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Sample records for dose range dependence

  1. Simulation of the Nonlinear Dose Dependence of Stabilized Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R; Pagonis, V; Lawless, J L

    2010-01-01

    The dose dependence of the concentration of point defects in alkali-halides as well as other crystals, as exhibited by the dependence of the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and ESR on the dose of non-ionizing UV excitation is studied using numerical simulation. The relevant set of coupled rate equations are first written and plausible sets of trapping parameters are chosen. Instead of using simplifying assumptions previously used for reaching conclusions concerning this dose behavior, exact numerical solutions have now been reached. Depending on the parameters chosen, different dose dependencies are seen. In some cases, linear dose dependence is reached in a broad range. Sublinear dose dependence, close to a D 1/2 dependence when D is the dose of excitation can be reached when retrapping is stronger than trapping in other traps stabilizing the defects. When strong competition between stabilizing traps takes place, an initial linear range is observed followed by strong superlinearity and an approach to saturation. All these behaviors have been observed experimentally in TL measurements as well as ESR and optical absorption in different materials. Similarities and dissimilarities to linear and non-linear dose dependencies obtained experimentally and by simulations when ionizing irradiation is used for excitation are discussed.

  2. Wide-range neutron dose determination with CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneja, A.R.; Waker, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical density measurements of CR-30 irradiated with 252 Cf neutrons and chemically etched with 6.5 N KOH solution have been used to determine neutron absorbed doses between 0.1 and 10 Gy. Optimum etching conditions will depend upon the absorbed dose. Since it is not always possible to know the range of absorbed dose on a CR-39 dosemeter collected from personnel and area monitor stations in a criticality accident situation, a three-step two-hour chemical etch at 60 o C has been found to be appropriate. If after a total of six hours of chemical etching the optical density is found to be below 0.04 for 500 nm light (transmission > 90%) then further treatment in the form of electrochemical etching can be carried out to determine the lower absorbed dose. In this manner, absorbed doses below 0.1 Gy can be determined by counting tracks over a unit area. (author)

  3. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Roed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ortho-voltage energies are often used for treatment of patients’ superficial lesions, and also for small- animal irradiations. Polymer-Gel dosimeters such as MAGAT (Methacrylic acid Gel and THPC are finding increasing use for 3-dimensional verification of radiation doses in a given treatment geometry. For mega-voltage beams, energy dependence of MAGAT has been quoted as nearly energy-independent. In the kilo-voltage range, there is hardly any literature to shade light on its energy dependence.Methods: MAGAT was used to measure depth-dose for 250 kVp beam. Comparison with ion-chamber data showed a discrepancy increasing significantly with depth. An over-response as much as 25% was observed at a depth of 6 cm.Results and Conclusion: Investigation concluded that 6 cm water in the beam resulted in a half-value-layer (HVL change from 1.05 to 1.32 mm Cu. This amounts to an effective-energy change from 81.3 to 89.5 keV. Response measurements of MAGAT at these two energies explained the observed discrepancy in depth-dose measurements. Dose-calibration curves of MAGAT for (i 250 kVp beam, and (ii 250 kVp beam through 6 cm of water column are presented showing significant energy dependence.-------------------Cite this article as: Roed Y, Tailor R, Pinksy L, Ibbott G. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020232. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.32 

  4. Two separate dose-dependent effects of paroxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anette Green; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Nøhr-Jensen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate paroxetine's putative dose-dependent impact on pupil reaction and inhibition of the O-demethylation of tramadol. METHODS: Twelve healthy CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers participated in this double-blinded randomized five-way placebo controlled cross-over study; they received...... concentrations of (+/-)-tramadol and (+/-)-O-desmethyltramadol (M1) were determined. RESULTS: With placebo, the median maximum pupil diameter was 6.43 mm (range 5.45-7.75 mm) before tramadol and 6.22 mm (4.35-7.65 mm) after 50 mg of tramadol (P = 0.4935). Paroxetine resulted in a statistically significant, dose......-dependent dilatation of the pupil with a geometric mean difference of 1.17 (95% CI 1.10-1.24) after ingestion of 50 mg paroxetine (P inhibition...

  5. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  6. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  7. Properties of Wide-dose-range GafChromic Films for Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2007-01-01

    GafChromic films have been used at SPring-8 to detect the intensively irradiated parts and protect them from damage by being covered with shield or moved. To extend the usable dose range more widely, a new type of sensitive film EBT was investigated for the introduction. Calibration curves were obtained irradiated with 60Co γ rays and compared with those of other GafChromic films. For the application, these films were set in the white x-ray hutch and the dose distribution was measured. Ratio of doses given by EBT and XT-R indicated the degree of the photon spectrum hardness, which depended on the positions. As a result, dose range from 50 mGy to 300 kGy became available for dose distribution measurements, and a set of films having different energy responses was found to give information of photon spectra

  8. Angular dependence of shallow dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical response of a detector is discussed and compared to measurements of shallow dose with tissue and phantom response detectors. A definite energy dependent angular response of dose and measurement was observed which could not be explained by simple trigonometric arguments. The response is back scatter dependent and must be considered in detector design and dose measurements. It is not possible for standard detectors to follow this response

  9. The dependence of radiation response on the dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The linear-quadratic (LQ) model explains the dependence of total dose in a fractionated course on the dose per fraction, in a very wide range of tumour and normal tissue studies, providing the dose per fraction remains above 2 Gy. In the range 2-1 Gy per fraction, some experimental studies show less increase in total dose than predicted by LQ; a probable explanation is incomplete repair between fractions given 2 seen between 1 and 0.1 Gy per fraction. This cannot be explained by incomplete repair; a modified LQ model where α decreases sharply with increasing dose per fraction in the range 0-1 Gy fits these data. The basic LQ model describes data from neutron fractionation studies, so the relationship between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and X-ray dose per fraction can be expressed in terms of LQ parameters and fitted directly to RBE data. Results from different experiments, different assays and both top-up and full-course fractionation techniques, can all be included in one analysis. (author)

  10. Ionizing acceleration of color center transformation in the low radiation dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, A.P.; Starodubtsev, V.A.; Chernov, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the study is investigation of annealing and colour centers transformation of known nature in lithium fluoride crystals at the γ-irradiation low doses. The controlled colour centers have been introduced by LiF monocrystal samples irradiation by protons with 6 MeV energy. The γ-radiation dose rate constitutes 25 Grxssup(-1). The variation of absorption spectra caused by proton and γ-irradiation in initial crystals and in the sample being twice exposed has been studied. It is shown that for LiF monocrystals in the γ-radiation low dose range (below 5 kGr) anomalous dependences of concentration of F-aggregate colour centers on the irradiation dose are observed. High efficiency in defects transformation can be caused by the chain of self-sustaining reactions. The observed N-type dependences caused defects decay and competition of the processes of capture of anionic vacancies by F- and F-aggregate centers

  11. Pulse and integral optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Similarities and dissimilarities to thermoluminescence (TL) dose dependence and dose-rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.; Leung, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (Tl) are two possible methods to monitor the absorbed radiation in solid samples, and therefore are utilized for dosimetry. For this application, two properties are desirable, namely, linear dose dependence of the measured quantity and dose-rate independence. For Tl, different kinds of super linear dose dependence have been reported in the literature in different materials, and in some cases, dose-rate dependence has also been found. These have been explained as being the result of competition. In OSL, some recent works reported on super linear dose dependence in annealed samples. In the present work, we explain the possible occurrence of these phenomena in OSL by solving numerically the relevant rate equations governing the process during irradiation, relaxation and read-out (heating or light stimulation). The results show that for short pulse OSL, quadratic dose dependence can be expected when only one trapping state and one kind of recombination center are involved and when the excitation starts with empty traps and centers. With the short pulse OSL, the calculation also reveals a possible dose-rate effect. Under the same circumstances, the area under the OSL curve depends linearly on the dose. The dependence of the whole area under the OSL curve on the dose is shown to be super linear when a disconnected trapping state or radiationless center take part in the process. Also, dose-rate effect can be expected in these cases, although no experimental effect of this sort has been reported so far. In pulse OSL, the analogy is made between the measured intensity and the initial rise range of non-first order Tl, whereas for the total area OSL, there is a nearly full analogy with the dose behavior of the Tl maximum. (Author)

  12. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanea, Fahed [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim [Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Drive, RT 041, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States); Stantz, Keith M., E-mail: kstantz@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 and Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 West Walnut Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  13. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  14. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  15. Simplified method for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve for the low dose range from Gafchromic EBT3 film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Gotanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiochromic film dosimeters have a disadvantage in comparison with an ionization chamber in that the dosimetry process is time-consuming for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve. The purpose of this study was the development of a simplified method of creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve from radiochromic film within a short time. This simplified method was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 film with a low energy dependence and step-shaped Al filter. The simplified method was compared with the standard method. The density-absorbed dose calibration curves created using the simplified and standard methods exhibited approximately similar straight lines, and the gradients of the density-absorbed dose calibration curves were −32.336 and −33.746, respectively. The simplified method can obtain calibration curves within a much shorter time compared to the standard method. It is considered that the simplified method for EBT3 film offers a more time-efficient means of determining the density-absorbed dose calibration curve within a low absorbed dose range such as the diagnostic range.

  16. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinck, P.A.; Muller, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r 1 and r 2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T 1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R 1 = 1/T 1 and R 2 = 1/T 2 ) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields. (orig.)

  17. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, Kristina J.; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution. This can be estimated by measurement of a suitable analogue, e.g. a well-bleached aeolian sample, but this requires such an analogue to be available, and in addition the assumptions that the sample is in fact a) well-bleached, and b) has a similar dose rate heterogeneity to the fossil deposit. Finally, it is an implicit assumption in such analysis that any over-dispersion is not significantly dose dependent. In this study we have undertaken laboratory investigations of the dose dependency of over-dispersion using a well-bleached modern sample with an average measured dose of 36 ± 3 mGy. This sample was prepared as heated (750 °C for 1 h), bleached and untreated portions which were then given uniform gamma doses ranging from 100 mGy to 208 Gy. We show that for these samples the relative laboratory over-dispersion is not constant as a function of dose and that the over-dispersion is smaller in heated samples. We also show that the dim grains in the distributions have a greater over-dispersion than the bright grains, implying that insensitive samples will have greater values of over-dispersion than sensitive samples.

  18. Dose-dependent metabolic disposition of hydroxytyrosol and formation of mercapturates in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Pizarro, Nieves; Serra, Aida; Robledo, Patricia; Joglar, Jesús; Rubió, Laura; Hernaéz, Alvaro; Tormos, Carmen; Motilva, Ma José; Fitó, Montserrat; Covas, Maria-Isabel; Solà, Rosa; Farré, Magí; Saez, Guillermo; de la Torre, Rafael

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT), one of the major polyphenols present in olive oil, is known to possess a high antioxidant capacity. The aim of the present study was to investigate dose dependent (0, 1, 10 and 100 mg/kg) alterations in the metabolism of HT in rats since it has been reported that metabolites may contribute to biological effects. Special attention was paid to the activation of the semiquinone-quinone oxidative cycle and the formation of adducts with potential deleterious effects. Thus, we developed a novel analytical methodology to monitor the in vivo formation of the HT mercapturate, N-acetyl-5-S-cysteinyl-hydroxytyrosol in urine samples. Biomarkers of hepatic and renal toxicity were evaluated within the dose range tested. Following HT administration, dose-dependent effects were observed for the recovery of all the metabolites studied. At the lowest dose of 1 mg/kg, the glucuronidation pathway was the most relevant (25-30%), with lower recoveries for sulfation (14%), while at the highest dose of 100 mg/kg, sulfation was the most prevalent (75%). In addition, we report for the first time the formation of the mercapturate conjugate of HT in a dose-dependent manner. The biochemical data did not reveal significant toxic effects of HT at any of the doses studied. An increase in the GSH/GSSG ratio at the highest dose was observed indicating that the products of HT autoxidation are counteracted by glutathione, resulting in their detoxification. These results indicate that the metabolic disposition of HT is highly dependent on the dose ingested. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  20. Kinetic and dose dependencies of the SOS-induction in E.coli K-12 (uvrA) cells exposed to different UV doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komova, O.V.; Kandiano, E.S.; Malavina, G.; )

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic and dose dependencies of the SOS-induction in E. coli (uvrA) cells exposed to UV light were investigated. below 2 J/m 2 the rate of the SOS-induction increased with dose. Maximal level of the SOS-response was proportional to the UV dose. Pyrimidine dimers were necessary for the induction. In the dose range 2-10 J/m 2 the rate of SOS-induction decreased with dose. Dose-maximum response curve was non-linear. Pyrimidine dimers were not required for the induction. nature of the molecular events leading to the SOS-induction at low and high doses was discussed [ru

  1. The continual reassessment method: comparison of Bayesian stopping rules for dose-ranging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, S; Chevret, S

    2001-10-15

    The continual reassessment method (CRM) provides a Bayesian estimation of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in phase I clinical trials and is also used to estimate the minimal efficacy dose (MED) in phase II clinical trials. In this paper we propose Bayesian stopping rules for the CRM, based on either posterior or predictive probability distributions that can be applied sequentially during the trial. These rules aim at early detection of either the mis-choice of dose range or a prefixed gain in the point estimate or accuracy of estimated probability of response associated with the MTD (or MED). They were compared through a simulation study under six situations that could represent the underlying unknown dose-response (either toxicity or failure) relationship, in terms of sample size, probability of correct selection and bias of the response probability associated to the MTD (or MED). Our results show that the stopping rules act correctly, with early stopping by using the two first rules based on the posterior distribution when the actual underlying dose-response relationship is far from that initially supposed, while the rules based on predictive gain functions provide a discontinuation of inclusions whatever the actual dose-response curve after 20 patients on average, that is, depending mostly on the accumulated data. The stopping rules were then applied to a data set from a dose-ranging phase II clinical trial aiming at estimating the MED dose of midazolam in the sedation of infants during cardiac catheterization. All these findings suggest the early use of the two first rules to detect a mis-choice of dose range, while they confirm the requirement of including at least 20 patients at the same dose to reach an accurate estimate of MTD (MED). A two-stage design is under study. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Analytical probabilistic proton dose calculation and range uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Hennig, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the concept of analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) to calculate the mean and the standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions under the influence of range uncertainties in closed form. For APM, range uncertainties are modeled with a multivariate Normal distribution p(z) over the radiological depths z. A pencil beam algorithm that parameterizes the proton depth dose d(z) with a weighted superposition of ten Gaussians is used. Hence, the integrals ∫ dz p(z) d(z) and ∫ dz p(z) d(z)2 required for the calculation of the expected value and standard deviation of the dose remain analytically tractable and can be efficiently evaluated. The means μk, widths δk, and weights ωk of the Gaussian components parameterizing the depth dose curves are found with least squares fits for all available proton ranges. We observe less than 0.3% average deviation of the Gaussian parameterizations from the original proton depth dose curves. Consequently, APM yields high accuracy estimates for the expected value and standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions for two dimensional test cases. APM can accommodate arbitrary correlation models and account for the different nature of random and systematic errors in fractionated radiation therapy. Beneficial applications of APM in robust planning are feasible.

  3. Consideration of the volume dependence of tolerance doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gremmel, H.; Wendhausen, H.

    1977-01-01

    A general formula for consideration of the dependence of tolerance doses upon volume is obtained by mathematical evaluation of known skin tolerance doses. The validity for different organs is verified using available data of literature. It is recommended to introduce the volume dependence into the Ellis-formula for tolerance doses. (orig.) [de

  4. An analysis of ingestion doses from a range of postulated Magnox reactor releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.

    1985-06-01

    An analysis has been carried out of ingestion doses from a range of postulated Magnox reactor releases to atmosphere. Calculations were made of the dose to the adult, ten year old child and one year old child, which showed the one year old child to receive the highest dose. Detailed studies were made of the significance of the ingestion dose to the one year old child in relation to other exposure routes. The ingestion dose was also analysed in terms of the contributing critical organs, foods and nuclides. Approximate calculations were also made of the dependence of the ingestion dose on the time of year when the release occurs. The results of the analysis were used to derive a set of release-specific Emergency Action Guidance Levels (EAGLs) of critical nuclide concentrations in the critical foods, which comply with NRPB's ingestion ERL recommendations. The EAGLs were supplemented with a corresponding set of EAGLs for grass, for use in situations where crop samples were not readily available. (author)

  5. Linear dose dependence of ion beam mixing of metals on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Appleton, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were conducted to determine the dose dependences of ion beam mixing of various metal-silicon couples. V/Si and Cr/Si were included because these couples were previously suspected of exhibiting a linear dose dependence. Pd/Si was chosen because it had been reported as exhibiting only the square root dependence. Samples were cut from wafers of (100) n-type Si. The samples were cleaned in organic solvents, etched in hydrofluoric acid, and rinsed with methanol before mounting in an oil-free vacuum system for thin-film deposition. Films of Au, V, Cr, or Pd were evaporated onto the Si samples with a nominal deposition rate of 10 A/s. The thicknesses were large compared with those usually used to measure ion beam mixing and were used to ensure that conditions of unlimited supply were met. Samples were mixed with Si ions ranging in energy from 300 to 375 keV, chosen to produce ion ranges that significantly exceeded the metal film depth. Si was used as the mixing ion to prevent impurity doping of the Si substrate and to exclude a background signal from the Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectra. Samples were mixed at room temperature, with the exception of the Au/Si samples, which were mixed at liquid nitrogen temperature. The samples were alternately mixed and analyzed in situ without exposure to atmosphere between mixing doses. The compositional distributions after mixing were measured using RBS of 2.5-MeV 4 He atoms

  6. The impact of the oxygen scavenger on the dose-rate dependence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC type polymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muzafar; Heilemann, Gerd; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Berg, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Recent developments in radiation therapy aimed at more precise dose delivery along with higher dose gradients (dose painting) and more efficient dose delivery with higher dose rates e.g. flattening filter free (FFF) irradiation. Magnetic-resonance-imaging based polymer gel dosimetry offers 3D information for precise dose delivery techniques. Many of the proposed polymer gels have been reported to exhibit a dose response, measured as relaxation rate ΔR2(D), which is dose rate dependent. A lack of or a reduced dose-rate sensitivity is very important for dosimetric accuracy, especially with regard to the increasing clinical use of FFF irradiation protocols with LINACs at high dose rates. Some commonly used polymer gels are based on Methacrylic-Acid-Gel-Initiated-by-Copper (MAGIC). Here, we report on the dose sensitivity (ΔR2/ΔD) of MAGIC-type gels with different oxygen scavenger concentration for their specific dependence on the applied dose rate in order to improve the dosimetric performance, especially for high dose rates. A preclinical x-ray machine (‘Yxlon’, E  =  200 kV) was used for irradiation to cover a range of dose rates from low \\dot{D} min  =  0.6 Gy min-1 to high \\dot{D} max  =  18 Gy min-1. The dose response was evaluated using R2-imaging of the gel on a human high-field (7T) MR-scanner. The results indicate that all of the investigated dose rates had an impact on the dose response in polymer gel dosimeters, being strongest in the high dose region and less effective for low dose levels. The absolute dose rate dependence \\frac{(Δ R2/Δ D)}{Δ \\dot{D}} of the dose response in MAGIC-type gel is significantly reduced using higher concentrations of oxygen scavenger at the expense of reduced dose sensitivity. For quantitative dose evaluations the relative dose rate dependence of a polymer gel, normalized to its sensitivity is important. Based on this normalized sensitivity the dose rate sensitivity was reduced distinctly

  7. Kinetic and dose dependences of the SOS-induction in E.coli K-12 (uvrA) cells exposed to the different UV doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komova, O.V.; Kandiano, E.S.; Malavya, G.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetic and dose dependences of the SOS-induction in E.coli (uvrA) cells exposed to UV light were investigated. Below 2 J/m 2 the rate of the SOS-induction increased with dose. The maximal level of the SOS-response was proportional to the UV dose. Pyrimidine dimers were necessary for the induction. In the dose range 2-10 J/m 2 the rate of the SOS-induction decreased with dose. The dose-response curve was non-linear. Pyrimidine dimers were not required for the induction. The nature of the molecular events leading to the SOS-induction at low and high UV doses was discussed. (author)

  8. Non-monotonic dose dependence of the Ge- and Ti-centres in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, C.; Wagner, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose response of the Ge- and Ti-centres in quartz is studied over a large dose range. After an initial signal increase in the low dose range, both defects show a pronounced decrease in signal intensities for high doses. The model by Euler and Kahan [1987. Radiation effects and anelastic loss in germanium-doped quartz. Phys. Rev. B 35 (9), 4351-4359], in which the signal drop is explained by an enhanced trapping of holes at the electron trapping site, is critically discussed. A generalization of the model is then developed, following similar considerations by Lawless et al. [2005. A model for non-monotonic dose dependence of thermoluminescence (TL). J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, 737-753], who explained a signal drop in TL by an enhanced recombination rate with electrons at the recombination centre. Finally, an alternative model for the signal decay is given, based on the competition between single and double electron capture at the electron trapping site. From the critical discussion of the different models it is concluded that the double electron capture mechanism is the most probable effect for the dose response

  9. An analysis of ingestion doses from a range of postulated Magnox reactor releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was carried out of ingestion doses from a range of postulated Magnox reactor releases to the atmosphere. Doses to the adult, ten year old child and one year old child were calculated, which showed the one year old child to receive the highest dose. Detailed studies were made of the significance of the ingestion dose to the one year old child in relation to other exposure routes. The ingestion dose was analysed for its contributing critical organs, foods and nuclides. Approximate calculations were also made of the dependence of the ingestion dose on the time of year when the release occurs. The ingestion pathway was found to dominate if the release occurs towards the end of the growing season but to be less significant relative to other exposure pathways at all other times. The calculations enabled a set of release-specific emergency action guidance levels of critical nuclide concentrations in the critical foods to be produced, which comply with NRPB's ingestion Emergency Reference Level guidelines. (author)

  10. Contrast media and glomerular filtration: dose dependence of clearance for three agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeck, S.E.K.; Krutzen, E.; Nilsson-Ehle, P.

