MCP-1, IL-4, Leptin, IL-3, and Tpo in the peripheral blood and slight increases in MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-2 in the spleen. This suggests that chronic γ-radiation can stimulate immune function without causing damage to the immune components of the body. Taken together, these data indicate hormesis of low-dose radiation, which could be attributed to the stimulation of immune function. Dose rate rather than total

  19. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Jonas; Toelli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min -1 . The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C 8 H 18 ) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH 3 ) 4 ). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  20. Modeling of transient ionizing radiation effects in bipolar devices at high dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FJELDLY, T.A.; DENG, Y.; SHUR, M.S.; HJALMARSON, HAROLD P.; MUYSHONDT, ARNOLDO

    2000-01-01

    To optimally design circuits for operation at high intensities of ionizing radiation, and to accurately predict their a behavior under radiation, precise device models are needed that include both stationary and dynamic effects of such radiation. Depending on the type and intensity of the ionizing radiation, different degradation mechanisms, such as photoelectric effect, total dose effect, or single even upset might be dominant. In this paper, the authors consider the photoelectric effect associated with the generation of electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor. The effects of low radiation intensity on p-II diodes and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) were described by low-injection theory in the classical paper by Wirth and Rogers. However, in BJTs compatible with modem integrated circuit technology, high-resistivity regions are often used to enhance device performance, either as a substrate or as an epitaxial layer such as the low-doped n-type collector region of the device. Using low-injection theory, the transient response of epitaxial BJTs was discussed by Florian et al., who mainly concentrated on the effects of the Hi-Lo (high doping - low doping) epilayer/substrate junction of the collector, and on geometrical effects of realistic devices. For devices with highly resistive regions, the assumption of low-level injection is often inappropriate, even at moderate radiation intensities, and a more complete theory for high-injection levels was needed. In the dynamic photocurrent model by Enlow and Alexander. p-n junctions exposed to high-intensity radiation were considered. In their work, the variation of the minority carrier lifetime with excess carrier density, and the effects of the ohmic electric field in the quasi-neutral (q-n) regions were included in a simplified manner. Later, Wunsch and Axness presented a more comprehensive model for the transient radiation response of p-n and p-i-n diode geometries. A stationary model for high-level injection in p

  1. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Heliana de; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Custodio, Wilson; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2009-01-01

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 ± 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from 60 Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h -1 - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h - '1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h -1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h -1 - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  2. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  3. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  4. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the LD 50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD 50 s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  5. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L 50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD 50 s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  6. Scintillation detectors, applications in ambient dose rate measurement of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harja, C.

    1997-01-01

    For the task of developing an ambient dose rate measuring probe, the company MAB decided for a design combining an organic plastic scintillator and a secondary electron multiplier. MAB tested a range of available plastic scintillators suitable for this task, and one proved to be particularly good for the intended purpose. This scintillator is a product of the British company NE Technology Ltd. and was specially developed for dosimetry applications, offering the following advantages: The response within the range from 33 keV to 1.3 MeV (Co-60) is much more constant than with combined-design types; there is no afterglow under conditions of excessive load. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  8. Macroarray analysis of gene expression in hematopoietic tissues from mice continuously irradiated by low dose-rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Nakamura, Shingo; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We found that the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow and spleen from 4 - 8 Gy-irradiated mice decreased about 50%, in spite of no change in the number of peripheral blood cells. To evaluate the effects of chronic irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression in mice hematopoietic cells from bone marrow and spleen, the RNA expressions of more than 500 genes such as cytokine genes and oncogenes were measured on the membranes by the RNA macroarray analysis method at accumulated doses at 4.7 and 8 Gy in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the dose rate of 20 mGy/day. The RNA macroarray analysis in spleens from 8 Gy-irradiated mice showed that the expressions in 16 genes including noggin were more than 1.5 times larger than that of control, while those in 64 genes including shh (sonic hedgehog) and BMP-4 (bone morphogenesis protein 4) were more than 1.5 times smaller than that of control. (author)

  9. Dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Li Yanbo; Kang Shunai; Gong Shouliang; Zhao Wenju

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro in order to reveal the possible mechanism of biological effect and adaptive response induced by low dose radiation. Methods: The experiment was divided into D2 (challenging dose), D1 (inductive dose) + D2 and sham-irradiation groups. EL-4 lymphoma cells were irradiated with D1 (75 mGy, 6.25-200.00 mGy·mm -1 ) and D2(1.5 Gy, 287 mGy·min -1 ), the time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The percentage of apoptosis and each cell cycle phase were measured with flow cytometry. Results: When the dose rates of D1 were 6.25-50.00 mGy·min -1 , the percentages of apoptosis in the D1 + D2 group were significantly lower than those in the D2 group (P 0 /G 1 phase cells decreased significantly (P -1 , D2 is 1.5 Gy (287 mGy·min -1 ), and the time interval between D1 and D2 is 6 h, the adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro could be induced. (authors)

  10. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  11. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Kodama, Yasko; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18±1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  12. The Effects of Low Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation on the Shapes of Transients in the LM124 Operational Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Stephen; McMorrow, Dale; Roche, Nicholas; Dusseau, Laurent; Pease, Ron L.

    2008-01-01

    Shapes of single event transients (SETs) in a linear bipolar circuit (LM124) change with exposure to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation. SETs shape changes are a direct consequence of TID-induced degradation of bipolar transistor gain. A reduction in transistor gain causes a reduction in the drive current of the current sources in the circuit, and it is the lower drive current that most affects the shapes of large amplitude SETs.

  13. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Sirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the dose dependency of the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H-HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}, and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice were measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  14. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  15. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  16. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  17. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60 Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm 3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60 Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma

  18. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  19. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-01-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  20. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure, and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6, and 15 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rad) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rad/day and 25 rad/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 110 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replication. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the 15-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used

  1. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  2. Effects of a prolonged irradiation with low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Izumi, Jun; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Kanaiwa-Kudo, Syouko

    2000-07-01

    SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/day. After irradiation, the numbers of CFU-S and CFU-GM in the bone marrow were determined. Number of peripheral blood cells was also counted. The day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earliest stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases in the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. Regardless of the severe decrease in the number of hemopoietic stem cells, no remarkable changes were observed in the number of peripheral blood cells, indicating an enhanced differentiation of the precursor cells. (author)

  3. Ionizing radiation decreases human cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    Information from nine studies with exposed nuclear workers and military observers of atmospheric bomb explosions confirms the results from animal studies which showed that low doses of ionizing radiation are beneficial. The usual ''healthy worker effect'' was eliminated by using carefully selected control populations. The results from 13 million person-years show the cancer mortality rate of exposed persons is only 65.6% that of carefully selected unexposed controls. This overwhelming evidence makes it politically untenable and morally wrong to withhold public health benefits of low dose irradiation. Safe supplementation of ionizing radiation should become a public health service. (author)

  4. Studies on the radicidation of natural food colorants. Effects of electron energy (accelerating voltages) and dose rate of ionizing radiation on functional properties of beet red colorant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashimura, Yutaka; Tada, Mikiro; Furuta, Masakazu

    2003-01-01

    In order to the practical use of radicidation of beet red, natural food colorant with low heat stability and high possibility of microbe contamination, we studied on the energy dependency and dose rate effect for the influence on functional properties of the beet red colorant. For the elucidation of energy dependency, the γ-ray (1.33 MeV) and electron beams with different accelerating voltages (0.75, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 MeV) were used. The dose rate effect was studied under the different dose rate by using γ-ray (0.723, 1.91 and 4.55 kGy/h) and electron beams with accelerating voltage of 10 MeV (1.0 x 10 3 , 2.6 x 10 3 , 7.0 x 10 3 , 7.0 x 10 3 , 2.0 x 10 4 and 5.0 x 10 4 kGy/h). The results obtained in this study showed that regardless of these energy and dose rate, the functional properties of the beet red colorant were little affected by irradiation less than 25 kGy of ionizing radiations. (author)

  5. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Yanai, Takanori; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Science, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of prolonged low-dose irradiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors in tissues, gene expression was analyzed in the spleen as a hemopoietic tissue that is well known to be one of the most sensitive tissues to irradiation. SPF C3H/HeN female mice (Clea Japan Inc.) were irradiated under SPF conditions with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 2, 4, 6, and 8 Gy and a dose rate of 20 mGy/day. Non-irradiated mice of the same age were maintained as controls. At the end of the period of irradiation, both groups of mice were sacrificed and dissected to extract total RNA from their tissues. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the Northern hybridization were employed to detect gene expression. RT-PCT showed no marked changes in the gene expression of GM-CSF. IL-6 gene expression was shown to tend to be enhanced by prolonged low-dose irradiation. The results of Northern hybridization showed that IL-6 mRNA was expressed slightly in both groups, and it was too weak to compare the difference in mRNA expression level between the irradiated group and the controls. No mRNA expression of GM-CSF was detected by Northern hybridization. Based on these results, it was concluded that the gene expression levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF were inadequate to detect the chemiluminescence signals without amplification. It was therefore concluded that improvement of detection sensitivity and larger RNA samples would be necessary for further analysis of the gene expression of hemopoietic factors. (K.H.)

  6. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  7. Present status of ambient dose equivalent rate and radioactive substance concentration measurements in working environment. (3) Measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Shohei

    2006-01-01

    In order to measure the airborne radioactive substance concentration in working environments, some kinds of sampler such as dust sampler and iodine sampler, measuring instruments (alpha and beta spectrometer, and liquid scintillation counter), monitor (dust-, iodine- and gas-monitor), survey meter for measuring gamma ray dose rate are stated. The measurement method of α, β and γ-ray nuclides and ambient dose-equivalent at 10 mm was explained. Some examples of the list of dust sampler, filter, tritium sampler, dust monitor, iodine monitor, gas monitor, and survey meter on the market are shown. There are so many kinds of measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environment that the best instrument for measurement should be selected. The environment conditions such as sample form, temperature and humidity have to be considered in order to evaluate the measurement values. (S.Y.)

  8. Absorbed dose measurement by using tissue equivalent ionization chamber (pair ionization chamber) in the Yayoi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, N.; Okamura, K.; Terakado, T.; Mabuchi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Sukegawa, Toshio; Aizawa, C.; Saito, I.; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    Each dose rate of neutron and gamma ray in the thermal column of the Yayoi reactor, in which an epithermal neutron field will be used for the boron neutron capture therapy, was measured by using a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and a graphite chamber. The tissue equivalent ionization chamber has some response to both neutron and gamma ray, but the graphite chamber has a few response to the neutron, so called pair ionization chamber method. The epithermal neutron fluxes of the thermal column were calculated by ANISN (one dimensional neutron-gamma transport code). A measured value for gamma dose rate by the pair ionization chamber agrees relevantly with a calculated result. For neutron dose rate, however, the measured value was too much small in comparison with the calculated result. The discrepancy between the measured value and the calculated result for neutron dose rate is discussed in detail in the report. (M. Suetake)

  9. Transition of some type of integrated circuits into latch-up mode under effect of ionizing radiation of large dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevskij, B.E.; Madzharova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    Some types of integrated circuits (IC) are almost short-circuit, i.e. they transit to the latch-up regime under the effect of ionizing radiation pulses of large dose rate. The results of investigation into IC under their transition into the latch-up regime at supply voltage of 10 V are presented. It is shown that IC stably transit to the latch-up regime if the dinistor current becomes at least equal to the photocurrent. At bias reduction from 15 to 6 V the dose rate at which the latch-up arises grows from 2.5x10 9 to 3.5x10 9 rad (Si)/s. Burn-out of supply busbar is the usual type of IC failure at latch-up arising. Measures for IC protection from latch-up are shown. In some IC the latch-up is formed beginning from a certain critical value of dose rate, the so-called ''windows'' of latch-up

  10. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  11. 110. PTB seminar: Dose rate measurements of ionizing radiation in the range of natural ambient radiation. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauterbach, U.; Pessara, W.; Woehler-Figgen, S.

    1997-12-01

    Measuring instruments for radiation dose measurement in the range of natural ambient radiation are not subject to legal obligations for calibration and the PTB received numerous requests in the past, asking for measures to be taken in order to ensure reliability of measuring results in this range of radiation. This has induced PTB to organise the seminar, intended to present the current status of measuring technology in this field, reveal problems encountered in practical applications, and discuss suitable ction for quality assurance. The papers of the seminar report the measuring performance and capabilities of the available instruments, results of comparative analyses of measurements, and resulting proposed action for quality assurance. Discussions concluding the sessions are also presented in the processdings volume. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  13. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  14. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiang Juliann G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined

  15. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigl, Martina L. [Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), Reston, VA (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Morgan, William F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  16. Dose rate constants for new dose quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.; Daverda, G.; Leitner, A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual changes and new quantities made is necessary to reassess dose rate quantities. Calculations of the dose rate constant were done for air kerma, ambient dose equivalent and directional dose equivalent. The number of radionuclides is more than 200. The threshold energy is selected as 20 keV for the dose equivalent constants. The dose rate constant for the photon equivalent dose as used mainly in German speaking countries as a temporary quantity is also included. (Author)

  17. Reducing ionizing radiation doses during cardiac interventions in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Elizabeth; Dix, Sarah; Wilson, Neil; Mackillop, Lucy; Ormerod, Oliver

    2012-09-01

    There is concern over ionizing radiation exposure in women who are pregnant or of child-bearing age. Due to the increasing prevalence of congenital and acquired heart disease, the number of women who require cardiac interventions during pregnancy has increased. We have developed protocols for cardiac interventions in pregnant women and women of child-bearing age, aimed at substantially reducing both fluoroscopy duration and radiation doses. Over five years, we performed cardiac interventions on 15 pregnant women, nine postpartum women and four as part of prepregnancy assessment. Fluoroscopy times were minimized by simultaneous use of intracardiac echocardiography, and by using very low frame rates (2/second) during fluoroscopy. The procedures most commonly undertaken were closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) or patent foramen ovale (PFO) in 16 women, coronary angiograms in seven, right and left heart catheters in three and two stent placements. The mean screening time for all patients was 2.38 minutes (range 0.48-13.7), the median radiation dose was 66 (8.9-1501) Gy/cm(2). The median radiation dose to uterus was 1.92 (0.59-5.47) μGy, and the patient estimated dose was 0.24 (0.095-0.80) mSv. Ionizing radiation can be used safely in the management of severe cardiac structural disease in pregnancy, with very low ionizing radiation dose to the mother and extremely low exposure to the fetus. With experience, ionizing radiation doses at our institution have been reduced.

  18. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  19. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  20. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  1. Health hazards of low doses of ionizing radiations. Vo. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation results in clinical manifestations of several disease entities that may be fatal. The onset and severity of these acute radiation syndromes are deterministic in relation to dose magnitude. Exposure to ionizing radiations at low doses and low dose rates could initiate certain damage in critical molecules of the cell, that may develop in time into serious health effects. The incidence of such delayed effects in low, and is only detectable through sophisticated epidemiological models carried out on large populations. The radiation damage induced in critical molecules of cells may develop by stochastic biochemical mechanisms of repair, residual damage, adaptive response, cellular transformation, promotion and progression into delayed health effects, the most important of which is carcinogenesis. The dose response relationship of probabilistic stochastic delayed effects of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, is very complex indeed. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the factors involved, and the uncertainties encountered. Contrary to acute deterministic effects, the occurrence of probabilistic delayed effects of radiation remains to be enigmatic. 7 figs

  2. SU-F-T-16: Experimental Determination of Ionization Chamber Correction Factors for In-Phantom Measurements of Reference Air Kerma Rate and Absorbed Water Dose Rate of Brachytherapy 192Ir Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, M; Lee, V; Wong, M; Leung, R; Law, G; Lee, K; Cheung, S; Tung, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Following the method of in-phantom measurements of reference air kerma rate (Ka) at 100cm and absorbed water dose rate (Dw1) at 1cm of high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibrated (ND,w,60Co) ionization chamber (IC), we experimentally determined the in-phantom correction factors (kglob) of the PTW30013 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) IC by comparing the Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated kglob of the other PTW30016 IC. Methods: The Dw1 formalism of in-phantom measurement is: M*ND,w,60Co*(kglob)Dw1, where M is the collected charges, and (kglob)Dw1 the in-phantom Dw1 correction factor. Similarly, Ka is determined by M*ND,w,60Co*(kglob)ka, where (kglob)ka the in-phantom Ka correction factor. Two thimble ICs PTW30013 and another PTW30016 having a ND,w,60Co from the German primary standard laboratory (PTB) were simultaneously exposed to the microselectron 192Ir v2 source at 8cm in a PMMA phantom. A reference well chamber (PTW33004) with a PTB transfer Ka calibration Nka was used for comparing the in-phantom measurements to derive the experimental (kglob)ka factors. We determined the experimental (kglob)Dw1 of the PTW30013 by comparing the PTW30016 measurements with MC-calculated (kglob)Dw1. Results: Ka results of the PTW30016 based on ND,w,60Co and MC-calculated (kglob)ka differ from the well chamber results based on Nka by 1.6% and from the manufacturer by 1.0%. Experimental (kglob)ka factors for the PTW30016 and two other PTW30013 are 0.00683, 0.00681 and 0.00679, and vary <0.5% with 1mm source positioning uncertainty. Experimental (kglob)Dw1 of the PTW30013 ICs are 75.3 and 75.6, and differ by 1.6% from the conversion by dose rate constant from the AAPM report 229. Conclusion: The 1.7% difference between MC and experimental (kglob)ka for the PTW30016 IC is within the PTB 2.5% expanded uncertainty in Ka calibration standard. Using a single IC with ND,w,60Co to calibrate the brachytherapy source and dose output in external

  3. On the dose-rate effect of ionizing radiations on the initial radiation-chemical yield of paramagnetic centers upon low-temperature radiolysis of n-heptane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kiryukhin, D.P.; Kuzina, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the authors report on an experimental study of the initial regions of dose dependence of paramagnetic centers in n-heptane upon varying the dose rate from 0.035 to 2.3 x 10 3 Gy/s. The buildup at 77 K of paramagnetic centers in n-heptane was studied in outgassed samples placed in Luch-2 glass cells

  4. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  5. Annual individual doses for personnel dealing with ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    Data on annual individual doses for personnel of national economy enterprises, research institutes, high schools, medical establishments dealing with ionizing radiation sources are presented. It is shown that radiation dose for the personnel constitutes only shares of standards established by sanitary legislation. Numeral values of individual doses of the personnel are determined by the type, character and scope of using ionizing radiation sources

  6. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  7. Biological evidence of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsch, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Throughout life, every person is constantly exposed to different types of ionising radiation, without even noticing the exposure. The mean radiation exposure for people living in Germany amounts to approximately 4 mSv per year and encompasses the exposure from natural and man-made sources. The risks associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are still the subject of intense and highly controversial discussions, emphasizing the social relevance of studies investigating the effects of low radiation doses. In this thesis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were analyzed within three projects covering different aspects. DSBs are among the most hazardous DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation, because this type of damage can easily lead to the loss of genetic information. Consequently, the DSB presents a high risk for the genetic integrity of the cell. In the first project, extensive results uncovered the track structure of charged particles in a biological model tissue. This provided the first biological data that could be used for comparison with data that were measured or predicted using theoretical physical dosimetry methods and mathematical simulations. Charged particles contribute significantly to the natural radiation exposure and are used increasingly in cancer radiotherapy because they are more efficient in tumor cell killing than X- or γ-rays. The difference in the biological effects of high energy charged particles compared with X- or γ-rays is largely determined by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition and the track structure inducing a three-dimensional damage pattern in living cells. This damage pattern consists of cells directly hit by the particle receiving a high dose and neighboring cells not directly hit by primary particles but exposed to far-reaching secondary electrons (δ-electrons). These cells receive a much lower dose deposition in the order of a few mGy. The radial dose distribution of single particle tracks was

  8. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  9. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  10. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  11. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  12. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  13. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  14. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  15. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A wide variety of portable survey instruments employing GM, ionization chamber and scintillation detectors exist for the measurement of gamma exposure rates. Often these same survey instruments are used for monitoring beta fields. This is done by making measurements with and without a removable shield which is intended to shield out the non-penetrating component (beta) of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. In many instances correction factors have been derived, that if properly applied, can reduce these errors substantially. However, this requires some knowledge of the beta spectra, calibration techniques and source geometry. This paper discusses some aspects of the proper use of instruments for beta measurements including the application of appropriate correction factors. Ionization type instruments are commonly used to measure beta dose rates. Through design and calibration these instruments will give an accurate reading only for uniform irradiation of the detection volume. Often in the field it is not feasible to meet these conditions. Large area uniform distributions of activity are not generally encountered and it is not possible to use large source-to-detector distances due to beta particle absorption in air. An example of correction factors required for various point sources is presented when a cutie pie ionization chamber is employed. The instrument reading is multiplied by the appropriate correction factor to obtain the dose rate at the window. When a different detector is used or for other geometries, a different set of correction factors must be used

  16. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrynkiewicz, A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the monograph is to review practical aspects of dosimetry. The work describes basic units which are used in dosimetry and natural as well as industrial sources of ionizing radiation. Information given in the monograph help in assessment of the radiation risk. 8 refs, 15 tabs

  17. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  18. The revision of dose limits for exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the current dose limits for exposure to ionizing radiations and the risk factors on which they are based, and summarizes the revised risk factors and the draft proposals for new dose limits published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  19. Increased ionization rate in laser enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, G.S.; Pike, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    A system employing multiple, upper excitation levels in a technique for isotopically selective ionization to improve the ionization efficiency is described. Laser radiation is employed to excite particles with isotopic selectivity. Excitation is produced to a plurality of excited states below the ionization level with the result of increasing the number of available excited particles for ionization and thereby increasing the ionization cross section for improved system efficiency

  20. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marcilei A.G.; Cirne, K.H.; Gimenez, S.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Medina, N.H.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de; Seixas Junior, L.E.; Melo, W. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Paulo Archer, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with

  1. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants; Avaliacao de caracteristicas de qualidade e propriedades funcionais da carne mecanicamente separada de frango tratada com diferentes taxas de dose de radiacao ionizante e uso de antioxidantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-07-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  2. A pressurized ionization chamber dose ratemeter for enviromental radiation measaurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qingyu; Jin Hua

    1986-01-01

    The dose ratemeter, mainly used for measuring absorbed doserate of environmental gamma radiation and the charged particle components of cosmic-rays in f ree-air , consists of an energy compensated spherical pressurized ionization chamber, a MOS electrometer and a digital voltmeter. The flat energy response of the pressurized ionization chamber ranges from 60 keV to 1250 keV. It has good stability and higher sensitivity, and weights 6 kg

  3. Pressurized ionization chamber dose ratemeter for enviromental radiation measaurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingyu, Yue; Hua, Jin; Youling, Jiang

    1986-01-01

    The dose ratemeter, mainly used for measuring absorbed doserate of environmental gamma radiation and the charged particle components of cosmic-rays in /sup f/ree-air/sup ,/ consists of an energy compensated spherical pressurized ionization chamber, a MOS electrometer and a digital voltmeter. The flat energy response of the pressurized ionization chamber ranges from 60 keV to 1250 keV. It has good stability and higher sensitivity, and weights 6 kg.

  4. The limiting dose rate and its importance in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Sonwani, Swetha; Arul Ananthakumar, A.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of defining a low dose of ionizing radiation still remains unclear. Before attempting to define a low dose, it is more important to define a low-dose rate since effects at low dose-rates are different from those observed at higher dose-rates. Hence, it follows that low dose-rates rather than a low dose is an important criteria to determine radio-biological effects and risk factors i.e. stochastic health effects. Chromosomal aberrations induced by ionizing radiations are well fitted by quadratic model Y= áD + âD 2 + C with the linear coefficient of dose predominating for high LET radiations and low doses of low LET. At higher doses and dose rates of sparsely ionizing radiation, break pairs produced by inter-track action leads to the formation of exchange type aberrations and is dependent on dose rate. Whereas at lower doses and dose rates, intra-track action produces break pairs and resulting aberrations are in direct proportion to absorbed dose and independent of dose rate. The dose rate at which inter-track ceases to be observable and where intra-track action effectively becomes the sole contributor of lesion-pair formation is referred to as limiting dose rate (LDR). Once the LDR is reached further reduction in dose rates will not affect the slope of DR since breaks produced by independent charged particle tracks are widely separated in time to interact with each other for aberration yield. This linear dependency is also noticed for acute exposures at very low doses. Existing reports emphasizes the existence of LDR likely to be e6.3cGyh -1 . However no systematic studies have been conducted so far to determine LDR. In the present investigation DR curves were constructed for the dose rates 0.002 and 0.003 Gy/min and to define LDR at which a coefficient approaches zero. Extrapolation of limiting low dose rate data can be used to predict low dose effects regardless of dose rate and its definition ought to serve as a useful index for studies pertaining

  5. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  6. Endophytic fungi of the Genus Penicillium isolated of Platypodium elegans from environments of high dose rate of ionizing radiation; Fungos endofiticos do genero Penicillium isolados de Platypodium elegans provenientes de locais de alta taxa de radiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Victor da

    1999-07-01

    The present work had as objective to isolate and to identify endophytic microorganisms and were exposed to stress situations, using for this ionizing radiations, these highly mutagen and in high doses, lethal to all the alive organisms. The endophytic microorganisms were obtained the starting from the species arboreal Platypodium elegans Vog., one of them developed in radioactive land in the area of Ipora/Go and other, developed in land Background in the city of Abadia de Goias/GO. The rates of dose of environmental radiation were shown sharply different, being in Ipora (Anomaly 2) with a value of approximately 140 {mu}R/h and in Abadia de Goias with approximately 20 {mu}R/H, both measured the area of root of the tree close to. Tests through PCR-RAPD were accomplished with the isolated ones, for verification of the similarity of its genetic characteristics and possible polymorphism among its DNA's . The isolated ones were studied with relationship to the effects of the gamma radiation, being used as source {sup 60} Co, with doses of 25 to 2131 Gy. These lineages had the same behavior practically with relationship to the resistance of the gamma radiation, declining strongly at levels of approximately 700 Gy. The isolated ones tested were identified at microscope for morphology, being of the Genus Penicillium, with the same genetic characteristics in agreement with PCR/RAPD, being just observed a polymorphism area in its DNA's. In spite of a lineage to have been isolated of a tree developed in radioactive land, any difference was observed among its resistance to the gamma radiation in comparison to the isolated lineage of tree developed in land radiometric background. (author)

  7. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  8. A graphical review of radiogenic animal cancer data using the 'dose and dose-rate map'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Hoshi, Yuko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    We have been investigating the effects of low dose or low dose rate irradiation on mice, using our low dose-rate irradiation facilities. In these studies, we found that the effects were highly dependent on both total dose and dose rate. To show this visually, we proposed the 'dose/dose rate map', and plotted the results of our laboratory and our co-workers. The map demonstrated that dose/dose rate plane could be divided into three areas; 1) An area where harmful effects are observed, 2) An area where no harmful effects are observed, and 3) Another area, between previous two areas, where certain protective functions are enhanced. As this map would be a powerful tool to find some trend among the vast numbers of data relating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, we have developed a computer program which plots the collected data on the dose/dose rate map sorting by experimental conditions. In this study, we graphically reviewed and analyzed the data relating to the lifespan studies of animals with a view to determining the relationships between doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation and cancer incidence. The data contains about 800 sets of experiments, which concerns 187,000 animals exposed to gamma ray or X-ray and their 112,000 controls, and total of about 30,000 cancers in exposed animals and 14,000 cancers in controls. About 800 points of data were plotted on the dose/dose rate map. The plot showed that 1) The divided three areas in the dose/dose rate map were generally confirmed by these 800 points of data, and 2) In some particular conditions, e.g. sarcoma by X-rays, the biologically effective area is extended to relatively high dose/dose rate area. (author)

  9. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  10. Reduction of the dose of ionizing radiation: progressions in TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlacchio, A.; Costanzo, E.; Chegai, F.; Simonetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of the dose of ionizing radiation in CT, it is a very important matter that can be reach avoiding unnecessary examinations, using un appropriate report KV / mAs reducing the rotation time, determining the field of study, using a high pitch using equipment that provide systems with dose reduction, through proper education of the staff that interacts with machinery and using radioprotective compounds.

  11. Simulation experiment on total ionization dose effects of linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Benqi; Zhang Yong; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    We carry out the ionization radiation experiment of linear CCDs operated in unbiased, biased, biased and driven mode respectively by Co-60 γ source with our self-designed test system, and offline test the Dark signal and Saturation voltage and SNR varied with total dose for TCD132D, and get some valuable results. On the basis of above work, we set forth a primary experiment approaches to simulate the total dose radiation effects of charge coupled devices. (authors)

  12. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  13. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  14. Mortality from diseases other than cancer following low doses of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Ashmore, P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation at very high (radio-therapeutic) dose levels can cause diseases other than cancer, particularly heart diseases. There is increasing evidence that doses of the order of a few sievert (Sv) may also increase the risk of non-cancer diseases. It is not known, however......, whether such effects also occur following the lower doses and dose rates of public health concern. METHODS: We used data from an international (15-country) nuclear workers cohort study to evaluate whether mortality from diseases other than cancer is related to low doses of external ionizing radiation....... Analyses included 275 312 workers with adequate information on socioeconomic status, over 4 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative radiation dose of 20.7 mSv; 11 255 workers had died of non-cancer diseases. RESULTS: The excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv was 0.24 [95% CI (confidence...

  15. Problems in continuous dose rate measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    The system of continuous dose rate measurement in Fukui Prefecture is described. A telemeter system was constructed in October, 1976, and it has been operated since 1977. Observation has been made at 11 observation stations in the Prefecture. In addition to the continuous measurement of dose rate by using NaI(T1)-DBM systems, the ionization chambers for high dose rate were installed, and also meteorological data have been collected. The detectors are covered with 1 mm thick aluminum designed so that the absorption of external radiation is kept as small as possible. To keep the environmental temperature of the detectors constant, constant temperature wind blow is made. With these consideration, the measurement of Xe-133 is possible, and the standard deviation of yearly dose is around 0.4 mR/Y. By measuring DBM transmission rate, the contribution of Xe-133, which comes from the exhaust pumps in power plants, can be detected. The problems of this system are as follows. First of all, the characteristics of the system must meet the purpose of dose monitoring. The system must detect the dose less than the target value to be achieved. The second is the selection of measuring systems to be set. The system is still not unified, and it is difficult to exchange data between different stations. Finally, the method of data analysis is not yet unified. Manuals or guide-books for this purpose are necessary for the mutual comparison of the data from the stations in different districts. (Kato, T.)

  16. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  17. The dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents calculations that illustrate two conclusions; for any particular cell type there will be a critical radius at which tumor control breaks down, and the radius at which this occurs is strongly dependent upon the low-dose-rate radiosensitivity of the cells

  18. Calibration of working standard ionization chambers and dose standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmahoud, A. A. B.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements were performed for the calibration of two working standard ionization chambers in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory of Sudan. 600 cc cylindrical former type and 1800 cc cylindrical radical radiation protection level ionization chambers were calibrated against 1000 cc spherical reference standard ionization chamber. The chamber were calibrated at X-ray narrow spectrum series with beam energies ranged from (33-116 KeV) in addition to 1''3''7''Cs beam with 662 KeV energy. The chambers 0.6 cc and 0.3 cc therapy level ionization were used for dose standardization and beam output calibrations of cobalt-60 radiotherapy machine located at the National Cancer Institute, University of Gazira. Concerning beam output measurements for 6''0''Co radiotherapy machine, dosimetric measurements were performed in accordance with the relevant per IAEA dosimetry protocols TRS-277 and TRS-398. The kinetic energy released per unit mass in air (air kerma) were obtained by multiplying the corrected electrometer reading (nC/min) by the calibration factors (Gy/n C) of the chambers from given in the calibration certificate. The uncertainty of measurements of air kerma were calculated for the all ionization chambers (combined uncertainty) the calibration factors of these ionization chambers then were calculated by comparing the reading of air kerma of secondary standard ionization chambers to than from radical and farmer chambers. The result of calibration working standard ionization chambers showed different calibration factors ranged from 0.99 to 1.52 for different radiation energies and these differences were due to chambers response and specification. The absorbed dose to to water calculated for therapy ionization chamber using two code of practice TRS-277 and TRS-398 as beam output for 6''0''Co radiotherapy machine and it can be used as a reference for future beam output calibration in radiotherapy dosimetry. The measurement of absorbed dose to water showed that the

  19. Field measurement and interpretation of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A large number of portable survey instruments employing G.M., ionization chamber, and scintillation detectors used for gamma measurements are also used for monitoring in beta fields by using removable shields to separate the beta and gamma components of the radiation field. The difference does not correspond to an absorbed dose rate for the beta field due to a variety of factors. Among these factors are the dependence on beta energy, source-detector geometries, mixed fields and variable ambient conditions. Attempting to use such measurements directly can lead to errors as high as a factor of 100. Appropriate calibrations and correction factors can be used to reduce the errors in beta measurements to a tolerable level

  20. In situ measurements of dose rates from terrestrial gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, M.C.; Jiang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was employed for the performance of in situ measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations in the ground in Taiwan, at altitudes ranging from sea level to 3900 m. The absolute peak efficiency of the HPGe detector for a gamma-ray source uniformly distributed in the semi-infinite ground was determined using a semi-empirical method. The gamma-ray dose rates from terrestrial radionuclides were calculated from the measured activity levels using recently published dose rate conversion factors. The absorbed dose rate in air due to cosmic rays was derived by subtracting the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate from the overall absorbed dose rate in air measured using a high-pressure ionization chamber. The cosmic-ray dose rate calculated as a function of altitude, was found to be in good agreement with the data reported by UNSCEAR. (orig.)

  1. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  3. Influence of dose rate of ionizing radiation on working capacity of the oil-filled electrical equipment for NPP; Vliyanie moshchnosti dozy ioniziruyushchego oblucheniya na rabotosposobnost` maslonapolnennogo ehlektrooborudovaniya dlya AEhS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutnev, A P [and others

    1994-12-31

    Dependence of radiation electric conductivity transformer oil on the gamma radiation absorbed dose rate and on the energy proton flux is investigated. It is ascertained that the electrical reliability of oil and oil-barrier insulation does not depend on the absorbed dose rate up to the maximum achieved values of 200 rad/s.

  4. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  5. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  6. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Raimundo Enoch Rodrigues

    2001-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H * (10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H * (10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H * (10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h -1 , net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h -1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h -1 . In addition, average values of H * (10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H * (10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to

  7. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hamid, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  8. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  9. Biochemical and immunological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.; Sayed, Z.S.; Mahdy, E.M.; El-Gawish, M.A.; Shosha, W.

    2006-01-01

    Malondialdehyde, lactate dehydrogenase, iron concentration, IL-6 and IL-1b concentration, hemoglobin content, red cells, white cells and platelet counts were determined in seventy-two male albino rats divided into two main groups. The first one was subdivided into 7 subgroups; control and 6 irradiated subgroups with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 Gy single dose of gamma radiation. The other was subdivided into 4 subgroups irradiated with fractionated doses of gamma radiation; three groups were irradiated with 0.3, 0.7 and 1 Gy (0.1 Gy/day) and the last subgroup with 1 Gy (0.2 Gy/day). All animals were sacrificed after three days of the last irradiation dose. The results revealed that all biochemical parameters were increased in rats exposed to fractionated doses more than the single doses. Hematological parameters were decreased in rats exposed to single doses more than the fractionated ones. In conclusion, the data of this study highlights the stimulatory effect of low ionizing radiation doses (= 1 Gy), whether single or fractionated, on some biochemical and immunological parameters

  10. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses

  11. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  12. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  13. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  14. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  15. On the common mechanism for initiation of different effects of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Main regularities of different endpoints of ionizing radiation low dose effects (adaptive response, stimulation of proliferation, special radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells, and others) have been examined. It has been shown that these endpoints have a commonness for the dose interval, the shape of the dose-response curve, the reverse effect of dose rate, non-specificity toward initiating agents, and others. An explanation is suggested for the common mechanism of the initiation of all the studied low dose effects, basing on the theory of the non-specific reaction of cell to external influences. It is concluded that initiation of the low dose effects is conditioned by radiation induced damage of functions of plasmic and internal membranes

  16. Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs

  17. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  18. Three-dimensional spatial imaging in multiphoton ionization rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredy, Richard; Camp, Howard A.; Nguyen, Hai; Awata, Takaaki; Shan Bing; Chang Zhenghu; DePaola, B.D.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is described in which an apparatus is used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring multiphoton photoionization rates in the interaction of short pulsed lasers with atoms or molecules. With this methodology, the ionization rate is measured as a function of the spatial position in the beam-waist region of the laser through the direct three-dimensional spatial imaging of the ionization events. Thus, if the spatial dependence of the laser beam intensity were known, a series of experiments could yield the intensity dependence of multiphoton ionization without the assumptions or errors that are generally inherent in the integration over one or more dimensions in the laser focal volume

  19. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  20. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  1. Calibration of ionization chambers and determination of the absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANDRIANTSEHENO, H.F

    1996-01-01

    In order to further improve the accuracy of dosimetric measurements in radiation therapy, the IAEA and WHO supported the establishment of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDLs). These SSDLs bridge the gap between the primary measurement standards and the user of ionizing radiation by providing the latter with calibrations against the SSDLs' secondary standards and by giving technical advice and assistance. However, a properly calibrated dosimeter is just necessary first condition for the determination of the dose. It has been demonstrated that the success or failure of radiation treatment depends on the absorbed dose delivered to the tumour and that this should not vary by more than a few per cent from described values. [fr

  2. Dose-rate dependence of thermoluminescence response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Chen, R.; Groom, P.J.; Durrani, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The previously observed dose-rate effect of thermoluminescence in quartz at high dose-rates is given at theoretical formulation. Computer calculations simulating the experimental conditions yield similar results to the experimental ones. (orig.)

  3. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  4. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  5. Ionizing radiation dose due to the use of agricultural fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umisedo, Nancy Kuniko

    2007-01-01

    Among several agents that exist in the environment which can expose to different risks and effects, there is the ionizing radiation whose knowledge of dose is of importance to the effective control and prevention of possible damages to human beings and to the environment. The transfer of radionuclides from fertilizers to/and soils to the foodstuffs can result as an increment in the internal dose when they are consumed by the human beings. This work evaluates the contribution of fertilizers to the ionizing radiation dose in the environment and in the human being. Samples of fertilizers, soils and vegetables produced in fertilized soils were analysed through gamma spectrometry with the use of a hyper pure germanium detector. Measurements of ambient dose with thermoluminescent dosimeters were also performed. In the fertilized soil samples values of specific activities from 36 to 342 Bq/kg for K-40, from 42 to 142 Bq/kg for U-238 and from 36 to 107 Bq/kg for Th-232 were obtained. In the vegetables the values varied from 21 to 118 Bq/kg for K-40 and for the elements of uranium and thorium series the values were less than 2 Bq/kg. In fertilizers the maximum value of 5800 Bq/kg was obtained for K-40, 430 Bq/kg for U-238 and 230 Bq/kg for Th-232. The average values of soil to plant transfer factor were not significantly different among the types of vegetables. The annual committed effective dose of 0.882 μSv due to the ingestion of K-40 from the analysed vegetables is very small if compared to the reference value of 170 μv given by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 2000). The thermoluminescent dosimetry provided the annual ambient dose equivalent from 1.5 to 1.8 mSv without differences between cultivated and non cultivated fields. Through the results obtained, it was not observed a significant transfer of radionuclides from fertilizers to soils and to foodstuffs in the conditions adopted in this work and consequently there

  6. Bayesian estimation of dose rate effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Groer, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical method was used to quantify the effectiveness of high dose rate 137 Cs gamma radiation at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice. The Bayesian approach considers both the temporal and dose dependence of radiation carcinogenesis and total mortality. This paper provides the first direct estimation of dose rate effectiveness using Bayesian statistics. This statistical approach provides a quantitative description of the uncertainty of the factor characterising the dose rate in terms of a probability density function. The results show that a fixed dose from 137 Cs gamma radiation delivered at a high dose rate is more effective at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice than the same dose delivered at a low dose rate. (author)

  7. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  8. Double ionization chamber survey meter for the separate measurement of penetrating and non-penetrating dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The full capabilities of an advanced 8-bit microprocessor have been utilized in construction of a wide range, multiplexing survey meter based on dual electrometers and ionization chambers. The ionization chambers are constructed of modular conducting and non-conducting parts in such a way that the angular dependence for measurement of beta radiation is controlled by design. Display functions for the high range instrument include logarithmic or linear analog display, digital display of rate or dose, SI or English units, optionally for either total, penetrating, or non-penetrating dose. The instrument is presently configured to operate in the range 0.1 R/hr to 50,000 R/hr in support of the requirements of Regulatory Guide 19.7

  9. Dose rate visualization of radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Kessler, S.F.; Tomaszewski, T.A.

    1995-09-01

    Advanced visualization techniques can be used to investigate gamma ray and neutron dose rates around complex dose rate intensive operations. A method has been developed where thousands of dose points are calculated using the MCNP(Monte Carlo N-Particle) computer code and then displayed to create color contour plots of the dose rate for complex geometries. Once these contour plots are created, they are sequenced together creating an animation to dynamically show how the dose rate changes with changes in the geometry or source over time

  10. Dose rate visualization of radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Kessler, S.F.; Tomaszewski, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced visualization techniques can be used to investigate gamma ray and neutron dose rates around complex dose rate intensive operations. A method has been developed where thousands of dose points are calculated using the MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) computer code (Briesmeister 1993) and then displayed to create color contour plots of the dose rate for complex geometries. Once these contour plots are created, they are sequenced together creating an animation to dynamically show how the dose rate changes with changes in the geometry or source over time. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in normal human skin fibroblasts. Enhancement of DNA repair rate and modulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, S.M. de; Mitchel, R.E.J.; Azzam, E.; Ottawa Univ., ON; Raaphorst, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    Low doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation enhance the rate of DNA repair in human fibroblasts and protect the cells against radiation-induced micronucleus formation. Chronic exposures reduce the mRNA levels of the genes topoisomerase II and FACC-1 (Fanconi's anemia, group C). (authors). 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  12. Compendium of Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Boutte, Alvin J.; Chen, Dakai; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Casey, Megan C.; Campola, Michael J.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Obryan, Martha V.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear, and hybrid devices.

  13. Secondary standard dosimetry system with automatic dose/rate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.; Bernhart, J.; Stehno, G.; Klosch, W.

    1980-01-01

    A versatile and automated secondary standard instrument has been designed for quick and accurate dose/rate measurement in a wide range of radiation intensity and quality (between 1 μR and 100 kR; 0.2 nC/kg - 20C/kg) for protection and therapy level dosimetry. The system is based on a series of secondary standard ionization chambers connected to a precision digital current integrator with microprocessor circuitry for data evaluation and control. Input of measurement parameters and calibration factors stored in an exchangeable memory chip provide computation of dose/rate values in the desired units. The ionization chambers provide excellent long-term stability and energy response and can be used with internal check sources to test validity of calibration. The system is a useful tool particularly for daily measurements in a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory or radiation therapy center. (H.K.)

  14. The Increase in Animal Mortality Risk following Exposure to Sparsely Ionizing Radiation Is Not Linear Quadratic with Dose

    OpenAIRE

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bo...

  15. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  16. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Cac, Franky Eduardo

    2004-10-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192 Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192 Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192 Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192 Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192 Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  17. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  18. Plastic packaging and burn-in effects on ionizing dose response in CMOS microcircuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, S.D.; Bings, J.P.; Maher, M.C.; Williams, M.K.; Alexander, D.R.; Pease, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Results are reported from an investigation of the effects of packaging and burn-in on the post-irradiation performance of National Semiconductor 54AC02 Quad 2-input NOR gates. The test population was drawn from a single wafer fabricated in the National process qualified under Mil-Prf-38535 to an ionizing radiation hardness of 100 krads(Si). The test sample was divided between plastic and ceramic packages. Additionally, half of the plastic samples and half of the two ceramic samples received a 168 hour/125 C burn-in. Two irradiation schemes were used. The first followed Mil-Std-883 Method 1019.4 (dose rate = 50 rads(Si)/s). The second used a low dose rate (0.1 rads(Si)/s). AC, DC, transfer function and functional behavior were monitored throughout the tests. Significant differences among the package types and burn-in variations were noted with the plastic, burned-in components demonstrating enhanced degradation. They show the worst post-irradiation parameter values as well as very broad post-irradiation parameter distributions. Degradation is highly dependent upon dose rate and anneal conditions. Two different radiation induced leakage paths have been identified, and their characteristics have been correlated to variations in high dose rate and low dose rate circuit performance. Caution is recommended for system developers to ensure that radiation hardness characterization is performed for the same package/burn-in configuration to be used in the system

  19. Specific-locus experiments show that female mice exposed near the time of birth to low-LET ionizing radiation exhibit both a low mutational response and a dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.; Lee, S.S.; Kelly, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Raymer, G.D.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Female mice were exposed to 300 R of 73-93 R/min X-radiation either as fetuses at 18.5d post conception (p.c.) or within 9h after birth. Combining the similar results from these 2 groups yielded a specific-locus mutation frequency of 9.4x10 -8 mutation/locus/R, which is statistically significantly higher than the historical-control mutation frequency, but much lower than the rate obtained by irradiating mature and maturing oocytes in adults. Other females, exposed at 18.5 days p.c. to 300 R of 0.79 R/min γ-radiation, yielded a mutation frequency that was statistically significantly lower than the frequency at high dose rates. The low-dose-rate group also had markedly higher fertility. It appears that the doe-rate effect for mutations induced near the time of birth may be more pronounced than that reported for mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A hypothesis sometimes advanced to explain low mutation frequencies recovered from cell populations that experience considerable radiation-induced cell killing is that there is selection against mutant cells. The reason for the relatively low mutational response following acute irradiation in the experiments is unknown; however, the finding of a dose-rate effect in these oocytes in the presence of only minor radiation-induced cell killing (as judged from fertility) makes it seem unlikely that selection was responsible for the low mutational response following acute exposure. Had selection been an important factor, the mutation frequency should have increased when oocyte killing was markedly reduced. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  20. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  1. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, L.B.; Jensen, F.; Tolstikhin, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    Within the weak-field asymptotic theory, the dependence of the tunneling ionization rate of a molecule in a static electric field on its orientation with respect to the field is determined by the structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). An accurate determination...

  2. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  3. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  4. Influence of low dose ionizing radiation on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Hou Dianjun; Qiao Jianwei; Shang Ximei; Li Jieqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of low dose ionization on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells. Methods: TIL cells isolated from Lewis lung cancer tissues and LAK cells from spleen of tumor-bearing mouse were irradiated with different low doses of X-rays and were cultured after irradiation. Results: Low dose ionizing radiation improved the amplification volume of LAK/TIL cells, decreased the cell death ratio in amplification process, and increased the toxicity of LAK/TIL cells, Conclusions: Low dose ionizing radiation can result in amplification of biologically activated lymphocytes, and decreases the death ratio of the cells in amplification process

  5. Measurement of air kerma rate for Cs-137 using different ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, K. T. A.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the importance of radiation doses in medical field quality assurance should be established in order to maintain a reasonable balance between the purpose of application and exposure. This study had been carried out to achieve quality control for protection based on air kerma rate. Measurements were performed by using Cs-137 for the comparison of two working ionization chambers in secondary standard dosimetry laboratory of Sudan. Spherical ionization chamber L S-01 1000 cc S/N 912 and Farmer ionization chamber 2675 A 600 cc S/N 0511, respectively. The results obtained from this study have been represented as mean and their standard deviations shown in most cases remains at 5% uncertainly. Comparison between kinetic energy released per unit mass in air rate (air kerma rate) were obtained by using spherical ionization chamber L S-01 1000 cc S/N 912 and results have been determined using inverse square law. The differences have been represented as means and standard deviations with significant P-value less than 0.05. Spherical ionization chamber gives accurate, reproducible results with acceptable uncertainty which is more suitable for calibration of radiation detectors.(Author)

  6. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation. Artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (1) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (2) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to 239 Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation–environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking. (author)

  7. Anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, I.P.; Mamontov, A.P.; Botaki, A.A.; Cherdantsev, P.A.; Chakhlov, B.V.; Sharov, S.R.; Timoshnikov, Yu.A.; Filipenko, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of small doses of 60 Co gamma rays on copper, tungsten, and WCo alloys has been investigated. A decrease in the concentration of material defects under the influence of small doses of ionizing radiation was found. Also the structural rearrangement of the crystal was found to be still in progress after irradiation ceased. The mechanism of the anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys is discussed in terms of the electron energy scheme. (U.K.)

  8. Concrete spent fuel storage casks dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bace, M.; Jecmenica, R.; Trontl, K.

    1998-01-01

    Our intention was to model a series of concrete storage casks based on TranStor system storage cask VSC-24, and calculate the dose rates at the surface of the casks as a function of extended burnup and a prolonged cooling time. All of the modeled casks have been filled with the original multi-assembly sealed basket. The thickness of the concrete shield has been varied. A series of dose rate calculations for different burnup and cooling time values have been performed. The results of the calculations show rather conservative original design of the VSC-24 system, considering only the dose rate values, and appropriate design considering heat rejection.(author)

  9. Clinical practitioners' knowledge of ionizing radiation doses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questions on radiosensitivity of different organs, imaging modalities that use ionizing radiation and considerations for the choice of ionizing radiation (IR) based examinations were included. Participants were also asked for their preferred methods of filling any knowledge gap on IR issues. Responses were presented in ...

  10. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  11. Low-dose ionizing radiation limitations to seed germination: Results from a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Guanghui; Qin, Youcai; Sun, Yi; Liu, Dianlei; Li, Lei; Liu, Hong

    2017-08-01

    There is much uncertainty about the risks of seed germination after repeated or protracted environmental low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination using a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation. A low-dose ionizing radiation environment simulator was built to investigate wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds germination process and then a kinetic model expressing the relationship between wheat seed germination dynamics and low-dose ionizing radiation intensity variations was developed by experimental data, plant physiology, relevant hypotheses and system dynamics, and sufficiently validated and accredited by computer simulation. Germination percentages were showing no differences in response to different dose rates. However, root and shoot lengths were reduced significantly. Plasma governing equations were set up and the finite element analysis demonstrated H 2 O, CO 2 , O 2 as well as the seed physiological responses to the low-dose ionizing radiation. The kinetic model was highly valid, and simultaneously the related influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination proposed in the modeling process was also adequately verified. Collectively these data demonstrate that low-dose ionizing radiation has an important effect on absorbing water, consuming O 2 and releasing CO 2 , which means the risk for embryo and endosperm development was higher. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  15. Impact of total ionizing dose on the electromagnetic susceptibility of a single bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doridant, A.; Jarrix, S.; Raoult, J.; Blain, A.; Dusseau, L.; Chatry, N.; Calvel, P.; Hoffmann, P.

    2012-01-01

    Space or military electronic components are subject to both electromagnetic fields and total ionizing dose. This paper deals with the electromagnetic susceptibility of a discrete low frequency transistor subject to total ionizing dose deposition. The electromagnetic susceptibility is investigated on both non-irradiated and irradiated transistors mounted in common emitter configuration. The change in susceptibility to 100 MHz-1.5 GHz interferences lights up a synergy effect between near field electromagnetic waves and total ionizing dose. Physical mechanisms leading to changes in signal output are detailed. (authors)

  16. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  17. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  18. Estimation of dose from chromosome aberration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deping

    1990-01-01

    The methods and skills of evaluating dose from correctly scored shromsome aberration rate are presented, and supplemented with corresponding BASIC computer code. The possibility and preventive measures of excessive probability of missing score of the aberrations in some of the current routine score methods are discussed. The use of dose-effect relationship with exposure time correction factor G in evaluating doses and their confidence intervals, dose estimation in mixed n-γ exposure, and identification of high by nonuniform acute exposure to low LET radiation and its dose estimation are discussed in more detail. The difference of estimated dose due to whether the interaction between subleisoms produced by n and γ have been taken into account is examined. In fitting the standard dose-aberration rate curve, proper weighing of experiment points and comparison with commonly accepted values are emphasised, and the coefficient of variation σ y √y of the aberration rate y as a function of dose and exposure time is given. In appendix I and II, the dose-aberration rate formula is derived from dual action theory, and the time variation of subleisom is illustrated and in appendix III, the estimation of dose from scores of two different types of aberrations (of other related score) is illustrated. Two computer codes are given in appendix IV, one is a simple code, the other a complete code, including the fitting of standard curve. the skills of using compressed data storage, and the production of simulated 'data ' for testing the curve fitting procedure are also given

  19. Ionization rates and profiles of electron concentration in Martian atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komitov, B.; Spasov, S.; Gogoshev, M.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization and vertical profiles of electron concentration in the Martian atmosphere are calculated as functions of the solar zenith angles varying from O deg to 90 deg. A neutral atmospheric model based on direct mass-spectometric measurements from the Viking-1 landing modul is employed in the calculation. The Earth data of the ionization solar flux at the same level of the solar activity and for the month of the Viking-1 measurements reduced for the Mars orbit are used. The numerical result for the photoionization rates and quasi-equilibrium electron-concentration profiles in the upper Martian atmosphere at different solar zenith angles from 0 deg to 100 deg are presented. It is shown that the maxima of both quantities decrease and move towards the upper atmosphere regions. The calculated electron density at the zenith solar angle of 40 deg are compared to Viking-1 experimental data and a good agreement is achieved

  20. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  1. Single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jianshe; Cai Nan; Liu Jiaxin; Wu Qinzhi; Wang Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this work, single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays and 252 Cf source were studied. The single event burnout and single event gate rupture (SEB/SEGR) effects were investigated, and the relationship between drain-source breakdown voltage and ionizing dose was obtained. The results showed that the VDMOSFET devices were sensitive to SEB and SEGR, and measures to improve their resistance to SEB and SEGR should be considered seriously for their space applications. The drain-source breakdown voltage was sensitive to total ionizing dose effects as the threshold voltage. In assessing the devices' resistance to the total ionizing dose effects, both the threshold voltage and the drain-source breakdown voltage should be taken into account. (authors)

  2. Compendium of Current Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Results from NASA GSFC and NEPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Chen, Dakai; Casey, Megan C.; Yau, Ka-Yen; Label, Kenneth A.; Cochran, Donna J.; O'Bryan, Martha V.

    2017-01-01

    Total ionizing dose and displacement damage testing was performed to characterize and determine the suitability of candidate electronics for NASA space utilization. Devices tested include opto-electronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  3. Recent Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Compendium of Candidate Electronics for NASA Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Boutte, Alvin J.; Campola, Michael J.; Carts, Martin A.; Casey, Megan C.; Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Marshall, Cheryl J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  4. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  5. Carcinogenesis in mice after low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The results from the experimental systems reported here indicate that the dose-response curves for tumor induction in various tissues cannot be described by a single model. Furthermore, although the understanding of the mechanisms involved in different systems is incomplete, it is clear that very different mechanisms for induction are involved. For some tumors the mechanism of carcinogenesis may be mainly a result of direct effects on the target cell, perhaps involving one or more mutations. While induction may occur, in many instances, through such direct effects, the eventual expression of the tumor can be influenced by a variety of host factors including endocrine status, competence of the immune system, and kinetics of target and interacting cell populations. In other tumors, indirect effects may play a major role in the initiation or expression of tumors. Some of the hormone-modulated tumors would fall into this class. Despite the complexities of the experimental systems and the lack of understanding of the types of mechanisms involved, in nearly every example the tumorigenic effectiveness per rad of low-LET radiation tends to decrease with decreasing dose rate. For some tumor types the differences may be small or may appear only with very low dose rates, while for others the dose-rate effects may be large

  6. Air dose rate in Aichi Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Shoko; Chaya, Kunio; Tomita, Banichi; Aoyama, Kan; Yamada, Naoki; Yamada, Masuo; Hamamura, Norikatsu

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out the observations of air dose rate during 1964--1983 at the fixed points of Aichi Prefecture and investigated the distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture during 1979--1983. The results of these researches are as follows. 1) The apparent half time of radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere during the last 20 years was about 9.7 years and it was longer than the apparent half time of fallout total β radioactivity in every rainfall that was about 3.2 years. 2) The influence of nuclear explosion test in China on the measurements of air does rate did not existed directly during the latter half of 20 years, not so as during the former and it was keeping decreasing. It was expected that the air dose rate would begin to indicate the natural radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere in the near future. 3) The distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture depended strongly on the geology. The maximum value was 5.6 μR/hr (except cosmic rays) in Fujioka Cho, the minimum value was 1.9 μR/hr (except cosmic rays) in Tahara Cho and the average in the whole prefecture was 3.5+-0.7 μR/hr (except cosmic rays). 4) It was estimated that the radiation dose which the inhabitants received from the earth and the atmosphere was 17--52 m rem a year and the average was 31 m rem a year. (author)

  7. Air dose rate in Aichi Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Shoko; Chaya, Kunio; Tomita, Banichi; Aoyama, Kan; Yamada, Naoki; Yamada, Masuo; Hamamura, Norikatsu

    1985-03-01

    We have carried out the observations of air dose rate during 1964-1983 at the fixed points of Aichi Prefecture and investigated the distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture during 1979-1983. The results of these researches are as follows. 1) The apparent half time of radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere during the last 20 years was about 9.7 years and it was longer than the apparent half time of fallout total ..beta.. radioactivity in every rainfall that was about 3.2 years. 2) The influence of nuclear explosion test in China on the measurements of air does rate did not existed directly during the latter half of 20 years, not so as during the former and it was keeping decreasing. It was expected that the air dose rate would begin to indicate the natural radiation dose from the earth and the atmosphere in the near future. 3) The distribution of air dose rate in this prefecture depended strongly on the geology. The maximum value was 5.6 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays) in Fujioka Cho, the minimum value was 1.9 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays) in Tahara Cho and the average in the whole prefecture was 3.5 +- 0.7 ..mu..R/hr (except cosmic rays). 4) It was estimated that the radiation dose which the inhabitants received from the earth and the atmosphere was 17-52 m rem a year and the average was 31 m rem a year.

  8. Conversion of ionization measurements to radiation absorbed dose in non-water density material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khatib, E.; Connors, S.

    1992-01-01

    In bone-equivalent materials two different calculations of absorbed dose are possible: the absorbed dose to soft tissue plastic (polystyrene) within bone-equivalent material and the dose to the bone-equivalent material itself. Both can be calculated from ionization measurements in phantoms. These two calculations result in significantly different doses in a heterogeneous phantom composed of polystyrene and aluminium (a bone substitute). The dose to a thin slab of polystyrene in aluminium is much higher than the dose to the aluminium itself at the same depth in the aluminium. Monte Carlo calculations confirm that the calculation of dose to polystyrene in aluminium can be accurately carried out using existing dosimetry protocols. However, the conversion of ionization measurements to absorbed dose to high atomic number materials cannot be accurately carried out with existing protocols and appropriate conversion factors need to be determined. (author)

  9. Dose rate calculations for a reconnaissance vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, L.; Mackey, J.; Salmon, M.; Smith, C.; Wall, S.