    1988-01-01

    Determination of plasma clearance of contrast agents has been advocated as a means to assess glomerular filtration rate. To evaluate the feasibility of different agents for this purpose, we have compared, in healthy volunteers, the dose dependence of plasma clearance for three contrast media (iohexol, a nonionic agent, and iothalamate and metrizoate, which are ionic substances), with special emphasis on the lower dose range (2-20 mL corresponding to 0.9-12.9 g, depending on dose and agent). Iohexol and iothalamate were cleared at constant rates, irrespective of given dose, whereas metrizoate clearance increased significantly at lower doses. In general, the clearances or iothalamate and metrizoate were, respectively, moderately and markedly higher than that of iohexol. The clearance of different doses of metrizoate (2 mL versus a radiographic dose of 40 mL or more) was also compared with the clearance of [ 51 Cr]EDTA in two groups of patients with reduced renal function. When compared with [ 51 Cr]EDTA in patients with renal dysfunction, metrizoate was cleared significantly faster after a 2-mL dose, whereas clearances were identical when the metrizoate dose was 40 mL or more. These findings indicate that tubular secretion plays an active role in the elimination of metrizoate. The pharmacokinetic properties of iohexol, in combination with its low toxicity, make it a suitable agent for determination of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice

  11. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  12. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R

    2006-06-07

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  13. Dose-Dependent Effects of Statins for Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Meta-Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Minh-Son; Prakash, Shivesh; Poonnoose, Santosh I; Bihari, Shailesh

    2018-05-01

    The study uses meta-regression analysis to quantify the dose-dependent effects of statin pharmacotherapy on vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND), and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Prospective, retrospective observational studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were retrieved by a systematic database search. Summary estimates were expressed as absolute risk (AR) for a given statin dose or control (placebo). Meta-regression using inverse variance weighting and robust variance estimation was performed to assess the effect of statin dose on transformed AR in a random effects model. Dose-dependence of predicted AR with 95% confidence interval (CI) was recovered by using Miller's Freeman-Tukey inverse. The database search and study selection criteria yielded 18 studies (2594 patients) for analysis. These included 12 RCTs, 4 retrospective observational studies, and 2 prospective observational studies. Twelve studies investigated simvastatin, whereas the remaining studies investigated atorvastatin, pravastatin, or pitavastatin, with simvastatin-equivalent doses ranging from 20 to 80 mg. Meta-regression revealed dose-dependent reductions in Freeman-Tukey-transformed AR of vasospasm (slope coefficient -0.00404, 95% CI -0.00720 to -0.00087; P = 0.0321), DIND (slope coefficient -0.00316, 95% CI -0.00586 to -0.00047; P = 0.0392), and mortality (slope coefficient -0.00345, 95% CI -0.00623 to -0.00067; P = 0.0352). The present meta-regression provides weak evidence for dose-dependent reductions in vasospasm, DIND and mortality associated with acute statin use after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the analysis was limited by substantial heterogeneity among individual studies. Greater dosing strategies are a potential consideration for future RCTs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging with thin detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, St. Akademicheskaya 1, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Schelin, H.R. [Pele Pequeno Principe Research Institute, Av. Silva Jardim 1632, Curitiba 80250-200 (Brazil); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Silva, R.C.L.; Kozuki, C.; Paschuk, S.A.; Milhoretto, E. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Since the earliest works proposing the use of protons for imaging, the main advantage of protons over X-rays was expected to be a result of the specific property of the proton flux dropping off very steeply at the end of the particle range. This idea was declared but was not checked. In the present work, this assumption was investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation for the case of registration of protons with a thin detector. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Principal idea of proton imaging 'to work at the end of the range' was tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The case of thin detector was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dose energy dependence was calculated using computer simulation.

  15. Dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slikker, William; Andersen, Melvin E.; Bogdanffy, Matthew S.; Bus, James S.; Cohen, Steven D.; Conolly, Rory B.; David, Raymond M.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Dorman, David C.; Gaylor, David W.; Hattis, Dale; Rogers, John M.; Woodrow Setzer, R.; Swenberg, James A.; Wallace, Kendall

    2004-01-01

    Scientists and decision makers from all sectors agree that risk assessments should be based on the best available science. Several years ago, the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI), a global branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), identified the need for better scientific understanding of dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity as one avenue by which the best and latest science can be integrated into the decision making process. In July 2001, the HESI Project Committee on Dose-Dependent Transitions in Mechanisms of Toxicity established a group of academic, government, and industry scientists to engage in active technical discourse on the issue of dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity. Over the next 18 months, case studies were examined. These case studies included acetaminophen, butadiene, ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, manganese, methylene chloride, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, progesterone/hydroxyflutamide, propylene oxide, vinyl acetate, vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, and zinc (Slikker, W., Jr., Andersen, M.E., Bogdanffy, M.S., Bus, J.S., Cohen, S.D., Conolly, R.B., David, R.M., Doerrer, N.G., Dorman, D.C., Gaylor, D.W., Hattis, D., Rogers, J.M., Setzer, R.W., Swenberg, J.A., Wallace, K., 2004. Dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity: case studies. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 201(3), 226-294 (this issue)). The HESI Project Committee sponsored two technical workshops in 2003. The first of these workshops took place on February 12-13, 2003, and was co-sponsored by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the American Chemistry Council, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Society of Toxicology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Additional support was provided by Health Canada. Invited experts from government, academia, and industry provided scientific perspectives and recommendations at the workshop. The purpose of

  16. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis

  17. TLD personnel monitoring dose estimation- extending the upper limit of the dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, K.L.; Sathian, Deepa; Divakaran, T.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    TLD personnel monitoring was introduced in the year 1975 in India and at present nearly 41,000 radiation workers are being monitored by 13 monitoring laboratories all over India. The BARC- TLD being used for personnel monitoring is based on CaSO 4 :Dy embedded in PTFE and semi-automatic TL reader using hot N 2 Gas for heating the dosimeters. This reader has the range to measure γ dose from ten μSv to 3 μSv and x-ray dose form 1 μ Sv to 0.3 Sv due to the higher sensitivity of CaSO 4 : Dy to lower energy photons (20keV-50 keV) generated by diagnostic x-ray units. The x-ray radiation workers are at present nearly 35% of the total radiation workers monitored and this number is expected to grow as more and more number of x-ray workers are covered under this service. The upper limit of the x-ray dose range of the instrument is 0.3 Sv, whereas in the past one year it has been observed that at least 25% of the total overexposures reported in case of x-ray workers have recorded the dose more than 0.3 Sv. This paper presents the technique developed to extend the upper limit of the range from 0.3 Sv to 1 Sv for x-rays and 10 Sv for γ rays

  18. Investigation of Kodak extended dose range (EDR) film for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Charland, Paule M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the measured optical density on the incident beam energy, field size and depth for a new type of film, Kodak extended dose range (Kodak EDR). Film measurements have been conducted over a range of field sizes (3x3 cm 2 to 25x25 cm 2 ) and depths (d max to 15 cm), for 6 MV and 15 MV photons within a solid water phantom, and the variation in sensitometric response (net optical density versus dose) has been reported. Kodak EDR film is found to have a linear response with dose, from 0 to 350 cGy, which is much higher than that typically seen for Kodak XV film (0-50 cGy). The variation in sensitometric response for Kodak EDR film as a function of field size and depth is observed to be similar to that of Kodak XV film; the optical density varied in the order of 2-3% for field sizes of 3x3 cm 2 and 10x10 cm 2 at depths of d max , 5 cm and 15 cm in the phantom. Measurements for a 25x25 cm 2 field size showed consistently higher optical densities at depths of d max , 5 cm and 15 cm, relative to a 10x10 cm 2 field size at 5 cm depth, with 4-5% differences noted at a depth of 15 cm. Fractional depth dose and profiles conducted with Kodak EDR film showed good agreement (2%/2 mm) with ion chamber measurements for all field sizes except for the 25x25 cm 2 at depths greater than 15 cm, where differences in the order of 3-5% were observed. In addition, Kodak EDR film measurements were found to be consistent with those of Kodak XV film for all fractional depth doses and profiles. The results of this study indicate that Kodak EDR film may be a useful tool for relative dosimetry at higher dose ranges. (author)

  19. Investigation of Kodak extended dose range (EDR) film for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Indrin J; Charland, Paule M

    2002-10-21

    We have investigated the dependence of the measured optical density on the incident beam energy, field size and depth for a new type of film, Kodak extended dose range (Kodak EDR). Film measurements have been conducted over a range of field sizes (3 x 3 cm2 to 25 x 25 cm2) and depths (d(max) to 15 cm), for 6 MV and 15 MV photons within a solid water phantom, and the variation in sensitometric response (net optical density versus dose) has been reported. Kodak EDR film is found to have a linear response with dose, from 0 to 350 cGy, which is much higher than that typically seen for Kodak XV film (0-50 cGy). The variation in sensitometric response for Kodak EDR film as a function of field size and depth is observed to be similar to that of Kodak XV film; the optical density varied in the order of 2-3% for field sizes of 3 x 3 cm2 and 10 x 10 cm2 at depths of d(max), 5 cm and 15 cm in the phantom. Measurements for a 25 x 25 cm2 field size showed consistently higher optical densities at depths of d(max), 5 cm and 15 cm, relative to a 10 x 10 cm2 field size at 5 cm depth, with 4-5% differences noted at a depth of 15 cm. Fractional depth dose and profiles conducted with Kodak EDR film showed good agreement (2%/2 mm) with ion chamber measurements for all field sizes except for the 25 x 25 cm2 at depths greater than 15 cm, where differences in the order of 3-5% were observed. In addition, Kodak EDR film measurements were found to be consistent with those of Kodak XV film for all fractional depth doses and profiles. The results of this study indicate that Kodak EDR film may be a useful tool for relative dosimetry at higher dose ranges.

  20. Analysis of the response dependence of Ebt3 radiochromic film with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scanning mode and humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon M, E. Y.; Camacho L, M. A.; Herrera G, J. A.; Garcia G, O. A.; Villarreal B, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    With the development of new modalities in radiotherapy treatments, the use of radiochromic films has increased considerably. Because the characteristics that presented, they are suitable for quality control and dose measurement. In this work and analysis of the dependence of the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scan mode and humidity, for a dose range of 0-70 Gy is presented. According to the results, the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films has low dependence on energy, dose rate, scan mode and humidity. However, the sensitivity of the response Ebt3 radiochromic films has a high dependence on the wavelength of the optical system used for reading. (Author)

  1. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic (registered) XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R [Struttura Complessa fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Corso Bramante 88, 10126 Turin (Italy)

    2006-06-07

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic (registered) films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  2. Study of the SEY dependence on the electron beams dose and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commisso, M.

    2011-01-01

    During operation, the internal walls of modern particle accelerators are subjected to synchrotron radiation irradiation and/or electron bombardment. Such phenomena do affect surface properties such as the secondary electron yield, (SEY). A low SEY is a key parameter to control and overcome any detrimental effect on the accelerator performance eventually induced by the build-up of an Electron Cloud (E C). In laboratory experiments SEY reduction (called scrubbing) has been studied as a function of dose but the actual kinetic energy dependence has never been considered as an important parameter. For this reason and given the peculiar behavior observed for low-energy electrons, we decided to study this dependence accurately. Here we report results of SEY measurements performed bombarding Cu samples obtained from the Large Hadron Collider (Lhc) with different doses of electron beam with energy in the range 10-500 eV. Our results demonstrate that the potentiality of an electron beam to reduce the SEY does not only depend on its dose, but also on its energy. Furthermore, since E C build-up was predicted and observed also the DAΦNE ring, we report some preliminary measurements on the conditioning of Al samples. An overview of future experiments which we will perform in LNF is then given.

  3. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  4. Dose-ranging pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulphonate (CMS) and colistin in rats following single intravenous CMS doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Sandrine; Lamarche, Isabelle; Gobin, Patrice; Couet, William

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of colistin methanesulphonate (CMS) dose on CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics in rats. Three rats per group received an intravenous bolus of CMS at a dose of 5, 15, 30, 60 or 120 mg/kg. Arterial blood samples were drawn at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. CMS and colistin plasma concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters of CMS and colistin were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. Linear relationships were observed between CMS and colistin AUCs to infinity and CMS doses, as well as between CMS and colistin C(max) and CMS doses. CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics were linear for a range of colistin concentrations covering the range of values encountered and recommended in patients even during treatment with higher doses.

  5. Delay differential equations and the dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D.

    2006-01-01

    The dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions impacts on the design of accelerated fractionation schedules--oral mucositis, for example, can be dose limiting for short treatments designed to avoid tumor repopulation. In this paper a framework for modeling early reaction dose-time dependence is developed. Variation of stem cell number with time after the start of a radiation schedule is modeled using a first-order delay differential equation (DDE), motivated by experimental observations linking the speed of compensatory proliferation in early reacting tissues to the degree of tissue damage. The modeling suggests that two types of early reaction radiation response are possible, stem cell numbers either monotonically approaching equilibrium plateau levels or overshooting before returning to equilibrium. Several formulas have been derived from the delay differential equation, predicting changes in isoeffective total radiation dose with schedule duration for different types of fractionation scheme. The formulas have been fitted to a wide range of published animal early reaction data, the fits all implying a degree of overshoot. Results are presented illustrating the scope of the delay differential model: most of the data are fitted well, although the model struggles with a few datasets measured for schedules with distinctive dose-time patterns. Ways of extending the current model to cope with these particular dose-time patterns are briefly discussed. The DDE approach is conceptually more complex than earlier descriptive dose-time models but potentially more powerful. It can be used to study issues not addressed by simpler models, such as the likely effects of increasing or decreasing the dose-per-day over time, or of splitting radiation courses into intense segments separated by gaps. It may also prove useful for modeling the effects of chemoirradiation

  6. Delay differential equations and the dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, John D

    2006-09-01

    The dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions impacts on the design of accelerated fractionation schedules--oral mucositis, for example, can be dose limiting for short treatments designed to avoid tumor repopulation. In this paper a framework for modeling early reaction dose-time dependence is developed. Variation of stem cell number with time after the start of a radiation schedule is modeled using a first-order delay differential equation (DDE), motivated by experimental observations linking the speed of compensatory proliferation in early reacting tissues to the degree of tissue damage. The modeling suggests that two types of early reaction radiation response are possible, stem cell numbers either monotonically approaching equilibrium plateau levels or overshooting before returning to equilibrium. Several formulas have been derived from the delay differential equation, predicting changes in isoeffective total radiation dose with schedule duration for different types of fractionation scheme. The formulas have been fitted to a wide range of published animal early reaction data, the fits all implying a degree of overshoot. Results are presented illustrating the scope of the delay differential model: most of the data are fitted well, although the model struggles with a few datasets measured for schedules with distinctive dose-time patterns. Ways of extending the current model to cope with these particular dose-time patterns are briefly discussed. The DDE approach is conceptually more complex than earlier descriptive dose-time models but potentially more powerful. It can be used to study issues not addressed by simpler models, such as the likely effects of increasing or decreasing the dose-per-day over time, or of splitting radiation courses into intense segments separated by gaps. It may also prove useful for modeling the effects of chemoirradiation.

  7. Moderate- vs high-dose methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, E C; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; Stitzer, M L

    1999-03-17

    Methadone hydrochloride treatment is the most common pharmacological intervention for opioid dependence, and recent interest has focused on expanding methadone treatment availability beyond traditional specially licensed clinics. However, despite recommendations regarding effective dosing of methadone, controlled clinical trials of higher-dose methadone have not been conducted. To compare the relative clinical efficacy of moderate- vs high-dose methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence. A 40-week randomized, double-blind clinical trial starting in June 1992 and ending in October 1995. Outpatient substance abuse treatment research clinic at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Campus, Baltimore, Md. One hundred ninety-two eligible clinic patients. Daily oral methadone hydrochloride in the dose range of 40 to 50 mg (n = 97) or 80 to 100 mg (n = 95), with concurrent substance abuse counseling. Opioid-positive urinalysis results and retention in treatment. By intent-to-treat analysis through week 30 patients in the high-dose group had significantly lower rates of opioid-positive urine samples compared with patients in the moderate-dose group (53.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 46.9%-59.2%] vs 61.9% [95% CI, 55.9%-68.0%]; P = .047. These differences persisted during withdrawal from methadone. Through day 210 no significant difference was evident between dose groups in treatment retention (high-dose group mean retention, 159 days; moderate-dose group mean retention, 157 days). Nineteen (33%) of 57 patients in the high-dose group and 11 (20%) of 54 patients in the moderate-dose group completed detoxification. Both moderate- and high-dose methadone treatment resulted in decreased illicit opioid use during methadone maintenance and detoxification. The high-dose group had significantly greater decreases in illicit opioid use.

  8. Energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose and object-detectability-dose curves for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Cohen, G.

    1982-01-01

    The energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose (CdD) and object-detectability-dose (OdD) curves for computed tomographic scanners is investigated. The effects of changes in beam energy on perceptibility are shown to be due to changes in signal-to-noise ratio resulting from changes in contrast and photon statistics. Energy-dependence analysis of OdD curves is shown to depend on the atomic composition of the phantom used to generate the curves, while such an analysis of CdD curves is independent of the atomic composition of the phantom. It is also shown that any OdD curve can be generated from CdD curves and that use of this fact rectifies any potential energy-dependent interpretation of CdD curves

  9. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karan, T [Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program.

  10. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karan, T; Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program

  11. Dose rate and SDD dependence of commercially available diode detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-rate dependence of commercially available diode detectors was measured under both high instantaneous dose-rate (pulsed) and low dose rate (continuous, Co-60) radiation. The dose-rate dependence was measured in an acrylic miniphantom at a 5-cm depth in a 10x10 cm 2 collimator setting, by varying source-to-detector distance (SDD) between at least 80 and 200 cm. The ratio of a normalized diode reading to a normalized ion chamber reading (both at SDD=100 cm) was used to determine diode sensitivity ratio for pulsed and continuous radiation at different SDD. The inverse of the diode sensitivity ratio is defined as the SDD correction factor (SDD CF). The diode sensitivity ratio increased with increasing instantaneous dose rate (or decreasing SDD). The ratio of diode sensitivity, normalized to 4000 cGy/s, varied between 0.988 (1490 cGy/s)-1.023 (38 900 cGy/s) for unirradiated n-type Isorad Gold, 0.981 (1460 cGy/s)-1.026 (39 060 cGy/s) for unirradiated QED Red (n type), 0.972 (1490 cGy/s)-1.068 (38 900 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad Red (n type), 0.985 (1490 cGy/s)-1.012 (38 990 cGy/s) for n-type Pt-doped Isorad-3 Gold, 0.995 (1450 cGy/s)-1.020 (21 870 cGy/s) for n-type Veridose Green, 0.978 (1450 cGy/s)-1.066 (21 870 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad-p Red, 0.994 (1540 cGy/s)-1.028 (17 870 cGy/s) for p-type preirradiated QED, 0.998 (1450 cGy/s)-1.003 (21 870 cGy/s) for the p-type preirradiated Scanditronix EDP20 3G , and 0.998 (1490 cGy/s)-1.015 (38 880 cGy/s) for Scanditronix EDP10 3G diodes. The p-type diodes do not always show less dose-rate dependence than the n-type diodes. Preirradiation does not always reduce diode dose-rate dependence. A comparison between the SDD dependence measured at the surface of a full scatter phantom and that in a miniphantom was made. Using a direct adjustment of radiation pulse height, we concluded that the SDD dependence of diode sensitivity can be explained by the instantaneous dose-rate dependence if sufficient buildup is

  12. Prednisolone dose-dependently influences inflammation and coagulation during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kruif, Martijn D.; Lemaire, Lucienne C.; Giebelen, Ida A.; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.; Pater, Jennie M.; van den Pangaart, Petra S.; Groot, Angelique P.; de Vos, Alex F.; Elliott, Peter J.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The effects of steroids on the outcome of sepsis are dose dependent. Low doses appear to be beneficial, but high doses do not improve outcome for reasons that are insufficiently understood. The effects of steroids on systemic inflammation as a function of dose have not previously been studied in

  13. Dosimetric performance of an enhanced dose range radiographic film for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    Film-based quality assurance (QA) is an important element of any intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) program. XV2 film is often used for IMRT QA, however, it has saturation and energy response limitations which hinder accurate film dosimetry. A new commercially released ready-pack film has been introduced that has an extended dose range (EDR2), reportedly allowing measured doses above 600 cGy without saturation. Also, this film may have less energy dependence due to its composition. The purpose of this paper is to study and compare the two types of film with respect to absolute dose accuracy for IMRT plans, percent depth dose accuracy for square fields between 2 and 20 cm, ability to measure composite plan isodoses and single beam fluence maps for IMRT cases, and sensitivity to processor variations over time. In 19 IMRT patient QA tests, the EDR2 film was able to achieve an absolute dose accuracy of better than 2% vs over 4% for XV2 film. The EDR2 film was able to reproduce ionization chamber and diode-measured percent depth doses to 20 cm depth generally to within 1% over the range of field sizes tested compared to about 10% for the XV2 film. When compared to calculations, EDR2 film agreed better than XV2 film for both composite plan isodoses and single beam fluence intensity maps. The EDR2 film was somewhat more resistant to processor changes over time than the XV2 film, with a standard deviation of dose reproducibility of less than 2% compared to 6%, respectively

  14. Space-Time Dependent Transport, Activation, and Dose Rates for Radioactivated Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazza, Sergio

    Two methods are developed to calculate the space - and time-dependent mass transport of radionuclides, their production and decay, and the associated dose rates generated from the radioactivated fluids flowing through pipes. The work couples space- and time-dependent phenomena, treated as only space- or time-dependent in the open literature. The transport and activation methodology (TAM) is used to numerically calculate space- and time-dependent transport and activation of radionuclides in fluids flowing through pipes exposed to radiation fields, and volumetric radioactive sources created by radionuclide motions. The computer program Radionuclide Activation and Transport in Pipe (RNATPA1) performs the numerical calculations required in TAM. The gamma ray dose methodology (GAM) is used to numerically calculate space- and time-dependent gamma ray dose equivalent rates from the volumetric radioactive sources determined by TAM. The computer program Gamma Ray Dose Equivalent Rate (GRDOSER) performs the numerical calculations required in GAM. The scope of conditions considered by TAM and GAM herein include (a) laminar flow in straight pipe, (b)recirculating flow schemes, (c) time-independent fluid velocity distributions, (d) space-dependent monoenergetic neutron flux distribution, (e) space- and time-dependent activation process of a single parent nuclide and transport and decay of a single daughter radionuclide, and (f) assessment of space- and time-dependent gamma ray dose rates, outside the pipe, generated by the space- and time-dependent source term distributions inside of it. The methodologies, however, can be easily extended to include all the situations of interest for solving the phenomena addressed in this dissertation. A comparison is made from results obtained by the described calculational procedures with analytical expressions. The physics of the problems addressed by the new technique and the increased accuracy versus non -space and time-dependent methods

  15. Real-life effectiveness of omalizumab in severe allergic asthma above the recommended dosing range criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, M; Gillman, A; Sutherland, M; Wark, P; Bowden, J; Guo, M; Reddel, H K; Jenkins, C; Marks, G B; Thien, F; Rimmer, J; Katsoulotos, G P; Cook, M; Yang, I; Katelaris, C; Bowler, S; Langton, D; Wright, C; Bint, M; Yozghatlian, V; Burgess, S; Sivakumaran, P; Yan, K Y; Kritikos, V; Peters, M; Baraket, M; Aminazad, A; Robinson, P; Jaffe, A; Powell, H; Upham, J W; McDonald, V M; Gibson, P G