    2005-01-01

    A Chemical Nuclear Reconnaissance System (CNRS) has been developed by the British Ministry of Defence to make chemical and radiation measurements on contaminated terrain using appropriate sensors and recording equipment installed in a land rover. A research programme is under way to develop and validate a predictive capability to calculate the build-up of contamination on the vehicle, radiation detector performance and dose rates to the occupants of the vehicle. This paper describes the geometric model of the vehicle and the methodology used for calculations of detector response. Calculated dose rates obtained using the MCBEND Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code in adjoint mode are presented. These address the transient response of the detectors as the vehicle passes through a contaminated area. Calculated dose rates were found to agree with the measured data to be within the experimental uncertainties, thus giving confidence in the shielding model of the vehicle and its application to other scenarios. (authors)

  10. Radioactivities (dose rates) of rocks in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu; Minato, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The radioactive distribution (radiation doses) of major rocks in Japan was monitored to clarify the factors influencing terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates. The rock samples were reduced to powder and analyzed by well-type NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and pulse height analyzer. Terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates were estimated in terms of gamma radiation dose rate 1 m above the ground. The radioactivity concentration was highest in acidic rock which contains much SiO 2 among igneous rock, followed by neutral rock, basic rock, and ultrabasic rock. The radioactive concentration was 30-40% lower in acidic and clastic rocks than those of the world average concentration. Higher radioactive concentration was observed in soils than the parent rocks of sedimentary rock and metamorphic rock. The gamma radiation dose rate was in proportion to the radioactive concentration of the rocks. To clarify the radioactive effect in the change course of rocks into soils, comparative measurement of outcrop and soil radioactive concentrations is important. (S.Y.)

  11. L-shell radiative transition rates by selective synchrotron ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, R D; Carreras, A C; Trincavelli, J; Castellano, G

    2004-01-01

    Relative L-shell radiative transition rates were obtained for a number of decays in Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta and Re by means of a method for refining atomic and experimental parameters involved in the spectral analysis of x-ray irradiated samples. For this purpose, pure samples were bombarded with monochromatic synchrotron radiation tuning the incident x-ray energy in order to allow selective ionization of the different atomic shells. The results presented are compared to experimental and theoretical values published by other authors. A good general agreement was found and some particular discrepancies are discussed

  12. Reference Dose Rates for Fluoroscopy Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geleijns, J.; Broerse, J.J.; Hummel, W.A.; Schalij, M.J.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Teeuwisse, W.; Zoetelief, J.

    1998-01-01

    The wide diversity of fluoroscopy guided interventions which have become available in recent years has improved patient care. They are being performed in increasing numbers, particularly at departments of cardiology and radiology. Some procedures are very complex and require extended fluoroscopy times, i.e. longer than 30 min, and radiation exposure of patient and medical staff is in some cases rather high. The occurrence of radiation-induced skin injuries on patients has shown that radiation protection for fluoroscopy guided interventions should not only be focused on stochastic effects, i.e. tumour induction and hereditary risks, but also on potential deterministic effects. Reference dose levels are introduced by the Council of the European Communities as an instrument to achieve optimisation of radiation protection in radiology. Reference levels in conventional diagnostic radiology are usually expressed as entrance skin dose or dose-area product. It is not possible to define a standard procedure for complex interventions due to the large inter-patient variations with regard to the complexity of specific interventional procedures. Consequently, it is not realistic to establish a reference skin dose or dose-area product for complex fluoroscopy guided interventions. As an alternative, reference values for fluoroscopy guided interventions can be expressed as the entrance dose rates on a homogeneous phantom and on the image intensifier. A protocol has been developed and applied during a nationwide survey of fluoroscopic dose rate during catheter ablations. From this survey reference entrance dose rates of respectively 30 mGy.min -1 on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom with a thickness of 21 cm, and of 0.8 μGy.s -1 on the image intensifier have been derived. (author)

  13. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  14. Dose-rate determination by radiochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangini, A.; Pernicka, E.; Wagner, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    At the previous TL Specialist Seminr we had suggested that α-counting is an unsuitable technique for dose-rate determination due to overcounting effects. This is confirmed by combining α-counting, neutron activation analysis, fission track counting, α-spectrometry on various pottery samples. One result of this study is that disequilibrium in the uranium decay chain alone cannot account for the observed discrepancies between α-counting and chemical analysis. Therefore we propose for routine dose-rate determination in TL dating to apply chemical analysis of the radioactive elements supplemented by an α-spectrometric equilibrium check. (author)

  15. Spontaneous mutation rates and the rate-doubling dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Borstel, R.C.; Moustaccki, E.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of radiation required to double the frequency of mutations or tumours over the rate of those that occur spontaneously is called the rate-doubling dose. An equivalent concept has been proposed for exposure to other environmental mutagens. The doubling dose concept is predicated on the assumption that all human populations have the same spontaneous mutation rate, and that this spontaneous mutation rate is known. It is now established for prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes that numerous genes control the spontaneous mutation rate, and it is likely that the same is true for human cells as well. Given that the accepted mode of evolution of human populatons is from small, isolated groups of individuals, it seems likely that each population would have a different spontaneous mutation rate. Given that a minimum of twenty genes control or affect the spontaneous mutation rate, and that each of these in turn is susceptible to spontaneously arising or environmentally induced mutations, it seems likely that every individual within a population (except for siblings from identical multiple births) will have a unique spontaneous mutation rate. If each individual in a population does have a different spontaneous mutation rate, the doubling dose concept, in rigorous terms, is fallacious. Therefore, as with other concepts of risk evaluation, the doubling dose concept is subject to criticism. Nevertheless, until we know individual spontaneous mutation rates with precision, and can evaluate risks based on this information, the doubling dose concept has a heuristic value and is needed for practical assessment of risks for defined populations. (author)

  16. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  17. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  18. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  19. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089–6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated 125 I and 103 Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 125 I and 6 103 Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 × 2.7 × 0.05 cm 3 voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the 125 I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for 103 Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were ⩽0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in 125 I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The 103 Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when calculated with the TG-43U1 rather than the NNDC(2000) initial spectrum. The measured values from three different

  20. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  1. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  2. Occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelina, P.; Bliznakov, V.; Bairacova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed and registered breast cancer [probability of causation - PC] among Bulgarian women who have used different ionizing radiation sources during their working experience. The National Institute of Health (NIH) in US has developed a method for estimating the probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed cancer. We have used this method. A group of 27 women with diagnosed breast cancer has been studied. 11 of them are former workers in NPP - 'Kozloduy', and 16 are from other sites using different sources of ionizing radiation. Analysis was performed for 14 women, for whom full personal data were available. The individual radiation dose for each of them is below 1/10 of the annual dose limit, and the highest cumulative dose for a period of 14 years of occupational exposure is 50,21 mSv. The probability of causation (PC) values in all analyzed cases are below 1%, which confirms the extremely low probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and occurring cases of breast cancer. (orig.)

  3. Circuit arrangement for indicating radiation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virag, Ernoe; Nyari, Istvan; Simon, Jozsef; Styevko, Mihaly; Krampe, Geza.

    1981-01-01

    The invention presents a dosemeter electronic circuit arrangement indicating hazardous dose rate threshold. If the treshold is reached or exceeded, well distinguished sound and light alarm is turned on immidiately. Moreover, certain critical levels can also be indicated by making the intermittent singalling continuous. (A.L.)

  4. SMART, Radiation Dose Rates on Cask Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SMART calculates radiation dose rate at the center of each cask surface by using characteristic functions for radiation shielding ability and for radiation current back-scattered from cask wall and cask cavity of each cask, once cask-type is specified. 2 - Method of solution: Matrix Calculation

  5. Critical commentary on dose-rate evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, E.J.; Malenfant, R.E.; Plassmann, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki present a unique problem in dosimetry: the effects of radiation exposure may be inferred although the exposure itself is unknown. Experience with a replica of Little Boy demonstrates the difficulties of measuring dose rates, the problems of comparing measurements with calculations, and the inadequacy of the conventional standards that are used to calibrate dosimeters

  6. Biology of dose rate in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles underlying brachytherapy, to understand why current treatment regimes are the way they are, and to discuss what the future may hold in store. Brachytherapy has a long history. It was suggested as long ago as 1903 by Alexander Graham Bell, and the optimal application of this technique has been a subject of debate ever since. 'Brachy' means 'short', and the essential features of conventional brachytherapy are: positioning of the source a short distance from, or in, the tumor, allowing good dose distributions; short overall treatment times, to counter tumor repopulation; low dose rate, enabling a good therapeutic advantage between tumor control and damage to late-responding tissue. The advantages of good dose distributions speak for themselves; in some situations, as we shall see, computer-based dose optimization can be used to improve them still further. The advantages of short overall times stem from the fact that accelerated repopulation of the tumor typically begins a few weeks after the start of a radiation treatment. If all the radiation can be crammed in before that time, the risks of tumor repopulation can be considerably reduced. In fact even external-beam radiotherapy is moving in this direction, with the use of highly accelerated protocols. The advantages of low dose rate stem from the differential response to fractionation of early- and late-responding tissues. Essentially, lowering the dose rate spares late-responding tissue more than it does early-responding tissue such as tumors. We shall also discuss some recent innovations in the context of the general principles that have been outlined. For example, High dose rate brachytherapy, particularly for the uterine cervix: Does it work? If so, when and why? Use of Ir-192 sources, with a half life of 70 days: Should corrections be made for changing biological effectiveness as the dose

  7. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  8. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  9. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InsTEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  10. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.

    2015-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm -1 which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm -1 which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm -1 which were associated with NH stretch of NH 2 and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  11. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  12. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  13. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Relationship between biological benefit and damage induction. A synopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption of ionizing radiation in biological tissue stochastically interacts with constituent atoms and molecules and always generates energy deposition (track) events accompanied by bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS are quite similar to those ROS that arise abundantly and constantly by normal oxidative metabolism. ROS effects from either source need attention when assessing radiation-induced alterations in biological structure and function. Endogenous ROS alone induce about 10 6 DNA oxyadducts per cell per day compared to about 5x10 -3 total DNA damage per average cell per day from background radiation exposure (1 mGy per year). At this background level, the corresponding ratio of probabilities of endogenous versus radiogenic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) per cell per day is about 103 with some 25-40 % of low-LET caused radiogenic DNA-DSBs being of the multi-damage-site type. Radiogenic DNA damage increases in proportion to absorbed dose over a certain dose range. By evolution, tissues possess physiological mechanisms of protection against an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism, mainly against the abundantly and constantly produced ROS. Ad hoc protection operates at a level that is genetically determined. Following small to moderate perturbation of cell-tissue homeostasis by a toxic impact, adaptive responses develop with a delay and may last from hours to weeks, even months, and aim at protecting the system against renewed insults. Protective responses encompass defense by scavenging mechanisms, DNA repair, damage removal largely by apoptosis and immune responses, as well as changes in cell proliferation. Acute low-dose irradiation below about 0.2 Gy can not only disturb cell-tissue homeostasis but also initiate adaptived protection that appears with a delay of hours and may last from less than a day to months. The balance between damage production and adaptive protection favors

  14. Campylobacter radicidation of poultry meat by means of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarjan, Veronika

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the number of sprouts of pathogenic Campylobacter was studied in the function of time, storage temperature and radiation dose. Culture-media and minced poultry meat treated with isolated bacteria were irradiated by sup(60)Co up to a dose of 1 kGy. It would be established that low irradiation doses of 3-5 kGy used to eliminate Salmonella infection satisfactorily destroy Campylobacter in chilled meat. (V.N.)

  15. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  16. The influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinska, T.

    1986-11-01

    Recent results concerning possible beneficial effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems are summarized. It is also pointed out on the basis of existing evidence that harmful effects on living organisms take place not only in the case of excess but also in the case of deficiency of ionizing radiation. Possibility of using radio-enhanced ultralow luminescence for studying hormesis phenomena is discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  17. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  18. Evaluation of experimental animal biological state at exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Rejtarova, T.Je.; Chernyikov, G.B.; Timoshevs'ka, Je.V.; Kozozojeva, O.O.

    1997-01-01

    New approaches to quantitative evaluation of ionizing radiation absorbed dose within the low-dose range (up to 400 mGy) according to the degree of the organism biological response was developed. The purpose of the stage of the work published in Communication 1 is to evaluate the shifts in the animal behaviour and cellular composition of the blood at irradiation by the dose of 100,200 and 400 mGy. Distinct dose dependence of behaviour reactions and hematological indices within the dose range of 100-400 mGy was not noted

  19. [Influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on tenascin expression in hybridoma cell systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunga, I N

    2003-01-01

    One of the achievements of the modern radiation ecology is the preparation and application of stable eukariotic cell lines to solve various problems occurring under exposure to ionizing radiation, especially to low doses. The detection of onco-fetal protein--tenascin in different embryonic and tumor cells of humans and animals supposes the probability of appropriate gene expression in lymphoid cells, including hybridomal cells. Using the immunochemical method, the study of tenascin expression in two mouse hybridomal lines was carried out. Tenascin was revealed in hybridomal lines MLC-1 and K-48. Further hybridomal cell lines were exposed to X-ray radiation (120 KV) with doses 2.10,15 cGy. The obtained results demonstrated the sensitivity of tenascin expression to low doses of ionizing radiation, that may be used as a convenient model of studying of genotoxic effects of various damaging ionizing agents on a cell level.

  20. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  1. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  2. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  3. Ionizing Radiation Dose Due to the Use of Agricultural Fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umisedo, Nancy K.; Okuno, Emico; Medina, Nilberto H.; Colacioppo, Sergio; Hiodo, Francisco Y.

    2008-01-01

    The transference of radionuclides from the fertilizers to/and from soils to the foodstuffs can represent an increment in the internal dose when the vegetables are consumed by the human beings. This work evaluates the contribution of fertilizers to the increase of radiation level in the environment and of dose to the people. Samples of fertilizers, soils and vegetables produced in farms located in the neighbourhood of Sao Paulo city in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil were analysed through gamma spectroscopy. The values of specific activity of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th show that there is no significant transference of natural radionuclides from fertilizers to the final product of the food chain. The annual committed effective dose due to the ingestion of 40 K contained in the group of consumed vegetables analysed in this work resulted in the very low value of 0.882 μSv

  4. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  5. Application of accelerated evaluation method of alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation on bipolar linear regulator LM317

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei; Wu Xue; Wang Xin; Zhang Jinxin; Zhang Xiaofu; Zheng Qiwen; Ma Wuying; Lu Wu; Guo Qi; He Chengfa

    2014-01-01

    With different irradiation methods including high dose rate irradiation, low dose rate irradiation, alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, and US military standard constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, the ionizing radiation responses of bipolar linear regulator LM317 from three different companies were investigated under the operating and zero biases. The results show that compared with constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method, the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method can not only very rapidly and accurately evaluate the dose rate effect of three bipolar linear regulators, but also well simulate the damage of low dose rate irradiation. Experiment results make the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method successfully apply to bipolar linear regulator. (authors)

  6. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  7. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  8. Study on ionizing radiation to the workers' lymphocyte micronucleus rate and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua; Wang Linchao; He Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study lymphocyte genetic material of an iron and steel enterprise workers exposed to the ionizing radiation, find out measures to protect their health and reduce ionizing radiation occupation harm. Methods: 342 workers were choseh as the exposed group who worked in an iron and steel enterprise in the beam installment operation, to examine their circumference blood lymphocyte micronucleus rate and the chromosome aberrations, simultaneously select 280 chefs as the control group, The irradiation dosage was determined and statistical analysis was carded out wich the consideration of their length of work and differences in work post. Results: Exposed group: the micronucleus rate masculine gender (MNR), 4 people, the masculine gender pick out rate is 12.87%. The chromosome aberration factor masculine gender (CAF), 12 people, the masculine rate is 3.51%. Control group: MNR 3 people, the asculine gender pick out rate is 1.07%; CAF 2 people, masculine gender rate is 0.72%. Comparing the two groups, every item has the significant difference. Workers in is the exposed group workers have the average exposure dose of 6.73mSv/a, MNR,CAF are illuminated to the dosage have a positive line correlation. They become increased as the job lenght prolongs. The nucleon name, the material calculation and the medical X-radial are responsible for the highest ratio. Conclusion: In iron and steel enterprises, long-time ionizing radiation can cause the workers' circumference blood lymphocyte micronucleus rate and the chromosome aberrations obvious to rise. The beam protection measures strengthened so as to reduce the harms to workers. (authors)

  9. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Hlatky, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival rfelationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The Monte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation. (orig.)

  10. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. (paper)

  11. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  12. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  13. Automatic dose-rate controlling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, T.; Nagy Czirok, Cs.; Batki, L.; Antal, S.

    1977-01-01

    The patent of a dose-rate controlling equipment that can be attached to X-ray image-amplifiers is presented. In the new equipment the current of the photocatode of the image-amplifier is led into the regulating unit, which controls the X-ray generator automatically. The advantages of the equipment are the following: it can be simply attached to any type of X-ray image-amplifier, it accomplishes fast and sensitive regulation, it makes possible the control of both the mA and the kV values, it is attached to the most reliable point of the image-transmission chain. (L.E.)

  14. A study on gamma dose rate in Seoul (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Chang Kyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Jeong Min

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out gamma dose rate in Seoul, from January to December in 2000, and the following results were achieved : The annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was 17.24 μR/hr as average. The annual gamma dose rate in subway of Seoul was 14.96 μR/hr as average. The highest annual gamma dose rate was Dong-daemon ku. Annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was higher autumn than winter

  15. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  16. Investigation of ionizing sublethal doses effects on endogenous radioresistance background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, Yu.B.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Antonova, S.V.; Akhalaya, M.Ya.; Bajzhumanov, A.A.; Shestakova, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Sublethal doses of X-radiation (0.5 Gy and 1 Gy) caused the alterations in levels of main components of endogenous radioresistance background in rat tissues. There were demonstrated the decrease of serotonin content in stomach mocosa and spleen, adrenalin, noradrenalin and corticosteroids contents in adrenal glands, nonprotein thiols content in spleen and the increase of lipid peroxide level in serum on the 3-14 days after irradiation. The recovery of the investigated parameters was occurred to the 21 day after exposure. (author)

  17. Compendium of Single Event Effects, Total Ionizing Dose, and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Chen, Dakai; Campola, Michael J.; Casey, Megan C.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present results and analysis investigating the effects of radiation on a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects (SEE), proton-induced displacement damage (DD), and total ionizing dose (TID). Introduction: This paper is a summary of test results.NASA spacecraft are subjected to a harsh space environment that includes exposure to various types of ionizing radiation. The performance of electronic devices in a space radiation environment is often limited by its susceptibility to single event effects (SEE), total ionizing dose (TID), and displacement damage (DD). Ground-based testing is used to evaluate candidate spacecraft electronics to determine risk to spaceflight applications. Interpreting the results of radiation testing of complex devices is quite difficult. Given the rapidly changing nature of technology, radiation test data are most often application-specific and adequate understanding of the test conditions is critical. Studies discussed herein were undertaken to establish the application-specific sensitivities of candidate spacecraft and emerging electronic devices to single-event upset (SEU), single-event latchup (SEL), single-event gate rupture (SEGR), single-event burnout (SEB), single-event transient (SET), TID, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS), and DD effects.

  18. Dose response of tracheal epithelial cells to ionizing radiation in air-liquid interface cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutsu, K.; Yamada, Y.; Shimo, M.

    2002-01-01

    The dose-response relationships of tracheal epithelial cells to ionizing radiation was examined in air-liquid interface cultures, which were developed for the purpose of simulating in vivo conditions. The cultures investigated in this study were expected to be advantageous for the performance of irradiation experiments using short-range α rays. The level of dose response of air-liquid interface cultures to ionizing radiation proved to be the same as that for in vivo conditions. This result indicates that air-liquid interface cultures will prove most useful, to facilitate future studies for the investigation of the biological effects induced in tracheal epithelial cells by ionizing radiation, especially by α-rays. (orig.)

  19. Dose rate correction in medium dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, F.D.; Negi, P.S.; Sharma, S.C.; Kapoor, R.; Singh, D.P.; Ghoshal, S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the magnitude of brachytherapy dose reduction required for stage IIB and III carcinoma cervix patients treated by external radiation and medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A.Materials and methods: In study-I, at the time of MDR brachytherapy application at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A, patients received either 3060 cGy, a 12.5% dose reduction (MDR-12.5), or 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-30), to point A and they were compared to a group of previously treated LDR patients who received 3500 cGy to point A at a dose rate of 55-65 cGy/h. Study-II was a prospective randomized trial and patients received either 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-II (30)) or 2800 cGy, a 20% dose reduction (MDR-II (20)), at point A. Patients were evaluated for local control of disease and morbidity. Results: In study-I the 5-year actuarial local control rate in the MDR-30 and MDR-12.5 groups was 71.7±10% and 70.5±10%, respectively, compared to 63.4±10% in the LDR group. However, the actuarial morbidity (all grades) in the MDR-12.5 group was 58.5±14% as against 34.9±9% in the LDR group (P 3 developed complication as against 62.5% of those receiving a rectal BED of (140 3 (χ 2 =46.43; P<0.001). Conclusion: We suggest that at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A the brachytherapy dose reduction factor should be around 30%, as suggested by radiobiological data, to keep the morbidity as low as possible without compromising the local control rates. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J. M.; Band, P. R.; Ashmore, P. J.; Jiang, H.; Shilnikova, N. S.; Tait, V. K.; Krewski, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  1. Low-dose ionizing radiation – is it harmful to health?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A. H. [CERN Radiation Protection Group (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN))

    1987-09-15

    A conference on the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation organized in London earlier this year by the British Nuclear Energy Society brought together epidemiologists who have been investigating the mortality of workers from the nuclear industry in an attempt to put low-level radiation risk estimates on a scientific basis.

  2. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  3. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. Recent Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Irwin, Tim L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert A.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Hawkins, Donald K.; Flanigan, Ryan J.; Cox, Stephen R.

    2005-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, hybrid devices, Analog-to- Digital Converters (ADCs), and Digital-to-Analog Converters (DACs), among others. T

  5. Analysis of the health of a group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Ledesma, F.; Crespo, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of exposure to low radiation doses, the health status of professional staff exposed to ionizing radiation is investigated. Based on archived material of medical and radiation exposure records taken over a time span of 13 years, a variety of medical parameters are explored. Findings of surveys made are given. (author)

  6. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  7. Audits in high dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.; Rosa, L.A.; Velasco, A.; Paiva, E. de; Goncalves, M.; Castelo, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The lack of well established dosimetry protocols for HDR sources is a point of great concern regarding the uniformity of procedures within a particular country. The main objective of this paper is to report the results of an implementation of the audit program in dosimetry of high dose rate brachytherapy sources used by the radiation therapy centers in Brazil. In Brazil, among 169 radiotherapy centers, 35 have HDR brachytherapy systems. This program started in August 2001 and until now eight radiotherapy services were audited. The audit program consists of the visit in loco to each center and the evaluation of the intensity of the source with a well type chamber specially design for HDR 192 Ir sources. The measurements was carried out with a HDR1000PLUS Brachytherapy Well Type Chamber and a MAX 4000 Electrometer, both manufactured by Standard Imaging Inc. The chamber was calibrated in air kerma strength by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin in the USA. The same chamber was calibrated in Brazil using a 192 lr high dose rate source whose intensity was determined by 60 Co gamma rays and 250 kV x rays interpolation methodology. The Nk of 60 Co and 250 kV x rays were provided by the Brazilian National Standard Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI)

  8. Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document reprints the text of the French by-law from January 8, 2002 relative to the approval and to the controls and verifications of facilities devoted to the ionizing of food products for human beings and animals. The by-law imposes the operators of such facilities to perform measurements and dosimetric verifications all along the ionization process. (J.S.)

  9. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  10. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  11. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  12. Dose rate measuring device and dose rate measuring method using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Sadao; Konno, Takahiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Yumitate, Tadahiro

    1998-11-13

    The device of the present invention comprises a scintillation fiber scope having a shape elongated in the direction of the height of a pressure vessel and emitting light by incident of radiation to detect radiation, a radioactivity measuring device for measuring a dose rate based on the detection of the fiber scope and a reel means for dispensing and taking up the fiber scope, and it constituted such that the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of a shroud are determined independently. Then, when the taken out shroud is contained in an container, excessive shielding is not necessary, in addition, this device can reliably be inserted to or withdrawn from complicated places between the pressure vessel and the shroud, and further, the dose rate of the pressure vessel and that of the shroud can be measured approximately accurately even when the thickness of them is different greatly. (N.H.)

  13. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  14. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  15. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  16. Low doses of ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide stimulate plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Y.; Narimanov, A.

    1997-01-01

    The present study shows that low-dose oxidative stress induced by ionizing radiation (10-20 cGy) and hydrogen peroxide (1-100 pmol per litre) stimulates germination of seeds and growth of sprouts and roots. The growth of seedlings can be stimulated by treatment of seeds as well as seedlings but in the latter case it needs lower doses. The stimulation effect is observed in a narrow dose interval which is the same for the plant species studied: barley, wheat, pea, maize and melon

  17. DNA excision repair as a component of adaptation to low doses of ionizing radiation Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Claycamp, H.G.

    1993-01-01

    In this study the authors examined whether or not DNA excision repair is a component of adaptation induced by very low-dose ionizing radiation in Escherichia coli, a well-characterized prokaryote, and investigated the relationship between enhanced excision repair and the SOS response. Their data suggest that there seems to be narrow 'windows' of dose-effect for the induction of SOS-independent DNA excision repair. Being similar to mammalian cell studies, the dose range for this effect was about 200-fold less than D 37 for radiation survival. (author)

  18. Dose rate effect on the yield of radiation induced response with thermal fading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Rogalev, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the dependences of the accumulation of thermally unstable radiation induced defects on the dose and dose rate is proposed. The model directly takes into account the track nature of the ionizing radiation represented as accumulation processes of defects in tracks averaged over a crystal volume considering various degrees of overlapping in space and time. The accumulation of the defects in the tracks is phenomenologically described. General expressions are obtained that allows radiation yield simulation of defects involving known creation and transformation processes. The cases considered, of linear accumulation (constant increment of the defects in tracks) and accumulation with saturation (complete saturation of the defects in one track), lead to a set of linear dose dependences with saturation, which are routinely used in luminescence and ESR dating. The accumulation, with increase of sensitivity in regions overlapped by two or more tracks, gave a set of dose dependences, from linear-sublinear-linear-saturation, distinctive of quartz up to linear-supralinear-linear-saturation. It is shown that the effect of the dose rate on dose dependences is determined by a dimensionless parameter a=Pτ/D0, where P is the dose rate, τ is the defect lifetime and D0 is the track dose. At a-bar 1 the dose rate influences basically the accumulation of thermally unstable defects. In the reverse case the dose dependences did not seems to be influenced by the dose rate

  19. The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation - A question of ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Three ethical questions are asked and answered about the current state of affairs concerning how those in power manipulate public understanding of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The questions are as follows: (1) Is it ethical to frighten people when you do not know that there is anything to be frightened of? (2) Is it ethical to be so conservative that resources are spent to solve a problem that may not exist? (3) Is it ethical not to tell the whole truth about the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation?

  20. Effect of ''pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microbes isolated at pharmacentical factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, E.P.; Shcheglova, S.G.; Sedov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microorganisms has been investigated, particularly, the influence of pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radia''ons on the drug sensitivity of microorganisms isolated at a Moscow pharmaceutical factory to a number of widely used antibiotics. 250 krad single irradiation of dry microbial culture resulted in a change of the antibiotic sensitivity in 0.5% of 686 strains studied. All changes were toward the appearance of sensitivity to one or several antibiotics. When cultures were irradiated 3 times, this value increased up to 9%. In no case the appearance of resistance to antibiotics was observed

  1. Simulation studies on a prototype ionization chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, J.; Oliveira, C.; Carvalho, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Metrological Laboratory of lonizing Radiation and Radioactivity (LMRIR) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) has designed and constructed a prototype ionization chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), similar to the developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and now commercialized by PTW. Tests already performed had shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very close to the PTB chamber, namely the energy dependence for the x-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 60 Co. However, the results obtained also show a high dependence on the energy for some incident radiation angles and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber. In order to try to optimize the performance of the chamber, namely to decrease the energy dependence and to improve the magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber, the LMRIR initiated numerical simulation of this ionization chamber using a Monte-Carlo method for simulation of radiation transport using, in a first step, the MCNPX code. So, simulation studies of some physical parameters are been performed in order to optimize the response of the ionization chamber, namely the diameter of the central electrode of the ionization chamber, the thickness of the front wall of the ionization chamber, among others. Preliminary results show that probably the actual geometry of the ionization chamber is not yet the optimized configuration. The simulation study will carry on in order to find the optimum geometry. (author)

  2. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  3. Mutational influences of low-dose and high let ionizing radiation in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang; Fanjun, Kong; Sun, Yeqing

    For cosmic environment consists of a varying kinds of radiation particles including high Z and energy ions which was charactered with low-dose and high RBE, it is important to determine the possible biofuctions of high LET radiation on human beings. To analyse the possible effectes of mutational influences of low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, wild fruit flies drosophila melanogaster were irradiated by 12C6+ ions in two LET levels (63.3 and 30 keV/µum) with different low doses from 2mGy to 2000mGy (2, 20, 200, 2000mGy) in HIRFL (Heavy ion radiation facility laboratory, lanzhou, China).In the same LET value group, the average polymorphic frequency was elevated along with adding doses of irradation, the frequency in 2000 mGy dose samples was significantly higher than other samples (p<0.01).These results suggest that genomic DNA sequence could be effected by low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, the irradiation dose is an important element in genomic mutation frequency origination.