    2016-11-01

    Omalizumab (Xolair) dosing in severe allergic asthma is based on serum IgE and bodyweight. In Australia, patients eligible for omalizumab but exceeding recommended ranges for IgE (30-1500 IU/mL) and bodyweight (30-150 kg) may still receive a ceiling dose of 750 mg/4 weeks. About 62% of patients receiving government-subsidized omalizumab are enrolled in the Australian Xolair Registry (AXR). To determine whether AXR participants above the recommended dosing ranges benefit from omalizumab and to compare their response to within-range participants. Data were stratified according to dose range status (above-range or within-range). Further sub-analyses were conducted according to the reason for being above the dosing range (IgE only vs. IgE and weight). Data for 179 participants were analysed. About 55 (31%) were above recommended dosing criteria; other characteristics were similar to within-range participants. Above-range participants had higher baseline IgE [812 (IQR 632, 1747) IU/mL vs. 209 (IQR 134, 306) IU/mL] and received higher doses of omalizumab [750 (IQR 650, 750) mg] compared to within-range participants [450 (IQR, 300, 600) mg]. At 6 months, improvements in Juniper 5-item Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5, 3.61 down to 2.01 for above-range, 3.47 down to 1.93 for within-range, P omalizumab have significantly improved symptom control, quality of life and lung function to a similar degree to within-range participants, achieved without dose escalation above 750 mg. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics of apigenin trimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Mai Gamal; Lin, Hai-Shu

    2018-06-15

    Apigenin trimethyl ether (5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone, ATE), one of the key polymethoxyflavones present in black ginger (rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora) possesses various health-promoting activities. To optimize its medicinal application, the pharmacokinetics of ATE was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats with emphases to identify the impacts from dose and repeated dosing on its major pharmacokinetic parameters. Plasma ATE levels were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Upon single intravenous administration (2 mg/kg), plasma levels of ATE declined through an apparent first-order process while dose-escalation to 4 and 8 mg/kg led to its non-linear disposition, which could be described by the Michaelis-Menten model. Similarly, dose-dependent oral pharmacokinetics was confirmed and when the dose was escalated from 5 to 15 and 45 mg/kg, much longer mean residence time (MRT 0→last ), higher dose-normalized maximal plasma concentration (C max /Dose) and exposure (AUC/Dose) were observed at 15 and/or 45 mg/kg. One-week daily oral administration of ATE at 15 mg/kg caused its accelerated elimination and the plasma exposure (AUC) after intravenous (2 mg/kg) and oral administration (15 mg/kg) dropped ~40 and 60%, respectively. As ATE displayed both dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics, caution is needed in the medicinal applications of ATE and/or black ginger. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity: case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slikker, William; Andersen, Melvin E.; Bogdanffy, Matthew S.; Bus, James S.; Cohen, Steven D.; Conolly, Rory B.; David, Raymond M.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Dorman, David C.; Gaylor, David W.; Hattis, Dale; Rogers, John M.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Swenberg, James A.; Wallace, Kendall

    2004-01-01

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed with increasing exposures, signaling the emergence of new modalities of toxic tissue injury at these higher doses. Therefore, dose-dependent transitions in principal mechanisms of toxicity may occur, and could have significant impact on the interpretation of reference data sets for risk assessment. To illustrate the existence of dose-dependent transitions in mechanisms of toxicity, a group of academic, government, and industry scientists, formed under the leadership of the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI), developed a series of case studies. These case studies included acetaminophen, butadiene, ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, manganese, methylene chloride, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), progesterone/hydroxyflutamide, propylene oxide, vinyl acetate, vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, and zinc. The case studies formed the basis for technical discourse at two scientific workshops in 2003

  18. Applichation of the sulphate ceric dosimetric in the high doses range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, F.

    1991-01-01

    The ceric-cerous dosimetric system is one of the system more employed in the high dose dosimetry. The spectrophotometric procedure to measure the ceric-concentration is an usual analityc method to determine the absorbed dose. On the other hand, due at increase employ of the irradiation process control. In this paper is realized the ceric-cerous dosimetric calibration in the dose range of 0,6 - 5 kGy and the application in the irradiation process control to differents absorbed dose values

  19. Dosimetric properties of the 'Pille' portable, wide dose range TLD reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, P.P.; Feher, I.; Deme, S.; Szabo, B.; Vagvoelgyi, J.

    1986-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of a portable TLD reader are described. The TLD system named 'Pille' or 'moth' consists of a lightweight battery-operated portable TLD reader and its CaSO 4 :Dy bulb dosemeters. The reproducibility of the TLD system at constant temperature was found to be better than + -2%, and the mean time between failures exceeded 5 years. The dose range of the system is wide, covering more than 6 orders of magnitude, from 5 μGy to 10 Gy. The energy dependence of the CaSO 4 :Dy bulb dosemeters is less than + - 20% above 100 keV in the energy compensation capsules. Without additional annealing, the bulb dosemeters can be re-used at least 100 times, which is an important aspect during in situ measurements. (author)

  20. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H E , as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized

  1. Propagation in a waveguide with range-dependent seabed properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Charles W

    2010-11-01

    The ocean environment contains features affecting acoustic propagation that vary on a wide range of time and space scales. A significant body of work over recent decades has aimed at understanding the effects of water column spatial and temporal variability on acoustic propagation. Much less is understood about the impact of spatial variability of seabed properties on propagation, which is the focus of this study. Here, a simple, intuitive expression for propagation with range-dependent boundary properties and uniform water depth is derived. It is shown that incoherent range-dependent propagation depends upon the geometric mean of the seabed plane-wave reflection coefficient and the arithmetic mean of the cycle distance. Thus, only the spatial probability distributions (pdfs) of the sediment properties are required. Also, it is shown that the propagation over a range-dependent seabed tends to be controlled by the lossiest, not the hardest, sediments. Thus, range-dependence generally leads to higher propagation loss than would be expected, due for example to lossy sediment patches and/or nulls in the reflection coefficient. In a few instances, propagation over a range-dependent seabed can be calculated using range-independent sediment properties. The theory may be useful for other (non-oceanic) waveguides.

  2. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism is dose-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Robinson, E.L.; Sutton, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation-induced hypopituitarism has been studies prospectively for up to 12 years in 251 adult patients treated for pituitary disease with external radiotherapy, ranging in dose from 20 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days to 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 21 days. Ten further patients were studied 2-4 years after whole-body irradiation for haematological malignancies using 12 Gy in six fractions over 3 days and seven patients were studied 3-11 years after whole-brain radiotherapy for a primary brain tumour (30 Gy, eight fractions, 11 days). Five years after treatment, patients who received 20 Gy had an incidence of TSH deficiency of 9% and in patients treated with 35-37 Gy, 40 Gy and 42-45 Gy, the incidence of TSH deficiency increased significantly with increasing dose. A similar relationship was observed for both ACTH and gonadotrophin deficiencies when the 20 Gy group was compared to patients treated with 35-45 Gy. Growth hormone deficiency was universal by 5 years over the dose range 35-45 Gy. In seven patients who were treated with 30 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days, deficiencies were observed at a similar frequency to the 40 Gy group (15 fractions, 21 days). No evidence of pituitary dysfunction was detected in the ten patients who received 12 Gy (six fractions, 3 days). (author)

  3. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  4. Dependence of the average life span, mortality and osteosarcoma occurence in rats on the radiation dose absorbed (Sr 90)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedov, V.L.; Panteleev, L.I.

    1975-01-01

    The dose dependence of mortality and osteosarcoma development frequency is studied in white rats which have received 0.00005-5.0μCi/day of strontium-90 throughout their lives. It is shown that total mortality in the dose range 0-10 krad is a more sensitive test than osteosarcoma frequency, osteosarcomatosis hardly reducing the mean life span of the irradiated rats. (author)

  5. Dose dependent disposition of gallium-67 in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive gallium-67 has been employed as a diagnostic and follow-up agent for cancer therapy. Currently gallium nitrate is undergoing Phase I clinical studies. A million fold increase in the concentration of the carrier gallium citrate over the range of carrier-free gallium-67 (pgm) to 1.0 μg caused no significant alteration in the disposition of gallium-67 in rats.Gallium-67 was eliminated from blood with a biological t1/2 of 4.1 days. A linear tissue binding profile was observed for gallium-67 over this concentration range. A multi-compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed in which all the tissues studied were treated as separate compartments. At 1.0 mg dose level, significant alteration in the disposition of gallium-67 was observed in rats, > 95% of the initial radioactivity was characteristic reappearance of the radioactivity in the blood approximately 4 hours after dosing leading to a ''hump'' in the blood concentration-time profiles. Following the 1.0 mg dose low tissue levels were observed, except for the kidneys, which contained about 8% of the administered dose per gram of the tissue one-half hour after dosing. A non-linear tissue binding profile was observed to be associated with gallium at high doses. It was hypothesized that the rapid loss of gallium-67 from the vascular system following the high doses of gallium citrate was due to the accumulation of the drug in the kidneys where it was eventually eliminated via urine. The kidneys thus would act as a temporary storage site for gallium. It was concluded that the dose-related renal toxicity associated with gallium therapy may be attributed to the kidney's role as a temporary storage site following high doses

  6. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  7. Dose-dependent EEG effects of zolpidem provide evidence for GABA(A) receptor subtype selectivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, S A G; Wolters, F L C; van der Graaf, P H; Peletier, L A; Danhof, M

    2003-03-01

    Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine GABA(A) receptor modulator that binds in vitro with high affinity to GABA(A) receptors expressing alpha(1) subunits but with relatively low affinity to receptors expressing alpha(2), alpha(3), and alpha(5) subunits. In the present study, it was investigated whether this subtype selectivity could be detected and quantified in vivo. Three doses (1.25, 5, and 25 mg) of zolpidem were administered to rats in an intravenous infusion over 5 min. The time course of the plasma concentrations was determined in conjunction with the change in the beta-frequency range of the EEG as pharmacodynamic endpoint. The concentration-effect relationship of the three doses showed a dose-dependent maximum effect and a dose-dependent potency. The data were analyzed for one- or two-site binding using two pharmacodynamic models based on 1) the descriptive model and 2) a novel mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for GABA(A) receptor modulators that aims to separates drug- and system-specific properties, thereby allowing the estimation of in vivo affinity and efficacy. The application of two-site models significantly improved the fits compared with one-site models. Furthermore, in contrast to the descriptive model, the mechanism-based PK/PD model yielded dose-independent estimates for affinity (97 +/- 40 and 33,100 +/- 14,800 ng x ml(-1)). In conclusion, the mechanism-based PK/PD model is able to describe and explain the observed dose-dependent EEG effects of zolpidem and suggests the subtype selectivity of zolpidem in vivo.

  8. A wide range survey meter for estimating γ- and β-dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1980-09-01

    A survey meter has been developed to measure β-dose rates in the range 0.1 - 100 rad/h (1 mGy/h - 1 Gy/h) and γ-dose rates in the range 1 mrad/h - 100 rad/h (10 μGy/h-1 Gy/h). It also provides an audible warning of high γ-dose rates and an audible and visible warning when a predetermined γ-dose is exceeded. The report describes the design of the survey meter and presents data measured on the performance of an engineering prototype. Factors which affect performance and have been investigated are temperature, battery voltage (and type of battery), GM counter counting loss, direction of incident radiation, and energy of γ-rays. Finally, the application and calibration of the survey meter are discussed. (auth)

  9. Evolution of density-dependent movement during experimental range expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronhofer, E A; Gut, S; Altermatt, F

    2017-12-01

    Range expansions and biological invasions are prime examples of transient processes that are likely impacted by rapid evolutionary changes. As a spatial process, range expansions are driven by dispersal and movement behaviour. Although it is widely accepted that dispersal and movement may be context-dependent, for instance density-dependent, and best represented by reaction norms, the evolution of density-dependent movement during range expansions has received little experimental attention. We therefore tested current theory predicting the evolution of increased movement at low densities at range margins using highly replicated and controlled range expansion experiments across multiple genotypes of the protist model system Tetrahymena thermophila. Although rare, we found evolutionary changes during range expansions even in the absence of initial standing genetic variation. Range expansions led to the evolution of negatively density-dependent movement at range margins. In addition, we report the evolution of increased intrastrain competitive ability and concurrently decreased population growth rates in range cores. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding movement and dispersal as evolving reaction norms and plastic life-history traits of central relevance for range expansions, biological invasions and the dynamics of spatially structured systems in general. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Mutation induction and neoplastic transformation in human and human-hamster hybrid cells: dependence on photon energy and modulation in the low-dose range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberg, D.; Frankenberg-Schwager, M.; Garg, I.; Pralle, E. [Abt. Klin. Strahlenbiologie und Klin. Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Uthe, D.; Greve, B.; Severin, E.; Goehde, W. [Institut fuer Strahlenbiologie, Universitaet Muenster, Munster (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Mutation induction in the HPRT gene of human fibroblasts after irradiation with mammography-like 29 kVp or 200 kVp x-rays shows radiohypersensitivity for doses smaller than {approx}0.5 Gy. Similarly, mutation induction in the CD 59 gene on human chromosome 11 in A{sub L} cells shows radiohypersensitivity for doses smaller than {approx}0.5 Gy after exposure to 200 kVp x-rays, but not after irradiation with low-filtered 30 kVp x-rays. The RBE values of 29 and 30 kVp x-rays relative to 200 kVp x-rays are strongly dose dependent. For neoplastic transformation of human hybrid (CGL1) cells after irradiation with 29 or 200 kVp x-rays or {sup 60}Co gamma rays a linear-quadratic dose relationship was observed with RBE values of approximately four and eight for mammography relative to 200 kVp x-rays and {sup 60}Co gamma rays, respectively. (author)

  11. TREATMENT OF STEROID DEPENDENT ASTHMATICS WITH LOW DOSES OF CYCLOSPORINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Šuškovič

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Asthmatics with glucocorticoid dependent asthma should be treated with systemic steroids. Cyclosporine is in many ways a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Cyclosporine is sometimes very effective in treating asthmatics and could allow us to lower the dose of oral steroid. In some randomized, double blind studies steroid dependent asthmatics were treated 12–36 weeks with cyclosporine in dose 5 mg/kg/day. We tried cyclosporine in steroid dependent asthmatics in shorter course and in lower dose.Methods. 13 steroid dependent asthmatics were in the first four weeks of the study treated by their own drugs (phase 1. Then they were for the next four weeks (phase 2 randomly and in double blind fashion treated with either cyclosporine (mean 1.7 mg/kg/day, SD 0.5, 6 patients – group 1 or by identical placebo (7 patients – group 2. To the patients in the group 2 serum concentration of cyclosporine was measured on the eight day of the study.Results. Morning peak expiratory flow (PEF raised significantly in group 1 (200 L/sec to 247 L/sec or for 23%. Patients in group1 had significantly less episodes of nocturnal asthma (2.2 episodes/night to 1.5 episodes/night or for 32%. In group 2 were not found any changes between first phase and second phase of the study. Steroid consumption did not change in any group. Mean serum concentration of cyclosporine in patients of group1 was 35.7 µg/L. We did not find any adverse effects of cyclosporine or placebo.Conclusions. Cyclosporine could have dangerous side effects, which are dependent on its serum concentration. So it should be administered in the lowest possible dose and for the most possible short period. In our study it was found that it is possible to successfully treat steroid dependent asthmatics with lower daily dose and for shorter time, than was found in other similar studies.

  12. Medical and Psychiatric Effects of Long-Term Dependence on High Dose of tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadidy, Mohmed Adel; Helaly, Ahmed Mohamed Nabil

    2015-04-01

    Tramadol dependence has been studied recently after large-scale exposure. Although tramadol dependence has increased rapidly in Egypt since 2004, no studies have evaluated the effect of high dose long-term tramadol dependence. To address the chronic sequel of tramadol dependence over at least 5 years duration with a large dose (more than 675 mg/day, three tablets or more, each tablet of 225 mg). The study was aimed to check the physical and psychiatric status during tramadol dependence and 3 months after complete treatment. The present study was applied on 79 patients with single tramadol-dependence dose of 675 mg or more for 5 years or more. We examined the physical and psychological impact of tramadol abuse before and after 3 months of stoppage of the drug. The blood chemistry was nearly within normal parameters, although slight nonsignificant rise in liver enzymes was reported in some cases. Patients during tramadol dependence period were angry, hostile, and aggressive. On the other hand, after treatment the main problem observed was the significant increase in comorbid anxiety, depressive, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but no increase was found in psychotic symptoms. Tramadol-dependence dose was more important than duration of use in psychiatric illness. Tramadol dependence on high dose could be physically safe to some limit, but psychiatrically it has many side effects.

  13. Non-linear character of dose dependences of chromosome aberration frequency in radiation-damaged root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, E.A.; Berezhnaya, V.V.; Sakada, V.I.; Rashidov, N.M.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Kravets, E.A.; Berezhnaya, V.V.; Sakada, V.I.; Rashidov, N.M.; Grodzinskij, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The dose dependences of the aberrant anaphases in the root meristem in 48 hours after the irradiation have non-linear character and a plateau in the region about 6-8 Gy. The plateau indicates the activation of recovery processes. In the plateau range, the level of damages for this genotype is 33% for aberrant anaphases (FAA), 2.3 aberrations per aberrant anaphase (A/AC), and 0.74 aberrations for the total number of anaphases. At 10 Gy, the dose curve forms the exponential region caused by the involvement of the large number of new cells with unrepaired damages in the mutation process. The increase of A/AC to 1.1 indicate the ''criticality'' of the meristem radiation damage.

  14. Theoretical analysis of the dose dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio and its relevance for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, Tatiana; Wilkens, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    The increased resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is usually believed to be the primary reason for treatment failure in tumors with oxygen-deficient areas. This oxygen effect can be expressed quantitatively by the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Here we investigate theoretically the dependence of the OER on the applied local dose for different types of ionizing irradiation and discuss its importance for clinical applications in radiotherapy for two scenarios: small dose variations during hypoxia-based dose painting and larger dose changes introduced by altered fractionation schemes. Using the widespread Alper-Howard-Flanders and standard linear-quadratic (LQ) models, OER calculations are performed for T1 human kidney and V79 Chinese hamster cells for various dose levels and various hypoxic oxygen partial pressures (pO2) between 0.01 and 20 mmHg as present in clinical situations in vivo. Our work comprises the analysis for both low linear energy transfer (LET) treatment with photons or protons and high-LET treatment with heavy ions. A detailed analysis of experimental data from the literature with respect to the dose dependence of the oxygen effect is performed, revealing controversial opinions whether the OER increases, decreases or stays constant with dose. The behavior of the OER with dose per fraction depends primarily on the ratios of the LQ parameters alpha and beta under hypoxic and aerobic conditions, which themselves depend on LET, pO2 and the cell or tissue type. According to our calculations, the OER variations with dose in vivo for low-LET treatments are moderate, with changes in the OER up to 11% for dose painting (1 or 3 Gy per fraction compared to 2 Gy) and up to 22% in hyper-/hypofractionation (0.5 or 20 Gy per fraction compared to 2 Gy) for oxygen tensions between 0.2 and 20 mmHg typically measured clinically in hypoxic tumors. For extremely hypoxic cells (0.01 mmHg), the dose dependence of the OER becomes more pronounced (up to 36

  15. Repeated dose studies with pure Epigallocatechin-3-gallate demonstrated dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity with associated dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Ramachandran

    Full Text Available EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate is the major active principle catechin found in green tea. Skepticism regarding the safety of consuming EGCG is gaining attention, despite the fact that it is widely being touted for its potential health benefits, including anti-cancer properties. The lack of scientific data on safe dose levels of pure EGCG is of concern, while EGCG has been commonly studied as a component of GTE (Green tea extract and not as a single active constituent. This study has been carried out to estimate the maximum tolerated non-toxic dose of pure EGCG and to identify the treatment related risk factors. In a fourteen day consecutive treatment, two different administration modalities were compared, offering an improved [i.p (intraperitoneal] and limited [p.o (oral] bioavailability. A trend of dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity was observed particularly with i.p treatment and EGCG increased serum lipid profile in parallel to hepatotoxicity. Fourteen day tolerable dose of EGCG was established as 21.1 mg/kg for i.p and 67.8 mg/kg for p.o. We also observed that, EGCG induced effects by both treatment routes are reversible, subsequent to an observation period for further fourteen days after cessation of treatment. It was demonstrated that the severity of EGCG induced toxicity appears to be a function of dose, route of administration and period of treatment. Keywords: EGCG, Green tea, Serum lipids, Dose dependant toxicity, Route dependant toxicity, Liver toxicity, Dyslipidemia

  16. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -11} compared to 4.6 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. (author)

  17. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -11 compared to 4.6 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Reference Man. (author)

  18. Cerebral Cortex Regions Selectively Vulnerable to Radiation Dose-Dependent Atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, Tyler M.; Karunamuni, Roshan; Kaifi, Samar; Burkeen, Jeffrey; Connor, Michael [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Krishnan, Anitha Priya; White, Nathan S.; Farid, Nikdokht; Bartsch, Hauke [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Murzin, Vyacheslav [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Nguyen, Tanya T. [Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Brewer, James B. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McDonald, Carrie R. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Dale, Anders M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Neurologic deficits after brain radiation therapy (RT) typically involve decline in higher-order cognitive functions such as attention and memory rather than sensory defects or paralysis. We sought to determine whether areas of the cortex critical to cognition are selectively vulnerable to radiation dose-dependent atrophy. Methods and Materials: We measured change in cortical thickness in 54 primary brain tumor patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT. The study patients underwent high-resolution, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted; T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, FLAIR) before RT and 1 year afterward. Semiautomated software was used to segment anatomic regions of the cerebral cortex for each patient. Cortical thickness was measured for each region before RT and 1 year afterward. Two higher-order cortical regions of interest (ROIs) were tested for association between radiation dose and cortical thinning: entorhinal (memory) and inferior parietal (attention/memory). For comparison, 2 primary cortex ROIs were also tested: pericalcarine (vision) and paracentral lobule (somatosensory/motor). Linear mixed-effects analyses were used to test all other cortical regions for significant radiation dose-dependent thickness change. Statistical significance was set at α = 0.05 using 2-tailed tests. Results: Cortical atrophy was significantly associated with radiation dose in the entorhinal (P=.01) and inferior parietal ROIs (P=.02). By contrast, no significant radiation dose-dependent effect was found in the primary cortex ROIs (pericalcarine and paracentral lobule). In the whole-cortex analysis, 9 regions showed significant radiation dose-dependent atrophy, including areas responsible for memory, attention, and executive function (P≤.002). Conclusions: Areas of cerebral cortex important for higher-order cognition may be most vulnerable to radiation-related atrophy. This is consistent with clinical observations