  4. Hormesis of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Immune System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.H.; Abbas, M.O.; El-Asady, R.S.; Amer, H.A.; El-Khouly, W.A.; Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the immune system has been a controversial subject. To evaluate the effect of low-doses γ-irradiation exposure on immune system. An animal model, using Rattus Rattus rats was used. The rats were divided into groups exposed to either continuous or fractionated 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mSv of radiation and compared to control rats that did not receive radiation. All groups were exposed to a total white blood count (Wcs), lymphocyte count and serum IgG level measurement, as indicators of the function of the cell-mediated (T lymphocytes) and the humoral (B lymphocytes) immune system. The results of the current study revealed that the counts of total leukocytes (WBCs) and lymphocytes, as well as the serum level of IgG were increased significantly in rats receiving low dose radiation, indicating enhancement of immune system. The data suggests that low-dose gamma-radiation improved hematological parameters and significantly enhances immune response indices of the exposed rats. These findings are similar to the radiation adaptive responses in which a small dose of pre irradiation would induce certain radiation resistance and enhances the cell response after exposure to further irradiation doses The applied low doses used in the present study may appear effective inducing the radio adaptive response. Farooqi and Kesavan (1993) and Bravard et al. (1999) reported that the adaptive response to ionizing radiation refers to the phenomenon by which cells irradiated with low (cGy) or sublethal doses (conditioning doses) become less susceptible to genotoxic effects of a subsequent high dose (challenge dose, several Gy).

  5. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  6. Effect of dose rate and exposure time on the stimulation effect of tube growth of Pinus sylvestris pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelles, L.; Fendrik, I.; Technische Univ. Hannover

    1975-01-01

    The stimulating effect of ionizing radiation in respect to dose rate and exposure time was studied using the tube growth of Pinus silvestris pollen. Stimulation was registered with a small dose (50 rad) supplied at low dose rates (0.5; 1.0; 3.0 and 5.0 rad/sec) and with higher doses (300; 800 and 1,400 rad) supplied at higher dose rates (10; 40 and 50 rad/sec). This suggests that only the exposure time is of importance for radiation-induced stimulation provided that the exposure time does not exceed 100 sec. (orig.) [de

  7. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damkaer, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm -2 sub([DNA]) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm -2 sub([DNA]). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation. (orig.)

  8. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  9. Airborne and total gamma absorbed dose rates at Patiala - India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesfaye, Tilahun; Sahota, H.S.; Singh, K.

    1999-01-01

    The external gamma absorbed dose rate due to gamma rays originating from gamma emitting aerosols in air, is compared with the total external gamma absorbed dose rate at the Physics Department of Punjabi University, Patiala. It has been found out that the contribution, to the total external gamma absorbed dose rate, of radionuclides on particulate matter suspended in air is about 20% of the overall gamma absorbed dose rate. (author)

  10. Disordered redox metabolism of brain cells in rats exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation or UHF electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, A P; Druzhyna, M O; Vovk, A V; Lukin, S М

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the changes of redox-state of mammalian brain cells as the critical factor of initiation and formation of radiation damage of biological structures in setting of continuous exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation or fractionated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF EMR) at non-thermal levels. The influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation was studied on outbred female rats kept for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl accident zone. The effects of total EMR in the UHF band of non-thermal spectrum were investigated on Wistar rats. The rate of formation of superoxide radicals and the rate of NO synthesis in mitochondria were determined by the EPR. After exposure to ionizing or UHF radiation, the levels of ubisemiquinone in brain tissue of rats decreased by 3 and 1.8 times, respectively. The content of NO-FeS-protein complexes in both groups increased significantly (р < 0.05). In the conditions of ionizing or EMR the rates of superoxide radical generation in electron-transport chain of brain cell mitochondria increased by 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively (р < 0.05). In brain tissue of rats kept in the Chernobyl zone, significant increase of NO content was registered; similar effect was observed in rats treated with UHFR (р < 0.05). The detected changes in the electron transport chain of mitochondria of brain cells upon low-intensity irradiation or UHF EMR cause the metabolic reprogramming of cell mitochondria that increases the rate of superoxide radical generation and nitric oxide, which may initiate the development of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Thirty Years After".

  11. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h{sup -1}, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month{sup -1}, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h{sup -1} associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h{sup -1} with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h{sup -1}). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h{sup -1}, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h{sup -1}. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h{sup -1} (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month{sup -1}), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h{sup -1}. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all

  12. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O.; Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h"-"1, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month"-"1, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h"-"1 associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h"-"1 with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h"-"1. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h"-"1). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h"-"1, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h"-"1. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h"-"1. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h"-"1 (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month"-"1), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h"-"1. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all risk operations, even with the use of the TLD

  13. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  14. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal migration on developing rat cerebral cortex, we need a tissue culture system in which neuronal migration can be observed. We prepared a tissue culture system of embryonic rat cerebral cortex starting on embryonic day 16 and cultivating it for 48 hours. The autoradiographic study in this system revealed not only the migration of 3 H-thymidine labeled neurons but also neuronal migration delays from low doses of ionizing radiation of more than 10 cGy. In addition, on immunohistochemical study, cell-cell adhesion molecule N-CAM staining was remarkably decreased in the matrix cell layer. In the tissue culture system where monoclonal anti-N-CAM antibodies were added, neuronal migration delay comparable to that of 20 cGy radiation was found. In conclusion, it was speculated that neuronal migration delay might be caused by disturbed N-CAM synthesis in matrix cells after low dose ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  16. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 x 10 -3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing

  17. The biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on adaptive possibilities of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulbuc, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of adaptive possibilities and cancer risk in animals exposed at low doses of ionizing radiation was the object of the present work. The action of immunostimulating treatment on these processes was studied as well. In previously irradiated animals the diminution of adaptive possibilities and of the antitumoral resistance of the organism was observed. The stimulating action of Bufostimulin on these processes in irradiated animals was less pronounced than in unirradiated ones. (author)

  18. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10 11 Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410 9 Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510 9 Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  19. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  20. Cytogenetic dose-response and adaptive response in cells of ungulate species exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulsh, B.A.; Miller, S.M.; Mallory, F.F.; Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.; Boreham, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    In the studies reported here, the micronucleus assay, a common cytogenetic technique, was used to examine the dose-responses in fibroblasts from three ungulate species (white-tailed deer, woodland caribou, and Indian muntjac) exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation (1-4 Gy of 60 Co gamma radiation). This assay was also used to examine the effects of exposure to low doses (1-100 mGy) typical of what these species experience in a year from natural and anthropogenic environmental sources. An adaptive response, defined as the induction of resistance to a stressor by a prior exposure to a small 'adapting' stress, was observed after exposure to low doses. This work indicates that very small doses are protective for the endpoint examined. The same level of protection was seen at all adapting doses, including 1 radiation track per cell, the lowest possible cellular dose. These results are consistent with other studies in a wide variety of organisms that demonstrate a protective effect of low doses at both cellular and whole-organism levels. This implies that environmental regulations predicated on the idea that even the smallest dose of radiation carries a quantifiable risk of direct adverse consequences to the exposed organism require further examination. Cytogenetic assays provide affordable and feasible biological effects-based alternatives that are more biologically relevant than traditional contaminant concentration-based radioecological risk assessment

  1. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  2. Transient Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation In Vivo in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials: RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results: Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions: Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin

  3. Optimal treatment scheduling of ionizing radiation and sunitinib improves the antitumor activity and allows dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleibeuker, Esther A; Hooven, Matthijs A ten; Castricum, Kitty C; Honeywell, Richard; Griffioen, Arjan W; Verheul, Henk M; Slotman, Ben J; Thijssen, Victor L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy with sunitinib is clinically hampered by rare but severe side effects and varying results with respect to clinical benefit. We studied different scheduling regimes and dose reduction in sunitinib and radiotherapy in preclinical tumor models to improve potential outcome of this combination treatment strategy. The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) was used as an angiogenesis in vivo model and as a xenograft model with human tumor cells (HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma, OE19 esophageal adenocarcinoma). Treatment consisted of ionizing radiation (IR) and sunitinib as single therapy or in combination, using different dose-scheduling regimes. Sunitinib potentiated the inhibitory effect of IR (4 Gy) on angiogenesis. In addition, IR (4 Gy) and sunitinib (4 days of 32.5 mg/kg per day) inhibited tumor growth. Ionizing radiation induced tumor cell apoptosis and reduced proliferation, whereas sunitinib decreased tumor angiogenesis and reduced tumor cell proliferation. When IR was applied before sunitinib, this almost completely inhibited tumor growth, whereas concurrent IR was less effective and IR after sunitinib had no additional effect on tumor growth. Moreover, optimal scheduling allowed a 50% dose reduction in sunitinib while maintaining comparable antitumor effects. This study shows that the therapeutic efficacy of combination therapy improves when proper dose-scheduling is applied. More importantly, optimal treatment regimes permit dose reductions in the angiogenesis inhibitor, which will likely reduce the side effects of combination therapy in the clinical setting. Our study provides important leads to optimize combination treatment in the clinical setting

  4. Dependence of total dose response of bipolar linear microcircuits on applied dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, S.; Will, W.; Perry, G.; Pease, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on the total dose radiation hardness of three commercial bipolar linear microcircuits is investigated. Total dose tests of linear bipolar microcircuits show larger degradation at 0.167 rad/s than at 90 rad/s even after the high dose rate test is followed by a room temperature plus a 100 C anneal. No systematic correlation could be found for degradation at low dose rate versus high dose rate and anneal. Comparison of the low dose rate with the high dose rate anneal data indicates that MIL-STD-883, method 1019.4 is not a worst-case test method when applied to bipolar microcircuits for low dose rate space applications

  5. Signalling detection of DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M.

    2011-01-01

    gamma-H2AX foci in response to irradiation. Using the methodological tools developed during this thesis we established for the various lymphocyte subsets the relationship between radiation dose and gamma-H2AX foci frequency as well as the kinetics of appearance/disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci. Finally, since no additional samples from patients of known radiosensitivity were available to continue the initial study with the improved protocol, we focused on radiosensitivity in another context: radio-adaptive response. This phenomenon corresponds to a lower cellular response to high dose of ionizing radiation exposure if it is preceded by an exposure to low doses. With the conditions used here we did not observe a radio-adaptive response in terms of gamma-H2AX signalling regardless of the lymphocyte subpopulation studied. However, the translocation rate of pre-irradiated CD4-positive lymphocytes was significantly different when compared to cells only irradiated acutely. This result thus indicates a differential repair of double strand breaks in lymphocytes after a radio-adaptation. (author)

  6. Effect of γ-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Pradeep K.; Jha, Rakhi; Gupta, B.L.; Guha, Sujoy K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of γ-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min γ-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy γ-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  7. Demonstration of a stimulating effect of natural ionizing radiation and of very low radiation doses on cell multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planel, G.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Croute, F.; Richoilley, G.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to demonstrate a possible effect of natural ionizing radiation. Using lead shielding devices or an underground laboratory, it was shown that a decrease in background irradiation induces a decrease in cell growth rate (experiments carried out on Paramecia). On the other hand, the recovery of a normal irradiation level in shielding devices induces a quite normal cell proliferation. Moreover, small doses of γ rays from 60 Co exhibit a stimulating effect. Variations in cell radiosensitivity to these low doses are reported. Experiments carried out in the underground laboratory and at high altitude show that both telluric radioactivity and cosmic rays contribute to this stimulating effect on cell multiplication. (author)

  8. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  9. Ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant working with unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerulis, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    With the liberation of the use of the nuclear energy for peaceful applications, International Commission Radiological Protection, ICRP, founded in 1928, created a system of protection of the undesirable doses of ionizing radiation in 1958. This has been received by workers, members of the public and environment and hence it became possible for the introduction of these applications. This protection system is adopted by the International Agency of Energy Atomic, IAEA, that publishes recommendations in safety series, 88 and by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN, which publishes these regulations. The international recommendations and national regulations were adapted and they need to be applied in this way. The present paper uses recommendations of the publication 75 from ICRP, of the publication 115 from 88 and regulations of the regulation NN 3.01 from CNEN to present, through radiological protection measures, the ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant that works in the research, production, division and packing of unsealed sources to be used in clinical applications. In that way it is possible to prevent appropriately the undesirable doses and to confirm the received doses. (author)

  10. Non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation act via TGF-beta to promote mammary carcinogenesis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a genome-wide approach to identifying genes persistently induced in the mouse mammary gland by acute whole body low dose ionizing radiation (10cGy) 1 and 4...

  11. Prevention of cancer and the dose-effect relationship: the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer prevention has to be based on robust biological and epidemiological data, therefore its reappraisal becomes mandatory in view of recent progress in the understanding of carcinogenesis. The first phase of the carcinogenic process, that of initiation, is generally associated with mutation; however the role of extrinsic mutagens is less critical than was thought two decades ago. During intracellular oxygen metabolism, reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.) are made which are potent mutagens. Defense mechanisms against these intrinsic mutagens include scavenger and enzymatic systems which destroy them (catalase, superoxide dismutase). When the radiation dose is low, DNA repair is very effective as well as the elimination of cells with unrepaired or bad repaired DNA. Therefore a small increase in the number of R.O.S., such as that caused by a small dose of radiation has most probably no significant effect on the risk of DNA damage. These conclusions are consistent with the concept of a practical threshold. The second phase, that of promotion, appears to be the key one. During the promotion phase, initiated cells must acquire new properties (immortalization, release of angiogenic factors, resistance to hypoxia, etc.) in order to become pre-cancerous. This evolution is due to the accumulation in the genome of 6 to 10 new alteration defects. In the clone of initiated cells, the occurrence in one cell of a mutation or an epigenetic event gives birth to a sub clone. There is a Darwinian type competition between the sub clones and those with the more rapid growth because dominant (the acceleration of the growth rate can be due to shorter cell cycles or to an alleviation of cell proliferation exerted by the neighboring cells or the microenvironment). In the dominant sub clones new genomic events provoke the appearance of new sub clones growing more rapidly and having greater autonomy. The process is very slow because the specific genetic events that favour this evolution

  12. Determination of dose components in mixed gamma neutron fields by use of high pressure ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Pliszczynski, T.; Wysocka, A.; Zielczynski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The two ionization chamber method for determination of dose components in mixed γ-neutron field has been improved by increasing gas pressure in the chambers up to some milions pascals. Advantages of high pressure gas filling are the followings: 1) significant reduction of the ratio of neutron-to gamma sensitivity for the hydrogen-free chamber, 2) possibility of sensitivity correction for both chambers by application of appropriate voltage, 3) high sensitivity for small detectors. High-pressure, pen-like ionization chambers have been examined in fields of different neutron sources: a TE-chamber, filled with 0.2 MPa of quasi-TE-gas and a conductive PTFE chamber, filled with 3.1 MPa of CO 2 . The ratio of neutron-to-gamma sensitivity for the PTFE chamber, operated at electrical field strength below 100 V/cm, has not exceeded 0.01 for neutrons with energy below 8 MeV. Formula is presented for calculation of this ratio for any high-pressure, CO 2 -filled ionization chamber. Contribution of gamma component to total tissue dose in the field of typical neutron sources has been found to be 3 to 70%

  13. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  14. THE IMPLICATIONS OF A HIGH COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE IN DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indriolo, Nick; Fields, Brian D.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar clouds show large abundances of H + 3 which can only be maintained by a high ionization rate of H 2 . Cosmic rays are the dominant ionization mechanism in this environment, so the large ionization rate implies a high cosmic-ray flux, and a large amount of energy residing in cosmic rays. In this paper, we find that the standard propagated cosmic-ray spectrum predicts an ionization rate much lower than that inferred from H + 3 . Low-energy (∼10 MeV) cosmic rays are the most efficient at ionizing hydrogen, but cannot be directly detected; consequently, an otherwise unobservable enhancement of the low-energy cosmic-ray flux offers a plausible explanation for the H + 3 results. Beyond ionization, cosmic rays also interact with the interstellar medium by spalling atomic nuclei and exciting atomic nuclear states. These processes produce the light elements Li, Be, and B, as well as gamma-ray lines. To test the consequences of an enhanced low-energy cosmic-ray flux, we adopt two physically motivated cosmic-ray spectra which by construction reproduce the ionization rate inferred in diffuse clouds, and investigate the implications of these spectra on dense cloud ionization rates, light-element abundances, gamma-ray fluxes, and energetics. One spectrum proposed here provides an explanation for the high ionization rate seen in diffuse clouds while still appearing to be broadly consistent with other observables, but the shape of this spectrum suggests that supernovae remnants may not be the predominant accelerators of low-energy cosmic rays.

  15. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  16. Determination of high level absorbed dose in a 60Co gamma ray field with ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongying Li; Benjiang Mao; Lu Zhang

    1995-01-01

    This paper relates to the principles and methods for determining the absorbed dose of high energy photons radiation with ionization chambers, and its shows the doserate results of high level 60 Co γ-rays in water measured with Farmer chambers. The results with two kinds of chambers at a same point are consistent within 0.3%, and the total uncertainty is less than ± 4%. In the domestic intercomparison on determining high level absorbed dose in which 12 laboratories participated, the deviation of our result from the mean result of the intercomparison is -0.04% [Chen Yundong (1992). Summing up report on a high level absorbed dose intercomparison (in Chinese)]. (author)

  17. The possibility of the dose limitation system application non-ionizing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranisavljevic, M., Markovic, S.

    1997-01-01

    Modern conception of the ionizing radiation protection is based on Dose Limitation System. In the base of every human decision lies compromise. Balance between positive and negative factors, benefit and detriment, profit and expense includes the decision about possibilities for realization any defined radiation practice. The optimal option for the given value of the varying parameter gives the maximum benefit and the minimum detriment. In radiation protection field, detriment is related with human health or expenses, and varying parameter is level of radiation protection (for example dimensions of the installed shielding). The problem lies in fact that for the given value of the varying shielding parameter the maximum benefit and the minimum detriment are not achievable simultaneously because the greater benefit includes the greater expense. The problems which have to be solved because of introducing Dose Limitation System, in regard to create Modified Dose Limitation System, are presented. (author)

  18. Physics and quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lowell L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To review the physical aspects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, including commissioning and quality assurance, source calibration and dose distribution measurements, and treatment planning methods. Following the introduction of afterloading in brachytherapy, development efforts to make it 'remote' culminated in 1964 with the near-simultaneous appearance of remote afterloaders in five major medical centers. Four of these machines were 'high dose rate', three employing 60Co and one (the GammaMed) using a single, cable-mounted 192Ir source. Stepping-motor source control was added to the GammaMed in 1974, making it the precursor of modern remote afterloaders, which are now suitable for interstitial as well as intracavitary brachytherapy by virtue of small source-diameter and indexer-accessed multiple channels. Because the 192Ir sources currently used in HDR remote afterloaders are supplied at a nominal air-kerma strength of 11.4 cGy cm2 s-1 (10 Ci), are not collimated in clinical use, and emit a significant fraction (15%) of photons at energies greater than 600 keV, shielding and facility design must be undertaken as carefully and thoroughly as for external beam installations. Licensing requirements of regulatory agencies must be met with respect both to maximum permissible dose limits and to the existence and functionality of safety devices (door interlocks, radiation monitors, etc.). Commissioning and quality assurance procedures that must be documented for HDR remote afterloading relate to (1) machine, applicator, guide-tube, and facility functionality checks, (2) source calibration, (3) emergency response readiness, (4) planning software evaluation, and (5) independent checks of clinical dose calculations. Source calibration checks must be performed locally, either by in-air measurement of air kerma strength or with a well ionization chamber calibrated (by an accredited standards laboratory) against an in-air measurement of air kerma strength for the

  19. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig

  20. Study of the influence of ionizing radiation on biometrical parameters of eggplantand tomato at different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliyeva, L.M.; Eminova, N.M.; Jafarov, E.S.; Babayev, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : The problem of influence of low-dose of ionizing radiation on plants for a long time attracted attention of researchers. Increasing interest in this issue is caused by many circumstances, especially by global radiation contamination of environment. By this time in radiobiology it has been gained great data about the negative effects of ionizing radiation on plants. It is well known that at the time of germination seed is very susceptible to a variety of physical and chemical agents which are capable of impacting their development. It is appropriate to conduct studies reflecting changes in biometrical parameters of agricultural plants importance for Azerbaijan. It was seen that radiation influence increases the productivity of the plants, the size of the stems, fruits, and the color more saturated

  1. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  2. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  3. Relationship between dose and risk, and assessment of carcinogenic risks associated with low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Aurengo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report raises doubts on the validity of using LNT (linear no-threshold) relationship for evaluating the carcinogenic risk of low doses (< 100 mSv) and even more for very low doses (< 10 mSv). The LNT concept can be a useful pragmatic tool for assessing rules in radioprotection for doses above 10 mSv; however since it is not based on biological concepts of our current knowledge, it should not be used without precaution for assessing by extrapolation the risks associated with low and even more so, with very low doses (< 10 mSv), especially for benefit-risk assessments imposed on radiologists by the European directive 97-43. The biological mechanisms are different for doses lower than a few dozen mSv and for higher doses. The eventual risks in the dose range of radiological examinations (0.1 to 5 mSv, up to 20 mSv for some examinations) must be estimated taking into account radiobiological and experimental data. An empirical relationship which has been just validated for doses higher than 200 mSv may lead to an overestimation of risks (associated with doses one hundred fold lower), and this overestimation could discourage patients from undergoing useful examinations and introduce a bias in radioprotection measures against very low doses (< 10 mSv). Decision makers confronted with problems of radioactive waste or risk of contamination, should re-examine the methodology used for the evaluation of risks associated with very low doses and with doses delivered at a very low dose rate. This report confirms the inappropriateness of the collective dose concept to evaluate population irradiation risks

  4. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Brömme, Jens O.; Geretschläger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3–23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  5. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  6. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Itami, Jun

    1994-01-01

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  7. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O 2 - and H 2 O 2 ) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim No.2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim No.3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET

  8. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...

  9. Low-Dose, Ionizing Radiation and Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Microarchitecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S. Alwood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis can profoundly affect the aged as a consequence of progressive bone loss; high-dose ionizing radiation can cause similar changes, although less is known about lower doses (≤100 cGy. We hypothesized that exposure to relatively low doses of gamma radiation accelerates structural changes characteristic of skeletal aging. Mice (C57BL/6J-10 wk old, male were irradiated (total body; 0-sham, 1, 10 or 100 cGy 137Cs and tissues harvested on the day of irradiation, 1 or 4 months later. Microcomputed tomography was used to quantify microarchitecture of high turnover, cancellous bone. Irradiation at 100 cGy caused transient microarchitectural changes over one month that were only evident at longer times in controls (4 months. Ex vivo bone cell differentiation from the marrow was unaffected by gamma radiation. In conclusion, acute ionizing gamma irradiation at 100 cGy (but not at 1 cGy or 10 cGy exacerbated microarchitectural changes normally found during progressive, postpubertal aging prior to the onset of age-related osteoporosis.

  10. Study of interaction of low doses of ionizing radiation with selected pesticides on Artemia franciscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Špalková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to observe the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, azoxystrobin and glyphosate separately as well as in their mutual combinations on the lethality of Artemia franciscana. Increasing intensity of agricultural production leads to continual exposure of animals to pesticide residues. Animals could be exposed to these negative factors in case of possible nuclear accident. A total of 1000 nauplia, randomly placed in 20 groups (1 control and 19 experimental groups, were irradiated with gamma rays (0, 20, 30, 40 or 50 Gy and were kept in solution of standardized sea water and standardized sea water with addition of pesticides (azoxystrobin at a concentration of 0.0001 g·l-1 and glyphosate at a concentration of 0.5 g·l-1 individually or in combination. A significant increase of lethality was observed after 48, 72 and 96 h of exposure to only azoxystrobin, but also in the group exposed to the combined effect of azoxystrobin and glyphosate at all time intervals. On the other hand, a significant decrease of lethality was observed in those groups exposed to ionizing radiation even at the dose of 30 Gy at all time intervals compared to non-irradiated groups. These results confirm the toxicity of azoxystrobin to aquatic organisms; non-toxicity of glyphosate to crustaceans and support the theory of radiation hormesis at the level of 30 Gy radiation dose.

  11. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  12. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1989-01-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is defined as the electron dose at a given point in phantom divided by the number of monitor units given for any one stationary electron beam. For a given depth of isocenter di the electron dose rates at dmax are linearly dependent on the nominal field width w, while for a given w the dose rates are inversely proportional to di. The dose rates for rotational electron beams with different di are related through the inverse square law provided that the two beams have (di,w) combinations which give the same characteristic angle beta. The photon dose at the isocenter depends on the arc angle alpha, field width w, and isocenter depth di. For constant w and di the photon dose at isocenter is proportional to alpha, for constant alpha and w it is proportional to di, and for constant alpha and di it is inversely proportional to w. The w and di dependence implies that for the same alpha the photon dose at the isocenter is inversely proportional to the electron dose rate at dmax

  13. The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J.

    1997-12-01

    This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly

  14. Assessment of a new p-Mosfet usable as a dose rate insensitive gamma dose sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettese, F.; Donichak, C.; Bourgeault, P.

    1995-01-01

    Dosimetric response of unbiased MOS devices has been assessed at dose rates greater than 2000 cGy/h. Application have been made to a personal dosemeter / dose rate meter to measure the absorbed tissue dose received in the case of acute external irradiation. (D.L.)

  15. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  16. Construction of data base for radiation safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Shin

    2001-01-01

    Data base with an electronic text on the safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation have been constructed. The contents and the data base system were designed to provide useful information to Japanese citizens, radiation specialists, and decision makers for a scientific and reasonable understanding of radiation health effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation protection. The data base consists of the following four essential parts, namely, ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION, DETAILED INFORMATION, TOPIC INFORMATION, and RELATED INFORMATION. The first two parts of the data base are further classified into following subbranches: Radiobiological effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation exposure and protection. (author)

  17. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocke, David

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  18. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  19. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andjelković, Marko S; Ristić, Goran S; Jakšić, Aleksandar B

    2015-01-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h −1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose. (paper)

  20. High dose rate versus medium dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy in inoperable esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, J.; Jager, J.; Jong, J. de; Rijken, J.; Pannebakker, M.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the results of medium dose rate (MDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) and high dose rate (HDR) ILBT in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma, with regard to dysphagia, complication rate and survival. Material and methods: Included were 114 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer who were treated with a single session of ILBT. In all cases a single dose of 15 Gy was administered, calculated at a 1 cm radius. Forty-eight patients were treated with MDR ( 137 Cs)ILBT. In June 1990 MDR was replaced by HDR and from then 66 patients were treated with HDR ( 192 Ir). Dysphagia was prospectively scored using a 5-point scale at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Results: No significant differences were noted between the two groups with regard to pretreatment variables. In patients treated with MDR-ILBT improvement of swallowing ability was noted in 30 out of 42 evaluable patients (71%), no change in 9 (21%) and progression of dysphagia in 3 patients (8%), as compared to 34 out of 59 evaluable patients (58%), 16 (27%) and 6 (15%) resp. in de HDR-ILBT group. In the latter category, progression of dysphagia was caused by fistulae in 2 patients. The differences were not significant (ns). Additional treatment in case of recurrent or persistent dysphagia was needed in 50% of the cases in the MDR-ILBT group as compared to 41% in the HDR-ILBT group (ns). The median survival of the MDR-ILBT group was 3.9 months as compared to 4.3 months in the HDR-ILBT group (ns). In 2 patients (4%) treated with MDR-ILBT bronchio-oesphageal fistulae developed at 6 weeks and 2 months. In the HDR-ILBT group fistulae were noted in 7 cases (11%) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 2, 3, 3, 4 and 9 months (ns). In all of these cases persistent of recurrent tumour was present. Conclusions: No significant differences were noted with regard to palliation of dysphagia, survival and complication rate between MDR-ILBT and HDR-ILBT in the management of esophageal

  1. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  2. Probing background ionization: positive streamers with varying pulse repetition rate and with a radioactive admixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijdam, S; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Ebert, U; Wormeester, G

    2011-01-01

    Positive streamers need a source of free electrons ahead of them to propagate. A streamer can supply these electrons by itself through photo-ionization, or the electrons can be present due to external background ionization. Here we investigate the effects of background ionization on streamer propagation and morphology by changing the gas composition and the repetition rate of the voltage pulses, and by adding a small amount of radioactive 85 Kr. We find that the general morphology of a positive streamer discharge in high-purity nitrogen depends on background ionization: at lower background ionization levels the streamers branch more and have a more feather-like appearance. This is observed both when varying the repetition rate and when adding 85 Kr, though side branches are longer with the radioactive admixture. But velocities and minimal diameters of streamers are virtually independent of the background ionization level. In air, the inception cloud breaks up into streamers at a smaller radius when the repetition rate and therefore the background ionization level is higher. When measuring the effects of the pulse repetition rate and of the radioactive admixture on the discharge morphology, we found that our estimates of background ionization levels are consistent with these observations; this gives confidence in the estimates. Streamer channels generally do not follow the paths of previous discharge channels for repetition rates of up to 10 Hz. We estimate the effect of recombination and diffusion of ions and free electrons from the previous discharge and conclude that the old trail has largely disappeared at the moment of the next voltage pulse; therefore the next streamers indeed cannot follow the old trail.