  19. Cerebral Cortex Regions Selectively Vulnerable to Radiation Dose-Dependent Atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, Tyler M.; Karunamuni, Roshan; Kaifi, Samar; Burkeen, Jeffrey; Connor, Michael; Krishnan, Anitha Priya; White, Nathan S.; Farid, Nikdokht; Bartsch, Hauke; Murzin, Vyacheslav; Nguyen, Tanya T.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Brewer, James B.; McDonald, Carrie R.; Dale, Anders M.; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Neurologic deficits after brain radiation therapy (RT) typically involve decline in higher-order cognitive functions such as attention and memory rather than sensory defects or paralysis. We sought to determine whether areas of the cortex critical to cognition are selectively vulnerable to radiation dose-dependent atrophy. Methods and Materials: We measured change in cortical thickness in 54 primary brain tumor patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT. The study patients underwent high-resolution, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted; T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, FLAIR) before RT and 1 year afterward. Semiautomated software was used to segment anatomic regions of the cerebral cortex for each patient. Cortical thickness was measured for each region before RT and 1 year afterward. Two higher-order cortical regions of interest (ROIs) were tested for association between radiation dose and cortical thinning: entorhinal (memory) and inferior parietal (attention/memory). For comparison, 2 primary cortex ROIs were also tested: pericalcarine (vision) and paracentral lobule (somatosensory/motor). Linear mixed-effects analyses were used to test all other cortical regions for significant radiation dose-dependent thickness change. Statistical significance was set at α = 0.05 using 2-tailed tests. Results: Cortical atrophy was significantly associated with radiation dose in the entorhinal (P=.01) and inferior parietal ROIs (P=.02). By contrast, no significant radiation dose-dependent effect was found in the primary cortex ROIs (pericalcarine and paracentral lobule). In the whole-cortex analysis, 9 regions showed significant radiation dose-dependent atrophy, including areas responsible for memory, attention, and executive function (P≤.002). Conclusions: Areas of cerebral cortex important for higher-order cognition may be most vulnerable to radiation-related atrophy. This is consistent with clinical observations

  20. A swinging seesaw as a novel model mechanism for time-dependent hormesis under dose-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effects: A case study on the toxicity of antibacterial chemicals to Aliivibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoyu; Calabrese, Edward J; Zheng, Min; Wang, Dali; Pan, Yongzheng; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying

    2018-08-01

    Hormesis occurs frequently in broadly ranging biological areas (e.g. plant biology, microbiology, biogerontology), toxicology, pharmacology and medicine. While numerous mechanisms (e.g. receptor and pathway mediated pathway responses) account for stimulatory and inhibitory features of hormetic dose responses, the vast majority emphasizes the inclusion of many doses but only one timepoint or use of a single optimized dose that is assessed over a broad range of timepoints. In this paper, a toxicity study was designed using a large number of properly spaced doses with responses determined over a large number of timepoints, which could help us reveal the underlying mechanism of hormesis. We present the results of a dose-time-response study on hormesis using five antibacterial chemicals on the bioluminescence of Aliivibrio fischeri, measuring expression of protein mRNA based on quorum sensing, simulating bioluminescent reaction and analyzing toxic actions of test chemicals. The findings show dose-time-dependent responses conforming to the hormetic dose-response model, while revealing unique response dynamics between agent induced stimulatory and inhibitory effects within bacterial growth phase dynamics. These dynamic dose-time features reveal a type of biological seesaw model that integrates stimulatory and inhibitory responses within unique growth phase, dose and time features, which has faultlessly explained the time-dependent hormetic phenomenon induced by five antibacterial chemicals (characterized by low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition). This study offers advances in understanding cellular dynamics, the biological integration of diverse and opposing responses and their role in evolutionary adaptive strategies to chemicals, which can provide new insight into the mechanistic investigation of hormesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MO-E-17A-06: Organ Dose in Abdomen-Pelvis CT: Does TG 111 Equilibrium Dose Concept Better Accounts for KVp Dependence Than Conventional CTDI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Morgan, A; Davros, W; Dong, F; Primak, A; Segars, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In CT imaging, a desirable quality assurance (QA) dose quantity should account for the dose variability across scan parameters and scanner models. Recently, AAPM TG 111 proposed to use equilibrium dose-pitch product, in place of CT dose index (CTDI100), for scan modes involving table translation. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether this new concept better accounts for the kVp dependence of organ dose than the conventional CTDI concept. Methods: The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A Monte Carlo program developed and validated for a 128-slice CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) was used to simulate organ dose for abdomenpelvis scans at five tube voltages (70, 80, 100, 120, 140 kVp) with a pitch of 0.8 and a detector configuration of 2x64x0.6 mm. The same Monte Carlo program was used to simulate CTDI100 and equilibrium dose-pitch product. For both metrics, the central and peripheral values were used together with helical pitch to calculate a volume-weighted average, i.e., CTDIvol and (Deq)vol, respectively. Results: While other scan parameters were kept constant, organ dose depended strongly on kVp; the coefficient of variation (COV) across the five kVp values ranged between 70–75% for liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, kidneys, colon, small intestine, bladder, and ovaries, all of which were inside the primary radiation beam. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the effect of kVp was highly significant (p=3e−30). When organ dose was normalized by CTDIvol, the COV across the five kVp values reduced to 7–16%. The effect of kVp was still highly significant (p=4e−4). When organ dose was normalized by (Deq)vol, the COV further reduced to 4−12%. The effect of kVp was borderline significant (p=0.04). Conclusion: In abdomen-pelvis CT, TG 111 equilibrium dose concept better accounts for kVp dependence than the conventional CTDI. This work is supported by a faculty startup

  2. MO-E-17A-06: Organ Dose in Abdomen-Pelvis CT: Does TG 111 Equilibrium Dose Concept Better Accounts for KVp Dependence Than Conventional CTDI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Morgan, A; Davros, W [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Primak, A [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In CT imaging, a desirable quality assurance (QA) dose quantity should account for the dose variability across scan parameters and scanner models. Recently, AAPM TG 111 proposed to use equilibrium dose-pitch product, in place of CT dose index (CTDI100), for scan modes involving table translation. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether this new concept better accounts for the kVp dependence of organ dose than the conventional CTDI concept. Methods: The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A Monte Carlo program developed and validated for a 128-slice CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) was used to simulate organ dose for abdomenpelvis scans at five tube voltages (70, 80, 100, 120, 140 kVp) with a pitch of 0.8 and a detector configuration of 2x64x0.6 mm. The same Monte Carlo program was used to simulate CTDI100 and equilibrium dose-pitch product. For both metrics, the central and peripheral values were used together with helical pitch to calculate a volume-weighted average, i.e., CTDIvol and (Deq)vol, respectively. Results: While other scan parameters were kept constant, organ dose depended strongly on kVp; the coefficient of variation (COV) across the five kVp values ranged between 70–75% for liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, kidneys, colon, small intestine, bladder, and ovaries, all of which were inside the primary radiation beam. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the effect of kVp was highly significant (p=3e−30). When organ dose was normalized by CTDIvol, the COV across the five kVp values reduced to 7–16%. The effect of kVp was still highly significant (p=4e−4). When organ dose was normalized by (Deq)vol, the COV further reduced to 4−12%. The effect of kVp was borderline significant (p=0.04). Conclusion: In abdomen-pelvis CT, TG 111 equilibrium dose concept better accounts for kVp dependence than the conventional CTDI. This work is supported by a faculty startup

  3. The optimal fraction size in high-dose-rate brachytherapy: dependency on tissue repair kinetics and low-dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Fowler, Jack F.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Indications of the existence of long repair half-times on the order of 2-4 h for late-responding human normal tissues have been obtained from continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). Recently, these data were used to explain, on the basis of the biologically effective dose (BED), the potential superiority of fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) with large fraction sizes of 5-7 Gy over continuous low-dose rate (LDR) irradiation at 0.5 Gy/h in cervical carcinoma. We investigated the optimal fraction size in HDR brachytherapy and its dependency on treatment choices (overall treatment time, number of HDR fractions, and time interval between fractions) and treatment conditions (reference low-dose rate, tissue repair characteristics). Methods and Materials: Radiobiologic model calculations were performed using the linear-quadratic model for incomplete mono-exponential repair. An irradiation dose of 20 Gy was assumed to be applied either with HDR in 2-12 fractions or continuously with LDR for a range of dose rates. HDR and LDR treatment regimens were compared on the basis of the BED and BED ratio of normal tissue and tumor, assuming repair half-times between 1 h and 4 h. Results: With the assumption that the repair half-time of normal tissue was three times longer than that of the tumor, hypofractionation in HDR relative to LDR could result in relative normal tissue sparing if the optimum fraction size is selected. By dose reduction while keeping the tumor BED constant, absolute normal tissue sparing might therefore be achieved. This optimum HDR fraction size was found to be largely dependent on the LDR dose rate. On the basis of the BED NT/TUM ratio of HDR over LDR, 3 x 6.7 Gy would be the optimal HDR fractionation scheme for replacement of an LDR scheme of 20 Gy in 10-30 h (dose rate 2-0.67 Gy/h), while at a lower dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h, four fractions of 5 Gy would be preferential, still assuming large differences between tumor

  4. Psilocybin dose-dependently causes delayed, transient headaches in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Sewell, R Andrew; Griffiths, Roland R

    2012-06-01

    Psilocybin is a well-characterized classic hallucinogen (psychedelic) with a long history of religious use by indigenous cultures, and nonmedical use in modern societies. Although psilocybin is structurally related to migraine medications, and case studies suggest that psilocybin may be efficacious in treatment of cluster headache, little is known about the relationship between psilocybin and headache. This double-blind study examined a broad range of psilocybin doses (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/70 kg) on headache in 18 healthy participants. Psilocybin frequently caused headache, the incidence, duration, and severity of which increased in a dose-dependent manner. All headaches had delayed onset, were transient, and lasted no more than a day after psilocybin administration. Possible mechanisms for these observations are discussed, and include induction of delayed headache through nitric oxide release. These data suggest that headache is an adverse event to be expected with the nonmedical use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms as well as the administration of psilocybin in human research. Headaches were neither severe nor disabling, and should not present a barrier to future psilocybin research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of dose monitoring system applicable to various radiations with wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-01-01

    A new inventive radiation dose monitor, designated as DARWIN (Dose monitoring system Applicable to various Radiations with WIde energy raNges), has been developed for monitoring doses in workspaces and surrounding environments of high energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN is composed of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, which consists of liquid organic scintillator BC501A coupled with ZnS(Ag) scintillation sheets doped with 6 Li, and a data acquisition system based on a Digital-Storage-Oscilloscope. Scintillations from the detector induced by thermal and fast neutrons, photons and muons were discriminated by analyzing their waveforms, and their light outputs were directly converted into the corresponding doses by applying the G-function method. Characteristics of DARWIN were studied by both calculation and experiment. The calculated results indicate that DARWIN gives reasonable estimations of doses in most radiation fields. It was found from the experiment that DARWIN has an excellent property of measuring doses from all particles that significantly contribute to the doses in surrounding environments of accelerator facilities - neutron, photon and muon with wide energy ranges. The experimental results also suggested that DARWIN enables us to monitor small fluctuation of neutron dose rates near the background-level owing to its high sensitivity. (author)

  6. Rescue dose orders as an alternative to range orders: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cassia

    2015-06-01

    Relief of pain is a fundamental aspect of optimal patient care. However, pain management in the inpatient setting is often constrained by concerns related to regulatory oversight, particularly with regard to the use of opioid dose range orders. These concerns can inadvertently result in the development of policies and practices that can negatively impact the health care team's ability to deliver optimal and individualized pain management. An evidence-based practice project was undertaken to address concerns about regulatory oversight of pain management processes by changing the way pain was managed in a large academic hospital setting. A novel pain management approach using rescue dose medications was established as an alternative to opioid dose range orders. The use of the rescue dose protocol was successfully implemented. Outcomes included an overall reduction in the administration of inappropriate intravenous opioids and opioid-acetaminophen combination medications, with a subsequent increase in single-entity first-line opioid analgesics. Rescue dose protocols may offer an alternative to opioid dose range orders as a means of effectively managing pain. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimation of personal dose based on the dependent calibration of personal dosimeters in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige; Koshida, Kichiro; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of present study is, in interventional radiology (IVR), to elucidate the differences between each personal dosimeter, and the dependences and calibrations of area or personal dose by measurement with electronic dosimeters in particular. We compare space dose rate distributions measured by an ionization survey meter with the value measured by personal dosimeter: an optically stimulated luminescence, two fluoroglass, and two electronic dosimeters. Furthermore, with electronic dosimeters, we first measured dose rate, energy, and directional dependences. Secondly, we calibrated the dose rate measured by electronic dosimeters with the results, and estimated these methods with coefficient of determination and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). The results, especially in electronic dosimeters, revealed that the dose rate measured fell by energy and directional dependences. In terms of methods of calibration, the method is sufficient for energy dependence, but not for directional dependence, because of the lack of stable calibration. This improvement poses a question for the future. The study suggested that these dependences of the personal dosimeter must be considered when area or personal dose is estimated in IVR. (author)

  8. Dose dependence of complication rates in cervix cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.; Wolf-Rosenblum, S.

    1986-01-01

    The population selected for this study was a group of 410 Stage IIB and III squamous cell Ca cervix patients treated at the Radiumhemmet between the years 1958-1966. A total of 48 of these patients developed moderate-to-severe rectal and/or bladder complications. Of these, 33 were evaluable with respect to dose-dependence of complications, that is, complete intracavitary dose measurements and external beam dose calculations, no chemotherapy or electrocautery, and complete clinical radiotherapy records. A group of 57 randomly selected uninjured patients were used as controls. Results show good correlation between dose, expressed in TDF units, and complication rates for both rectal and bladder injuries. Severity of rectal injury was observed to increase with increase in dose, although no such correlation was observed for bladder injuries. Mean delays in the expression of symptoms of injury were 10 months for the rectum and 22 months for the bladder

  9. Dose dependence of complication rates in cervix cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C.G.; Wolf-Rosenblum, S.

    1986-01-01

    The population selected for this study was a group of 410 Stage IIB and III squamous cell Ca cervix patients treated at the Radiumhemmet between the years 1958-1966. A total of 48 of these patients developed moderate-to-severe rectal and/or bladder complications. Of these, 33 were evaluable with respect to dose-dependence of complications, that is, complete intracavitary dose measurements and external beam dose calculations, no chemotherapy or electrocautery, and complete clinical radiotherapy records. A group of 57 randomly selected uninjured patients were used as controls. Results show good correlation between dose, expressed in TDF units, and complication rates for both rectal and bladder injuries. Severity of rectal injury was observed to increase with increase in dose, although no such correlation was observed for bladder injuries. Mean delays in the expression of symptoms of injury were 10 months for the rectum and 22 months for the bladder.

  10. Estimation of average glandular dose depending on the thickness of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da; Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Pertile, Alessandra S.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women worldwide. Mammography is, to date, the most efficient method for detecting an abnormality in the patient's breast. It is a technique of imaging diagnostic that requires special care because radiographs without adequate quality may lead to a false diagnosis and lead to the need for a repeat examination, increasing the dose of radiation in the patient. This study aimed to evaluate the average glandular dose (AGD), depending on the breast thickness in patients undergoing routine tests, with a digital computer radiography processing system. Analyzed 30 exhibitions in patients aged (65 ± 12) years, in the right and left caudal skull projections, for breasts with thicknesses between 45 mm and 50 mm. The calculated value of the AGD for this track thickness was (1.600 ± 0.009) mGy. The performance of mammography quality control tests was satisfactory and the AGD values obtained for the chosen thickness range is acceptable, since the threshold achievable is 1.6 mGy and the acceptable is 2 mGy. In Brazil, it is only required the input dose calculation in skin for 45 mm breasts. However, the calculation of AGD is required for different thicknesses of the breast, to identify the best mammographic pattern aiming at better image quality at the lowest dose provided the patient

  11. Absorbed dose/melting heat dependence studies for the PVDF homopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Pereira, Claubia

    2013-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of gamma irradiated Poly (vinylidene Fluoride) [PVDF] homopolymer has been studied in connection with the use of material in industrial high gamma dose measurement. Interaction between gamma radiation and PVDF leads to the radio-induction of C=O and conjugated C=C bonds, as it can be inferred from previous infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometric data. These induced defects result in a decrease of the polymer crystallinity that can be followed with DSC scans, by measuring the latent heat during the melting transition (Hmelt). After a systematic investigation, we have found that Hmelt is unambiguously related to the delivered doses ranging from 100 to 2,000 kGy of gamma radiation. One the other hand, further fading investigation analysis has proved that the Hmelt x Dose relationship can be fitted by an exponential function that remains constant for several months. Both the very large range of dose measurement and also the possibility of evaluating high gamma doses until five months after irradiation make PVDF homopolymers very good candidates to be investigated as commercial high gamma dose dosimeters. The high gamma dose irradiation facilities in Brazil used to develop high dose dosimeters are all devoted to industrial and medical purposes. Therefore, in view of the uncertainties involved in the dose measurements related to the electronic equilibrium correction factors and backscattering in the isodose curves used at the irradiation setup, a validation process is required to correctly evaluate the delivered absorbed doses. The sample irradiations were performed with a Co-60 source, at 12kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h, in the high gamma dose facilities at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The comparison of the curve of the Hmelt vs Dose is presented in this paper. (author)

  12. First-principles X-ray absorption dose calculation for time-dependent mass and optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Rubinstein, Boris; Melo, Lis G A; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2018-05-01

    A dose integral of time-dependent X-ray absorption under conditions of variable photon energy and changing sample mass is derived from first principles starting with the Beer-Lambert (BL) absorption model. For a given photon energy the BL dose integral D(e, t) reduces to the product of an effective time integral T(t) and a dose rate R(e). Two approximations of the time-dependent optical density, i.e. exponential A(t) = c + aexp(-bt) for first-order kinetics and hyperbolic A(t) = c + a/(b + t) for second-order kinetics, were considered for BL dose evaluation. For both models three methods of evaluating the effective time integral are considered: analytical integration, approximation by a function, and calculation of the asymptotic behaviour at large times. Data for poly(methyl methacrylate) and perfluorosulfonic acid polymers measured by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy were used to test the BL dose calculation. It was found that a previous method to calculate time-dependent dose underestimates the dose in mass loss situations, depending on the applied exposure time. All these methods here show that the BL dose is proportional to the exposure time D(e, t) ≃ K(e)t.

  13. Darwin: Dose monitoring system applicable to various radiations with wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Satoh, D.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A new radiation dose monitor, designated as DARWIN (Dose monitoring system Applicable to various Radiations with Wide energy ranges), has been developed for real-time monitoring of doses in workspaces and surrounding environments of high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN is composed of a Phoswitch-type scintillation detector, which consists of liquid organic scintillator BC501A coupled with ZnS(Ag) scintillation sheets doped with 6 Li, and a data acquisition system based on a Digital-Storage-Oscilloscope. DARWIN has the following features: (1) capable of monitoring doses from neutrons, photons and muons with energies from thermal energy to 1 GeV, 150 keV to 100 MeV and 1 MeV to 100 GeV, respectively, (2) highly sensitive with precision and (3) easy to operate with a simple graphical user-interface. The performance of DARWIN was examined experimentally in several radiation fields. The results of the experiments indicated the accuracy and wide response range of DARWIN for measuring dose rates from neutrons, photons and muons with wide energies. It was also found from the experiments that DARWIN enables us to monitor small fluctuations of neutron dose rates near the background level because of its high sensitivity. With these properties, DARWIN will be able to play a very important role for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities. (authors)

  14. Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene in a wide range of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezaki, J.; Okada, T.; Sakurada, I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of water-saturated styrene (water content 3.5 x 10 -2 mole/liter) was carried out in a wide range of dose rate between 1.2 x 10 3 and 1.8 x 10 7 rad/sec, and compared with the polymerization of the moderately dried styrene (water content 3.2 x 10 -3 mole/liter). Molecular weight distribution curves of the polymerization products showed that they were generally consisted of four parts, namely, oligomers, radical, cationic, and super polymers. Contributions of the four constituents to the polymerization and the number average degrees of polymerization (DP) of the four kinds of polymers were calculated by the graphical analysis of the curves. The rate of radical polymerization and DP of radical polymers are independent of the water content; the dose rate dependences of the polymerization rate and DP agree with the well known square root and inverse square root laws, respectively, of the radical polymerization of styrene. The rate of ionic polymerization is directly proportional to the dose rate, but it decreases, at a given dose rate, inversely proportional to the water content of styrene. DP of ionic polymer is independent of the dose rate but decreases with increasing water content. The super polymer of DP about 10 4 is not formed in the case of the moderately dried styrene. G values for the initiating radical and ion formation are calculated to be independently of the dose rate and water content, 0.66 and 0.027, respectively. It was suggested that oligomer was formed in the early stage by the interaction of cation with anion and only those cations which had survived underwent polymerization. 10 figures, 4 tables

  15. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  16. Simulation studies of optimum energies for DXA: dependence on tissue type, patient size and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, G. J.; Henderson, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a well established technique for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). However, in recent years DXA is increasingly being used to measure body composition in terms of fat and fat-free mass. DXA scanners must also determine the soft tissue baseline value from soft-tissue-only regions adjacent to bone. The aim of this work is to determine, using computer simulations, the optimum x- ray energies for a number of dose models, different tissues, i.e. bone mineral, average soft tissue, lean soft tissue and fat; and a range of anatomical sites and patient sizes. Three models for patient dose were evaluated total beam energy, entrance exposure and absorbed dose calculated by Monte Carlo modelling. A range of tissue compositions and thicknesses were chosen to cover typical patient variations for the three sites femoral neck, PA spine and lateral spine. In this work, the optimisation of the energies is based on (1) the uncertainty that arises from the quantum statistical nature of the number of x-rays recorded by the detector, and (2) the radiation dose received by the patient. This study has deliberately not considered other parameters such as detector response, electronic noise, x-ray tube heat load etc, because these are technology dependent parameters, not ones that are inherent to the measuring technique. Optimisation of the energies is achieved by minimisation of the product of variance of density measurement and dose which is independent of the absolute intensities of the x-ray beams. The results obtained indicate that if solving for bone density, then E-low in the range 34 to 42 keV, E-high in the range 100 to 200 keV and incident intensity ratio (low energy/high energy) in the range 3 to 10 is a reasonable compromise for the normal range of patient sizes. The choice of energies is complicated by the fact that the DXA unit must also solve for fat and lean soft tissue in soft- tissue-only regions adjacent to the bone. In this

  17. Age-dependent effective doses for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effective doses for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air are reported. The calculations were performed for 160 radionuclides, which are important for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. The energies and intensities of photons emitted from radionuclides were taken from the decay data DECDC used for dose calculations. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ) for 6 age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years-old and adult. The effective doses for the adult are also compared to values given in the literature.