  3. Recommended de minimis radiation dose rates for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    A de minimis dose or dose rate as used in this report represents a level of risk which is generally accepted as being of no significance to an individual, or in the case of a population, of no significance to society. The doses corresponding to these levels of risk are based on current scientific knowledge. Dose rates recommended in this report are as follows: a de minimis individual dose rate of 10 μSv a -1 , based on a risk level that would generally be regarded as negligible in comparison with other risks; and a de minimis collective dose rate of 1 person-Sv a -1 , based on an imperceptible increase above the normal incidences of cancer and genetic defects in the exposed population. The concept of de minimis is to be distinguished from 'exempt from regulation' (below regulatory concern). The latter involves broader social and economic factors which encompass but are not limited to the purely risk-based factors addressed by the de minimis dose. De minimis is one of the factors that determine the exemption of sources or practices that may result in doses below or above the de minimis level. Although these de minimis dose rates should be considered in developing criteria and guidelines for deriving quantities and concentrations of radioactive substances that may be exempted from regulation, this document is only concerned with establishing de minimis dose rates, not with exempting sources and practices

  4. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    Full Text Available The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy, few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy, where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  5. Charophyte electrogenesis as a biomarker for assessing the risk from low-dose ionizing radiation to a single plant cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevriukova, Olga; Kanapeckaite, Auste; Lapeikaite, Indre; Kisnieriene, Vilma; Ladygiene, Rima; Sakalauskas, Vidmantas

    2014-01-01

    The impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on the electrical signalling pattern and membrane properties of the characea Nitellopsis obtusa was examined using conventional glass-microelectrode and voltage-clamp techniques. The giant cell was exposed to a ubiquitous radionuclide of high biological importance – tritium – for low-dose irradiation. Tritium was applied as tritiated water with an activity concentration of 15 kBq L −1 (an external dose rate that is approximately 0.05 μGy h −1 above the background radiation level); experiments indicated that this was the lowest effective concentration. Investigating the dynamics of electrical excitation of the plasma membrane (action potential) showed that exposing Characeae to tritium for half an hour prolonged the repolarization phase of the action potential by approximately 35%: the repolarization rate decreased from 39.2 ± 3.1 mV s −1 to 25.5 ± 1,8 mV s −1 due to tritium. Voltage-clamp measurements showed that the tritium exposure decreased the Cl – efflux and Ca 2+ influx involved in generating an action potential by approximately 27% (Δ = 12.4 ± 1.1 μA cm −2 ) and 64% (Δ = −5.3 ± 0.4 μA cm −2 ), respectively. The measured alterations in the action potential dynamics and in the chloride and calcium ion transport due to the exogenous low-dose tritium exposure provide the basis for predicting possible further impairments of plasma membrane regulatory functions, which subsequently disturb essential physiological processes of the plant cell. - Highlights: • We show some cellular details of the impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on biota. • Giant green algae cells provides a useful tool for studying HTO toxicity to a single plant cell. • Rapid real-time electrophysiological methods allowed to determine low dose tritium effect on transmembrane ion fluxes. • Pattern of charophyte cell membrane electrical excitation encodes tritium-caused alteration in cell homeostasis

  6. Dose rate analysis for Tank 101 AZ (Project W151)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Hillesland, K.E.; Carter, L.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document describes the expected dose rates for modification to tank 101 AZ including modifications to the steam coil, mixer pump, and temperature probes. The thrust of the effort is to determine dose rates from: modification of a steam coil and caisson; the installation of mixer pumps; the installation of temperature probes; and estimates of dose rates that will be encountered while making these changes. Because the dose rates for all of these configurations depend upon the photon source within the supernate and sludge, comparisons were also made between measured dose rates within a drywell and the corresponding calculated dose rates. The calculational tool used is a Monte Carlo (MCNP 2 ) code since complicated three dimensional geometries are involved. A summary of the most important results of the entire study is given in Section 2. The basic calculational geometry model of the tank is discussed in Section 3, along with a tabulation of the photon sources that were used within the supernate and the sludge, and a discussion of uncertainties. The calculated dose rates around the steam coil and caisson before and after modification are discussed in Section 4. The configuration for the installation of the mixer pumps and the resulting dose rates are given in Section 5. The predicted changes in dose rates due to a possible dilution of the supernate source are given in Section 6. The calculational configuration used to model the installation of temperature probes and the resulting predicted dose rates are discussed in Section 7. Finally, comparisons of measured to calculated dose rates within a drywell are summarized in Section 8. Extended discussions of calculational models and Monte Carlo optimization techniques used are included in Appendix A

  7. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  8. INTERSTELLAR METASTABLE HELIUM ABSORPTION AS A PROBE OF THE COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hobbs, L. M.; Hinkle, K. H.

    2009-01-01

    The ionization rate of interstellar material by cosmic rays has been a major source of controversy, with different estimates varying by three orders of magnitude. Observational constraints of this rate have all depended on analyzing the chemistry of various molecules that are produced following cosmic-ray ionization, and in many cases these analyses contain significant uncertainties. Even in the simplest case (H + 3 ), the derived ionization rate depends on an (uncertain) estimate of the absorption path length. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of inferring the cosmic-ray ionization rate using the 10830 A absorption line of metastable helium. Observations through the diffuse clouds toward HD 183143 are presented, but yield only an upper limit on the metastable helium column density. A thorough investigation of He + chemistry reveals that only a small fraction of He + will recombine into the triplet state and populate the metastable level. In addition, excitation to the triplet manifold of helium by secondary electrons must be accounted for as it is the dominant mechanism which produces He* in some environments. Incorporating these various formation and destruction pathways, we derive new equations for the steady state abundance of metastable helium. Using these equations in concert with our observations, we find ζ He -15 s -1 , an upper limit about 5 times larger than the ionization rate previously inferred for this sight line using H + 3 . While observations of interstellar He* are extremely difficult at present, and the background chemistry is not nearly as simple as previously thought, potential future observations of metastable helium would provide an independent check on the cosmic-ray ionization rate derived from H + 3 in diffuse molecular clouds, and, perhaps more importantly, allow the first direct measurements of the ionization rate in diffuse atomic clouds.

  9. Femtosecond Coherent Spectroscopy at 800nm: MI-FROG Measures High-Field Ionization Rates in Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the first quantitative phase-sensitive measurement of ultrafast ionization rates in gases using Multi-phase Interferometric Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating. Ultrafast probe depletion via frequency mixing in the ionization front is observed

  10. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: Conflict between assumptions and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Devasagayam, T.P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data on cancer incidence among the A-bomb survivors and more importantly experimental studies in cell and molecular radiobiology do not lend unequivocal support to the ''linear, no threshold'' (LNT) hypothesis; in fact, the discernible evidence that low and high doses of ionizing radiations induce qualitatively different/opposite effects cannot be summarily rejected. A time has come to examine the mechanistic aspects of ''radiation hormesis'' and ''radioadaptive response'' seriously rather than proclaiming one's profound disbelief about these phenomena. To put the discussion in a serious scientific mode, we briefly catalogue here reports in the literature on gene expression differentially influenced by low and high doses. These are not explicable in terms of the current radiation paradigm. (author)

  11. Terrestrial gamma dose rate in Pahang state Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola; Ramli, A.T.; Sanusi, M.S.; Saleh, M.A.; Garba, N.N.; Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria

    2014-01-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiations (TGR) were measured in Pahang state Malaysia between January and April 2013. The TGR dose rates ranged from 26 to 750 nGy h -1 . The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGR dose rate was found to be 176 ± 5 nGy h -1 . Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were located in Raub, Temerloh, Bentong and Rompin districts. These areas have external gamma dose rates of between 500 and 750 nGy h -1 . An Isodose map of the state was produced using ArcGIS9 software version 9.3. To evaluate the radiological hazard due to terrestrial gamma dose, the annual effective dose equivalent and the mean population weighted dose rate were calculated and found to be 0.22 mSv year -1 and 168 nGy h -1 respectively. (author)

  12. The efficiency of superficially active compounds on the process of decontamination in animals exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossakowski, S.

    1977-01-01

    The efficiency of some superficially active compounds on the process of decontamination was investigated in swine exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation (300, 600 R), and then contaminated with 90 Sr, 131 I, 137 Cs, and 144 Ce. The results revealed that the time factor after irradiation was more important for the efficiency of decontamination than the doses of radiation. (author)

  13. The choice of food consumption rates for radiation dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The practical problem in estimating radiation doses due to radioactive contamination of food is the choice of the appropriate food intakes. To ensure compliance or to compare with dose equivalent limits, higher than average intake rates appropriate to critical groups should be used. However for realistic estimates of health detriment in the whole exposed population, average intake rates are more appropriate. (U.K.)

  14. Low doses of ionizing radiation and risk of cardiovascular disease: A review of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Bonaventure, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M.O.; Milliat, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background While cardiovascular risks associated with high level of ionizing radiation are well-established, long-term effects of low and medium levels of exposure, between 0 and 5 gray (Gy), on the cardiovascular system are debated. Methods Available literature was reviewed considering various populations, such as survivors of atomic bombs, nuclear workers, Chernobyl liquidators, radiologists and radiological technologists and patients exposed for medical reasons. Results A significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with low doses of ionizing radiation was observed in 13 studies among the 27 analyzed. The ischemic heart diseases risk was detailed in 16 studies and seven of them showed a significant increase. The cerebrovascular risk was significantly increased in five studies among the 12 considered. Conclusion Some epidemiological and experimental data are clearly in favour of an increased cardiovascular risk associated with exposure to low doses. However, given the multi-factorial origin of cardiovascular diseases and the lack of a clear pathophysiologic mechanism, epidemiological results have to be carefully interpreted. Further research should be conducted in this area. (authors)

  15. High Total Ionizing Dose and Temperature Effects on Micro- and Nano-electronic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillardin, M.; Martinez, M.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.; Marcandella, C.; Duhamel, O.; Raine, M.; Richard, N.; Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.; Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Andrieu, F.; Barraud, S.; Faynot, O.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates the vulnerability of several micro- and nano-electronic technologies to a mixed harsh environment including high total ionizing dose at MGy levels and high temperature. Such operating conditions have been revealed recently for several applications like new security systems in existing or future nuclear power plants, fusion experiments, or deep space missions. In this work, the competing effects already reported in literature of ionizing radiations and temperature are characterized in elementary devices made of MOS transistors from several technologies. First, devices are irradiated using a radiation laboratory X-ray source up to MGy dose levels at room temperature. Devices are grounded during irradiation to simulate a circuit which waits for a wake up signal, representing most of the lifetime of an integrated circuit operating in a harsh environment. Devices are then annealed at several temperatures to discuss the post-irradiation behavior and to determine whether an elevated temperature is an issue or not for circuit function in mixed harsh environments. (authors)

  16. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (stress on epigenetic gene modification. In this review, we show evidence that suggests that LDIR-induced oxidative stress provides a mechanistic link between LDIR and epigenetic gene regulation. We also discuss the potential implication of LDIR exposure during pregnancy where intrauterine fetal development is highly susceptible to oxidative stress-induced epigenetic programing.

  17. Comparison of the dose-effect relationship for UV radiation and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenhouts, H.P.; Sijsma, M.J.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1990-06-01

    Ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation (UV) are both physical agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. However, there are some basic differences in the fundamental mechanism of their interaction with biological material that may have consequences for risk assessment. In this paper the dose-effect relationships for gamma radiation and UV at cellular level will be used to demonstrate the different radio-biological effectiveness of both agents. The results will be discussed in the framework of a biophysical model, based on the assumption that DNA doublestranded lesions are crucial for the cytotoxic action. After exposure to ionizing radiation, the lesions are fixed immediately following irradiation, but after UV exposure the lethal lesions are recognized only in the next DNA synthesis phase. The combination of this concept with the mechanism of lesion induction and the possibility of repair, leads to different dose and time relationships for the radiation effects of both agents. The possible consequences for risk assessment at low levels will be discussed. (author). 9 refs.; 5 figs

  18. Cancer radiotherapy based on femtosecond IR laser-beam filamentation yielding ultra-high dose rates and zero entrance dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Belmouaddine, Hakim; Allard, Jean-François; Tanguay-Renaud, Catherine; Lemay, Rosalie; Brastaviceanu, Tiberius; Tremblay, Luc; Paquette, Benoit; Wagner, J Richard; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Lepage, Martin; Huels, Michael A; Houde, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    Since the invention of cancer radiotherapy, its primary goal has been to maximize lethal radiation doses to the tumor volume while keeping the dose to surrounding healthy tissues at zero. Sadly, conventional radiation sources (γ or X rays, electrons) used for decades, including multiple or modulated beams, inevitably deposit the majority of their dose in front or behind the tumor, thus damaging healthy tissue and causing secondary cancers years after treatment. Even the most recent pioneering advances in costly proton or carbon ion therapies can not completely avoid dose buildup in front of the tumor volume. Here we show that this ultimate goal of radiotherapy is yet within our reach: Using intense ultra-short infrared laser pulses we can now deposit a very large energy dose at unprecedented microscopic dose rates (up to 10(11) Gy/s) deep inside an adjustable, well-controlled macroscopic volume, without any dose deposit in front or behind the target volume. Our infrared laser pulses produce high density avalanches of low energy electrons via laser filamentation, a phenomenon that results in a spatial energy density and temporal dose rate that both exceed by orders of magnitude any values previously reported even for the most intense clinical radiotherapy systems. Moreover, we show that (i) the type of final damage and its mechanisms in aqueous media, at the molecular and biomolecular level, is comparable to that of conventional ionizing radiation, and (ii) at the tumor tissue level in an animal cancer model, the laser irradiation method shows clear therapeutic benefits.

  19. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitano, R F [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, c.p. 2400 Rome (Italy); Guerra, A S [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, c.p. 2400 Rome (Italy); Pimpinella, M [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, c.p. 2400 Rome (Italy); Caporali, C [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, c.p. 2400 Rome (Italy); Petrucci, A [A.C.O. S. Filippo Neri, U.O. Fisica Sanitaria, Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k{sub s}, relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k{sub s} by TVA. The determination of k{sub s} was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhaeuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k{sub s} was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams.

  20. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  1. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  2. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damkaer, D.M.; Dey, D.B.; Heron, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm/sup -2/sub((DNA)) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm/sup -2/sub((DNA)). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation.

  3. Conversion Factors for Predicting Unshielded Dose Rates in Shielded Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapham, M.; Seamans Jr, J.V.; Arbon, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the methodology developed and used by the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project for determining the activity content and the unshielded surface dose rate for lead lined containers contaminated with transuranic waste. Several methods were investigated: - Direct measurement of the dose rate after removing the shielding. - Use of a MicroShield R derived dose conversion factor, (mRem/hr unshielded )/(mRem/hr shielded ), applied to the measured surface dose rate to estimate the unshielded surface dose rate. - Use of a MicroShield R derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. - Use of an empirically derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. The last approach proved to be the most efficacious by using a combination of nondestructive assay and empirically defined dose rate conversion factors. Empirically derived conversion factors were found to be highly dependent upon the matrix of the waste. Use of conversion factors relied on activity values corrected to address the presence of a lead liner. (authors)

  4. Feasibility study for the development of a Dose Calibrator with a well ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista Romeu, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Dose calibrators are intended for the metrological assurance of medical diagnostic studies in which radiopharmaceuticals are used. It is the final link in the national system of standards to ensure quality control and the radiation safety of the dose administered to patients while using these nuclear techniques. The wide utilization of radiopharmaceuticals in our country in several modules of nuclear medicine and other laboratories where radio-isotopic preparations are used, as well as the existence of the National Center of Isotopes to produce them determine the necessity of national production of dose calibration equipment. In this paper, it is presented the result of a feasibility study to develop a dose calibrator with a well-type ionization chamber for nuclear medicine services of the National Health System with gamma camera. It is specifically intended to contribute to monitor and control the activity of the prepared samples to be administered to patients under studies with gamma cameras to ensure compliance with the current requirements of quality and radiation safety. (Author)

  5. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident: Possible contribution of historic dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar-Nazir, Laila; Shi, Xiaopei; Moller, Anders; Mousseau, Timothy; Byun, Soohyun; Hancock, Samuel; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2018-08-01

    The impact of the Chernobyl NPP accident on the environment is documented to be greater than expected, with higher mutation rates than expected at the current, chronic low dose rate. In this paper we suggest that the historic acute exposure and resulting non-targeted effects (NTE) such as delayed mutations and genomic instability could account at least in part for currently measured mutation rates and provide an initial test of this concept. Data from Møller and Mousseau on the phenotypic mutation rates of Chernobyl birds 9-11 generations post the Chernobyl accident were used and the reconstructed dose response for mutations was compared with delayed reproductive death dose responses (as a measure of genomic instability) in cell cultures exposed to a similar range of doses. The dose to birds present during the Chernobyl NPP accident was reconstructed through the external pathway due to Cs-137 with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with such reconstruction. The percentage of Chernobyl birds several generations after the accident without mutations followed the general shape of the clonogenic survival percentage of the progeny of irradiated cells, and it plateaued at low doses. This is the expected result if NTE of radiation are involved. We suggest therefore, that NTE induced by the historic dose may play a role in generating mutations in progeny many generations following the initial disaster. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  7. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null...

  8. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  9. Predicting Ionization Rates from SEP and Solar Wind Proton Precipitation into the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R.; Dong, C.; Lee, C. O.; Curry, S.; Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D.; Halekas, J. S.; Larson, D. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize planetary atmospheres and increase total electron content. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutrals and pass through the magnetosheath, while SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. In this study we will present predicted ionization rates and resulting electron densities produced by solar wind and SEP proton ionization during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare ionization by SEP and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help to quantify how the ionosphere responds to extreme solar events during solar minimum.

  10. Model predictions and analysis of enhanced biological effectiveness at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Sykes, C.E.; Younis, A.-R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A severe challenge to all models purporting to describe the biological effects of ionizing radiation has arisen with the discovery of two phenomena: the anomalous trend with dose rate of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells and the apparent excessive damaging power of electron-capture radionuclides when incorporated into cell nuclei. A new model is proposed which predicts and enables interpretation of these phenomena. Radiation effectiveness is found to be expressible absolutely in terms of the geometrical cross-sectional area of the radiosensitive sites. The duration of the irradiation, the mean free path for ionization, the influence of particles in the slowing-down spectrum perrtaining in the medium and two collective time factors determining the mean repair rate and the mean lifetime of unidentified reactive chemical species [pt

  11. Which Molecular Features Affect the Intrinsic Hepatic Clearance Rate of Ionizable Organic Chemicals in Fish?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yi; Hermens, Joop L M; Jonker, Michiel T O; Arnot, Jon A; Armitage, James M; Brown, Trevor; Nichols, John W; Fay, Kellie A; Droge, Steven T J

    2016-01-01

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study, we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a pooled batch of

  12. The calculation of dose rates from rectangular sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    A common problem in radiation protection is the calculation of dose rates from extended sources and irregular shapes. Dose rates are proportional to the solid angle subtended by the source at the point of measurement. Simple methods of calculating solid angles would assist in estimating dose rates from large area sources and therefore improve predictive dose estimates when planning work near such sources. The estimation of dose rates is of particular interest to producers of radioactive ores but other users of bulk radioactive materials may have similar interest. The use of spherical trigonometry can assist in determination of solid angles and a simple equation is derived here for the determination of the dose at any distance from a rectangular surface. The solid angle subtended by complex shapes can be determined by modelling the area as a patchwork of rectangular areas and summing the solid angles from each rectangle. The dose rates from bags of thorium bearing ores is of particular interest in Western Australia and measured dose rates from bags and containers of monazite are compared with theoretical estimates based on calculations of solid angle. The agreement is fair but more detailed measurements would be needed to confirm the agreement with theory. (author)

  13. High dose-per-pulse electron beam dosimetry - A model to correct for the ion recombination in the Advanced Markus ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Kristoffer; Jaccard, Maud; Germond, Jean-François; Buchillier, Thierry; Bochud, François; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Bailat, Claude

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish an empirical model of the ion recombination in the Advanced Markus ionization chamber for measurements in high dose rate/dose-per-pulse electron beams. In addition, we compared the observed ion recombination to calculations using the standard Boag two-voltage-analysis method, the more general theoretical Boag models, and the semiempirical general equation presented by Burns and McEwen. Two independent methods were used to investigate the ion recombination: (a) Varying the grid tension of the linear accelerator (linac) gun (controls the linac output) and measuring the relative effect the grid tension has on the chamber response at different source-to-surface distances (SSD). (b) Performing simultaneous dose measurements and comparing the dose-response, in beams with varying dose rate/dose-per-pulse, with the chamber together with dose rate/dose-per-pulse independent Gafchromic™ EBT3 film. Three individual Advanced Markus chambers were used for the measurements with both methods. All measurements were performed in electron beams with varying mean dose rate, dose rate within pulse, and dose-per-pulse (10 -2  ≤ mean dose rate ≤ 10 3 Gy/s, 10 2  ≤ mean dose rate within pulse ≤ 10 7  Gy/s, 10 -4  ≤ dose-per-pulse ≤ 10 1  Gy), which was achieved by independently varying the linac gun grid tension, and the SSD. The results demonstrate how the ion collection efficiency of the chamber decreased as the dose-per-pulse increased, and that the ion recombination was dependent on the dose-per-pulse rather than the dose rate, a behavior predicted by Boag theory. The general theoretical Boag models agreed well with the data over the entire investigated dose-per-pulse range, but only for a low polarizing chamber voltage (50 V). However, the two-voltage-analysis method and the Burns & McEwen equation only agreed with the data at low dose-per-pulse values (≤ 10 -2 and ≤ 10 -1  Gy, respectively). An empirical

  14. Measurements of surgeons' exposure to ionizing radiation dose during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Boram; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-06-15

    Measurement of radiation dose from C-arm fluoroscopy during a simulated intraoperative use in spine surgery. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate scatter radiation doses to specific organs of surgeons during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy in spine surgery and to provide practical intraoperative guidelines. There have been studies that reported the radiation dose of C-arm fluoroscopy in various procedures. However, radiation doses to surgeons' specific organs during spine surgery have not been sufficiently examined, and the practical intraoperative radioprotective guidelines have not been suggested. Scatter radiation dose (air kerma rate) was measured during the use of a C-arm on an anthropomorphic chest phantom on an operating table. Then, a whole body anthropomorphic phantom was located besides the chest phantom to simulate a surgeon, and scatter radiation doses to specific organs (eye, thyroid, breast, and gonads) and direct radiation dose to the surgeon's hand were measured using 4 C-arm configurations (standard, inverted, translateral, and tube translateral). The effects of rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient and of a thyroid shield were also evaluated. Scatter radiation doses decreased as distance from the patient increased during C-arm fluoroscopy use. The standard and translateral C-arm configurations caused lower scatter doses to sensitive organs than inverted and tube translateral configurations. Scatter doses were highest for breast and lowest for gonads. The use of a thyroid shield and rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient reduced scatter radiation dose to the surgeon's thyroid and eyes. The direct radiation dose was at least 20 times greater than scatter doses to sensitive organs. The following factors could reduce radiation exposure during intraoperative use of C-arm; (1) distance from the patient, (2) C-arm configuration, (3) radioprotective equipments, (4) rotating the surgeons' eyes away from the patient, and (5) avoiding

  15. Early Effect of High Dose of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Plasma Lipids Profile and Liver Fatty Acids Composition in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noaman, E.; Mansour, S.Z.; Ibrahim, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was conducted to analyze the effect of acute gamma-irradiation on rats at supralethal doses of 20 Gy to determine the synthesis and amounts of free fatty acids, neutral lipids and phospholipids of plasma and liver after 24 and 48 h of gamma-irradiation. Male Wistar rats weighing 120+- 20 g were exposed to 20 Gy of gamma radiation (dose rate of 0.59 Gy/min). Exposure of rats to ionizing radiation resulted in significant alterations in the assayed parameters indicating lipid metabolism disturbance. Plasma cholesterol and phospholipid levels increased up to 71.3 and 71.5 %, respectively, after 24 h from radiation exposure and then returned to 28 and 27 % change in-compare with control values after 48 h post-irradiation. Plasma triacylglycerol concentrations increased concomitantly with irradiation, but their values are less high than cholesterol and phospholipid levels recording significant changes at 19 and 9 % comparing with control rats. Lipid peroxidation measured as MDA recorded significant elevation after 24 and 48 h post irradiation. It was shown that the synthesis of free fatty acids, cholesterol, cholesterol ethers and phospholipids was activated 48 h after irradiation at 20 Gy. The amount of free fatty acids of the rat liver decreased at 20 Gy exposures. This is assumed to be a result of the radioresistance to some degree in the system of free fatty acid synthesis of the rat to the gamma-irradiation in the lethal doses

  16. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  17. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  18. Review of techniques and detectors used in instruments for field measurement of beta doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, field measurements are required to assess the hazard from #betta#-rays before personnel are allowed to occupy a working space or perform a task. Occasionally, the measurements are required for an assessment after a #betta#-ray exposure is suspected to have occurred. Until recently the dose or dose rate have been the quantities of interest but there is now felt to be a need to characterize the energies and directions of the #betta#-rays as well. The purpose of #betta#-dosimetry is the assessment of hazard to superficial tissues (within approx. 10 mm of the surface) and that these tissues may also be exposed simultaneously to other ionizing radiations. The #betta#-dosimetry technique must take account of this. With these uses of field instruments in mind the following detectors, and associated techniques will be discussed in terms of the measurement principles, advantages and limitations: thin-walled ion chambers (sometimes in combination with thick-walled ones or with covers thick enough to prevent penetration of #betta#-particles); thin scintillators, nearly tissue equivalent, to provide a detector analogous to skin; scintillators, thick enough to absorb all the energy of the #betta#-particles (circuitry is required to count pulses according to size to permit calculation of dose or dose rate); silicon diodes with thin detection layers operated as photocurrent generators; silicon diodes, reversed biassed, with pulses counted according to size; and simple pulse counters (e.g., GM counters or silicon diodes with thin windows)

  19. Dose Rate of Environmental Gamma Radiation in Java Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Buchori; Dadong Iskandar

    2007-01-01

    The dose rate Monitoring of environmental gamma radiation at some locations in Java Island in the year 2005 / 2006 has been carried out. The dose rate measurement of gamma radiation is carried out by using the peripheral of Portable Gamma of Ray Spectrometer with detector of NaI(Tl), Merck Exploranium, Model GR-130- MINISPEC, while to determine its geographic position is used by the GPS (Global Positioning System), made in German corporation of GPS III Plus type. The division of measurement region was conducted by dividing Java Island become 66 parts with same distance, except in Jepara area that will built PLTN (Nuclear Energy Power), distance between measurement points is more closed. The results of dose rate measurement are in 66 locations in Java Island the range of (19.24 ± 4.05) nSv/hour until (150.78 ± 12.26) nSv/hour with mean (51.93 ± 36.53) nSv/h. The lowest dose rate was in location of Garut, while highest dose rate was in Ujung Lemah Abang, Jepara location. The data can be used for base line data of dose rate of environmental gamma radiation in Indonesia, specially in Java Island. The mean level of gamma radiation in Java monitoring area (0.46 mSv / year) was still lower than worldwide average effective dose rate of terrestrial gamma rays 0.5 mSv / year (report of UNSCEAR, 2000). (author)

  20. The effect of extreme ionization rates during the initial collapse of a molecular cloud core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.; Price, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    What cosmic ray ionization rate is required such that a non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of a collapsing molecular cloud will follow the same evolutionary path as an ideal MHD simulation or as a purely hydrodynamics simulation? To investigate this question, we perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal MHD simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating, one solar mass, magnetized molecular cloud cores, which include Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. We assume a uniform grain size of ag = 0.1 μm, and our free parameter is the cosmic ray ionization rate, ζcr. We evolve our models, where possible, until they have produced a first hydrostatic core. Models with ζcr ≳ 10-13 s-1 are indistinguishable from ideal MHD models, and the evolution of the model with ζcr = 10-14 s-1 matches the evolution of the ideal MHD model within 1 per cent when considering maximum density, magnetic energy, and maximum magnetic field strength as a function of time; these results are independent of ag. Models with very low ionization rates (ζcr ≲ 10-24 s-1) are required to approach hydrodynamical collapse, and even lower ionization rates may be required for larger ag. Thus, it is possible to reproduce ideal MHD and purely hydrodynamical collapses using non-ideal MHD given an appropriate cosmic ray ionization rate. However, realistic cosmic ray ionization rates approach neither limit; thus, non-ideal MHD cannot be neglected in star formation simulations.

  1. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Effect of low dose rate irradiation on doped silica core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.; Askins, C.G.; Gingerich, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The optical attenuation induced in multimode doped silica core optical fiber waveguides by a year's exposure to low dose rate (1 rad/day) ionizing radiation was studied, allowing a characterization of fibers deployed in these environments and a determination of the permanent induced loss in the waveguides. Variations in the induced attenuation at 0.85 μm have been observed with changes in the dose rate between 1 rad/day and 9000 rads/min. These dose rate dependences have been found to derive directly from the recovery that occurs during the exposure; the recovery data predict little or no dose rate dependence of the damage at 1.3 μm. The low dose rate exposure has been found to induce significant permanent attenuation in the 0.7-1.7-μm spectral region in all fibers containing P in the core, whether doped uniformly across the diameter or constrained to a narrow spike on the centerline. Whereas permanent loss was induced at 0.85 μm in a P-free binary Ge-doped silica core fiber by the year's exposure, virtually no damage was observed at 1.3 μm

  3. High dose-per-pulse electron beam dosimetry: Usability and dose-rate independence of EBT3 Gafchromic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Maud; Petersson, Kristoffer; Buchillier, Thierry; Germond, Jean-François; Durán, Maria Teresa; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François O; Bailat, Claude

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of Gafchromic EBT3 films for reference dose measurements in the beam of a prototype high dose-per-pulse linear accelerator (linac), capable of delivering electron beams with a mean dose-rate (Ḋ m ) ranging from 0.07 to 3000 Gy/s and a dose-rate in pulse (Ḋ p ) of up to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. To do this, we evaluated the overall uncertainties in EBT3 film dosimetry as well as the energy and dose-rate dependence of their response. Our dosimetric system was composed of EBT3 Gafchromic films in combination with a flatbed scanner and was calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to primary standard. All sources of uncertainties in EBT3 dosimetry were carefully analyzed using irradiations at a clinical radiotherapy linac. Energy dependence was investigated with the same machine by acquiring and comparing calibration curves for three different beam energies (4, 8 and 12 MeV), for doses between 0.25 and 30 Gy. Ḋ m dependence was studied at the clinical linac by changing the pulse repetition frequency (f) of the beam in order to vary Ḋ m between 0.55 and 4.40 Gy/min, while Ḋ p dependence was probed at the prototype machine for Ḋ p ranging from 7 × 10 3 to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. Ḋ p dependence was first determined by studying the correlation between the dose measured by films and the charge of electrons measured at the exit of the machine by an induction torus. Furthermore, we compared doses from the films to independently calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) that have been reported as being dose-rate independent up to such high dose-rates. We report that uncertainty below 4% (k = 2) can be achieved in the dose range between 3 and 17 Gy. Results also demonstrated that EBT3 films did not display any detectable energy dependence for electron beam energies between 4 and 12 MeV. No Ḋ m dependence was found either. In addition, we obtained excellent consistency between films and TLDs over the entire Ḋ p

  4. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  5. Absolute absorbed dose measurements with an array of ionization chambers as part of a routine procedure of quality control for the VMAT technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Cabello Murillo, E.; Ramirez Ros, J. C.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la

    2011-01-01

    Arcotheraphy techniques volumetric modulated (VMAT) treatments involve continuous variation of the gantry rotation speed, positions of the sheets and dose rate. Since all treatments are administered by continuous arcs, these techniques require quality control procedures to ensure quick and easy constancy of the calibration factor (total absorbed dose) for any gantry angle. We report here a simple method of quality control for the measurement of the calibration factor using an array of ionization chambers. The measurements were performed on a unit of 6 MV Elekta Synergy with VMAT, belonging to the Radiation Oncology service of the Defense Central Hospital Gomez Ulla.

  6. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  7. Design of movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongyu; Cheng Wen; Li Jikai; Huang Hong; Shen Qiming; Zhang Qiang; Liu Zhengshan

    2005-10-01

    Movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor has not only the characteristics of fixed area γ dose rate monitor, but that of portable meter as well. Its main function is to monitor the areas where dose rate would change without orderliness to prevent unplanned radiation exposure accidents from happening. The design way of the monitor, the main indicators description, the working principle and the comprising of software and hardware are briefly introduced. The monitor has the characteristics of simple installation, easy maintenance, little power consumption, wide range, notability of visual and audible alarm and so on. Its design and technique have novelty and advancement. (authors)

  8. Nuclear Enterprises portable dose rate meter type PDR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Iles, W.J.

    1978-06-01

    This instrument is a portable battery powered dose rate meter covering the dose rate range from 0.05 to 500 mrad h -1 . It is designed to measure X- and γ-radiation dose rates over the energy range from 35 keV to 3 MeV. The radiation detector is an MX 164/S GM tube provided with a compensation sheath. The report describes the instrument under the headings: facilities and controls; radiation characteristics; electrical characteristics; environmental characteristics; mechanical characteristics; the manual; summary of performance. (U.K.)

  9. Contributions to indoor gamma dose rate from building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xionghua; Li Guangming; Yang Xiangdong

    1990-01-01

    In the coures of construction of a building structured with bricks and concrets, the indoor gamma air absorbed dose rates were seperately measured from the floors, brick walls and prefabricated plates of concrets, etc.. It suggested that the indoor gamma dose rates from building materials are mainly attributed to the brick walls and the floors. A little contribution comes from other brilding materials. The dose rates can be calculated through a 4π-infinite thick model with a correction factor of 0.52

  10. Determination of surface dose rate for cloisonne using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengyuan, Zhao; Yulian, Zhang

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the measuring method and results of surface dose rate of cloisonne using CaSO/sub 4/ Dy-Teflon foil dosimeter are described. The surface dose rate of all products are below 0.015 mrad/h. These products contain 42 sorts of jewelery and 20 sets of wares (such as vases, plates, ash-trays, etc.). Most of the data fall within the range of natural background. For comparison, some jewelery from Taiwan and 3 vases from Japan are measured. The highest surface dose rate of 0.78 mrad/h is due to the necklace jewelery from Taiwan.

  11. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  12. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR 192 Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single 192 Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the 192 Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for 192 Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  13. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  14. Scientific conception on mechanisms of calcium homeostasis disorders under low dose effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abylaev, Zh.A.; Dospolova, Zh.G.

    1997-01-01

    Scientific conception of probable consequences of calcium homeostasis disorders in personals, exposed to low dose effect of ionizing radiation has been developed. Principle positions of the conception is that pathologic processes development have different ways of conducting. During predominance of low doses of external gamma-radiation there is leading pathologic mechanism (mechanism 1) of disorder neuroendocrine regulation of both the calcium and the phosphor. In this case sicks have disorders of both the vegetative tonus and the endocrine status. Under internal irradiation (mechanism 2) there is disfunction of organs and systems (bore changes and disorders of hormone status). These changes are considered as consequence of negative action on organism of incorporated long-living radionuclides. Radio-toxic factors action (mechanism 3) provokes the excess of hormones, which acting on bone tissue and could be cause of steroid osteoporosis. Influence of chronic stress factor (mechanism 4) enlarges and burden action on organism of low radiation doses. It is emphasized, that decisive role in development of pathologic processes has mechanism of disturbance of neuroendocrine regulation of calcium exchange

  15. The assessment of effects of low doses of ionizing radiations: contributions of epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, P.; Hubert, Ph.; Bard, D.

    1998-01-01

    After a brief recall of the history of the application of epidemiological studies to the field of ionizing radiations (actually to study the consequences of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing), and after having outlined that most of these epidemiological studies addressed carcinogenic effects of radiations on populations exposed to doses greater than 0,2 Gy, this article more particularly addresses epidemiological studies for low doses (lower than 0,5-1 Gy). The authors present objectives and methods (monitoring, etiological research, risk quantification), and discuss the limitations of epidemiology and its strengths. In the next part, they comment and discuss the main data sources used for the epidemiological assessment of low doses. These sources respectively deal with Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study, its results in terms of solid cancers and leukaemia, its limitations), with occupational exposures (radiologists, workers in nuclear installations, crews of intercontinental flights, Chernobyl liquidators, uranium minors exposed to radon), with environmental exposures (domestic exposures to radon, exposure to natural radiation, to nuclear test fallouts, and to Chernobyl accident fallouts, exposure about nuclear installations), and with other types of exposure

  16. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    We obtained the following results with regards to the effects of low dose ionizing radiation (5, 10, 15 and 20 cGy) on neuronal migration of developing rat cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration delay was found by autoradiography after intraperitoneal labeling with 3 H-thymidine to pregnant Wistar rats embryonic 16, and low dose radiation an hour or 48 hours after labeling. In 15-20 cGy, N-CAM (neural cell adhesion molecules) staining patterns changed with immunohistochemical method, whereas those of L1 and cytoskeleton neurofilament (160 KD), tauprotein, MAP2 (microtubule associated protein 2) did not. After 24-48 hours of radiation, N-CAM were not detected on the matrix cell layer. After 72-96 hours of radiation, N-CAM staining recovered to a normal pattern. In conclusion, low dose radiation of 15-20 cGy gave rise to neuronal migration delay and it was suggested that N-CAM may be related to neuronal migration as one of the mechanisms involved. (author)

  17. Effect of the rate and dose rate of irradiation on the quality of mushrooms, shrimps and marinated poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Mahrour, A.; Beaulieu, M.; Jobin, M.; Nketsa-Tabiri, J.; Gagnon, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this research programme, three investigations involving irradiation in combination with other preservation treatments are described. The first study evaluated the effect of the gamma irradiation dose rate combined with control storage at 15 deg. C and 90% relative humidity on the biochemical, microbiological and physical quality of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). A 2 kGy dose was necessary to control the pathogenic microorganisms and to decrease the ageing process of mushrooms. The shelf-life of the mushrooms, as assessed by colour, was extended by 4 days at the lower dose rate (4.5 kGy/h) and by only 2 days at the higher dose rate (32 kGy/h). The higher dose rate caused stress to the cells and altered cell permeability. The second study was to verify the efficacy of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co) on frozen shrimps in eliminating or reducing the pathogenic bacteria that may occasionally be present and to increase the cold storage life of thawed shrimps. A dose of 2.5 kGy permitted storage at 4 deg. C for 1 month without affecting the quality of the product. The third study investigated the anti-oxidant and anti-microbial properties of the natural substances added to fresh poultry before irradiation. Irradiation of poultry at 5 kGy was found to be highly effective in eliminating Salmonella and reducing the number of spoilage microorganisms to ensure safety and quality. Moreover, use of marinating techniques had a synergistic effect with irradiation in reducing the microbial load and the oxidation rate of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly C18:2. The essential oils in rosemary and thyme were the most potent anti-microbial agents investigated and prevented the deterioration of stored foods by bacteria. Several phenolic compounds with anti-oxidant activities were also isolated from rosemary. (author)

  18. Absorbed dose rate meter for β-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingo, K.

    1977-01-01

    The absorbed dose of β-ray depends on the energy of β-rays and the epidermal thickness of tissue in interest. In order to measure the absorbed dose rate at the interested tissue directly, the ratio of counting rate to absorbed dose should be constant independent of β-ray energy. In this purpose, a thin plastic scintillator was used as a detector with a single channel analyzer. The pulse height distribution, obtained using the scintillator whose thickness is less than the range of β-rays, shows a peak at a particular pulse height depending on the thickness of scintillator used. This means an increase of the number of pulses at lower pulse height. The lower level of discrimination and window width of the single channel analyzer are chosen according to the epidermal thickness of the tissue. In the experiment, scintillators of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 mm thick were tested. It was found that desirable pulse height distribution, to obtain a constant dose sensitivity, could be obtained using the 2 mm thick scintillator. The sensitivity of the absorbed dose rate meter is constant within +-15% for β-ray with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV, when the absorbed dose rate for skin (epidermal thickness 7mg/cm 2 ) is measured. In order to measure the dose rate for a hand (epithermal thickness 40mg/cm 2 ) the lower level of discrimination is changed to be higher and at the same time the window width is also changed. Combining these techniques, one can get an absorbed dose rate meter for the tissue dose of various thickness, which has the constant dose sensitivity within +-15% for β-rays with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV

  19. Characterization of total ionizing dose damage in COTS pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Ma, Wuying; Huang, Shaoyan; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Sheng, Jiangkun; Xue, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan (China)

    2016-03-15

    The characterization of total ionizing dose (TID) damage in COTS pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) is investigated. The radiation experiments are carried out at a {sup 60}Co γ-ray source. The CISs are produced by 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the pixel architecture is 8T global shutter pixel with correlated double sampling (CDS) based on a 4T PPD front end. The parameters of CISs such as temporal domain, spatial domain, and spectral domain are measured at the CIS test system as the EMVA 1288 standard before and after irradiation. The dark current, random noise, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU), overall system gain, saturation output, dynamic range (DR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), quantum efficiency (QE), and responsivity versus the TID are reported. The behaviors of the tested CISs show remarkable degradations after radiation. The degradation mechanisms of CISs induced by TID damage are also analyzed.

  20. Total-ionizing-dose effects on isolation oxides in modern CMOS technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, Hugh J.; Mclain, Michael; Esqueda, Ivan Sanchez

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the total dose response of deep sub-micron bulk CMOS devices and integrated circuits. Ionizing radiation experiments on shallow trench isolation (STI) field oxide MOS capacitors (FOXCAP) indicate a characteristic build-up of radiation-induced defects in the dielectric. In this paper, capacitors fabricated with STI, thermal, SIMOX and bipolar base oxides of similar thickness are compared and show the STI oxide to be most susceptible to radiation effects. Experimental data on irradiated shift registers and n-channel MOSFETs are also presented. These data indicate that radiation damage to the STI can increase the off-state current of n-channel devices and the standby current of CMOS integrated circuits

  1. Measurement of nonlinear refractive index and ionization rates in air using a wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Kimmel, Mark; Atherton, Briggs

    2012-04-09

    A wavefront sensor has been used to measure the Kerr nonlinear focal shift of a high intensity ultrashort pulse beam in a focusing beam geometry while accounting for the effects of plasma-defocusing. It is shown that plasma-defocusing plays a major role in the nonlinear focusing dynamics and that measurements of Kerr nonlinearity and ionization are coupled. Furthermore, this coupled effect leads to a novel way that measures the laser ionization rates in air under atmospheric conditions as well as Kerr nonlinearity. The measured nonlinear index n₂ compares well with values found in the literature and the measured ionization rates could be successfully benchmarked to the model developed by Perelomov, Popov, and Terentev (PPT model) [Sov. Phys. JETP 50, 1393 (1966)].

  2. Microfluidic thrombosis under multiple shear rates and antiplatelet therapy doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Li

    Full Text Available The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s(-1 and therapy concentrations (0-2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0-2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA, 3.5-40 Units/L for heparin using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose. Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment.

  3. Acceleration of skin wound healing by low-dose indirect ionizing radiation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Nasrollah; Farjah, Gholam Hossein; Ghadimi, Behnam; Zanjani, Hajar; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2017-08-01

    A recent hypothesis has revealed that low-dose irradiation (LDI) with ionizing radiation might have a promoting effect on fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of direct (electron beam) and indirect (gamma-ray) low-dose ionizing irradiations on the wound healing process in male rats. In 72 male rats, a full-thickness wound was incised. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups, each with 24 rats. The first two groups were named IG-I and IG-II and respectively exposed to electron and gamma-radiations (75 cGy) immediately after the surgical procedure. The third group was considered as the control (CG) and remained untreated. Skin biopsies from the subgroups were collected on days 3, 7, 15, and 21 after the operation and evaluated using histological and biomechanical methods. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS 20 software. Histological studies of tissues showed that the mean number of fibroblasts, macrophages, blood vessel sections, and neutrophils on the third and seventh days after the surgery in the gamma-treated group was higher than that in both other groups. In contrast, on day 21, the mean number of mentioned cells in the gamma-treated group was lower than in the other two groups. In addition, the mean maximum stress value was significantly greater in the gamma-treated group. Results of this study showed that gamma-ray irradiation is effective in the acceleration of wound healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. Acceleration of skin wound healing by low-dose indirect ionizing radiation in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Jabbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A recent hypothesis has revealed that low-dose irradiation (LDI with ionizing radiation might have a promoting effect on fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of direct (electron beam and indirect (gamma-ray low-dose ionizing irradiations on the wound healing process in male rats. In 72 male rats, a full-thickness wound was incised. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups, each with 24 rats. The first two groups were named IG–I and IG–II and respectively exposed to electron and gamma-radiations (75 cGy immediately after the surgical procedure. The third group was considered as the control (CG and remained untreated. Skin biopsies from the subgroups were collected on days 3, 7, 15, and 21 after the operation and evaluated using histological and biomechanical methods. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS 20 software. Histological studies of tissues showed that the mean number of fibroblasts, macrophages, blood vessel sections, and neutrophils on the third and seventh days after the surgery in the gamma-treated group was higher than that in both other groups. In contrast, on day 21, the mean number of mentioned cells in the gamma-treated group was lower than in the other two groups. In addition, the mean maximum stress value was significantly greater in the gamma-treated group. Results of this study showed that gamma-ray irradiation is effective in the acceleration of wound healing.

  5. Estimating average glandular dose by measuring glandular rate in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Sumimoto, Tetsuhiro; Eiho, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The glandular rate of the breast was objectively measured in order to calculate individual patient exposure dose (average glandular dose) in mammography. By employing image processing techniques and breast-equivalent phantoms with various glandular rate values, a conversion curve for pixel value to glandular rate can be determined by a neural network. Accordingly, the pixel values in clinical mammograms can be converted to the glandular rate value for each pixel. The individual average glandular dose can therefore be calculated using the individual glandular rates on the basis of the dosimetry method employed for quality control in mammography. In the present study, a data set of 100 craniocaudal mammograms from 50 patients was used to evaluate our method. The average glandular rate and average glandular dose of the data set were 41.2% and 1.79 mGy, respectively. The error in calculating the individual glandular rate can be estimated to be less than ±3%. When the calculation error of the glandular rate is taken into consideration, the error in the individual average glandular dose can be estimated to be 13% or less. We feel that our method for determining the glandular rate from mammograms is useful for minimizing subjectivity in the evaluation of patient breast composition. (author)

  6. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-01-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  7. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  8. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  9. VMATc: VMAT with constant gantry speed and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Fei; Romeijn, H Edwin; Epelman, Marina A; Jiang, Steve B

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the treatment plan optimization problem for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with constant gantry speed and dose rate (VMATc). In particular, we consider the simultaneous optimization of multi-leaf collimator leaf positions and a constant gantry speed and dose rate. We propose a heuristic framework for (approximately) solving this optimization problem that is based on hierarchical decomposition. Specifically, an iterative algorithm is used to heuristically optimize dose rate and gantry speed selection, where at every iteration a leaf position optimization subproblem is solved, also heuristically, to find a high-quality plan corresponding to a given dose rate and gantry speed. We apply our framework to clinical patient cases, and compare the resulting VMATc plans to idealized IMRT, as well as full VMAT plans. Our results suggest that VMATc is capable of producing treatment plans of comparable quality to VMAT, albeit at the expense of long computation time and generally higher total monitor units. (paper)

  10. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering

  11. GARDEC, Estimation of dose-rates reduction by garden decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Orihiko

    2006-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: GARDEC estimates the reduction of dose rates by garden decontamination. It provides the effect of different decontamination Methods, the depth of soil to be considered, dose-rate before and after decontamination and the reduction factor. 2 - Methods: This code takes into account three Methods of decontamination : (i)digging a garden in a special way, (ii) a removal of the upper layer of soil, and (iii) covering with a shielding layer of soil. The dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the external dose-rate, in the air, at a given height above the ground from a unit concentration of a specific radionuclide in each soil layer

  12. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to γ radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D 0 ) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury

  13. Beta induced Bremsstrahlung dose rate in concrete shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric study of beta-induced Bremsstrahlung in concrete is importance in the field of radiation protection. The efficiency, intensity and dose rate of beta induced Bremsstrahlung by 113 pure beta nuclides in concrete shielding is computed. The Bremsstrahlung dosimetric parameters such as the efficiency (yield), Intensity and dose rate of Bremsstrahlung are low for 199 Au and high for 104 Tc in concrete. The efficiency, Intensity and dose rate of Bremsstrahlung increases with maximum energy of beta nuclide (Emax) and modified atomic number (Zmod) of the target. The estimated Bremsstrahlung efficiency, Intensity and dose rate are useful in the calculations photon track-length distributions. These parameters are useful to determine the quality and quantity of the radiation (known as the source term). Precise estimation of this source term is very important in planning of radiation shielding. (author)

  14. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  15. Dose rate evaluation after accident in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladel, C.; Duchemin, B.; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, B.; Nimal, J.C.; Evrard, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    A calculation scheme for the gamma radiation dose rate after accident in a PWR is presented. These studies use a fine description of the geometry and of the fission product inventory. Some results are given and some improvements are planned

  16. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven ... and geological structures of soil and rocks. (Florou and Kritids 1992, ... Selection of Sampling Points and location of. Field Dosimeters.

  17. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  18. Dose rate from the square volume radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The expression for determining the dose rate from a three-dimensional square flat-parallel source of any dimensions is obtained. A simplified method for integrating the resultant expression is proposed. A comparison of the calculation results with the results by the Monte Carlo method has shown them to coincide within 6-8%. Since buildings and structures consist of rectangular elements, the method is recommended for practical calculations of dose rates in residential buildings

  19. Low Dose of Ionizing Radiation Effect on the Professionally Exposure Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojevic, V.; Joksic, T. G.; Pavelkic, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows the comparative medical results of the peripheral blood hematological biochemical analysis as well as chromosome aberration in the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood of the people professionally exposed to the small doses of the ionizing radiation.Selected group is formed of 54 x-rays radiotherapy technicians (22 male and 32 female) and 38 radio-diagnosis technicians (20 male, 18 female). The ophthalmology and occupational medical specialists medically examined them. The changes on eye-lenses such as cataract have not been confirmed in any of the examined group. In regard to the TLD-dosimeter's results, there were no oversteps in the allowed annual doses. The middle value of the exposed work experience (EWE) at x-ray radiotherapy technicians was 13 years and radio-diagnosis technician a 10 years. The middle value of the red blood cells (RBC) was 4.74? 1012/1 at radiodiagnosis and 4.93? 1012/1 at radio therapist while the middle values of hemoglobin (Hgb) were 13.91 g/l and 14.3 g/l respectively. The middle value of white blood cells (WBC) at a radiotherapy technician was 6.96 ? 1091 (granulocyte 66.34% and lymphocyte 27.39%), at radiodiagnosis technician 6.92? 109/l (granulocyte 63.94% and lymphocyte 28.17%). Analysis confirmed hematological biochemical changes at 4 radio diagnostics technicians (2 anemia, leucopenia and leucocytosis). the chromosome confirmed aberration analysis in white blood cells of peripheral blood that 16 technicians do have the changes of the dicenteric type and acentric fragment up to 14 technicians of the radio-diagnosis and at 2 radiotherapy technicians. At 3 radio diagnostic technician found lowered value of leukocytes followed by the changes of dicentric type of chromosomes but the results of one person showed that the while blood cells were essentially raised level 11.6? 109/l followed as well as with the changes on the chromosomes. All the examined workers that showed positive to any changes were subjectively healthy

  20. Beta particle dose rates to micro-organisms in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.; Spiers, F.W.; Iinuma, Takeshi.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were made to estimate the beta-particle dose rates to micro-organisms of various sizes in soil. The small insects and organisms living in soil are constantly exposed to beta-radiation arising from naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields them. The technique of measuring beta-particle dose rate consisted of using of a thin plastic scintillator to measure the pulse height distribution as the beta particle traverses the scintillator. The integrated response was determined by the number and size of the photomultiplier pulses. From the data of soil analyses it was estimated that typically about 29% of the beta particles emitted per gm. of soil were contributed by the U/Ra series, 21% by the Th series and about 50% by potassium. By combining the individual spectra of these three radionuclides in the proportion found in a typical soil, a resultant spectrum was computed representing the energy distribution of the beta particles. The dose rate received by micro-organisms of different shape and size in soil was derived from the equilibrium dose rates combined with a 'Geometrical Factor' of the organisms. For small organisms, the dose rates did not vary between the spherical and cylindrical types, but in the case of larger organisms, the dose rates were found to be greater for the spherical types of the same diameter. (auth.)

  1. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  2. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  3. Low dose ionizing radiation responses and knockdown of ATM kinase activity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Y.C.; Roberts, T.; Day, B.; Kozlov, S.; Walker, D.; Lavin, M.; Harding, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis of new cells in the mammalian brain has previously been regarded as a negligible event; an assumption that long limited our understanding in the development of neoplasias. The recent discovery of perpetual lineages derived from neural stem cells has resulted in a new approach to studying the cellular behaviour of potential cancer stem cells in the brain. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and lethal brain tumour is derived from a group of cancerous stem cells known as glioma stem cells. GBM cells are impervious to conventional therapies such as surgical resection and ionizing radiation because of their pluripotent and radioresistant properties. Thus in our study, we aim to investigate whether a combination of chemo- and radio- therapies is an effective treatment for glioma stem cells. The study utilizes a specific kinase inhibitor (ATMi) of the ATM (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein which is an essential protein in DNA-damage responses. In the presence of both low dose radiation and ATMi, glioma stem cells have rapid onset of cell death and reduction in growth. Since DNA damage can be inherited through cell division, accumulated DNA breaks in later generations may also lead to cell death. The limitation of conventional radiation therapy is that administration of fractionated (low) doses to reduce any potential harm to the surrounding healthy cells in the brain outweighs the benefits of high radiation doses to induce actual arrest in the propagation of malignant cells. Our study demonstrates a benefit in using low dose radiation combined with chemotherapy resulting in a reduction in malignancy of glioma stem cells. (author)

  4. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanisch, Per Henrik; Furre, Torbjoern; Olsen, Dag Rune; Pettersen, Erik O.

    2007-01-01

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T 1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  5. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 μSv per hour (20 μrem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNPtrademark are reported for materials typical of those being shipped

  6. Collective dose of irradiation of the population in the USSR as a result of using ionizing radiations with medical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knizhnikov, V.A.; Barkhudarov, R.M.; Lyass, F.M.; Likhtarev, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of the studies is determination of a genetically significant dose for the population of the USSR as a whole connected with the use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic purposes. On the base of the accepted relationship ''dose-effect'' an evaluation of a possible risk at the expense of X-ray and radioisotope diagnostic procedures is given. Data on dose loads on the gonads, bone marrow, critical organs and the body as a whole are presented. The risk of additional mortality due to newgrowths and genetic sequelae of mean dose loads is discussed

  7. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  8. Method for measuring and evaluation dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons in mixed gamma-neutron fields around particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruceru, I.; Sandu, M.; Cruceru, M.

    1994-01-01

    A method for measuring and evaluation of doses and dose equivalent rate in mixed gamma- neutron fields is discussed in this paper. The method is basedon a double detector system consist of an ionization chamber with components made from a plastic scintillator, coupled to on photomultiplier. Generally the radiation fields around accelerators are complex, often consisting of many different ionizing radiations extending over a broad range of energies. This method solve two major difficulties: determination of response functions of radiation detectors; interpretation of measurement and determination of accuracy. The discrimination gamma-fast neutrons is assured directly without a pulse shape discrimination circuit. The method is applied to mixed fields in which particle energies are situated in the energy range under 20 MeV and an izotropic emision (Φ=10 4 -10 11 n.s -1 ). The dose equivalent rates explored is 0.01mSV--0.1SV

  9. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  10. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  11. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of silicon. They obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, the authors study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates

  12. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  13. An estimate of the doubling dose of ionizing radiation for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    All accumulated data on the children of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors have been analyzed employing the revised procedures for estimating gonadal radiation exposures that became effective in 1986. The basic statistical procedure employed has been to obtain a linear regression of indicator on the combined gonadal exposures of the parents. There is no statistically significant regression of indicator on dose for any of the indicators; however, it is accepted that some mutations were produced in the survivors of the bombings. The implications of the data for the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans have been explored. The appropriate dose rate factor to be applied in extrapolating to the effect of chronic radiation is 2. This leads to a doubling dose estimate for the chronic irradiation of humans of between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. The error is large but indeterminate, but the estimate is based on conservative assumptions. (3 tabs.)

  14. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. - Highlights: • Establishment of a low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment simulator. • Escherichiacoli DH5α was selected as a bacterial representative for investigation. • Precise LDIR intensity for E. coli DH5α was calculated by FEA and plasma theory. • Development of system dynamics model of LDIR influence on E. coli DH5α population. • Mechanism of bacterial boom in LDIR environment was elucidated by computer simulation.