  18. High dose-per-pulse electron beam dosimetry: Usability and dose-rate independence of EBT3 Gafchromic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Maud; Petersson, Kristoffer; Buchillier, Thierry; Germond, Jean-François; Durán, Maria Teresa; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François O; Bailat, Claude

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of Gafchromic EBT3 films for reference dose measurements in the beam of a prototype high dose-per-pulse linear accelerator (linac), capable of delivering electron beams with a mean dose-rate (Ḋ m ) ranging from 0.07 to 3000 Gy/s and a dose-rate in pulse (Ḋ p ) of up to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. To do this, we evaluated the overall uncertainties in EBT3 film dosimetry as well as the energy and dose-rate dependence of their response. Our dosimetric system was composed of EBT3 Gafchromic films in combination with a flatbed scanner and was calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to primary standard. All sources of uncertainties in EBT3 dosimetry were carefully analyzed using irradiations at a clinical radiotherapy linac. Energy dependence was investigated with the same machine by acquiring and comparing calibration curves for three different beam energies (4, 8 and 12 MeV), for doses between 0.25 and 30 Gy. Ḋ m dependence was studied at the clinical linac by changing the pulse repetition frequency (f) of the beam in order to vary Ḋ m between 0.55 and 4.40 Gy/min, while Ḋ p dependence was probed at the prototype machine for Ḋ p ranging from 7 × 10 3 to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. Ḋ p dependence was first determined by studying the correlation between the dose measured by films and the charge of electrons measured at the exit of the machine by an induction torus. Furthermore, we compared doses from the films to independently calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) that have been reported as being dose-rate independent up to such high dose-rates. We report that uncertainty below 4% (k = 2) can be achieved in the dose range between 3 and 17 Gy. Results also demonstrated that EBT3 films did not display any detectable energy dependence for electron beam energies between 4 and 12 MeV. No Ḋ m dependence was found either. In addition, we obtained excellent consistency between films and TLDs over the entire Ḋ p

  19. Chronic UVA (365-nm) irradiation induced scratching in hairless mice: dose-time dependency and the effect of ketanserin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laat, J.M.T. de; Groenendijk, M.; Vloten, W.A. van; Gruijl, F.R. de; Seite, S.

    1997-01-01

    In a study on the dose-response relationship for longwave UVA (UVA1; 340-400 nm) carcinogenesis in hairless mice scratch marks appeared after months of daily exposure as an unwanted side effect. Tumor induction in the highest of the 4 tested dose groups (receiving a daily dose of 430 kJ/m 2 of 365-nm radiation) could not be determined because extensive scarification occurred prior to the development of any tumors. The induction of scratch marks could be scored and quantified in all 4 dose groups tested. The UVA1 dose-dependencies for the induction of tumors and scratch marks were compared. We found that the induction of scratch marks depended mainly on the cumulative UVA1 exposure, whereas tumor induction showed a lesser dose-dependency. An attempt was made to prevent the apparent pruritogenic effect of UVA1 irradiation and to understand its mechanism. The influence of ketanserin, a serotonin/histamine antagonist, on the UVA1 induction of scratch marks was tested in groups of 8 mice daily irradiated with 430 kJ/m 2 . No difference was found between treated and untreated animals. Histological examination of skin biopsies from irradiated mice from the 430-kJ/m 2 dose group from the UVA1 carcinogenic experiment, showed no changes in numbers of mast cells or other inflammatory features when compared to skin biopsies from unirradiated control mice. This indicated that UVA1-induced scratching is not mediated through mast cell release of serotonin and/or histamine. An adequate therapeutic treatment which can prevent UVA1-induced scratching would enable us to test tumor induction with UVA1 over a larger dose range, and may provide additional insight in how this radiation damages the skin. It remains conjectural whether there exists and analogous UVA-induced pruritus in human skin. (au)

  20. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jursinic, Paul A., E-mail: pjursinic@wmcc.org [West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  1. Calculation of age-dependent effective doses for external exposure using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van

    2013-01-01

    Age-dependent effective dose for external exposure to photons uniformly distributed in air were calculated. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources with source energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years-old and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. From the calculated results, it is shown that the effective doses depend on the body size; the effective doses in younger phantoms are higher than those in the older phantoms, especially below 100 keV. (orig.)

  2. Calculation of age-dependent effective doses for external exposure using the MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Tran Van [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, ThuDuc, HoChiMinh City (VT)

    2013-07-15

    Age-dependent effective dose for external exposure to photons uniformly distributed in air were calculated. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources with source energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years-old and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. From the calculated results, it is shown that the effective doses depend on the body size; the effective doses in younger phantoms are higher than those in the older phantoms, especially below 100 keV. (orig.)

  3. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Aoki-Nakano, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Wada, Seiichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV μm -1 ), neon (375 keV μm -1 ) and argon ions (1260 keV μm -1 ) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1- 6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. (authors)

  4. The influence of patient positioning uncertainties in proton radiotherapy on proton range and dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebl, Jakob, E-mail: jakob.liebl@medaustron.at [EBG MedAustron GmbH, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz (Austria); Paganetti, Harald; Zhu, Mingyao; Winey, Brian A. [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: Thirty-eight clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50%- and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs), and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: The authors identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position, respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. For target volumes TCP decreases by more than 10% (absolute) occurred in less than 2.2% of the considered treatment scenarios for anatomy-based patient positioning and were nonexistent for fiducial-based patient positioning. EUD changes for target volumes were up to 35% (anatomy-based positioning) and 16% (fiducial-based positioning). Conclusions: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions

  5. Investigation of percentage depth dose and dose rate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter for photon beams using MRI technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadbakht, B.; Hadad, K.; Zahmatkesh, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the investigation of the normoxic Pagan polymer-gel dosimeter percentage depth dose and it's dose rate dependence has been made. Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide(bis), 4.5% acrylamide, 5% gelatine, 5 m M tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, 0.01 m M hydroquinone and 86% HPLC(Water). Irradiation of vials was performed using photon beams of Co-60 therapy unit and an Elec ta linear accelerator. Gel dosimeters were imaged in a Siemens Symphony 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner using a head coil. Post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both selected to be 1 day. For determining the percentage depth dose of the Pagan gel it was found that at the depth of 21 cm, the percentage depth dose for 1.25 MeV γ-ray photons of 60 Co and for 4,6 and 18 MV x-ray photons of Elec ta linear accelerator, are 48%, 52%, 57.3% and 59.73%, respectively. Thus, in the case of the higher energy photon beams, a higher dose can he delivered. to deep-seated tumors. The dose rate dependence of percentage depth dose was studied for 6 MV x-ray photons with the use of dose rates of 80, 160, 240, 320, 400 and 480 c Gy/min. No trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T 2 dependence was found on the mean dose rate and energy for the photon beams.

  6. Dependence on age at intake of committed dose equivalents from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.

    1981-01-01

    The dependence of committed dose equivalents on age at intake is needed to assess the significance of exposures of young persons among the general public resulting from inhaled or ingested radionuclides. The committed dose equivalents, evaluated using ICRP principles, depend on the body dimensions of the young person at the time of intake of a radionuclide and on subsequent body growth. Representation of growth by a series of exponential segments facilitates the derivation of general expressions for the age dependence of committed dose equivalents if metabolic models do not change with age. The additional assumption that intakes of radionuclides in air or food are proportional to a person's energy expenditure (implying age-independent dietary composition) enables the demonstration that the age of the most highly exposed 'critical groups' of the general public from these radionuclides is either about 1 year or 17 years. With the above assumptions the exposure of the critical group is less than three times the exposure of adult members of the general public. Approximate values of committed dose equivalents which avoid both underestimation and excessive overestimation are shown to be obtainable by simplified procedures. Modified procedures are suggested for use if metabolic models change with age. (author)

  7. The dose dependence of fracture toughness Of F82H steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States); Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Odette, G. [UCSB, Santa-Barbara, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering UCSB, AK (United States); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The ferritic-martensitic steel F82H is a primary candidate low-activation material for fusion applications, and it is being investigated in the joint U.S. Department of Energy-Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As a part of this program, several capsules containing fracture toughness specimens were irradiated in High-Flux Isotope Reactor. These specimens were irradiated to a wide range of doses from 3.5 to 25 dpa. The range of irradiation temperature was from 250 deg. C to 500 deg. C. This paper summarizes the changes in fracture toughness transition temperature and decrease in the ductile fracture toughness as result of various irradiation conditions. It is shown that in the 3.5 to 25 dpa dose range, irradiation temperature plays the key rote in determination of the shift of the transition temperature. Highest embrittlement observed at 250 deg.C and the lowest at 500 deg. C. At a given irradiation temperature, shift of the fracture toughness transition temperature increases slightly with dose within the studied dose range. It appears that main gain in transition temperature shift occurred during initial {approx}5 dpa of irradiation. The present data are compared to the available published trends. (authors)

  8. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  9. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • First study on early stress responses in salmon exposed to low-dose gamma radiation. • Dramatic dose-dependent transcriptional responses characterized. • Multiple modes of action proposed for gamma radiation. - Abstract: Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48 h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280 mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15 mGy radiation

  10. Volume and dose rate dependent (MDR-LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitial brachytherapy) treatment optimisation, for squamouscell carcinoma of the lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stas, Nathalie; Goncalves, Julieta; Pinho, Eliana; Trigo, Lurdes; Fernandes, Tome; Vieira, Elio

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: From 1/1/90 to 1/1/95, 53 patients with squamouscell carcinoma of the lip were treated by MDR or LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitital brachytherapy. We compare the oncological and aesthetical results and sequelae depending on the volume and the dose rate. Material and methods: 53 patients, 41 men and 12 women, median age = 66y; 48 primary tumors (T1 = 26; T2 = 16; T3 = 6; N0 = 47; N1 = 1; M0 = 48) and 5 recurrencies; squamouscell carcinoma (grade 1 =45, g2 =6, g3 =2); clinical extension: buccal comissure=3, check =2, muscular =15, skin =7, lower and upper lip =1. Before radiotherapy, 28 biopsies and 25 excisional surgeries (19 with positive margins, 6 with negative margins) were performed. Brachytherapy was performed alone (dose 60-75 Gy BD85%) or as a boost (dose 10-30 Gy BD85%) associated with external beam (dose 46-50 Gy). MDR or LDR microselectron's afterloading was done after a computerised dosimetry (Paris System): treatment mean time = 30, 98 hours; mean volume = 10,2 cc (T1-T2 8, 61cc); Ir - 192 activity = range 0,7 - 4,792 mCi/cm; reference dose rate 45,6 - 290, 1 cGy/h. Results: 46 patients are alive without cancer, 1 died without responding, 6 died from non oncological diseases; 8 patients had recurrences (5 local, 3 nodal) but are alive. Mean follow-up 30,83 months (range 3-60m), mean DFS = 22,49 m (range 5-57m). Acute secondary effects: 30 radioepithelyties (grade 1 = 7, g2=23, g3=14), and 39 radiomucitis (g1=3; g2=23; g3=13); mean time for complete healing = 21, 66 days. Sequelae: moderate sclerosis of the skin =11, skin retraction = 1, hyperpigmentation2, depigmentation= 10, edema= 6, gingivitis= 7. Aesthetical results: good32; moderate= 18; bad= 2, very bad= 1 (uncontrolled tumor). Conclusions: The sequelae and aesthetical results are closely dependent on the treated volume and the dose rate, less dependent on the total dose, and independent on the Iridium activity. Complete healing time does not influence the late aesthetical results

  11. Development of new chemical dosimeter for low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Adhikari, S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of low dose radiation in complex systems is of utmost importance in radiation biology and related areas. Ferrous Benzoic acid Xylenol orange (FBX) system is being widely used for measurement of low dose gamma radiation because of its reproducibility and precision. However, an additional step, i.e., dissolution of benzoic acid in water at higher temperature followed by cooling at room temperature is involved for the preparation of this dosimeter. This makes it inconvenient as a ready to use dosimeter. In the present work, the organic molecule, sorbitol has been used for measurement of low doses of radiation. The advantages of using sorbitol are its ready availability and instantaneous water solubility. Owing to its dissolution at room temperature, possible errors those are involved in calculation of dose due to thermal oxidation of ferrous ions during preparation of the FBX dosimetric solution could be made insignificant in the proposed dosimeter. In the present system, sorbitol acts as radiolytic sensitizer for the oxidation of ferrous ion, and xylenol orange forms a 1:1 complex specifically with ferric ions. Thus, the analytical detection limit of ferric ions is enhanced compared to other systems. Final composition of the dosimetric solution is; 0.5 mol/m 3 xylenol orange, 10 mol/m 3 sorbitol and 0.2 mol/m 3 ferrous ion in 50 mol/m 3 sulfuric acid. Radiolytic sensitization in combination with analytical enhancement of the ferrous based system, allows us to measure radiation dose in the range of 0.05 Gy–12 Gy with ease and high reproducibility.

  12. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  13. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deuk Hee; Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm 3 which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way

  14. Upgrading NASA/DOSE laser ranging system control computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Cheek, Jack; Seery, Paul J.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mcgarry, Jan F.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ranging systems now managed by the NASA Dynamics of the Solid Earth (DOSE) and operated by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Texas have produced a wealth on interdisciplinary scientific data over the last three decades. Despite upgrades to the most of the ranging station subsystems, the control computers remain a mix of 1970's vintage minicomputers. These encompass a wide range of vendors, operating systems, and languages, making hardware and software support increasingly difficult. Current technology allows replacement of controller computers at a relatively low cost while maintaining excellent processing power and a friendly operating environment. The new controller systems are now being designed using IBM-PC-compatible 80486-based microcomputers, a real-time Unix operating system (LynxOS), and X-windows/Motif IB, and serial interfaces have been chosen. This design supports minimizing short and long term costs by relying on proven standards for both hardware and software components. Currently, the project is in the design and prototyping stage with the first systems targeted for production in mid-1993.

  15. On discriminating between long-range dependence and changes in mean

    OpenAIRE

    Berkes, István; Horváth, Lajos; Kokoszka, Piotr; Shao, Qi-Man

    2006-01-01

    We develop a testing procedure for distinguishing between a long-range dependent time series and a weakly dependent time series with change-points in the mean. In the simplest case, under the null hypothesis the time series is weakly dependent with one change in mean at an unknown point, and under the alternative it is long-range dependent. We compute the CUSUM statistic Tn, which allows us to construct an estimator k̂ of a change-point. We then compute the statistic Tn,1 based on the observa...

  16. Evaluation of GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry for the low dose range using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotanda, Tatsuhiro; Katsuda, Toshizo; Akagawa, Takuya; Gotanda, Rumi; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenyu; Kuwano, Tadao; Takedo, Yoshihiro; Yatake, Hidetoshi; Yabunaka, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed radiochromic films can easily be used to measure absorbed doses because they do not need development processing and indicate a density change that depends on the absorbed dose. However, in GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry (GAF-EBT2) as a radiochromic film, the precision of the measurement was compromised, because of non-uniformity problems caused by image acquisition using a flat-bed scanner with a transmission mode. The purpose of this study was to improve the precision of the measurement using a flat-bed scanner with a reflection mode at the low absorbed dose dynamic range of GAF-EBT2. The calibration curves of the absorbed dose versus the film density for GAF-EBT2 were provided. X-rays were exposed in the range between ~0 and 120 mGy in increments of about 12 mGy. The results of the method using a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode were compared with those of the method using the same scanner with the reflection mode. The results should that the determination coefficients (r 2 ) for the straight-line approximation of the calibration curve using the reflection mode were higher than 0.99, and the gradient using the reflection mode was about twice that of the one using the transmission mode. The non-uniformity error that is produced by a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode setting could be almost eliminated by converting from the transmission mode to the reflection mode. In light of these findings, the method using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode (only using uniform white paper) improved the precision of the measurement for the low absorbed dose range.

  17. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  18. Testing for long-range dependence in world stock markets

    OpenAIRE

    Cajueiro, Daniel Oliveira; Tabak, Benjamin Miranda

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we show a novel approach to rank stock market indices in terms of weak form efficiency using state of the art methodology in statistical physics. We employ the R/S and V/S methodologies to test for long-range dependence in equity returns and volatility. Empirical results suggests that although emerging markets possess stronger long-range dependence in equity returns than developed economies, this is not true for volatility. In the case of volatility, Hurst exponents...

  19. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  20. Dose-dependent elimination of 8-methoxypsoralen in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheney, P.; Pacula, C.M.; Gerber, N.; Mays, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a photoactive linear furocoumarin, is effective in the treatment of several diseases, including psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and T-cell leukemia. Recently, a specific extraction procedure for 14 C-8-MOP showed that the elimination of 8-MOP in the rat was dose-dependent. Similar pharmacokinetic studies were undertaken in mice. Purity of 14 C-8-MOP, verified by a four-tube countercurrent distribution using hexane (8 ml) and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer (0.1 M 15 ml) as described by Bush, was >98% and distributed with a partition coefficient of 3.86. Male CD-1 mice were each given an i.p. dose of 10 or 50 mg/kg of 14 C-8-MOP (3.4 μCi/mg) sacrificed at timed intervals, homogenized in 150 ml of 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and a portion (0.8 ml) of the homogenate used to quantify 8-MOP as described above. The elimination half-life measured in the first 45 min was 7.4 min at 10 mg/kg and 95 min at 50 mg/kg. A similar half-life of 9.2 min was measured in mice given an i.v. dose 10 mg/kg of 8-MOP. Explanations of dose-dependent elimination include enzyme saturation, product inhibition or both. Between 58-80% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. Nine peaks of radioactivity were observed in the urine by HPLC, two of which coeluted with 5,8-dihydroxypsoralen and 6-(7-hydroxy-8-methoxycoumaryl)-acetic acid

  1. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The model was made to conform to these data requirements by the use of age-specific estimates of the biological half-time of iodine in the thyroid and an age- and sex-dependent representation of the mass of the thyroid. Also, it was assumed that the thyroid burden was maximum 24 hours after administration (the 131 I dose is not critically sensitive to this assumption). The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K[exp(-μ 1 t) - exp(-μ 2 t)] (μCi), where μ 1 = lambda/sub r/ + lambda/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), lambda/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and lambda/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of lambda/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time of maximum uptake and the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptake at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/μCi-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. The model could prove useful in the dosimetry of very short-lived radioiodines. Tables of age- and sex-dependent coefficients are provided to enable readers to make their own calculations. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Temperature and dose dependencies of microstructure and hardness of neutron irradiated OFHC copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Horsewell, A.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile specimens of pure oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper were irradiated with fission neutrons between 320 and 723 K to fluences in the range 5x10 21 to 1.5x10 24 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV) with a flux of 2.5x10 17 n/m 2 s. Irradiated specimens were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantitative determinations were made of defect clusters and cavities. The dose dependence of tensile properties of specimens irradiated at 320 K was determined at 295 K. Hardness measurements were made at 295 K on specimens irradiated at different temperatures and doses. Microstructures of tensile tested specimens were also investigated by TEM. Results show that the increase in cluster density and hardening nearly saturate at a dose of similar 0.3 dpa. Irradiations at 320 K cause a drastic decrease in the uniform elongation already at ∼ =0.1 dpa. It is suggested that the irradiation-induced increase in the initial yield stress and a drastic decrease in the ability of copper to deform plastically in a homogeneous fashion are caused by a substantial reduction in the ability of grown-in dislocations to act as efficient dislocation sources. ((orig.))

  3. Silver Nanoparticles Incite Size and Dose-Dependent Developmental Phenotypes and Nanotoxicity in Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Lauren M.; Lee, Kerry J.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess distinctive physicochemical properties and promise a wide range of applications, from advanced technology to leading-edge medicine. However, their effects on living organisms remain largely unknown. Here we report that the purified silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 97 ± 13 nm) incite specific developmental stage embryonic phenotypes and nanotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, upon acute exposure of given-stage embryos to the NPs (0–24 pM) for only 2 h. The critical concentrations of the NPs that cause 50% of embryos develop normally for cleavage, early-gastrula, early-segmentation, late-segmentation, and hatching stage zebrafish embryos are 3.5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 pM, respectively, showing that the earlier developmental stage embryos are much more sensitive to the effects of the NPs than the later stage. Interestingly, distinctive phenotypes (head abnormality and no eyes) are observed only in cleavage and early-gastrula stage embryos treated with the NPs, showing the stage-specific effects of the NPs. By comparing with our study of the smaller Ag NPs (13.1 ± 2.5 nm), we found that the embryonic phenotypes strikingly depend upon the sizes of Ag NPs and embryonic developmental stages. These notable findings suggest that the Ag NPs are unlike any conventional chemicals or ions. They can potentially enable target specific study and therapy for early embryonic development in size, stage, dose, and exposure-duration dependent manners. PMID:24024906

  4. Silver nanoparticles incite size- and dose-dependent developmental phenotypes and nanotoxicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Lauren M; Lee, Kerry J; Nallathamby, Prakash D; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2013-10-21

    Nanomaterials possess distinctive physicochemical properties and promise a wide range of applications, from advanced technology to leading-edge medicine. However, their effects on living organisms remain largely unknown. Here we report that the purified silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) (97 ± 13 nm) incite specific developmental stage embryonic phenotypes and nanotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, upon acute exposure of given stage embryos to the NPs (0-24 pM) for only 2 h. The critical concentrations of the NPs that cause 50% of embryos to develop normally for cleavage, early gastrula, early segmentation, late segmentation, and hatching stage zebrafish embryos are 3.5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 pM, respectively, showing that the earlier developmental stage embryos are much more sensitive to the effects of the NPs than the later stage embryos. Interestingly, distinctive phenotypes (head abnormality and no eyes) are observed only in cleavage and early gastrula stage embryos treated with the NPs, showing the stage-specific effects of the NPs. By comparing these Ag NPs with smaller Ag NPs (13.1 ± 2.5 nm), we found that the embryonic phenotypes strikingly depend upon the sizes of Ag NPs and embryonic developmental stages. These notable findings suggest that the Ag NPs are unlike any conventional chemicals or ions. They can potentially enable target-specific study and therapy for early embryonic development in size-, stage-, dose-, and exposure duration-dependent manners.

  5. Determination of dose ranges of gamma rays to induce specific changes in three ornamental species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez J, J.