  15. High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial irradiation (IRT) of the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Lucas A.M.; Plas, Mirjam van der; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Hanssen, Alex E.J.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a newly developed technique to study radiation tolerance of rat spinal cord to continuous interstitial irradiation (IRT) at different dose rates. Material and methods: Two parallel catheters are inserted just laterally on each side of the vertebral bodies from the level of Th 10 to L 4 . These catheters are afterloaded with two 192 Ir wires of 4 cm length each (activity 1-2.3 mCi/cm) for the low dose rate (LDR) IRT or connected to the HDR micro-Selectron for the high dose rate (HDR) IRT. Spinal cord target volume is located at the level of Th 12 -L 2 . Due to the rapid dose fall-off around the implanted sources, a dose inhomogeneity across the spinal cord thickness is obtained in the dorso-ventral direction. Using the 100% reference dose (rate) at the ventral side of the spinal cord to prescribe the dose, experiments have been carried out to obtain complete dose response curves at average dose rates of 0.49, 0.96 and 120 Gy/h. Paralysis of the hind-legs after 5-6 months and histopathological examination of the spinal cord of each irradiated rat are used as experimental endpoints. Results: The histopathological damage seen after irradiation is clearly reflected the inhomogeneous dose distribution around the implanted catheters, with the damage predominantly located in the dorsal tract of the cord or dorsal roots. With each reduction in average dose rate, spinal cord radiation tolerance is significantly increased. When the dose is prescribed at the 100% reference dose rate, the ED 50 (induction of paresis in 50% of the animals) for the HDR-IRT is 17.3 Gy. If the average dose rate is reduced from 120 Gy/h to 0.96 or 0.49 Gy/h, a 2.9- or 4.7-fold increase in the ED 50 values to 50.3 Gy and 80.9 Gy is observed; for the dose prescribed at the 150% reference dose rate (dorsal side of cord) ED 50 values are 26.0, 75.5 and 121.4 Gy, respectively. Using different types of analysis and in dependence of the dose prescription and reference dose rate, the

  16. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose rate in a didactic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Phelipe Amaral Ferreira; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed in order to create a new didactic experiment in the X-ray apparatus of PHYWE, where the saturation current was obtained through a free air ionization chamber. The values of saturation currents were obtained in two ways. Initially, the anodic DDP was kept constant and the anodic current was varied. In the second way, the anodic current was kept constant while the anodic DDP was varied. Therefore, we were able to evaluate the dependence of the absolved dose rate in relation to the DDP and the tube current. (author)

  17. Influence of burn-in on total-ionizing-dose effect of SRAM device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Minbo; Yao Zhibin; Huang Shaoyan; He Baoping; Sheng Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The influence of Burn-in on the total-ionizing-dose (TID) effect of SRAM device was investigated. SRAM devices of three different feature sizes were selected and irradiated by "6"0Co source with or without pre-irradiation Burn-in. Some parameters for radiation effect of SRAM device such as upset data, were measured, and the influence on the TID effect of different feature size SRAM devices with or without pre-irradiation Burn-in was obtained. The influence of different temperature Burn-in on radiation resistant capability of SRAM device was studied for 0.25 μm SRAM device. The results show that the smaller the device feature size is, the better the radiation-resistant capability of SRAM device is and the weaker the influence of Burn-in is. And the higher Burn-in temperature is, the more serious the influence of Burn-in on the total-dose radiation effect is. (authors)

  18. Morphological analysis of amnion stored in glycerol sterilized with different doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fernando Augusto N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Martino Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci Diva B.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: fernandonevessoares@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CTR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes

    2013-07-01

    The amniotic membrane (AM) is the innermost layer of the fetal membranes (placenta), widely used in transplantation being a tissue that combines anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifibrotic, and limited immunogenicity. The tissue can be used a bandage biological for treatment of burns and skin wounds, chronic ulcers, reconstructions from different body areas, including ophthalmic repairs. In the last decades the amniotic membrane has been used widely also as a carrier substrate to transfer tissues cultured 'in vitro'. The use of fresh membrane has some limitations, the main ones are being necessary your quick use and the inability to obtain full security for certain infections. Other types of preservation require a processing thereof. The radiosterilization is an alternative for ensuring quality and safety of tissues used in transplants, and other clinical applications in order to minimize the risk of contamination of the receptor tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test various doses of radiation using two sources of ionizing radiation: the cobalt-60 irradiator Gamma and Electron Beam Accelerator (E.B.). A tissue analysis was done by visual and tactile qualitative analysis, semi-quantitative (solid colorimetry) and light microscopy to observe morphological and physic-chemical changes after the irradiation of AM preserved in glycerol, comparing the results obtained with the sample not irradiated. It was noted that at higher doses, for both radiation sources, irradiated membranes suffered greater color change, becoming yellowish and thereby reducing their initial malleability. (author)

  19. Morphological analysis of amnion stored in glycerol sterilized with different doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Fernando Augusto N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Martino Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci Diva B.; Mathor, Monica B.

    2013-01-01

    The amniotic membrane (AM) is the innermost layer of the fetal membranes (placenta), widely used in transplantation being a tissue that combines anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifibrotic, and limited immunogenicity. The tissue can be used a bandage biological for treatment of burns and skin wounds, chronic ulcers, reconstructions from different body areas, including ophthalmic repairs. In the last decades the amniotic membrane has been used widely also as a carrier substrate to transfer tissues cultured 'in vitro'. The use of fresh membrane has some limitations, the main ones are being necessary your quick use and the inability to obtain full security for certain infections. Other types of preservation require a processing thereof. The radiosterilization is an alternative for ensuring quality and safety of tissues used in transplants, and other clinical applications in order to minimize the risk of contamination of the receptor tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test various doses of radiation using two sources of ionizing radiation: the cobalt-60 irradiator Gamma and Electron Beam Accelerator (E.B.). A tissue analysis was done by visual and tactile qualitative analysis, semi-quantitative (solid colorimetry) and light microscopy to observe morphological and physic-chemical changes after the irradiation of AM preserved in glycerol, comparing the results obtained with the sample not irradiated. It was noted that at higher doses, for both radiation sources, irradiated membranes suffered greater color change, becoming yellowish and thereby reducing their initial malleability. (author)

  20. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Balter, Stephen; Rauch, Phillip; Wagner, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic

  1. Equivalent doses of ionizing radiation received by medical staff at a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuk, E.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Jazwinski, J.; Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Palijczuk, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Total annual activity of I-131 used for the treatment of thyroid disorders at the Dept.of Nuclear Medicine, Central Clinical Hospital, Military University School of Medicine, in Warsaw, Poland, equal to 190 GBq; at the same time, total activity of Tc-99m utilized at the same Department for diagnostic purposes reached 1 TBq. As estimated from the radiometer readings, in extreme cases the equivalent at a couple of measurement points at this Department may exceed 200 mSv per year. Thus, in the present study we aimed to assess the potential risk of the exposure of medical personnel of the Department to ionizing radiation. Material and Methods: Polymethacrylate cases each housing four thermoluminescent dosimeters were continuously worn for one year by the nurses and doctors with the dosimeters being replaced by the new ones every three months. In addition, cases containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (three dosimeters per case) were placed in 20 different measurement points across the Department and the monitoring of the doses was carried out continuously for more than six years (from May 1995 to March 2002). Based on the quarterly readings of the dosimeters, equivalent doses were calculated for both the members of the personnel and the measurement space points. Results: The doses registered in the patient rooms ranged 5 to 90 mSv x y -1 , in the application room 10 to 15 mSv x y -1 , in the laboratory rooms 1.5 to 30 mSv x y -1 , and in the waiting room 2 to 6 mSv x y -1 ; no increment above the background level was detected in the nurses' station. Accordingly, the annual doses calculated from the dosimeters worn by the staff ranged 0.2 to 1.1 mSv x y -1 ; these latter findings were confirmed by direct readings from individual film dosimeters additionally worn by the staff members. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that it is unlikely for the personnel of the monitored Nuclear Medicine Department to receive doses of radiation exceeding 40% of the annual

  2. Evaluating low dose ionizing radiation effects on gene expression in human skin biopsy cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Z.; Schwietert, C.; Stern, R.L.; Lehnert, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    Significant biological effects can occur in animals, animal cells, immortalized human cell lines, and primary human cells after exposure to doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in the <1-10 cGy region. However it is unclear how these observations mimic or even pertain to the actual in vivo condition in humans, though such knowledge is required for reducing the uncertainty of assessing human risks due to low dose IR (LDIR) exposures. Further, low dose effects have increasing clinical relevance in the radiotherapeutic management of cancer as the volume of tissue receiving only LDIR increases as more targeted radiotherapy (i.e. IMRT) becomes more widely used. Thus, human translational data must be obtained with which to correlate in vitro experimental findings and evaluate their 'real-life' applicability. To evaluate LDIR effects in human tissue we have obtained freshly explanted full thickness human skin samples obtained from aesthetic surgery, and subjected them to ex vivo irradiation as a translational research model system of a complex human tissue. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposures were delivered at 1, 10, or 100 cGy. The temporal response to IR was assessed by harvesting RNA at multiple time points out to 24 hours post IR. Gene expression changes were assessed by real time PCR. We have shown that RNA can be reliably extracted with fidelity from 3 mm diameter punch biopsies of human tissue and provide good quality sample for the real time PCR evaluation. Genes of interest include those reported to have altered expression following LDIR from in vitro cell culture models. These include genes associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and various cytokines. These feasibility studies in human skin irradiated ex vivo, have demonstrated that gene expression can be measured accurately from very small human tissue samples, thus setting the stage for biopsy acquisition of tissue irradiated in vivo from patients-volunteers. The clinical study has begun and the data from

  3. Todralazine protects zebra fish from lethal doses of ionizing radiation: role of hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimri, Manali; Joshi, Jaidev; Indracanti, Prem Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced cell killing and hematopoietic stem cell depletion leads to compromised immune functions and opportunistic infections which significantly affect the recovery and survival upon irradiation. Any agent which can expand residual hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated organism can render protection from the effects of lethal doses of ionizing radiation. Johns Hopkins Clinical compound library (JHCCL) was screened for protection against lethal doses of ionizing radiation using developing zebra fish as a model organism. Modulation of radiation induced reactive oxygen species by the small molecules were done by DCFDA staining and for visual identification and quantification of apoptosis acridine orange assay, flow cytometry were employed respectively. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion potential was assessed by quantifying runx1 expression, a marker for definitive stem cells, were done by RT-PCR and by the kinetics of recovery from chemically induced anaemia. Todralazine hydrochloride from JHCCL exhibited promising results with potential anti radiation effects. A dose of 5μM was found to be the most effective and has rendered significant organ and whole body protection (100% survival advantage over a period of 6 days) against 20 Gy. However todralazine did not modulated radiation induced free radicals (monitored within 2 h of irradiation) and apoptosis in zebra fish embryos analysed at 8 and 24h post irradiation. Flow cytometric quantification of pre G1 population suggested the same. Chemoinformatics approaches were further carried out to elucidate possible targets which are contributing to its radioprotection potential. Structural similarity search suggested several targets and possible hematopoietic stem cell expanding potential. Treatment of zebra fish embryos with todralazine has lead to significant proliferation of hematopoietic stem cell as indicated by increase in expression of runx1. HSC expanding potential of todralazine was further supported by

  4. Detection limits of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in molluscan shells as determined by e.p.r. spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Michalik, J.; Burlinska, G.; Sadlo, J.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Ostrowski, K.

    1995-01-01

    The exposure of waters to ionizing radiation from radionuclides imprisoned in dumped nuclear waste containers, freed in nuclear submarine accidents or released in underwater magma eruptions are difficult to be evaluated by conventional radiometric methods. Ionizing radiation evokes stable paramagnetic centers in crystalline lattice of mineral components in bone skeletons of mammals and fishes as well as in exoskeletons of mollusca. They give rise in e.p.r. to specific, extremely stable signals which are proposed to be applied as indicators of radiation exposure levels. In the present study the e.p.r. detection limits of the dose of ionizing radiation absorbed in shells of fresh water and marine mollusca (selected species) have been estimated. It has been found that with fresh water mollusca the dose of 1-2 Gy can be detected, while the sea water mollusca by one order of magnitude lower, i.e. about 0.1 Gy. (author)

  5. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  6. Ionization balance for Ti and Cr ions: effects of uncertainty in dielectronic recombination rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Il H

    2003-01-01

    The available electron-impact ionization cross sections for Ti and Cr ions are reviewed, and calculations of the ionization balance for the ions under coronal equilibrium are presented. The calculated ionic abundance fractions are compared with those of previous works. The effects of modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination on isoelectronic line ratios, which are formed using the same spectral line from two elements of slightly different atomic numbers, are discussed concentrating on high temperature ranges. Also discussed are the effects of modelling uncertainty on inter-ionization stage line ratios formed from adjacent ionization stages. It is demonstrated that the modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination tends to cancel out only when the isoelectronic line ratio of He-like ions is considered, and that the sensitivity of the isoelectronic line ratios to the modelling uncertainty tends to increase for less ionized stages. It is also found that the interstage line ratios are less sensitive to the typical ∼20% uncertainties of dielectronic rates than the isoelectronic line ratios, and that the interstage line ratio of He-to Li-like ions in Ti and Cr plasmas is a better choice for a temperature diagnostic in the temperature ranges from ∼0.6 to ∼1.5 keV in which Li-like ions have maximum ionic abundances

  7. Quantitative analysis of biological responses to low dose-rate γ-radiation, including dose, irradiation time, and dose-rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Because biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose, it is necessary to include dose, dose-rate and irradiation time simultaneously to predict the risk of low dose-rate irradiation. In this study, we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, irradiation time and dose-rate, using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells. For evaluation of chromosome breakage we assessed micronuclei induced by radiation. U2OS cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were exposed to gamma-ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60 Co. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide, and the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was determined by fluorescent microscopy. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [3H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. Dose-rate in the irradiation room was measured with photoluminescence dosimeter. While irradiation time less than 24 h did not affect dose-response curves for both biological responses, they were remarkably attenuated as exposure time increased to more than 7 days. These biological responses were dependent on dose-rate rather than dose when cells were irradiated for 30 days. Moreover, percentage of micronucleus-forming cells cultured continuously for more than 60 days at the constant dose-rate, was gradually decreased in spite of the total dose accumulation. These results suggest that biological responses at low dose-rate, are remarkably affected by exposure time, that they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in the case of long-term irradiation, and that cells are getting resistant to radiation after the continuous irradiation for 2 months. It is necessary to include effect of irradiation time and dose-rate sufficiently to evaluate risk

  8. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  9. Some changes of cholesterol, glucose and total proteins in serum of chicken after effect of low dose of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Novakova, J.; Benova, K.; Falis, M.; Sezstakova, E.; Toropila, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of investigate was the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on the organism of chicken. We investigated changes of concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in time gap 1, 3, 14 and 25 days after expose with a single whole-body gamma irradiation of 3 Gy. (authors)

  10. How to gain a better knowledge of the hazards of low doses of ionizing radiation to the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, L.

    1990-01-01

    The author shows that the approach chosen up to the present for obtaining knowledge of the hazards emanating from low-dose irradiation with ionizing radiation still relies exclusively on the metaphysical way, and that there is need for adding to this the way of scientific, basic research work. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakama, Minoru; Imura, Hiroyoshi; Akou, Natsuki; Takeuchi, Emi; Morihiro, Yukinori

    2004-01-01

    Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture has been carried out using a portable NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter and a CsI(Tl) pocket type one. To our knowledge, previous several surveys in Tokushima, for example by Abe et al. (1982) and Yoshino et al. (1991), have remained to report the environmental radiation dose rates merely about the major cities, that is Tokushima City and others along the Pacific. Up to now, there have been few efforts to survey the environmental radiation dose rates about mountain valleys in Tokushima. In this work, it is remarkable that we have for the first time made surveys of environmental radiation dose rates on the 6 routes across the Sanuki mountains and inside the pier of Onaruto Bridge, 'Naruto Uzu-no-michi', in the northern area of Tokushima. In the course of present surveys, the maximum value of the environmental radiation dose rates was 0.117±0.020 μGy/h at Higetouge in Sanuki City, and then it was found that the radiation dose rates across the Sanuki mountains tend to increase slightly with approaching Kagawa area from Tokushima one. Considering geological formation around the northern side of Sanuki mountains, there are mainly geological layers of granodiorite containing in the substantial amount of naturally occurring radionuclides, 40 K, U-series, and Th-series, than other geological rocks and it was found that the terrestrial gamma-rays have effect on the environmental radiation dose rates according to the geological formation. (author)

  12. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological evidence of low ionizing radiation doses; Biologischer Nachweis niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsch, Johanna

    2017-03-17

    Throughout life, every person is constantly exposed to different types of ionising radiation, without even noticing the exposure. The mean radiation exposure for people living in Germany amounts to approximately 4 mSv per year and encompasses the exposure from natural and man-made sources. The risks associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are still the subject of intense and highly controversial discussions, emphasizing the social relevance of studies investigating the effects of low radiation doses. In this thesis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were analyzed within three projects covering different aspects. DSBs are among the most hazardous DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation, because this type of damage can easily lead to the loss of genetic information. Consequently, the DSB presents a high risk for the genetic integrity of the cell. In the first project, extensive results uncovered the track structure of charged particles in a biological model tissue. This provided the first biological data that could be used for comparison with data that were measured or predicted using theoretical physical dosimetry methods and mathematical simulations. Charged particles contribute significantly to the natural radiation exposure and are used increasingly in cancer radiotherapy because they are more efficient in tumor cell killing than X- or γ-rays. The difference in the biological effects of high energy charged particles compared with X- or γ-rays is largely determined by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition and the track structure inducing a three-dimensional damage pattern in living cells. This damage pattern consists of cells directly hit by the particle receiving a high dose and neighboring cells not directly hit by primary particles but exposed to far-reaching secondary electrons (δ-electrons). These cells receive a much lower dose deposition in the order of a few mGy. The radial dose distribution of single particle tracks was

  14. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  15. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadao Hattori

    1997-01-01

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low-dose

  16. Dose dependence of complication rates in cervix cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.; Wolf-Rosenblum, S.

    1986-01-01

    The population selected for this study was a group of 410 Stage IIB and III squamous cell Ca cervix patients treated at the Radiumhemmet between the years 1958-1966. A total of 48 of these patients developed moderate-to-severe rectal and/or bladder complications. Of these, 33 were evaluable with respect to dose-dependence of complications, that is, complete intracavitary dose measurements and external beam dose calculations, no chemotherapy or electrocautery, and complete clinical radiotherapy records. A group of 57 randomly selected uninjured patients were used as controls. Results show good correlation between dose, expressed in TDF units, and complication rates for both rectal and bladder injuries. Severity of rectal injury was observed to increase with increase in dose, although no such correlation was observed for bladder injuries. Mean delays in the expression of symptoms of injury were 10 months for the rectum and 22 months for the bladder

  17. Dose dependence of complication rates in cervix cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C.G.; Wolf-Rosenblum, S.

    1986-01-01

    The population selected for this study was a group of 410 Stage IIB and III squamous cell Ca cervix patients treated at the Radiumhemmet between the years 1958-1966. A total of 48 of these patients developed moderate-to-severe rectal and/or bladder complications. Of these, 33 were evaluable with respect to dose-dependence of complications, that is, complete intracavitary dose measurements and external beam dose calculations, no chemotherapy or electrocautery, and complete clinical radiotherapy records. A group of 57 randomly selected uninjured patients were used as controls. Results show good correlation between dose, expressed in TDF units, and complication rates for both rectal and bladder injuries. Severity of rectal injury was observed to increase with increase in dose, although no such correlation was observed for bladder injuries. Mean delays in the expression of symptoms of injury were 10 months for the rectum and 22 months for the bladder.

  18. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear accidents of tremendous magnitude, such as those of Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011), mean that individuals living in the contaminated areas are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the dose-response relationship for effects of low doses of radiation is not still established. The present study was aimed at investigating in mice the early effects of low-dose internal radiation exposure on the kidney. Adult male (C57BL/6J) mice were divided into three groups. Two groups received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of cesium ( 137 Cs) with activities of 4000 and 8000Bq/kg bw. A third group (control group) received a single s.c. injection of 0.9% saline. To evaluate acute and subacute effects, mice (one-half of each group) were euthanized at 72h and 10 days post-exposure to 137 Cs, respectively. Urine samples were collected for biochemical analysis, including the measurement of F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) levels. Moreover, the concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured in renal tissue. Urinary excretion of total protein significantly increased at 72h in mice exposed to Cs4000. Uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased significantly at both times post-exposure in animals exposed to Cs8000. After 72h and 10d of exposure to Cs4000, a significant increase in the γ-glutamil transferase (GGT) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities was observed. In turn, F2-IsoP levels increased -mainly in the Cs4000 group- at 72h post-exposure. Following irradiation ( 137 Cs), the highest level of KIM-1 was corresponded to the Cs4000 group at 72h. Likewise, the main DNA damage was detected in mice exposed to Cs4000, mainly at 10d after irradiation. The alterations observed in several biomarkers suggest an immediate renal damage following exposure to low doses of IR (given as 137 Cs). Further investigations are required to clarify the

  19. Compendium of Current Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Results from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Chen, Dakai; Casey, Megan C.; Yau, Ka-Yen; Cochran, Donna J.; Label, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Mondy, Timothy K.; O'Bryan, Martha V.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Total ionizing dose and displacement damage testing was performed to characterize and determine the suitability of candidate electronics for NASA space utilization. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices. Displacement Damage, Optoelectronics, Proton Damage, Single Event Effects, and Total Ionizing Dose.

  20. Precedents For Authorization Of Contents Using Dose Rate Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-01-01

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  1. Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Dose Rate of West Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, A.; Ramli, A. T.; Saridan Wan Hassan, W. M.; Idris, H. N.; Basri, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    A study of terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) dose rate was conducted in west of Sarawak, covering Kuching, Samarahan, Serian, Sri Aman, and Betong divisions to construct a baseline TGR dose rate level data of the areas. The total area covered was 20,259.2 km2, where in-situ measurements of TGR dose rate were taken using NaI(Tl) scintillation detector Ludlum 19 micro R meter NaI(Tl) approximately 1 meter above ground level. Twenty-nine soil samples were taken across the 5 divisions covering 26 pairings of 9 geological formations and 7 soil types. A hyperpure Germanium detector was then used to find the samples' 238U, 232Th, and 40K radionuclides concentrations producing a correction factor Cf = 0.544. A total of239 measured data were corrected with Cf resulting in a mean Dm of 47 ± 1 nGy h-1, with a range between 5 nGy h-1 - 103 nGy h-1. A multiple regression analysis was conducted between geological means and soil types means against the corrected TGR dose rate Dm, generating Dg,s= 0.847Dg+ 0.637Ds- 22.313 prediction model with a normalized Beta equation of Dg,s= 0.605Dg+ 0.395Ds. The model has an 84.6% acceptance of Whitney- Mann test null hypothesis when tested against the corrected TGR dose rates.

  2. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  3. Investigations on MGy ionizing dose effects in thin oxides of micro-electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Raine, M.; Martinez, M.; Marcandella, C.; Duhamel, O.; Richard, N.; Leray, J.L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Goiffon, V.; Corbiere, F.; Rolando, S.; Molina, R.; Magnan, P. [ISAE, Universite de Toulouse, 10 avenue Edouard Belin, BP 54032, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR-5516, 42000, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    Total ionizing dose (TID) effects have been studied for a long time in micro-electronic components designed to operate in natural and artificial environments. In most cases, TID induces both charge trapping in the bulk of irradiated oxides and the buildup of interface traps located at semiconductor/dielectric interfaces. Such effects result from basic mechanisms driven by both the shape of the electric field which stands into the oxide and by fabrication process parameters inducing pre-existing traps in the oxide's bulk. From the pioneering studies based on 'thick' oxide technologies to the most recent ones dedicated to innovative technologies, most studies concluded that the impact of total ionizing dose effects reduces with the oxide thinning. This is specifically the case for the gate-oxide of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) for which it is generally considered that TID is not a major issue anymore at kGy dose ranges. TID effects are now mainly due to charge trapping in the field oxides such as Shallow Trench Isolation. This creates either parasitic conduction paths or Radiation-Induced Narrow Channel Effects (RINCE). Static current-voltage (I-V) electrical characteristics are then modified through a significant increase of the off-current of NMOS transistors or by shifting the whole I-V curves (of both NMOS and PMOS transistors). Based on these assumptions, no significant shift of I-V curves should be observed in modern bulk CMOS technologies. However, such phenomenon may not be directly extrapolated to higher TID ranges, typically of several MGy for which only few data are available in the literature. This paper presents evidences of large threshold voltage shifts measured at MGy dose levels despite the fact that transistors are designed in a submicron bulk technology which features a 7-nm thin gate-oxide on GO2 transistors dedicated to mixed analog/digital integrated circuits. Such electrical shifts are encountered

  4. Investigations on MGy ionizing dose effects in thin oxides of micro-electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Raine, M.; Martinez, M.; Marcandella, C.; Duhamel, O.; Richard, N.; Leray, J.L.; Goiffon, V.; Corbiere, F.; Rolando, S.; Molina, R.; Magnan, P.; Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total ionizing dose (TID) effects have been studied for a long time in micro-electronic components designed to operate in natural and artificial environments. In most cases, TID induces both charge trapping in the bulk of irradiated oxides and the buildup of interface traps located at semiconductor/dielectric interfaces. Such effects result from basic mechanisms driven by both the shape of the electric field which stands into the oxide and by fabrication process parameters inducing pre-existing traps in the oxide's bulk. From the pioneering studies based on 'thick' oxide technologies to the most recent ones dedicated to innovative technologies, most studies concluded that the impact of total ionizing dose effects reduces with the oxide thinning. This is specifically the case for the gate-oxide of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) for which it is generally considered that TID is not a major issue anymore at kGy dose ranges. TID effects are now mainly due to charge trapping in the field oxides such as Shallow Trench Isolation. This creates either parasitic conduction paths or Radiation-Induced Narrow Channel Effects (RINCE). Static current-voltage (I-V) electrical characteristics are then modified through a significant increase of the off-current of NMOS transistors or by shifting the whole I-V curves (of both NMOS and PMOS transistors). Based on these assumptions, no significant shift of I-V curves should be observed in modern bulk CMOS technologies. However, such phenomenon may not be directly extrapolated to higher TID ranges, typically of several MGy for which only few data are available in the literature. This paper presents evidences of large threshold voltage shifts measured at MGy dose levels despite the fact that transistors are designed in a submicron bulk technology which features a 7-nm thin gate-oxide on GO2 transistors dedicated to mixed analog/digital integrated circuits. Such electrical shifts are encountered

  5. Estimation of the transit dose component in high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Lozano Flores, F.J.; Lope Lope, R.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Current high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning systems usually calculate dose only from source stopping positions (stationary component), but fails to account for the administered dose when the source is moving (dynamic component or transit dose). Numerical values of this transit dose depends upon the source velocity, implant geometry, source activity and prescribed dose. In some HDR treatments using particular geometry the transit dose cannot be ignored because it increases the dose at the prescriptions points and also could increase potential late tissue complications as predicted by the linear quadratic model. International protocols recommend to verify this parameter. The aim of this paper has been to establish a procedure for the transit dose calculation for the Gammamed 12i equipment at the RT Department in the Clinical University Hospital (Zaragoza-Spain). A numeric algorithm was implemented based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving HDR source and the calculated results for the entrance-exit transit dose was compared with TLD measurements made in some discrete points. (author) [es

  6. Fast neutron dose equivalent rates in heavy ion target areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulmer, C.B.; Butler, H.M.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Mosko, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    At heavy ion accelerators, personnel access to areas near the target is sometimes important for successful performance of experiments. Radiation levels determine the amount of time that can be spent in these areas without exceeding maximum permissible exposures. Inasmuch as the fast neutrons contribute the major part of the Rem dose rates in these areas, knowledge of the fast neutron levels is important for planning permissive entry to target areas. Fast neutron dose rates were measured near thick medium mass targets bombarded with beams of C, N, O, and Ne ions. beam energies ranged from 3 to 16 MeV/amu. Dose rates (mrem/h) 1 meter from the target 90 degrees from the beam direction range from approx. 0.05 at MeV/amu to approx. 50 at 16 MeV/amu. These data should be helpful in planning permissive entry to heavy ion target areas

  7. Fast neutron dose equivalent rates in heavy ion target areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulmer, C.B.; Butler, H.M.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Mosko, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    At heavy ion accelerators, personnel access to areas near the target is sometimes important for successful performance of experiments. Radiation levels determine the amount of time that can be spent in these areas without exceeding maximum permissible exposures. Inasmuch as the fast neutrons contribute the major part of the Rem dose rates in these areas, knowledge of the fast neutron levels is important for planning permissive entry to target areas. Fast neutron dose rates were measured near thick medium mass targets bombarded with beams of C, N, O, and Ne ions. beam energies ranged from 3 to 16 MeV/amu. Dose rates (mrem/h) 1 meter from the target 90 degrees from the beam direction range from approx. 0.05 at MeV/amu to approx. 50 at 16 MeV/amu. These data should be helpful in planning permissive entry to heavy ion target areas.

  8. Three-dimensional Finite Elements Method simulation of Total Ionizing Dose in 22 nm bulk nFinFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikyriakou, Eleni, E-mail: ec3g12@soton.ac.uk; Potter, Kenneth; Redman-White, William; De Groot, C.H.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of Total Ionizing Dose using the Finite Elements Method. • Carrier generation, transport and trapping in the oxide. • Application in three-dimensional bulk FinFET model of 22 nm node. • Examination of trapped charge in the Shallow Trench Isolation. • Trapped charge dependency of parasitic transistor current. - Abstract: Finite Elements Method simulation of Total Ionizing Dose effects on 22 nm bulk Fin Field Effect Transistor (FinFET) devices using the commercial software Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is presented. The simulation parameters are extracted by calibrating the charge trapping model to experimental results on 400 nm SiO{sub 2} capacitors irradiated under zero bias. The FinFET device characteristics are calibrated to the Intel 22 nm bulk technology. Irradiation simulations of the transistor performed with all terminals unbiased reveal increased hardness up to a total dose of 1 MRad(SiO{sub 2}).

  9. The shape of dose-effect curves for diploid yeast cells irradiated with ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.