    2011-11-01

    In order to confirming the possibility of to settle a dose range that takes place directly and not at random, a specific effect independently of the species that is were produced several similar organisms to three ornamental species took place via meristems cultivation: Petunia hybrid, Impatiens walleriana and Sprekelia formosissima, same that were irradiated in an irradiator Gamma cell 220, to different dose: 0, 3.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5 and 20 Gy. Later on, of the plants treated via in vitro the subsequent generations were obtained until the M 4 . To determine the DL 50 and the possible good doses, the survival parameters, development, morphogenesis and height were evaluated during 8 weeks, interpreting based on them, the possible physiologic and genetic alterations induced by the radiation. The established DL 50 were: 7.5 Gy (Petunia), 19.0 Gy (Impatiens) and 12.0 Gy (Sprekelia). Based on the DL 50 of each species, a range of coincident dose settled down that produces a similar effect in the three species: a range of DL 23 to the DL 50 induces and alteration in the cytokinins production affecting directly in the leaves number, buds and plants taken place by meristem, also a range of DL 32 - DL 50 impacts in the auxins production altering to the radicule system. However, when being superimposed the dose is considered that the investigation should continue. (Author)

  6. A better understanding of long-range temporal dependence of traffic flow time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Wang, Xingmin; Sun, Haowei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Li

    2018-02-01

    Long-range temporal dependence is an important research perspective for modelling of traffic flow time series. Various methods have been proposed to depict the long-range temporal dependence, including autocorrelation function analysis, spectral analysis and fractal analysis. However, few researches have studied the daily temporal dependence (i.e. the similarity between different daily traffic flow time series), which can help us better understand the long-range temporal dependence, such as the origin of crossover phenomenon. Moreover, considering both types of dependence contributes to establishing more accurate model and depicting the properties of traffic flow time series. In this paper, we study the properties of daily temporal dependence by simple average method and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based method. Meanwhile, we also study the long-range temporal dependence by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA). The results show that both the daily and long-range temporal dependence exert considerable influence on the traffic flow series. The DFA results reveal that the daily temporal dependence creates crossover phenomenon when estimating the Hurst exponent which depicts the long-range temporal dependence. Furthermore, through the comparison of the DFA test, PCA-based method turns out to be a better method to extract the daily temporal dependence especially when the difference between days is significant.

  7. Assessment of 226Ra age-dependent dose from water intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porntepkasemsan, Boonsom; Srisuksawad, Kanitha

    2008-01-01

    The radioactivity in canal and ground waters collected in a 2-year long observation from the vicinity of the Rare Earth Research and Development Center (RRDC), Phathumthani Province, Thailand, was measured in order to determine the concentration of 226 Ra and to estimate the age-dependent effective dose to humans due to consumption. 226 Ra activities in both canal and ground waters were well below the WHO guidance level for drinking water quality of 1 Bq L -1 . The highest 226 Ra effective doses per year were found for infants and teens. However, the observed levels of calculated 226 Ra effective doses for all age groups in both canal and ground waters show satisfactory low values (less than 15 μSv yr -1 ). These values are acceptable in accordance with the WHO recommended reference dose level of 100 μSv yr -1 from water intake of 2 L day -1

  8. Vitamin D production depends on ultraviolet-B dose but not on dose rate: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, Morten K B; Schmedes, Anne V; Philipsen, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation increases serum vitamin D level expressed as 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25(OH)D), but the dose-response relationship and the importance of dose rate is unclear. Of 172 fair-skinned persons screened for 25(OH)D, 55 with insufficient baseline 25(OH)D=50 nm (mean 31.2 nm...... exposed. Skin pigmentation and 25(OH)D were measured before and after the irradiations. The increase in 25(OH)D after UV-B exposure (adjusted for baseline 25(OH)D) was positively correlated with the UV-B dose (P=0.001; R(2) =0.176) but not to dose rate (1-20 min). 25(OH)D increased in response to four UV......-B treatments of 3 SED with 24.8 nm on average and 14.2 nm after four UV-B treatments of just 0.375 SED. In conclusion, the increase in 25(OH)D after UV-B exposure depends on the dose but not on the dose rate (1-20 min). Further, a significant increase in 25(OH)D was achieved with a very low UV-B dose....

  9. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics Against Postoperative Respiratory Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabitz, Stephanie D; Farhan, Hassan N; Ruscic, Katarina J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalational anesthetics are bronchodilators with immunomodulatory effects. We sought to determine the effect of inhalational anesthetic dose on risk of severe postoperative respiratory complications. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of data on file in surgical cases between January 2007...... with endotracheal intubation. INTERVENTIONS: Median effective dose equivalent of inhalational anesthetics during surgery (derived from mean end-tidal inhalational anesthetic concentrations). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Postoperative respiratory complications occurred in 6,979 of 124,497 cases (5.61%). High...... inhalational anesthetic dose of 1.20 (1.13-1.30) (median [interquartile range])-fold median effective dose equivalent versus 0.57 (0.45-0.64)-fold median effective dose equivalent was associated with lower odds of postoperative respiratory complications (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.53-0.65; p

  10. Dose-dependent pharmacokinetics and teratogenic activity of topical retinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.P.; Willhite, C.C.; Berry, D.L.; Allen, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    Oral retinoid treatment can be teratogenic and topical applications are used to treat acne and smooth wrinkles. A single topical trace (2.5 μg; 191 μCi/kg) or high (1.3 mg; 195 μCi/kg) dose of all-trans-[10, 11- 3 H 2 ] retinoic acid (RA) dissolved in acetone was applied to 4 cm 2 shaved dorsal hamster skin. Peak plasma radioactivity (C max ) occurred at 12 and 36 hr and mean t1/2 values for parent PA absorption were 48 min and 2.8 hr, for trace and high dose, respectively. The dermal RA C max values were only 2% of that after an equivalent oral dose, but plasma AUC after dermal treatment was 63% of the oral value. The mean t1/2 for rapid elimination was shorter for the high (57 min) than for the trace (6.9 hr) dose, but t1/2 values for slow elimination were comparable (t1/2 high = 51.2 hr; t1/2 trace = 36.8 hr). Single topical application of 10-30 mg/kg RA or 5 mg/kg etretinate (Ro 10-9359) to pregnant hamsters (day 8) caused local hyperkeratosis, but failed to induce terata. Similar application of 10-1000 μg/kg arotinoid Ro 13-6298 caused dose-dependent terata, being twice as embryolethal by parenteral as enteric dosing. Skin toxicity and attenuated maternal blood levels limit the amount of retinoids that can reach the embryo

  11. Dose rate and total dose dependence of the 1/f noise performance of a GaAs operational amplifier during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiemstra, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    A pictorial of a sectioned view of the torus of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is shown. Maintenance and inspection of the reactor are required to be performed remotely. This is due to the high gamma radiation environment in vessel during inspection and maintenance activities. The custom GaAs operational amplifier is to be used to readout sensors on the in-vessel manipulator and inspection equipment. The gamma dose rate during maintenance and inspection is anticipated to be 3 Mrad(GaAs)/hour. Here, dose rate and total dose dependence of the 1/f noise performance of a custom GaAs MESFET operational amplifier during irradiation are presented. Dose rate dependent 1/f noise degradation during irradiation is believed to be due to electron trapping in deep levels, enhanced by backgating and shallow traps excited during irradiation. The reduction of this affect with accumulated total dose is believed to be due a reduction of deep level site concentration associated with substitutional oxygen. Post irradiation 1/f noise degradation is also presented.The generation-recombination noise observed post irradiation can be attributed to the production of shallow traps due to ionizing radiation

  12. Estimation of average glandular dose depending on the thickness of the breast; Estimativa da dose glandular media em funcao da espessura da mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da, E-mail: jessica.real@pucrs.br, E-mail: renata.luz@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (HSL/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Pertile, Alessandra S.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: bruna.frohlich@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: lessandra.pertile@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women worldwide. Mammography is, to date, the most efficient method for detecting an abnormality in the patient's breast. It is a technique of imaging diagnostic that requires special care because radiographs without adequate quality may lead to a false diagnosis and lead to the need for a repeat examination, increasing the dose of radiation in the patient. This study aimed to evaluate the average glandular dose (AGD), depending on the breast thickness in patients undergoing routine tests, with a digital computer radiography processing system. Analyzed 30 exhibitions in patients aged (65 ± 12) years, in the right and left caudal skull projections, for breasts with thicknesses between 45 mm and 50 mm. The calculated value of the AGD for this track thickness was (1.600 ± 0.009) mGy. The performance of mammography quality control tests was satisfactory and the AGD values obtained for the chosen thickness range is acceptable, since the threshold achievable is 1.6 mGy and the acceptable is 2 mGy. In Brazil, it is only required the input dose calculation in skin for 45 mm breasts. However, the calculation of AGD is required for different thicknesses of the breast, to identify the best mammographic pattern aiming at better image quality at the lowest dose provided the patient.

  13. Field size and dose distribution of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Wee Saing

    1980-01-01

    The author concerns some relations between the field size and dose distribution of electron beams. The doses of electron beams are measured by either an ion chamber with an electrometer or by film for dosimetry. We analyzes qualitatively some relations; the energy of incident electron beams and depths of maximum dose, field sizes of electron beams and depth of maximum dose, field size and scatter factor, electron energy and scatter factor, collimator shape and scatter factor, electron energy and surface dose, field size and surface dose, field size and central axis depth dose, and field size and practical range. He meets with some results. They are that the field size of electron beam has influence on the depth of maximum dose, scatter factor, surface dose and central axis depth dose, scatter factor depends on the field size and energy of electron beam, and the shape of the collimator, and the depth of maximum dose and the surface dose depend on the energy of electron beam, but the practical range of electron beam is independent of field size

  14. Registration-Based Range-Dependence Compensation for Bistatic STAP Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapierre Fabian D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of detecting slow-moving targets using space-time adaptive processing (STAP radar. Determining the optimum weights at each range requires data snapshots at neighboring ranges. However, in virtually all configurations, snapshot statistics are range dependent, meaning that snapshots are nonstationary with respect to range. This results in poor performance. In this paper, we propose a new compensation method based on registration of clutter ridges and designed to work on a single realization of the stochastic snapshot at each range. The method has been successfully tested on simulated, stochastic snapshots. An evaluation of performance is presented.

  15. Long-range dependence in returns and volatility of Central European Stock Indices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 3 (2010), s. 1-19 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : long-range dependence * rescaled range * modified rescaled range * bootstrapping Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/E/kristoufek-long-range dependence in returns and volatility of central european stock indices.pdf

  16. High-dose zolpidem dependence - Psychostimulant effects? A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijna Chandan Chattopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem, an imidazoline nonbenzodiazepine sedative drug, is used widely. Initial reports showed minimal abuse potential. However, multiple reports have appeared of dose escalation and abuse. Subjective effects of high-dose zolpidem are not known. In light of accumulating evidence of abuse potential, we hereby report a case of high-dose dependence and a review of relevant literature. A 33-year-old male presented with 5 years of daily use of 600–1700 mg of zolpidem tartrate. He reported subjective effects of euphoria, intense craving, and inability to stop use. Loss of receptor specificity, pharmacokinetic factors, and different receptor distributions can explain paradoxical stimulatory effects of high-dose zolpidem. Further studies are required to characterize subjective effects of high-dose zolpidem.

  17. Determination of dose correction factor for energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Koo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Na, Seong Ho

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the MOSFET dosimeter has been widely used in various medical applications such as dose verification in radiation therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The MOSFET dosimeter is, however, mainly made of silicon and shows some energy dependence for low energy photons. Therefore, the MOSFET dosimeter tends to overestimate the dose for low energy scattered photons in a phantom. This study determines the correction factors to compensate these dependences of the MOSFET dosimeter in ATOM phantom. For this, we first constructed a computational model of the ATOM phantom based on the 3D CT image data of the phantom. The voxel phantom was then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation code and used to calculate the energy spectrum of the photon field at each of the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom. Finally, the correction factors were calculated based on the energy spectrum of the photon field at the dosimeter locations and the pre-determined energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter. Our result for 60 Co and 137 Cs photon fields shows that the correction factors are distributed within the range of 0.89 and 0.97 considering all the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom

  18. Induction of IgG memory responses with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is antigen dose dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lite, H.S.; Braley-Mullen, H.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiated recipients of spleen cells from mice primed with a very low dose (0.0025 μ/g) of the thymus-independent (TI) antigen polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) produced PVP-specific IgG memory responses after secondary challenge with a T-dependent (TD) form of PVP, PVP-HRBC. The IgG memory responses induced by low doses of PVP were similar in magnitude to those induced by the TD antigen PVP-HRBC. The induction of IgG memory by the TI form of antigen was markedly dependent on the dose of PVP used to prime donor mice. Spleen cells from mice primed with an amount of PVP (0.25 μg) that induces an optimal primary IgM response did not produce significant IgG antibody after challenge with PVP-HRBC. The inability of higher doses of PVP to induce IgG memory may be due, at least in part, to the fact that such doses of PVP were found to induce tolerance in PVP-specific B cells and could suppress the induction of memory induced by PVP-HRBC. Low doses of PVP did not interfere with the induction of memory by PVP-HRBC. Expression of IgG memory responses in recipients of PVP-HRBC or low-dose PVP-primed cells was found to be T cell dependent. Moreover, only primed T cells could reconstitute the respnse of recipients of primed B cells, suggesting that the ability of PVP to induce IgG memory may be related to its ability to prime T helper cells. Expression of the IgG memory response in recipient mice also required the use of a TD antigen for secondary challenge, i.e., mice challenged with PVP did not develop IgG

  19. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.rebolini@kjemi.uio.no; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-07

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of the He and Be atoms and small molecules (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  20. Two factors influencing dose reconstruction in low dose range: the variability of BKG intensity on one individual and water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tengda; Zhang, Wenyi; Zhao, Zhixin; Zhang, Haiying; Ruan, Shuzhou; Jiao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate retrospective dosimetry method for the triage is very important in radiation accidents. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) fingernail dosimetry is a promising way to estimate radiation dose. This article presents two factors influencing dose reconstruction in low dose range: the variability of background signal (BKG) intensity on one individual and water content. Comparing the EPR spectrum of dried and humidified fingernail samples, it is necessary to add a procedure of dehydration before EPR measurements, so as to eliminate the deviation caused by water content. Besides, the BKGs of different fingers' nails are not the same as researchers thought previously, and the difference between maximum and minimum BKG intensities of one individual can reach 55.89 %. Meanwhile, the variability of the BKG intensity among individuals is large enough to impact precise dose reconstruction. Water within fingernails and instability of BKG are two reasons that cause the inaccuracy of radiation dose reconstruction in low-dosage level. (authors)

  1. A novel nuclear dependence of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hongkai [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Rong, E-mail: rwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Yin [Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Xurong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-10

    A linear correlation is found between the magnitude of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations and the nuclear binding energy per nucleon with pairing energy removed. By using this relation, the strengths of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations of some unmeasured nuclei are predicted. Discussions on nucleon–nucleon pairing energy and nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations are made. The found nuclear dependence of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations may shed some lights on the short-range structure of nucleus.

  2. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  3. Energy-dependency correction factors for the digital dosimeters using in NMD environment dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.C.; Huang, Y. F.; Chen, Y.W.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Short-term environment dose-rate assessments using real-time digital dosimeters within a Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) are gaining more world-wide uses recently. In the past, conventional ion chamber-type survey-meters are used dominantly in environmental dose rates evaluation. Although it has suffered less gamma energy-dependency, but it is less sensitive in comparison with other digital dosimeters and more bulky in design that can hardly make it into a pocket size application. With modern electronic advancement and its shrinking in physical size, real-time personal dosimeter nowadays has gaining more popular to use a miniature G-M counter or a solid-state diode sensor, or even a NaI(Tl) scintillation device for ambient radiation monitoring. Radiation sensor operated in pulse-mode can never been used in doses or dose rates determination since each digital pulse has carried no energy information of the impinging gamma ray being interactive with, especially in the G-M counter or the diode sensor case. The raw count rates measured from a pulse-mode device are heavily dependent on the packaging of the sensor to make it less energy-sensitive. The doses or dose rates are then calculated by using a built-in conversion factor, based on a Cs-137 beam source calibration data conducted by various manufacturing vendors, to convert its raw counts into a so-called dose or dose-rate unit. In this study, we have focused our interests in the low energy response of the digital dosimeters from several brands currently for our in-house uses. Mainly, Tc-99m and I-131 in point sources and water phantoms detection configurations have been deployed to simulate our NMD outpatients for environment radiation monitoring purpose. The energy-dependent correction factors of the digital dosimeters will be evaluated by using calibrated Tc-99m or I-131 standard sources directly that has much lower gamma energy than the Cs-137 beam source of 661 keV. In the near future, we would

  4. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192 Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D w,m ). The relation between D m,m and D w,m for 192 Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D w,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D m,m, D w,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D w,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D w,m (SCT) and D w,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D m,m and D w,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  5. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  6. Energy and integrated dose dependence of MOSFET dosimeter for clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manigandan, D.; Bharanidharan, G.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.; Tamil Kumar, T.; Rai

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the sensitivity (mV/cGy) and integral dose dependence of a MOSFET detector for different clinical electron beams was studied. Calibrated clinical electron beams (Varian 2100) were used for the exposure. A Markus type parallel plate chamber was used for the absolute dose measurements. In order to study the sensitivity of a MOSFET, the response of the ion chamber and MOSFET for the absorbed dose of 100 cGy was measured. The sensitivity of the MOSFET was then expressed as mV/cGy. Sensitivity was measured for 4-18 MeV electron beams. (author)

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study using Genz-644470 and sevelamer carbonate in hyperphosphatemic chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Moustafa Moustafa,1 Lawrence Lehrner,2 Fahd Al-Saghir,3 Mark Smith,4 Sunita Goyal,5 Maureen Dillon,5 John Hunter,5 Randy Holmes-Farley5 1South Carolina Nephrology and Hypertension Center Inc., Orangeburg, SC, USA; 2Kidney Specialists of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 3Michigan Kidney Consultants, Pontiac, MI, USA; 4Kidney Care Associates, LLC, Augusta, GA, USA; 5Genzyme, a Sanofi company, Cambridge, MA, USA Background: Genz-644470 is a new, nonabsorbed phosphate binding polymer. In an in vitro competitive phosphate binding assay, Genz-644470 bound significantly more phosphate per gram than sevelamer. As a consequence, this clinical study evaluated the ability of Genz-644470 to lower serum phosphorus in patients on hemodialysis and compared serum phosphorus lowering of Genz-644470 with sevelamer carbonate and placebo. Because three different fixed doses of Genz-644470 and sevelamer carbonate were used, phosphate-lowering dose-responses of each agent were also analyzed. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging study was conducted. After a 2-week phosphate binder washout, 349 hyperphosphatemic (serum phosphorus >5.5 mg/dL hemodialysis patients were randomized to one of seven fixed-dose groups: placebo, Genz-644470 2.4 g/day, Genz-644470 4.8 g/day, Genz-644470 7.2 g/day, sevelamer carbonate 2.4 g/day, sevelamer carbonate 4.8 g/day, or sevelamer carbonate 7.2 g/day. Indicated total daily doses were administered in fixed divided doses three times a day with meals for 3 weeks. The change in serum phosphorus during the treatment period and its dose-response patterns were assessed. Results: Dose-dependent reductions in serum phosphorus were observed with both Genz-644470 and sevelamer carbonate. Serum phosphorus-lowering responses to fixed doses of sevelamer carbonate and Genz-644470 were enhanced in a roughly linear fashion with increasing doses over a threefold range after 3 weeks of treatment. Genz-644470 did not show any advantage in

  8. Marijuana’s Dose-Dependent Effects in Daily Marijuana Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Divya; Haney, Margaret; Cooper, Ziva D.

    2013-01-01

    Active marijuana produces significant subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects relative to inactive marijuana, yet demonstrating that these effects are dose-dependent has proven difficult. This within-subject, double-blind study was designed to develop a smoking procedure to obtain a marijuana dose–response function. In four outpatient laboratory sessions, daily marijuana smokers (N = 17 males, 1 female) smoked six 5-s puffs from 3 marijuana cigarettes (2 puffs/cigarette). The numbe...

  9. Testing for long-range dependence in the Brazilian term structure of interest rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical evidence of fractional dynamics in interest rates for different maturities for Brazil. A variation of a newly developed test for long-range dependence, the V/S statistic, with a post-blackening bootstrap is employed. Results suggest that Brazilian interest rates possess strong long-range dependence in volatility, even when considering the structural break in 1999. These findings imply that the development of policy models that give rise to long-range dependence in interest rates' volatility could be very useful. The long-short-term interest rates spread has strong long-range dependence, which suggests that traditional tests of expectation hypothesis of the term structure of interest rates may be misspecified.

  10. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 μg/kg). At higher doses (50-500 μg/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ERα or ERβ, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ERα in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ERβ in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research highlights: → The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. → The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. → The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to the estimated

  11. Dosing-time-dependent variation in biliary excretion of flomoxef in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Koh-ichi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kumagai, Yuji; Fujimura, Akio

    2003-05-01

    We previously reported that the biliary excretion of flomoxef, an oxacephem antibiotic, was greater after dosing at 21:00 than at 09:00 h in diurnally active human subjects. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the biliary excretion of flomoxef is also dependent on its dosing time in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were housed under light on at 07:00 h and off at 19:00 h. Bile fluid was completely drained through a polyethylene catheter from conscious animals. Flomoxef (20 mg/kg) was injected into the tail vein at 09:00 or 21:00 h by a cross-over design, and drained bile fluid was collected for 8 h after each dosing. The maximum concentration of biliary flomoxef was significantly greater and its total excretion tended to be greater after dosing at 09:00 than 21:00 h. These results suggest the biliary excretion of flomoxef is enhanced after dosing at the beginning of the rest period in rats, as it is in humans.

  12. Inhibition of the iNOS pathway in inflammatory macrophages by low-dose X-irradiation in vitro. Is there a time dependence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, G.; Loppnow, G.; Jahns, J.; Hindemith, M.; Kamprad, F.; Anderegg, U.; Saalbach, A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Low radiation doses (≤ 1.25 Gy), if applied 6 h before or after stimulation, are known to inhibit the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway in inflammatory macrophages in vitro. We therefore investigated the time dependence and the underlying molecular mechanism of this effect, since it may be involved in the clinically observed anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy. Material and Methods: Metabolic activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, iNOS- and hemoxygenase 1-(HO-1-)protein and -mRNA expression by macrophages in vitro after stimulation with LPS/IFN-γ (0.1 μg ml -1 /100 U ml -1 ) were investigated. Irradiation was performed at 6, 4, 2 h before and 0, 2, 4, 6 h after stimulation with doses ranging from 0.3 to 10 Gy. For each group, three independent experiments were performed over a period of 30 h with sampling intervals of 3 h. Results: In stimulated macrophages, metabolic activity was not affected by radiation doses up to 10 Gy. A dose-dependent modulation of the cumulative NO production was observed with significant inhibition by low radiation doses (≤ 1.25 Gy) and return to control level and even higher concentrations by higher doses (≥ 5 Gy). The degree of inhibition did not show any significant time dependence within the experimental time window used. The iNOS-mRNA expression 3-18 h following stimulation and subsequent irradiation was not affected by doses ≤ 1.25 Gy. The iNOS-protein expression 6-24 h following stimulation and subsequent irradiation was reduced by doses ≤ 1.25 Gy. By contrast, neither HO-1-protein nor HO-1-mRNA expression at the same time points was influenced by these low doses. Conclusion: The inhibitory interference of low radiation doses with the iNOS pathway in inflammatory macrophages appears to be based on radiation effects on the translational and posttranslational control mechanisms of iNOS activity. However, contrary to our working hypothesis this is not related to

  13. SU-E-T-44: Angular Dependence of Surface Dose Enhancement Measured On Several Inhomogeneities Using Radiochromic EBT3 Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, A; Schoenfeld, A; Poppinga, D; Chofor, N; Poppe, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm 3 were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurements were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat

  14. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sissay, Adonay [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Lopata, Kenneth, E-mail: klopata@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  15. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  16. Tissue-phantom dose ratio R(t, F) in irradiation planning. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegewald, H.

    1986-01-01

    The principles for measuring doses are represented to complete the developed tissue-phantom dose ratio R(t, F). The functional dependence of the tissue-phantom dose ratio on the field size results from the different spectral energy distribution in the buildup range compared to greater depths. This once more illustrates the demand, to move the calibration and reference depths into greater depths than the dose maximum depth on account of a high precision. The scattering factors and their dependence on the type of collimator are represented and tables are made up for practical use. In a supplement the derivations of the equation systems are given, to find out the tissue-phantom dose ratio by computation and the correspondence is tested. The measurements are more relevant in the megavolt range since dose values typically for the equipment are measured in the buildup range and depth dose tables are not available in the required completeness. (author)

  17. Search for an intermediate-range composition-dependent force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boynton, P.E.; Crosby, D.; Ekstrom, P.; Szumilo, A.

    1987-01-01

    We have conducted an experiment to detect a composition-dependent force with range λ between 10 m and 1 km, and find a statistically significant effect. If interpreted as arising from a new force, this result and other recent measurementes would be consistent in strength only if the coupling were predominantly to nuclear isospin

  18. Dose-dependent effects of an immune challenge at both ultimate and proximate levels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

    2014-05-01

    Immune responses are highly dynamic. The magnitude and efficiency of an immune response to a pathogen can change markedly across individuals, and such changes may be influenced by variance in a range of intrinsic (e.g. age, genotype, sex) and external (e.g. abiotic stress, pathogen identity, strain) factors. Life history theory predicts that up-regulation of the immune system will come at a physiological cost, and studies have confirmed that increased investment in immunity can reduce reproductive output and survival. Furthermore, males and females often have divergent reproductive strategies, and this might drive the evolution of sex-specific life history trade-offs involving immunity, and sexual dimorphism in immune responses per se. Here, we employ an experiment design to elucidate dose-dependent and sex-specific responses to exposure to a nonpathogenic immune elicitor at two scales--the 'ultimate' life history and the underlying 'proximate' immune level in Drosophila melanogaster. We found dose-dependent effects of immune challenges on both male and female components of reproductive success, but not on survival, as well as a response in antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that even in the absence of the direct pathogenic effects that are associated with actual disease, individual life histories respond to a perceived immune challenge--but with the magnitude of this response being contingent on the initial dose of exposure. Furthermore, the results indicate that immune responses at the ultimate life history level may indeed reflect underlying processes that occur at the proximate level. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.E.; Bristow, R.G.; Clark, G.M.; Nussbaum, C.; Taylor, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed

  20. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  1. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Danielle; Fallone, B Gino; Warkentin, Brad; Siegbahn, E Albert; Serduc, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm 2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm 2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm 2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2–49 (mouse) and 2–46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2–87% and 33–96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this

  2. Dose-Dependent Effect of Statin Pretreatment on Preventing the Periprocedural Complications of Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Sohn, Sung-Il; Kwak, Jaehyuk; Yoo, Joonsang; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kwon, O-Ki; Jung, Cheolkyu; Chung, Inyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2017-07-01

    We investigated whether statin pretreatment can dose dependently reduce periprocedural complications in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting because of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We enrolled a consecutive series of 397 symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (≥50% stenosis on conventional angiography) treated with carotid artery stenting at 2 tertiary university hospitals over a decade. Definition of periprocedural complications included any stroke, myocardial infarction, and death within 1 month after or during the procedure. Statin pretreatment was divided into 3 categories according to the atorvastatin equivalent dose: none (n=158; 39.8%), standard dose (statin use were 12.0%, 4.5%, and 1.2%. After adjustment, a change in the atorvastatin dose category was associated with reduction in the odds of periprocedural complications for each change in dose category (standard-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.81; high-dose statin: odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.96; P for trend=0.01). Administration of antiplatelet drugs was also an independent factor in periprocedural complications (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05-0.69). This study shows that statin pretreatment may reduce the incidence of periprocedural complications dose dependently in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenting. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of dose rate (1–1014 rad s−1). Upon irradiation of the film, the profile of the radiation field is registered as a permanent colored image of the dose distribution. Unlike most other types of dyed plastic dose meters, the optical density produced by irradiation is in most cases stable for periods...... of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...

  4. Establishment Success of the Beetle Tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta Depends on Dose and Host Body Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane Cassidy, Elizabeth; Vitt Meyling, Nicolai

    2018-01-01

    Parasite effects on host fitness and immunology are often intensity-dependent. Unfortunately, only few experimental studies on insect-parasite interactions attempt to control the level of infection, which may contribute substantial variation to the fitness or immunological parameters of interest. The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta—flour beetle Tenebrio molitor model—has been used extensively for ecological and evolutionary host–parasite studies. Successful establishment of H. diminuta cysticercoids in T. molitor relies on ingestion of viable eggs and penetration of the gut wall by the onchosphere. Like in other insect models, there is a lack of standardization of the infection load of cysticercoids in beetles. The aims of this study were to: (1) quantify the relationship between exposure dose and establishment success across several H. diminuta egg concentrations; and (2) test parasite establishment in beetles while experimentally manipulating host body condition and potential immune response to infection. Different egg concentrations of H. diminuta isolated from infected rat feces were fed to individual beetles 7–10 days after eclosion and beetles were exposed to starvation, wounding, or insertion of a nylon filament one hour prior to infection. We found that the establishment of cysticercoids in relation to exposure dose could be accurately predicted using a power function where establishment success was low at three lowest doses and higher at the two highest doses tested. Long-term starvation had a negative effect on cysticercoid establishment success, while insertion of a nylon filament and wounding the beetles did not have any effect compared to control treatment. Thus, our results show that parasite load may be predicted from the exposure dose within the observed range, and that the relationship between dose and parasite establishment success is able to withstand some changes in host body condition. PMID:29401652

  5. Establishment Success of the Beetle Tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta Depends on Dose and Host Body Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Dhakal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Parasite effects on host fitness and immunology are often intensity-dependent. Unfortunately, only few experimental studies on insect-parasite interactions attempt to control the level of infection, which may contribute substantial variation to the fitness or immunological parameters of interest. The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta—flour beetle Tenebrio molitor model—has been used extensively for ecological and evolutionary host–parasite studies. Successful establishment of H. diminuta cysticercoids in T. molitor relies on ingestion of viable eggs and penetration of the gut wall by the onchosphere. Like in other insect models, there is a lack of standardization of the infection load of cysticercoids in beetles. The aims of this study were to: (1 quantify the relationship between exposure dose and establishment success across several H. diminuta egg concentrations; and (2 test parasite establishment in beetles while experimentally manipulating host body condition and potential immune response to infection. Different egg concentrations of H. diminuta isolated from infected rat feces were fed to individual beetles 7–10 days after eclosion and beetles were exposed to starvation, wounding, or insertion of a nylon filament one hour prior to infection. We found that the establishment of cysticercoids in relation to exposure dose could be accurately predicted using a power function where establishment success was low at three lowest doses and higher at the two highest doses tested. Long-term starvation had a negative effect on cysticercoid establishment success, while insertion of a nylon filament and wounding the beetles did not have any effect compared to control treatment. Thus, our results show that parasite load may be predicted from the exposure dose within the observed range, and that the relationship between dose and parasite establishment success is able to withstand some changes in host body condition.

  6. Development of dose monitoring system applicable to various radiations with wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira

    2006-01-01

    A new radiation dose monitor, designated as DARWIN (Dose monitoring system Applicable to various Radiations with WIde energy raNges), has been developed for real-time monitoring of doses in workspaces and surrounding environments of high energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN is composed of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, which consists of liquid organic scintillator BC501A coupled with ZnS(Ag) scintillation sheets doped with 6 Li, and a data acquisition system based on a Digital-Storage-Oscilloscope. DARWIN has the following features: (1) capable of monitoring doses from neutrons, photons and muons with energies from thermal energy to 1 GeV, 150 keV to 100 MeV, and 1 MeV to 100 GeV, respectively, (2) highly sensitive with precision, and (3) easy to operate with a simple graphical user-interface. The performance of DARWIN was examined experimentally in several radiation fields. The results of the experiments indicated the accuracy and rapid response of DARWIN for measuring dose rates from neutrons, photons and muons with wide energies. With these properties, we conclude that DARWIN will be able to play a very important role for improving radiation safety in high energy accelerator facilities. (author)

  7. High Dose Oral Calcium Treatment in Patients with Vitamin D-dependent Rickets Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vakili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D-dependent rickets type II (VDDR2 is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in vitamin D receptor (VDR and leads to resistance to biological effects of calcitriol. Based on the type of mutation, this disease is resistant to calcitriol even at high doses of calcitriol and successful treatment of these patients requires hypocalcemic modification through administration of high doses of calcium and bypassing the intestinal defect in VDR signaling. In addition to the need for frequent hospitalization and high costs, intravenous administration of calcium is associated with complications and problems such as arrhythmia and sepsis, venous catheter infection and hypercalciuria. This study aims to report the positive treatment effects of high doses of oral calcium in 4 patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II. CASE REPORT: In this study, 4 patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II, diagnosed based on clinical and biochemical symptoms of rickets with alopecia, underwent therapy using high doses of oral calcium (300 mg/kg/day in pediatric endocrinology and metabolism center of Imam Reza hospital. After a short period, increased growth rate in height, strength and elasticity of muscles was observed in addition to biochemical improvements without serious side effects and even one patient started walking independently within the first week of therapy for the first time. Patients were regularly followed up in terms of height and weight, growth rate and biochemical factors including calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase every 3 months for one year. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the type of mutation in vitamin D receptor, it is suggested that a 3-6 months trial of high dose oral calcium be started in each patient with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II, particularly for patients whose disease was diagnosed at lower ages.

  8. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  9. TRADOS - an air trajectory dose model for long range transport of radioactive release to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.; Valkama, I.

    1985-01-01

    A model for estimating radiation doses resulting from long range atmospheric transport of released radionuclides in accidents is precented. The model (TRADOS) is able to treat changing diffusion conditions. For example the plume can be exposed to temporary rain, changes in turbulence and mixing depth. This can result in considerable changes in individual doses. The method is applied to an example trajectory and the doses caused by a serious reactor accident are calculated

  10. Testing Dose-Dependent Effects of the Nectar Alkaloid Anabasine on Trypanosome Parasite Loads in Adult Bumble Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Winston E; Palmer-Young, Evan C; Leonard, Anne S; Irwin, Rebecca E; Adler, Lynn S

    2015-01-01

    The impact of consuming biologically active compounds is often dose-dependent, where small quantities can be medicinal while larger doses are toxic. The consumption of plant secondary compounds can be toxic to herbivores in large doses, but can also improve survival in parasitized herbivores. In addition, recent studies have found that consuming nectar secondary compounds may decrease parasite loads in pollinators. However, the effect of compound dose on bee survival and parasite loads has not been assessed. To determine how secondary compound consumption affects survival and pathogen load in Bombus impatiens, we manipulated the presence of a common gut parasite, Crithidia bombi, and dietary concentration of anabasine, a nectar alkaloid produced by Nicotiana spp. using four concentrations naturally observed in floral nectar. We hypothesized that increased consumption of secondary compounds at concentrations found in nature would decrease survival of uninfected bees, but improve survival and ameliorate parasite loads in infected bees. We found medicinal effects of anabasine in infected bees; the high-anabasine diet decreased parasite loads and increased the probability of clearing the infection entirely. However, survival time was not affected by any level of anabasine concentration, or by interactive effects of anabasine concentration and infection. Crithidia infection reduced survival time by more than two days, but this effect was not significant. Our results support a medicinal role for anabasine at the highest concentration; moreover, we found no evidence for a survival-related cost of anabasine consumption across the concentration range found in nectar. Our results suggest that consuming anabasine at the higher levels of the natural range could reduce or clear pathogen loads without incurring costs for healthy bees.

  11. Testing Dose-Dependent Effects of the Nectar Alkaloid Anabasine on Trypanosome Parasite Loads in Adult Bumble Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston E Anthony

    Full Text Available The impact of consuming biologically active compounds is often dose-dependent, where small quantities can be medicinal while larger doses are toxic. The consumption of plant secondary compounds can be toxic to herbivores in large doses, but can also improve survival in parasitized herbivores. In addition, recent studies have found that consuming nectar secondary compounds may decrease parasite loads in pollinators. However, the effect of compound dose on bee survival and parasite loads has not been assessed. To determine how secondary compound consumption affects survival and pathogen load in Bombus impatiens, we manipulated the presence of a common gut parasite, Crithidia bombi, and dietary concentration of anabasine, a nectar alkaloid produced by Nicotiana spp. using four concentrations naturally observed in floral nectar. We hypothesized that increased consumption of secondary compounds at concentrations found in nature would decrease survival of uninfected bees, but improve survival and ameliorate parasite loads in infected bees. We found medicinal effects of anabasine in infected bees; the high-anabasine diet decreased parasite loads and increased the probability of clearing the infection entirely. However, survival time was not affected by any level of anabasine concentration, or by interactive effects of anabasine concentration and infection. Crithidia infection reduced survival time by more than two days, but this effect was not significant. Our results support a medicinal role for anabasine at the highest concentration; moreover, we found no evidence for a survival-related cost of anabasine consumption across the concentration range found in nectar. Our results suggest that consuming anabasine at the higher levels of the natural range could reduce or clear pathogen loads without incurring costs for healthy bees.

  12. SU-E-T-324: The Influence of Patient Positioning Uncertainties in Proton Radiotherapy On Proton Range and Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebl, J [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Paganetti, H; Winey, B [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: 38 clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50% and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: We identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 mm and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. TCP decreases larger than 10% (absolute) were seen for less than 2.2% of the target volumes or non-existent. EUD changes were up to 178% for OARs and 35% for target volumes. Conclusion: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions in the human brain and target and OAR dosimetry were studied. Observed range uncertainties were correlated with HIs. The clinical practice of using multiple compensator

  13. Dose comparison according to Smooth Thickness application of Range compensator during proton therapy for brain tumor patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tase Woan; Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jae Weon; Jeong, Kyeong Sik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Range Compensator used for proton therapy compensates the proton beam dose which delivers to the normal tissues according to the Target's Distal Margin dose. We are going to check the improvement of dose on the target part by comparing the dose of PTV and OAR according to applying in different method of Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used in brain tumor therapy. For 10 brain tumor patients taking proton therapy in National Cancer Center, Apply Smooth Thickness applied in Range Compensator in order from one to five by using Compensator Editor of Eclipse Proton Planning System(Version 10.0, Varian, USA). The therapy plan algorithm used Proton Convolution Superposition(version 8.1.20 or 10.0.28), and we compared Dmax, Dmin, Homogeneity Index, Conformity Index and OAR dose around tumor by applying Smooth Thickness in phase. When Smooth Thickness was applied from one to five, the Dmax of PTV was decreased max 4.3%, minimum at 0.8 and average of 1.81%. Dmin increased max 1.8%, min 1.8% and average. Difference between max dose and minimum dose decreased at max 5.9% min 1.4% and average 2.6%. Homogeneity Index decreased average of 0.018 and Conformity Index didn't had a meaningful change. OAR dose decreased in Brain Stem at max 1.6%, min 0.1% and average 0.6% and in Optic Chiasm max 1.3%, min 0.3%, and average 0.5%. However, patient C and patient E had an increase each 0.3% and 0.6%. Additionally, in Rt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.5%, min 0.3%, and average 0.8%, however, patient B had 0.1% increase. In Lt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.8%, min 0.3%, and average 0.7%, however, patient H had 0.4 increase. As Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used as the proton treatment for brain tumor patients is applied in stages, the resolution of Compensator increased and as a result the most optimized amount of proton beam dose can be delivered. This is considered to be able to irradiate the equal amount at PTV and

  14. Long-range dependence and sea level forecasting

    CERN Document Server

    Ercan, Ali; Abbasov, Rovshan K

    2013-01-01

    This study shows that the Caspian Sea level time series possess long range dependence even after removing linear trends, based on analyses of the Hurst statistic, the sample autocorrelation functions, and the periodogram of the series. Forecasting performance of ARMA, ARIMA, ARFIMA and Trend Line-ARFIMA (TL-ARFIMA) combination models are investigated. The forecast confidence bands and the forecast updating methodology, provided for ARIMA models in the literature, are modified for the ARFIMA models. Sample autocorrelation functions are utilized to estimate the differencing lengths of the ARFIMA

  15. Dose dependent effect of progesterone on hypoxic ventilatory response in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Oubeidallah; Laurin, Jean-C; Julien, Cécile A; Joseph, Vincent; Bairam, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The effect of progesterone as a respiratory stimulant in newborn subjects is less known than that in adults. This study investigated the dose-response curve (0, 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg, ip) of progesterone on ventilation in non-anesthetized newborn rats at 4- and 12-days old using plethysmography. Progesterone had no effects in the regulation of normoxic ventilation. However, it enhanced the response to moderate hypoxia (FiO(2) 12%, 20 min) in 4- but not in 12-days old pups. This response was similar between the dose of 4 and 8 mg/kg. These observations suggested that progesterone enhances in age- and dose-dependent manner the hypoxic ventilatory response in newborn rats.

  16. Long-range dependence in returns and volatility of Central European Stock Indices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 27 (2010), s. 50-67 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045; GA ČR GA402/09/0965 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 5183/2010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : long-range dependence * bootstrapping * rescaled range analysis * rescaled variance analysis Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/E/kristoufek-long-range dependence in returns and volatility of central european stock indices bces.pdf

  17. A review of radiology staff doses and dose monitoring requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of radiation doses received during X-ray procedures by radiology, cardiology and other clinical staff have been reviewed. Data for effective dose (E), and doses to the eyes, thyroid, hands and legs have been analysed. These data have been supplemented with local measurements to determine the most exposed part of the hand for monitoring purposes. There are ranges of 60-100 in doses to individual tissues reported in the literature for similar procedures at different centres. While ranges in the doses per unit dose-area product (DAP) are between 10 and 25, large variations in dose result from differences in the sensitivity of the X-ray equipment, the type of procedure and the operator technique, but protection factors are important in maintaining dose levels as low as possible. The influence of shielding devices is significant for determining the dose to the eyes and thyroid, and the position of the operator, which depends on the procedure, is the most significant factor determining doses to the hands. A second body dosemeter worn at the level of the collar is recommended for operators with high workloads for use in assessment of effective dose and the dose to the eye. It is proposed that the third quartile values from the distributions of dose per unit DAP identified in the review might be employed in predicting the orders of magnitude of doses to the eye, thyroid and hands, based on interventional operator workloads. Such dose estimates could be employed in risk assessments when reviewing protection and monitoring requirements. A dosemeter worn on the little finger of the hand nearest to the X-ray tube is recommended for monitoring the hand. (authors)

  18. [Occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Age dependence and dose-response relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronius, M

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical experience and studies on animal models the age of 6-7 years was regarded as the limit for treatment of amblyopia, although functional improvement was also occasionally reported in older patients. New technical developments as well as insights from clinical studies and the neurosciences have attracted considerable attention to this topic. Various aspects of the age dependence of amblyopia treatment are discussed in this article, e. g. prescription, electronic monitoring of occlusion dosage, calculation of indicators for age-dependent plasticity of the visual system, and novel, alternative treatment approaches. Besides a discussion of the recent literature, results of studies by our "Child Vision Research Unit" in Frankfurt are presented: results of a questionnaire about prescription habits concerning age limits of patching, electronic recording of occlusion in patients beyond the conventional treatment age, calculation of dose-response function and efficiency of patching and their age dependence. The results of the questionnaire illustrate the uncertainty about age limits of prescription with significant deviations from the guideline of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). Electronic recording of occlusion allowed the quantification of declining dose-response function and treatment efficiency between 5 and 16 years of age. Reports about successful treatment with conventional and novel methods in adults are at variance with the notion of a rigid adult visual system lacking plasticity. Electronic recording of patching allowed new insights into the age-dependent susceptibility of the visual system and contributes to a more evidence-based treatment of amblyopia. Alternative approaches for adults challenge established notions about age limits of amblyopia therapy. Further studies comparing different treatment options are urgently needed.

  19. Withdrawal of corticosteroids in inflammatory bowel disease patients after dependency periods ranging from 2 to 45 years: a proposed method.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Even in the biologic era, corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients is common and causes a lot of morbidity, but methods of withdrawal are not well described. AIM: To assess the effectiveness of a corticosteroid withdrawal method. METHODS: Twelve patients (10 men, 2 women; 6 ulcerative colitis, 6 Crohn\\'s disease), median age 53.5 years (range 29-75) were included. IBD patients with quiescent disease refractory to conventional weaning were transitioned to oral dexamethasone, educated about symptoms of the corticosteroid withdrawal syndrome (CWS) and weaned under the supervision of an endocrinologist. When patients failed to wean despite a slow weaning pace and their IBD remaining quiescent, low dose synthetic ACTH stimulation testing was performed to assess for adrenal insufficiency. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess predictors of a slow wean. RESULTS: Median durations for disease and corticosteroid dependency were 21 (range 3-45) and 14 (range 2-45) years respectively. Ten patients (83%) were successfully weaned after a median follow-up from final wean of 38 months (range 5-73). Disease flares occurred in two patients, CWS in five and ACTH testing was performed in 10. Multivariate analysis showed that longer duration of corticosteroid use appeared to be associated with a slower wean (P = 0.056). CONCLUSIONS: Corticosteroid withdrawal using this protocol had a high success rate and durable effect and was effective in patients with long-standing (up to 45 years) dependency. As symptoms of CWS mimic symptoms of IBD disease flares, gastroenterologists may have difficulty distinguishing them, which may be a contributory factor to the frequency of corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients.

  20. Radiation doses due to long-range transport of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, G.; Valkama, I.; Rossi, J.; Savolainen, I.

    1985-12-01

    Within the framework of this study a model for estimating the long range transport of radioactive material and for calculating the resultant doses is developed. In the model initially the dispersion paths, i.e. trajectories, of the radioactive matter are calculated from the assumed source areas as well as the dispersion conditions along the trajectories. The trajectories are calculated at three-hour intervals in a two-dimensional grid using numerically analysed winds at a constant pressure level of 850 mb. The dispersion condition parameters applied are: the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer, the so-called mixing height, occurrence of precipitation and the character of the terrain. For each trajectory a type-index value is computed, describing the severity of the possible effects of radioactivity transported by the particular trajectory. The dispersion model uses the information on dispersion conditions provided by the trajectory model to compute the remaining radioactivity in the cloud, the deposition, as well as the doses due to different dose pathways. The pathways used are the external radiation from the cloud and from the activity deposited on the ground, inhalation of radioactive material and ingestion of contaminated food products (milk, meat, green vegetables, grain and roots). In addition to the effects of individual transport incidents, the cumulative probability distributions of the effects of accidental releases of radioactive matter can also be calculated using trajectory statistics and the trajectory type index

  1. Dose and duration dependent of aluminium in the serum liver and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis on dose and duration dependent aluminum concentration in serum, liver and brain digests of three groups of male Wistar albino rats were investigated after seven and fourteen days of daily 0.38mg/kg, 3.8mg/kg and 38mg/kg aluminum administration respectively.