    1975-01-01

    In a cybernetic model for the radiation reactions in eukaryotic cells, after irradiation they are assumed to be in one of three states: (a) viable cells; (b) with repairable damage; and (c) with irreparable damage. Two biological counter reactions with certain time constants can be observed: (i) recovery from sublethal damage; and (ii) repair of potential lethal damage. The shape of the dose-effect curve is influenced in a characteristic way by the different occupation of these states of the cells and by the time constants of the biological counter reactions. The biochemical analysis of the biological counter reactions, recovery and repair, has shown that both are linked together by the energy pool in the cell. In this way changes in the slope of the dose-effect curve due to different metabolic states of the cells can be understood quantitatively. Also the complicated dependence of survival cells on the absorbed dose rate over a wide range can be explained quantitatively. (author)

  10. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  11. Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells - Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Producing the Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, Neil J. [Centre for Research In Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Chronic low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to cells, such as those that occur in contaminated environments, are widely reported to produce a variety of effects, from adverse effects to no effects to positive effects. In addition, bystander effects have been reported in some studies. For only relatively few of these effects have mechanistic explanations been reported but in many of those for which they have, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or the anti-oxidants that help to control their effects, have often been suggested to have a role. In general, it is assumed that either radiolysis of water or stress due to IR cause an increase in ROS and/or anti-oxidant activity, and hence the observed effects. The role of ROS in producing the effects reported at chronic low doses of radiation has infrequently been tested at either a theoretical or experimental level. Here we use a dynamic model of anti-oxidant capacity in cells to test the theoretical underpinnings of the ROS hypothesis together with genomic and proteomic experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana to test the molecular effects of IR in cells. The published model we have constructed for testing the interaction of IR and anti-oxidant systems (Smith et al, 2012) first calculates the amount of ROS produced by IR. Overall, at the dose rates that occur in contaminated environments the amount of ROS produced by IR is extremely small, certainly much smaller than is routinely produced in a cell during many metabolic processes. ROS from respiration leak out of mitochondria at significant rates and in plant cells ROS also leak out of photo-synthesizing chloroplasts. Although there is a variety of anti-oxidants in many cells, the nexus of their capacity is glutathione (GSH) which ultimately derives its reducing power from NADPH. We thus modeled the anti-oxidative capacity of a cell from the activity GSH and used predicted concentrations of ROS from IR to calculate the oxidative stress that they would cause via the

  12. Synergistic effects of total ionizing dose on single event upset sensitivity in static random access memory under proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yao; Guo Hong-Xia; Zhang Feng-Qi; Zhao Wen; Wang Yan-Ping; Zhang Ke-Ying; Ding Li-Li; Luo Yin-Hong; Wang Yuan-Ming; Fan Xue

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic effects of the total ionizing dose (TID) on the single event upset (SEU) sensitivity in static random access memories (SRAMs) were studied by using protons. The total dose was cumulated with high flux protons during the TID exposure, and the SEU cross section was tested with low flux protons at several cumulated dose steps. Because of the radiation-induced off-state leakage current increase of the CMOS transistors, the noise margin became asymmetric and the memory imprint effect was observed. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. Methodology for calibration of ionization chambers for X-ray of low energy in absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.T.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The beams of low energy X-ray (10 to 150 kV) are used in several places in the world to treat a wide variety of surface disorders, and between these malignancies. As in Brazil, at this moment, there is no calibration laboratory providing the control service or calibration of parallel plate ionization chambers, the aim of this project was to establish a methodology for calibration of this kind of ionization chambers at low energy X-ray beams in terms of absorbed dose to water using simulators in the LCI. (author)

  14. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  15. An overview of zinc addition for BWR dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, W.J. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the BWRs employing feedwater zinc addition to reduce primary system dose rates. It identifies which BWRs are using zinc addition and reviews the mechanical injection and passive addition hardware currently being employed. The impact that zinc has on plant chemistry, including the factor of two to four reduction in reactor water Co-60 concentrations, is discussed. Dose rate results, showing the benefits of implementing zinc on either fresh piping surfaces or on pipes with existing films are reviewed. The advantages of using zinc that is isotopically enhanced by the depletion of the Zn-64 precursor to Zn-65 are identified.

  16. The regulatory effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Ikaros-autotaxin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hana; Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Ikaros, a transcription factor containing zinc-finger motif, has known as a critical regulator of hematopoiesis in immune system. Ikaros protein modulates the transcription of target genes via binding to the regulatory elements of the genes promoters. However the regulatory function of Ikaros in other organelle except nuclear remains to be determined. This study explored radiation-induced modulatory function of Ikaros in cytoplasm. The results showed that Ikaros protein lost its DNA binding ability after LDIR (low-dose ionizing radiation) exposure. Cell fractionation and Western blot analysis showed that Ikaros protein was translocated into cytoplasm from nuclear by LDIR. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. We identified Autotaxin as a novel protein which potentially interacts with Ikaros through in vitro protein-binding screening. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that Ikaros and Autotaxin are able to bind each other. Autotaxin is a crucial enzyme generating lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a phospholipid mediator, which has potential regulatory effects on immune cell growth and motility. Our results indicate that LDIR potentially regulates immune system via protein-protein interaction of Ikaros and Autotaxin.

  17. Synthesis and degradation of cyclic nucleotides in brain after a high dose of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    Previous data from our laboratory have indicated that a high dose of ionizing radiation can deplete the cyclic nucleotides guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) on several areas of the rat brain. cGMP is more sensitive to radiation than cAMP and does not recover for at least 24 h after irradiation. The response of cAMP is transient and recovery occurs within 4 h. The purpose of the present paper is to determine whether alternations in the activity of the synthetic and degradative enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels could account for the observed effects. Guanylate and adenylate cyclase and cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities were determined 10 min after irradiation with 10,000 rad of high-energy electrons. No alteration was detected under these experimental conditions. The data suggest that the reduction in cyclic nucleotides is not a direct effect on their metabolic enzymes and is probably secondary to some as yet-undefined action of radiation on the brain

  18. Total Ionizing Dose effects in 130-nm commercial CMOS technologies for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gonella, L; Silvestri, M; Gerardin, S; Pantano, D; Re, V; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Ranieri, A

    2007-01-01

    The impact of foundry-to-foundry variability and bias conditions during irradiation on the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) response of commercial 130-nm CMOS technologies have been investigated for applications in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. n- and p-channel MOSFETs from three different manufacturers have been irradiated with X-rays up to more than 100 Mrad (SiO2). Even though the effects of TID are qualitatively similar, the amount of degradation is shown to vary considerably from foundry to foundry, probably depending on the processing of the STI oxide and/or doping profile in the substrate. The bias during irradiation showed to have a strong impact as well on the TID response, proving that exposure at worst case bias conditions largely overestimates the degradation a device may experience during its lifetime. Overall, our results increase the confidence that 130-nm CMOS technologies can be used in future HEP experiments even without Hardness-By-Design solutions, provided that constant monitoring of th...

  19. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  20. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  1. Dose rate determining factors of PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Kuge, Toshiharu; Nakano, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between dose rate trends and water chemistry has been studied to clarify the determining factors on the dose rates. Therefore dose rate trends and water chemistry of 11 PWR plants of KEPCO (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.) were summarized. It is indicated that the chemical composition of the oxide film, behaviour of corrosion products and Co-58/Co-60 ratio in the primary system have effected dose rate trends based on plant operation experiences for over 40 years. According to plant operation experiences, the amount of Co-58 has been decreasing with the increasing duration of SG (Steam Generator) usage. It is indicated that the stable oxide film formation on the inner surface of SG tubing, is a major beneficial factor for radiation sources reduction. On the other hand, the reduction of the amount of Co-60 for the long term has been not clearly observed especially in particular high dose plants. The primary water parameters imply that considering release and purification balance on Co-59 is important to prevent accumulation of source term in primary water. In addition, the effect of zinc injection, which relates to the chemical composition of oxide film, was also assessed. As the results, the amount of radioactive Co has been clearly decreased. The decreasing trend seems to correlate to the half-life of Co-60, because it is considered that the injected zinc prevents the uptake of radioactive Co into the oxide film on the inner surface of the components and piping. In this paper, the influence of water chemistry and the replacement experiences of materials on the dose rates were discussed. (author)

  2. Measures of association of some air pollutants. Natural ionizing radiation and cigarette smoking with mortality rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwing, R C; McDonald, G C

    1976-03-01

    Two methods are employed to estimate the association of hydrocarbons, sulfur compounds, nitrogen compounds, natural ionizing radiation, and cigarette smoking with some age stratified and disease specific United States mortality rates for white males. The first method is based on a ridge regression technique and the second on a sign constrained least squares analysis. It is concluded that increased concentration of sulfur compounds and increased consumption of cigarettes are associated with increases in the total white male mortality rate. Associations for nitrogen compounds, the hydrogen index, and ionizing radiation are dependent on methodology and data stratification. The estimated elasticities are not directly comparable to those from other studies. Most estimates are fairly close except for the associations of heart disease with sulfur compounds. (JTE)

  3. Comparison of traditional low-dose-rate to optimized and nonoptimized high-dose-rate tandem and ovoid dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, William E.; Erickson, Beth; Albano, Katherine; Gillin, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Few dose specification guidelines exist when attempting to perform high-dose-rate (HDR) dosimetry. The purpose of this study was to model low-dose-rate (LDR) dosimetry, using parameters common in HDR dosimetry, to achieve the 'pear-shape' dose distribution achieved with LDR tandem and ovoid applications. Methods and Materials: Radiographs of Fletcher-Suit LDR applicators and Nucletron 'Fletcher-like' HDR applicators were taken with the applicators in an idealized geometry. Traditional Fletcher loadings of 3M Cs-137 sources and the Theratronics Planning System were used for LDR dosimetry. HDR dosimetry was performed using the Nucletron Microselectron HDR UPS V11.22 with an Ir-192 source. Dose optimization points were initially located along a line 2 cm lateral to the tandem, beginning at the tandem tip at 0.5-cm intervals, ending at the sail, and optimized to 100% of the point A dose. A single dose optimization point was also placed laterally from the center of each ovoid equal to the radius of the ovoid (ovoid surface dose). For purposes of comparison, dose was also calculated for points A and B, and a point located 1 cm superior to the tandem tip in the plane of the tandem, (point F). Four- and 6-cm tandem lengths and 2.0-, 2.5-, and 3.0-cm ovoid diameters were used for this study. Based on initial findings, dose optimization schemes were developed to best approximate LDR dosimetry. Finally, radiographs were obtained of HDR applications in two patients. These radiographs were used to compare the optimization schemes with 'nonoptimized' treatment plans. Results: Calculated doses for points A and B were similar for LDR, optimized HDR, and nonoptimized HDR. The optimization scheme that used tapered dose points at the tandem tip and optimized a single ovoid surface point on each ovoid to 170% of point A resulted in a good approximation of LDR dosimetry. Nonoptimized HDR resulted in higher doses at point F, the bladder, and at points lateral to the tandem tip

  4. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  5. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  6. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of molecules: General Hartree-Fock-based integral representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Jensen, Frank; Dnestryan, Andrey I.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2017-07-01

    In the leading-order approximation of the weak-field asymptotic theory (WFAT), the dependence of the tunneling ionization rate of a molecule in an electric field on its orientation with respect to the field is determined by the structure factor of the ionizing molecular orbital. The WFAT yields an expression for the structure factor in terms of a local property of the orbital in the asymptotic region. However, in general quantum chemistry approaches molecular orbitals are expanded in a Gaussian basis which does not reproduce their asymptotic behavior correctly. This hinders the application of the WFAT to polyatomic molecules, which are attracting increasing interest in strong-field physics. Recently, an integral-equation approach to the WFAT for tunneling ionization of one electron from an arbitrary potential has been developed. The structure factor is expressed in an integral form as a matrix element involving the ionizing orbital. The integral is not sensitive to the asymptotic behavior of the orbital, which resolves the difficulty mentioned above. Here, we extend the integral representation for the structure factor to many-electron systems treated within the Hartree-Fock method and show how it can be implemented on the basis of standard quantum chemistry software packages. We validate the methodology by considering noble-gas atoms and the CO molecule, for which accurate structure factors exist in the literature. We also present benchmark results for CO2 and for NH3 in the pyramidal and planar geometries.

  7. The Increase in Animal Mortality Risk following Exposure to Sparsely Ionizing Radiation Is Not Linear Quadratic with Dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Haley

    Full Text Available The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII, which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS. It was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limited number of animal studies.We argue that the linear-quadratic model does not provide appropriate support to estimate the risk of contemporary exposures. In this work, we re-estimated DDREFLSS using 15 animal studies that were not included in BEIR VII's original analysis. Acute exposure data led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 0.9 to 3.0. By contrast, data that included both acute and protracted exposures led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 4.8 to infinity. These two estimates are significantly different, violating the assumptions of the linear-quadratic model, which predicts that DDREFLSS values calculated in either way should be the same.Therefore, we propose that future estimates of the risk of protracted exposures should be based on direct comparisons of data from acute and protracted exposures, rather than from extrapolations from a linear-quadratic model. The risk of low dose exposures may be extrapolated from these protracted estimates, though we encourage ongoing debate as to whether this is the most valid approach. We also encourage efforts to enlarge the datasets used to estimate the risk of protracted exposures by including both human and animal data, carcinogenesis outcomes, a wider range of exposures, and by making more radiobiology data publicly accessible. We believe that these steps will contribute to better estimates

  8. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Guzzi, G.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M.C.; Ripamonti, D.

    2006-01-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to 4 K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials

  9. Portable meter study of ionizing radiation Teletector in high rates of air kerma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damatto, Willian Behling; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established. Applied tests were: energy dependence and primarily overload with the new irradiation system. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs) and new calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. (author)

  10. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in high rate curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of high rate curietherapy. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment

  11. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in pulsed rate curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of pulsed rate curietherapy. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment

  12. The impact of the oxygen scavenger on the dose-rate dependence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC type polymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muzafar; Heilemann, Gerd; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Berg, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Recent developments in radiation therapy aimed at more precise dose delivery along with higher dose gradients (dose painting) and more efficient dose delivery with higher dose rates e.g. flattening filter free (FFF) irradiation. Magnetic-resonance-imaging based polymer gel dosimetry offers 3D information for precise dose delivery techniques. Many of the proposed polymer gels have been reported to exhibit a dose response, measured as relaxation rate ΔR2(D), which is dose rate dependent. A lack of or a reduced dose-rate sensitivity is very important for dosimetric accuracy, especially with regard to the increasing clinical use of FFF irradiation protocols with LINACs at high dose rates. Some commonly used polymer gels are based on Methacrylic-Acid-Gel-Initiated-by-Copper (MAGIC). Here, we report on the dose sensitivity (ΔR2/ΔD) of MAGIC-type gels with different oxygen scavenger concentration for their specific dependence on the applied dose rate in order to improve the dosimetric performance, especially for high dose rates. A preclinical x-ray machine (‘Yxlon’, E  =  200 kV) was used for irradiation to cover a range of dose rates from low \\dot{D} min  =  0.6 Gy min-1 to high \\dot{D} max  =  18 Gy min-1. The dose response was evaluated using R2-imaging of the gel on a human high-field (7T) MR-scanner. The results indicate that all of the investigated dose rates had an impact on the dose response in polymer gel dosimeters, being strongest in the high dose region and less effective for low dose levels. The absolute dose rate dependence \\frac{(Δ R2/Δ D)}{Δ \\dot{D}} of the dose response in MAGIC-type gel is significantly reduced using higher concentrations of oxygen scavenger at the expense of reduced dose sensitivity. For quantitative dose evaluations the relative dose rate dependence of a polymer gel, normalized to its sensitivity is important. Based on this normalized sensitivity the dose rate sensitivity was reduced distinctly

  13. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  14. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  15. Dose rate of restroon in facilities using radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Gwi [Dept. of uclear Medicine, Inha University hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); An, Seong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study is therefore aimed at measuring the surface dose rate and the spatial dose rate in and outside the radionuclide facility in order to ensure safety of the patients, radiation workers and family care-givers in their use of such equipment and to provide a basic framework for further research on radiation protection. The study was conducted at 4 restrooms in and outside the radionuclide facility of a general hospital in Incheon between May 1 and July 31, 2014. During the study period, the spatial contamination dose rate and the surface contamination dose rate before and after radiation use were measured at the 4 places−thyroid therapy room, PET center, gamma camera room, and outpatient department. According to the restroom use survey by hospitals, restrooms in the radionuclide facility were used not only by patients but also by family care-givers and some of radiation workers. The highest cumulative spatial radiation dose rate was 8.86 mSv/hr at camera room restroom, followed by 7.31 mSv/hr at radioactive iodine therapy room restroom, 2.29 mSv/hr at PET center restroom, and 0.26 mSv/hr at outpatient department restroom, respectively. The surface radiation dose rate measured before and after radiation use was the highest at toilets, which are in direct contact with patient's excretion, followed by the center and the entrance of restrooms. Unsealed radioactive sources used in nuclear medicine are relatively safe due to short half lives and low energy. A patient who received those radioactive sources, however, may become a mobile radioactive source and contaminate areas the patient contacts−camera room, sedation room, and restroom−through secretion and excretion. Therefore, patients administered radionuclides should be advised to drink sufficient amounts of water to efficiently minimize radiation exposure to others by reducing the biological half-life, and members of the public−family care-givers, pregnant women, and children−be as far away from

  16. Radiology Residents' Awareness about Ionizing Radiation Doses in Imaging Studies and Their Cancer Risk during Radiological Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goekce, Senem Divrik [I. Ikad Community Health Center, Health Directorate, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Gekce, Erkan [Samsun Maternity and Women' s Disease and Pediatrics Hospital, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Coskun, Melek [Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz May' s University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    Imaging methods that use ionizing radiation have been more frequent in various medical fields with advances in imaging technology. The aim of our study was to make residents be aware of the radiation dose they are subjected to when they conduct radiological imaging methods, and of cancer risk. A total of 364 residents participated in this descriptive study which was conducted during the period between October, 2008 and January, 2009. The questionnaires were completed under strict control on a one-to-one basis from each department. A X{sup 2}-test was used for the evaluation of data obtained. Only 7% of residents correctly answered to the question about the ionizing radiation dose of a posteroanterior (PA) chest X-ray. The question asking about the equivalent number of PA chest X-rays to the ionizing dose of a brain CT was answered correctly by 24% of residents; the same question regarding abdominal CT was answered correctly by 16% of residents, thorax CT by 16%, thyroid scintigraphy by 15%, intravenous pyelography by 9%, and lumbar spine radiography by 2%. The risk of developing a cancer throughout lifetime by a brain and abdominal CT were 33% and 28%, respectively. Radiologic residents should have updated knowledge about radiation dose content and attendant cancer risks of various radiological imaging methods during both basic medical training period and following practice period.

  17. Radiology Residents' Awareness about Ionizing Radiation Doses in Imaging Studies and Their Cancer Risk during Radiological Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divrik Gökçe, Senem; Coşkun, Melek

    2012-01-01

    Objective Imaging methods that use ionizing radiation have been more frequent in various medical fields with advances in imaging technology. The aim of our study was to make residents be aware of the radiation dose they are subjected to when they conduct radiological imaging methods, and of cancer risk. Materials and Methods A total of 364 residents participated in this descriptive study which was conducted during the period between October, 2008 and January, 2009. The questionnaires were completed under strict control on a one-to-one basis from each department. A χ2-test was used for the evaluation of data obtained. Results Only 7% of residents correctly answered to the question about the ionizing radiation dose of a posteroanterior (PA) chest X-ray. The question asking about the equivalent number of PA chest X-rays to the ionizing dose of a brain CT was answered correctly by 24% of residents; the same question regarding abdominal CT was answered correctly by 16% of residents, thorax CT by 16%, thyroid scintigraphy by 15%, intravenous pyelography by 9%, and lumbar spine radiography by 2%. The risk of developing a cancer throughout lifetime by a brain and abdominal CT were 33% and 28%, respectively. Conclusion Radiologic residents should have updated knowledge about radiation dose content and attendant cancer risks of various radiological imaging methods during both basic medical training period and following practice period. PMID:22438688

  18. Radiology Residents' Awareness about Ionizing Radiation Doses in Imaging Studies and Their Cancer Risk during Radiological Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goekce, Senem Divrik; Gekce, Erkan; Coskun, Melek

    2012-01-01

    Imaging methods that use ionizing radiation have been more frequent in various medical fields with advances in imaging technology. The aim of our study was to make residents be aware of the radiation dose they are subjected to when they conduct radiological imaging methods, and of cancer risk. A total of 364 residents participated in this descriptive study which was conducted during the period between October, 2008 and January, 2009. The questionnaires were completed under strict control on a one-to-one basis from each department. A X 2 -test was used for the evaluation of data obtained. Only 7% of residents correctly answered to the question about the ionizing radiation dose of a posteroanterior (PA) chest X-ray. The question asking about the equivalent number of PA chest X-rays to the ionizing dose of a brain CT was answered correctly by 24% of residents; the same question regarding abdominal CT was answered correctly by 16% of residents, thorax CT by 16%, thyroid scintigraphy by 15%, intravenous pyelography by 9%, and lumbar spine radiography by 2%. The risk of developing a cancer throughout lifetime by a brain and abdominal CT were 33% and 28%, respectively. Radiologic residents should have updated knowledge about radiation dose content and attendant cancer risks of various radiological imaging methods during both basic medical training period and following practice period.

  19. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagache, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere

  20. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  1. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagache, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere.

  2. HIGH-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY IN CARCINOMA CERVIX STAGE IIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya Maruthavanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced (IIB-IVA and early inoperable cases. The current standard of practice with curable intent is concurrent chemoradiation in which intracavitary brachytherapy is an integral component of radiotherapy. This study aims at assessing the efficacy of HDR ICBT (High-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy in terms local response, normal tissue reactions, and feasibility. METHODS AND MATERIALS A total of 20 patients of stage IIIB cancer of the uterine cervix were enrolled in the study and were planned to receive concurrent chemotherapy weekly along with EBRT (external beam radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 Fr. Suitability for ICBT was assessed at 40 Gy/20 Fr. 6/20 patients were suitable at 40 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 5.5 Gy to point A in 4 sessions (5.5 Gy/4 Fr. The remaining 14/20 patients completed 50 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 6 Gy to point A in 3 sessions (6 Gy/3 Fr. RESULTS A total of 66 intracavitary applications were done and only one application required dose modification due to high bladder dose, the pelvic control rate was 85% (17/20. 10% (2/20 had stable disease and 5% (1/20 had progressive disease at one year of follow up. When toxicity was considered only 15% developed grade I and grade II rectal complications. Patient compliance and acceptability was 100%. Patients were very comfortable with the short treatment time as compared with patients on LDR ICBT (low-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment interviewed during the same period. CONCLUSION This study proves that HDR brachytherapy is efficacious and feasible in carcinoma of cervix stage IIIB. It also proves that good dose distribution can be achieved with HDR intracavitary facility by the use of dose optimization. The short treatment time in HDR ICBT makes it possible to maintain this optimised dose distribution throughout the treatment providing a gain in the therapeutic ratio and

  3. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  4. Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lespukh, E.; Stegnar, P.; Yunusov, M.; Tilloboev, H.; Zyazev, G.; Kayukov, P.; Hosseini, A.; Strømman, G.; Salbu, B.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) was carried out at former uranium (U) mining and processing sites in Taboshar and at Digmai in Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments. 222 Rn/ 220 Rn measurements were carried out with field instruments for instantaneous measurements and then discriminative 222 Rn/ 220 Rn solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were used for longer representative measurements. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected U legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low to relatively low radiological risk. The radiation doses deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor 222 Rn and 220 Rn with their short-lived progenies did not exceed national or international standards. At none of the sites investigated did the average individual annual effective doses exceed 10 mSv, the recommended threshold value for the general public. A radiation hazard could be associated with exceptional situations, such as elevated exposures to ionizing radiation at the Digmai tailings site and/or in industrial facilities, where gamma and 222 Rn/ 220 Rn dose rates could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a hazard to the health of the resident public, with the exception of some specific situations. These issues should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation

  5. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandar, Dadong; Syarbaini, Sutarman; Bunawas, Kusdiana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world, comprising five main islands - Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua - as well as 30 archipelagoes totaling 17,508 islands with about 6000 of those inhabited. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is a research project conducted by National Nuclear Energy Agency since 2005 aiming to produce a baseline data map as an overview for planning purposes. In these three years 4 main islands has been measured. The grid system has been used in the research. In Sumatra Island the grid is 50 x 50 km 2 , while in Java 40 x 40 km 2 , in Kalimantan 60 x 60 km 2 , and in Sulawesi 40 x 40 km 2 . The gamma dose rates have been measured by Mini Gamma Ray Spectrometer Model GR-130 made by Exploranium-Canada. Figure 1 shows the map of outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia. Range of dose rate are in Sumatra from 22,96 ± 0,46 n Sv/h to 186,08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h, in Java 11,32 ± 0,72 n Sv/h to 127,54 ± 6,14 n Sv/h, in Kalimantan 10.72 ± 8.32 n Sv/h to 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h, and in Sulawesi 17.7 ± 11,5 n Sv/h to 467 ± 102 n Sv/h. The arithmetic and geometric mean of dose rate in Indonesia are 68 n Sv/h and 53 n Sv/h, respectively. In general, outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is in a normal range. There are some regions have anomaly of gamma dose rate, for examples at North Sumatra 186.08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h (N 2.12727, E 99.80909), at West Kalimantan 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h (S 1.39507, E 110.57584), at West Sulawesi 487 ± 103 n Sv/h (S 2.95781, E 118.86995), etc. These data is very useful as a radiation baseline in Indonesia. (author)

  6. Dose and dose rate effects on coherent-to-incoherent transition of precipitates upon irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengchao

    2006-01-01

    A typical precipitation hardened alloy, Cu-Co dilute alloy was selected to study the precipitation behavior and irradiation effect on precipitates. It is found that the principal effect of ion irradiation on the coherent precipitates is loss of coherency, and TEM cross-section observations show that the fraction of the incoherent precipitates is dependent on dose but not on dose rate during heavy ion irradiation.

  7. Total dose and dose rate models for bipolar transistors in circuit simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for total dose effects in bipolar junction transistors for use in circuit simulation. The components of the model are an electrical model of device performance that includes the effects of trapped charge on device behavior, and a model that calculates the trapped charge densities in a specific device structure as a function of radiation dose and dose rate. Simulations based on this model are found to agree well with measurements on a number of devices for which data are available.

  8. Understanding deposition rate loss in high power impulse magnetron sputtering: I. Ionization-driven electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenning, N; Huo, C; Raadu, M A; Lundin, D; Helmersson, U; Vitelaru, C; Stancu, G D; Minea, T

    2012-01-01

    The lower deposition rate for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) compared with direct current magnetron sputtering for the same average power is often reported as a drawback. The often invoked reason is back-attraction of ionized sputtered material to the target due to a substantial negative potential profile, sometimes called an extended presheath, from the location of ionization toward the cathode. Recent studies in HiPIMS devices, using floating-emitting and swept-Langmuir probes, show that such extended potential profiles do exist, and that the electric fields E z directed toward the target can be strong enough to seriously reduce ion transport to the substrate. However, they also show that the potential drops involved can vary by up to an order of magnitude from case to case. There is a clear need to understand the underlying mechanisms and identify the key discharge variables that can be used for minimizing the back-attraction. We here present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the problem of electric fields E z in the ionization region part of HiPIMS discharges, and their effect on the transport of ionized sputtered material. In particular, we have investigated the possibility of a ‘sweet spot’ in parameter space in which the back-attraction of ionized sputtered material is low. It is concluded that a sweet spot might possibly exist for some carefully optimized discharges, but probably in a rather narrow window of parameters. As a measure of how far a discharge is from such a window, a Townsend product Π Townsend is proposed. A parametric analysis of Π Townsend shows that the search for a sweet spot is complicated by the fact that contradictory demands appear for several of the externally controllable parameters such as high/low working gas pressure, short/long pulse length, high/low pulse power and high/low magnetic field strength. (paper)

  9. Ionizing acceleration of color center transformation in the low radiation dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, A.P.; Starodubtsev, V.A.; Chernov, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the study is investigation of annealing and colour centers transformation of known nature in lithium fluoride crystals at the γ-irradiation low doses. The controlled colour centers have been introduced by LiF monocrystal samples irradiation by protons with 6 MeV energy. The γ-radiation dose rate constitutes 25 Grxssup(-1). The variation of absorption spectra caused by proton and γ-irradiation in initial crystals and in the sample being twice exposed has been studied. It is shown that for LiF monocrystals in the γ-radiation low dose range (below 5 kGr) anomalous dependences of concentration of F-aggregate colour centers on the irradiation dose are observed. High efficiency in defects transformation can be caused by the chain of self-sustaining reactions. The observed N-type dependences caused defects decay and competition of the processes of capture of anionic vacancies by F- and F-aggregate centers

  10. Medium-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of medium-dose-rate (MDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICRT) for cervical cancer. Between May 1991 and March 2001, 80 patients with cervical cancer were treated with external radiotherapy combined with MDR-ICRT. Two patients were excluded from this study. The median age of patients was 61 years (range: 30-87 years). Seventy-five patients had pathologically proved squamous cell carcinoma, and 3 had adenocarcinoma. The patients were staged by Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) classification as follows: Stage IA (2), Stage IB (4), Stage IIA (5), Stage IIB (22), Stage IIIA (1), Stage IIIB (32), Stage IVA (5), Stage IVB (7). Median follow-up for survivor was 68 months (range: 12-131 months). The radiation therapy was based on a combination of ICRT and external pelvic irradiation. Patients with stages II, III and IVA were treated with whole-pelvic irradiation with respective total doses of 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Doses of 40, 30, 20, and 20 Gy parametrial irradiation were added with central shield pelvic irradiation for stages IB, II, III and IVA lesions respectively. For MDR-ICRT, from May 1991 to December 1995, point A dose were 40 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 38 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 28.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. And from January 1996 to March 2001, point A dose of 36 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 34 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 25.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. The median dose rate at point A was 1.7 Gy/hour (range: 1.3-2.2 Gy/hour). The 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 100%, 76%, 51% and 40% for stages I, II, III and IVA respectively. All patients with stage IVB died from the tumor with a median survival time of 12 months. The 5-year pelvic control rates