  2. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10 11 Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410 9 Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510 9 Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  3. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ammonium bicarbonate over a large dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Vujosevic, S.I.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Albarran-Sanchez, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.05 mol dm -3 ammonium and sodium bicarbonate were studied after receiving various doses of 60 Co gammas (0.01-400 kGy) or 0.5-20 Gy pulses of 10 Mev electrons. Formate and oxalate were found to be the main radiolytic products, in addition to trace amounts of formaldehyde and an unidentified polymer. A large initial yield of formate in the γ-radiolysis, G(HCOO - ) = 2.2, is due to the reaction COO - + HCO 3 - ↔ HCOO - +CO 3 - . The efficiency of organic synthesis within the large dose range studied is low and is explained by efficient pathways leading to the reformation of bicarbonate, where the reaction COO - + CO 3 - is particularly significant. (author)

  4. The mode of lymphoblastoid cell death in response to gas phase cigarette smoke is dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltatzis George E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke (CS is the main cause in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the pathogenesis of which is related to an extended inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of low and high doses of gas phase cigarette smoke (GPS on cultured lymphocyte progenitor cells, using techniques to assess cell viability and to elucidate whether cells die of apoptosis or necrosis upon exposure to different doses of GPS. Methods In our approach we utilised a newly-established system of exposure of cells to GPS that is highly controlled, accurately reproducible and simulates CS dosage and kinetics that take place in the smokers' lung. This system was used to study the mode of cell death upon exposure to GPS in conjunction with a range of techniques widely used for cell death studies such as Annexin V staining, activation of caspase -3, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome C, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation. Results Low doses of GPS induced specific apoptotic indexes in CCRF-CEM cells. Specifically, cytochrome C release and cleaved caspase-3 were detected by immunofluorescence, upon treatment with 1-3 puffs GPS. At 4 h post-exposure, caspase-3 activation was observed in western blot analysis, showing a decreasing pattern as GPS doses increased. Concomitant with this behaviour, a dose-dependent change in Δψm depolarization was monitored by flow cytometry 2 h post-exposure, while at 4 h Δψm collapse was observed at the higher doses, indicative of a shift to a necrotic demise. A reduction in DNA fragmentation events produced by 5 puffs GPS as compared to those provoked by 3 puffs GPS, also pointed towards a necrotic response at the higher dose of GPS. Conclusion Collectively, our results support that at low doses gas phase cigarette smoke induces apoptosis in cultured T-lymphocytes, whereas at high doses GPS leads to necrotic death, by-passing the characteristic

  5. Temperature and ion-mass dependence of amorphization dose for ion beam irradiated zircon (ZrSiO4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Eby, R.K.

    1992-12-01

    The temperature dependence of amorphization dose for zircon under 1.5 MeV Kr ion irradiation has been investigated using the ANL HVEM-Tandem Facility. Three regimes were observed in the amorphization dose-temperature curve. In the first regime (15 to 300 K), the critical amorphization dose increased from 3.06 to 4.5 ions/nm 2 . In the second regime (300 to 473 K), there is little change in the amorphizationdose. In the third regime (> 473 K), the amorphization dose increased exponentially to 8.3 ions/nm 2 at 913 K. This temperature dependence of amorphization dose can be described by two processes with different activation energies (0.018 and 0.31 eV respectively) which are attributed to close pair recombination in the cascades at low temperatures and radiation-enhanced epitaxial recrystallization at higher temperatures. The upper temperature limit for amorphization of zircon is estimated to be 1100 K. The ion-mass dependence of the amorphization dose (in dpa) has also been discussed in terms of the energy to recoils based on data obtained from He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe irradiations and a 238 Pu-doped sample

  6. Age-dependent dose factors and dose limits of annual radioactivity uptake with unsealed radioactive substances by occupationally exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.; Nosske, D; Elsasser, U; Roedler, H.D.; Henrichs, K.

    1986-01-01

    The dose factors have been calculated on the basis of the ICRP models for dosimetric and metabolistic assessment, and are laid open in accordance with Annex XI ( to sec. 45 sub-section (2)) of the amended version of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. The contribution in hand explains the scientific fundamentals and results of the calculations of dose factors relating to inhalation and ingestion of unsealed radioactive substances by adult reference man, and age-dependent factors calculated for children and adolescents. Further, annual limits of uptake by occupationally exposed persons, as calculated on the basis of primary dose limits pursunant to the draft amendment presented by the Federal Interior Minister, are compared with relevant data given by the ICRP and EC institutions. (orig./DG) [de

  7. Dependence of the rate of DNA synthesis in x-irradiated HeLa S3 cells on dose and time after exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, L.J.; Jones, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    After irradiation of randomly dividing cultures of HeLa S3 cells with 220-kV x rays, the rate of DNA synthesis, measured by pulsed incorporation of labeled thymidine, falls nearly exponentially with time (t/sub 1/2/ approximately 1.3 hr), in a dose-independent fashion. The fall is less rapid than that observed after addition of inhibitors of protein synthesis. With doses up to 8 krad, the rate reaches a minimum and begins to increase after 1-3 hr, the minima occurring at lower values and at slightly later times with increasing dose. The increase appears to be roughly linear for about 6 hr, with the slope an inverse function of dose in the range 1-8 krad. About 7-9 hr after the completion of irradiation, the rate again falls, although no more than 10 percent of the cells die sooner than 14 hr after irradiation with 8 krad (and later with smaller doses). Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated delay in expression of the depression, described previously for doses up to 1 krad, occurs also at higher doses. During the period when the rate per culture rises, the rate in the individual cells, measured autoradiographically, appears to increase also, i.e., the rise presumably does not merely reflect populational shifts. The initial descending portion of the rate curve can be at least partially separated from the ascending portion by administering the total dose in suitably spaced fractions. If interpreted in terms of the model that attributes the initial depression in rate of synthesis to a temporary absence of replicon initiation, the results indicate that initiation is halted by an x-ray dose smaller than 1 krad; that it begins again after a dose-dependent delay amounting to about 0.7 hr after 1 krad and 1.5 hr after 7 krad; and that once begun, the rate of synthesis increases in a dose-dependent fashion. The second depression might derive from synchronization and/or from the imminence of cell death

  8. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  9. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  10. Repeated dose studies with pure Epigallocatechin-3-gallate demonstrated dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity with associated dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Jayavelu, Subramani; Murhekar, Kanchan; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2016-01-01

    EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate) is the major active principle catechin found in green tea. Skepticism regarding the safety of consuming EGCG is gaining attention, despite the fact that it is widely being touted for its potential health benefits, including anti-cancer properties. The lack of scientific data on safe dose levels of pure EGCG is of concern, while EGCG has been commonly studied as a component of GTE (Green tea extract) and not as a single active constituent. This study has been carried out to estimate the maximum tolerated non-toxic dose of pure EGCG and to identify the treatment related risk factors. In a fourteen day consecutive treatment, two different administration modalities were compared, offering an improved [i.p (intraperitoneal)] and limited [p.o (oral)] bioavailability. A trend of dose and route dependant hepatotoxicity was observed particularly with i.p treatment and EGCG increased serum lipid profile in parallel to hepatotoxicity. Fourteen day tolerable dose of EGCG was established as 21.1 mg/kg for i.p and 67.8 mg/kg for p.o. We also observed that, EGCG induced effects by both treatment routes are reversible, subsequent to an observation period for further fourteen days after cessation of treatment. It was demonstrated that the severity of EGCG induced toxicity appears to be a function of dose, route of administration and period of treatment.

  11. Angular dependence of depth doses in a tissue slab irradiated with monoenergetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, E.; Zankl, M.; Drexler, G.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents dose equivalents from external photon irradiation, normalised to air kerma free in air, on the central axis of a cuboid slab of ICRU tissue for various depths, photon energies and angles of beam incidence. The data were calculated by a Monte Carlo method using an idealised planar parallel source of monoenergetic photons. The data presented here aim at facilitating the calibration of individual dosimeters; they provide also an estimate of the quantity 'personal dose equivalent' defined by the ICRU. A detailed evaluation of the dependence of the calculated conversion coefficients on depth in the slab, photon energy and angle of incidence is given. A comparison with published measured an calculated values of angular dependence factors is made. (orig.)

  12. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  13. Dose dependence of true stress parameters in irradiated bcc, fcc, and hcp metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, T. S.

    2007-04-01

    The dose dependence of true stress parameters has been investigated for nuclear structural materials: A533B pressure vessel steels, modified 9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic martensitic steels, 316 and 316LN stainless steels, and Zircaloy-4. After irradiation to significant doses, these alloys show radiation-induced strengthening and often experience prompt necking at yield followed by large necking deformation. In the present work, the critical true stresses for deformation and fracture events, such as yield stress (YS), plastic instability stress (PIS), and true fracture stress (FS), were obtained from uniaxial tensile tests or calculated using a linear strain-hardening model for necking deformation. At low dose levels where no significant embrittlement was detected, the true fracture stress was nearly independent of dose. The plastic instability stress was also independent of dose before the critical dose-to-prompt-necking at yield was reached. A few bcc alloys such as ferritic martensitic steels experienced significant embrittlement at doses above ∼1 dpa; and the true fracture stress decreased with dose. The materials fractured before yield at or above 10 dpa.

  14. Induction of oral tolerance with micro-doses of ovomucoid depends on the length of the feeding period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    Oral administration of antigen induces antigen-specific immunologic tolerance, which is known to be dose-dependent. We studied the influence of continuous oral administration of nanogram and microgram doses of antigen on oral tolerance induction. Mice were continuously exposed to varying doses (1...

  15. Cocoa consumption dose-dependently improves flow-mediated dilation and arterial stiffness decreasing blood pressure in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Necozione, Stefano; di Giosia, Paolo; Barnabei, Remo; Allegaert, Leen; Bernaert, Herwig; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    Cocoa flavonoids exert beneficial vascular effects and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, the involved mechanisms have not been clarified and no study has yet focused on the dose-response effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of different doses of cocoa flavonoids on flow-mediated dilation (FMD), endothelin-1 (ET-1), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and SBP and DBP. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 20 healthy volunteers (1.5% improvement in FMD in 20 individuals: 0.99 at alpha = 0.05) were assigned to receive either five treatments with daily intake of 10 g cocoa (0, 80, 200, 500 and 800 mg cocoa flavonoids/day) in five periods lasting 1 week each. Cocoa dose-dependently increased FMD from 6.2% (control) to 7.3, 7.6, 8.1 and 8.2% after the different flavonoid doses, respectively (P cocoa flavonoids per day increased FMD (P Cocoa dose-dependently decreased PWV (P Cocoa intake decreased office blood pressure (BP) (SBP: -4.8 ± 1.03  mmHg, P cocoa ingestion decreased 24-h (P = 0.05) and daytime (P = 0.038) SBP, and 24-h (P = 0.0064), daytime (P = 0.0088) and night-time (P = 0.0352) pulse pressure. Compared with the control, cocoa dose-dependently decreased ET-1 levels [from 17.1 (control) to 15.2, 14.5, 14.2 and 14.1 pg/ml, after the different flavonoid doses, respectively (P for treatment cocoa dose-dependently improved FMD and decreased PWV and ET-1 also by ameliorating office and monitored BP. Our findings are clinically relevant, suggesting cocoa, with very low calorie intake, might be reasonably incorporated into a dietary approach, representing a consistent tool in cardiovascular prevention.

  16. HDL and CER-001 Inverse-Dose Dependent Inhibition of Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in apoE-/- Mice: Evidence of ABCA1 Down-Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Claudine; Goffinet, Marine; Boubekeur, Nadia; Cholez, Guy; Ackermann, Rose; Sy, Gavin; Keyserling, Constance; Lalwani, Narendra; Paolini, John F; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Barbaras, Ronald; Baron, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    CER-001 is a novel engineered HDL-mimetic comprised of recombinant human apoA-I and charged phospholipids that was designed to mimic the beneficial properties of nascent pre-ß HDL. In this study, we have evaluated the dose-dependent regulation of ABCA1 expression in vitro and in vivo in the presence of CER-001 and native HDL (HDL3). CER-001 induced cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages in a dose-dependent manner similar to natural HDL. A strong down-regulation of the ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) transporter mRNA (- 50%) as well as the ABCA1 membrane protein expression (- 50%) was observed at higher doses of CER-001 and HDL3 compared to non-lipidated apoA-I. In vivo, in an apoE-/- mouse "flow cessation model," in which the left carotid artery was ligatured to induce local inflammation, the inhibition of atherosclerotic plaque burden progression in response to a dose-range of every-other-day CER-001 or HDL in the presence of a high-fat diet for two weeks was assessed. We observed a U-shaped dose-response curve: inhibition of the plaque total cholesterol content increased with increasing doses of CER-001 or HDL3 up to a maximum inhibition (- 51%) at 5 mg/kg; however, as the dose was increased above this threshold, a progressively less pronounced inhibition of progression was observed, reaching a complete absence of inhibition of progression at doses of 20 mg/kg and over. ABCA1 protein expression in the same atherosclerotic plaque was decreased by-45% and-68% at 50 mg/kg for CER-001 and HDL respectively. Conversely, a-12% and 0% decrease in ABCA1 protein expression was observed at the 5 mg/kg dose for CER-001 and HDL respectively. These data demonstrate that high doses of HDL and CER-001 are less effective at slowing progression of atherosclerotic plaque in apoE-/- mice compared to lower doses, following a U-shaped dose-response curve. A potential mechanism for this phenomenon is supported by the observation that high doses of HDL and CER-001 induce a rapid and

  17. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats

  18. Radioiodine therapy induces dose-dependent in-vivo oxidation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.; Resch, U.; Tatzber, F.; Weiss, K.

    2002-01-01

    Until now, radiation hazards as a consequence of radioiodine therapy are not examined in detail. Oxidation of lipoproteins may favour vasculopathy. We studied the influence of a single radioiodine therapy with 5 (n=8; 46-71a), 10 (n=6; 54-75a), 20 (n=11; 45-73a), 80 (n=6; 37-75a) or 200 (n=6; 43-67a) mCi on in-vivo oxidation injury in blood (plasma [P], serum [Se]), urine (U) and saliva (Sa) in patients suffering from hyperthyroidism opr thyroid cancer, respectively. The isoprostane 8-epi-prostaglandin (PG) F 2α as a marker of in-vivo oxidation injury (Sa, Se, P, U), oxidation of lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), thromboxane B2 (Sa, Se, P, U), PGE 2 , PGF 2α and circulating endothelial cells (CEC) were examined before therapy, daily for 7 days and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks. Blood was also analyzed for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), relative electrophoretic mobility (REM), baseline dienes (BD), endogenous peroxides (POX) and formation of conjugated dienes in copper-mediated oxidation (CD) expressed in lag-time and rate of propagation. There is a dose-dependent increase in 8-epi-PGF 2α being most pronounced in saliva (p 2 and HDL 3 subfractions 24 h after application, but 48 h and 72 h after application there was a significant increase in TBARS, REM, BD, POX and rate of propagation and a decrease in lag-time in HDL-subfractions independently from applied dose. Also HDL 2 showed more TBARS, REM, BD, POX and shorter lag-time than HDL 3 48 h after application, but this effect was reversed 72 h after application. HDL is the lipoprotein most prone to oxidation by radioiodine treatment. Apparently, when LDL becomes oxidized, it shifts metabolically its oxidation products to HDL. These findings show a significant temporary and dose-dependent endothelial desquamation, oxidation of lipoproteins and long-lasting in-vivo oxidation injury (saliva > urine > blood) as side effect of radioiodine therapy, altogether being potentially proatherogenic

  19. Quality of life in a cohort of high-dose benzodiazepine dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Mirijello, Antonio; Faccini, Marco; Casari, Rebecca; Cossari, Anthony; Musi, Gessica; Bissoli, Giorgia; Quaglio, Gianluca; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZD) are among the most widely prescribed drugs in developed countries. Since BZD can produce tolerance and dependence even in a short time, their use is recommended for a very limited time. However, these recommendations have been largely disregarded. The chronic use of BZD causes a number of serious side effects, i.e., cognitive impairment, falls, traffic accidents, dependence and tolerance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL) in a cohort of 62 consecutive high-dose BZD-dependent patients seeking a BZD detoxification. Patients seeking BZD detoxification were evaluated using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the short form-36 questionnaire (SF-36). Patients showed a significant reduction of QoL as measured by either SF-36 or GHQ-12. In particular, the greater impairment was observed in the items exploring physical and emotional status. Physical functioning was the item more influenced by the length of BZD abuse. Female patients showed a greater reduction of QoL compared to male, at least in some of the explored items. Social functioning scores were greatly reduced. The present study shows for the first time that high-doses BZD dependent patients have a reduced QoL and a reduced social functioning, along with high levels of psychological distress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dose dependence of radiation-induced segregation in Ni-1 at% Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Okamoto, P.R.; Wiedersich, H.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of alloy composition as a function of depth from the external surface in Ni-1 at% Si specimens after irradiation with 3-MeV 58 Ni + ions to several different doses at nominal temperatures of 525 and 600 0 C. Very rapid segregation of Si toward the external surface ocurred during irradiation. Surface concentrations of Si in excess of the 10 at% solubility limit were found at both irradiation temperatures after a dose of only approximately 0.05 dpa. The rate of segregation decreased markedly in the dose range from approximately 1-10 dpa. Qualitative agreement was found between the experimental observations and calculations made using a modified Johnson-Lam segregation mode (1976). The present investigation suggests that radiation-induced segregation may significantly alter the mechanical behavior of irradiated alloys long before the onset of void swelling. (Auth.)

  1. Tofacitinib in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a phase II, 16-week, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Deodhar, Atul; Wei, James C; Drescher, Edit; Fleishaker, Dona; Hendrikx, Thijs; Li, David; Menon, Sujatha; Kanik, Keith S

    2017-08-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of various doses of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor, with placebo in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS, radiographic axial spondyloarthritis). In this 16-week (12-week treatment, 4-week washout), phase II, multicentre, dose-ranging trial, adult patients with active AS were randomised (N=51, 52, 52, 52, respectively) to placebo or tofacitinib 2, 5 or 10 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society 20% improvement (ASAS20) response rate at week 12. Secondary endpoints included objective measures of disease activity, patient-reported outcomes and MRI of sacroiliac joints and spine. Safety was monitored. Emax model analysis of the primary endpoint predicted a tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily ASAS20 response rate of 67.4%, 27.3% higher than placebo. Supportive normal approximation analysis demonstrated tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily ASAS20 response rate significantly higher than placebo (80.8% vs 41.2%; ptofacitinib 2 and 10 mg twice daily demonstrated greater response rate than placebo (51.9% and 55.8%, respectively; not significant). Secondary endpoints generally demonstrated greater improvements with tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily than placebo. Objective (including MRI) endpoints demonstrated clear dose response. Adverse events were similar across treatment groups with no unexpected safety findings. Dose-dependent laboratory outcome changes returned close to baseline by week 16. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily demonstrated greater clinical efficacy versus placebo in reducing signs, symptoms and objective endpoints of active AS in adult patients with a similar 12-week safety profile as reported in other indications. NCT01786668. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Hearing preservation after low dose linac radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma depends on initial hearing and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long term outcomes and factors determining hearing preservation after low dose linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuroma (AN) at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using prospectively collected data. Material and methods: Between 1994 and 2010, 102 patients had SRS for AN. Five patients had neurofibromatosis type 2, six sporadic cases had relapsed after surgery, and the remaining 91 sporadic cases had primary SRS. Dose was 12 or 14 Gy. Sustained changes ⩾ 2 mm in any diameter were deemed significant, and useful hearing was defined as inter-aural pure tone average (PTA) ⩽ 50 dB. Possible prognostic factors for hearing retention were tested by dividing the patients at pre-specified cutpoints: age (60 years), maximum tumour diameter (20 mm), initial PTA (20 dB) and dose (12 vs 14 Gy). Results: Eighty-four of the 91 sporadic primary SRS cases were evaluable for tumour control with at least one post-treatment MRI. Their median follow-up was 65 mo (range 10–184 mo). Eighty-two (97.6%) were controlled, the remaining two requiring salvage surgery for progression at 5.75 and 9.75 years. Also, one of the post-operative cases required surgery at 2.1 years after SRS. For the 50 sporadic primary SRS patients with initially useful hearing, median age was 56 (range 21–76), median initial PTA 16 dB (range −11 to +45 dB) and median tumour diameter 21 mm (range 10–33 mm). Four received 14 Gy, the rest 12 Gy. After SRS, 19 patients (38%) retained useful hearing. The Kaplan–Meier estimated preservation rate at 5 years was 50% (95% CI 36–64%) but by 10 years, this had fallen to 23% (95% CI 12–41%). On univariate analysis, the only significant factor was initial PTA (P < 0.0001). The estimated risk of hearing loss after SRS for patients with initial PTA ⩾ 20 dB was 5.0 (95% CI 2.2–11.2) times that with PTA < 20 dB. Conclusions: Tumour control was excellent (99/102 = 97% freedom from surgical salvage). Hearing preservation was strongly

  3. Fractality Evidence and Long-Range Dependence on Capital Markets: a Hurst Exponent Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprean, Camelia; Tănăsescu, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Since the existence of market memory could implicate the rejection of the efficient market hypothesis, the aim of this paper is to find any evidence that selected emergent capital markets (eight European and BRIC markets, namely Hungary, Romania, Estonia, Czech Republic, Brazil, Russia, India and China) evince long-range dependence or the random walk hypothesis. In this paper, the Hurst exponent as calculated by R/S fractal analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is our measure of long-range dependence in the series. The results reinforce our previous findings and suggest that if stock returns present long-range dependence, the random walk hypothesis is not valid anymore and neither is the market efficiency hypothesis.

  4. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient.

  5. Age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides: Pt. 5. Compilation of ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The present report is a compilation of age-dependent committed effective dose coefficients for ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides of the 31 elements covered in previous CRP Publications. The biokinetic models for adults given in ICRP Publication 30 are applied to calculate these dose coefficients, except that age-specific excretion rates are used and increased gastrointestinal absorption in infants is assurred. Changes in body mass, and tissue geometry in children are also taken into account. (UK)

  6. The dependence of dose recovery experiments on the bleaching of natural quartz OSL using different light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.H.; Murray, A.S.; Cheong, C.-S.; Hong, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the dependence of dose recovery tests on the different bleaching light sources (blue-LEDs, solar simulator, natural sunlight) is investigated with a variety of sedimentary quartz samples, selected so that their OSL signals are dominated by the fast OSL component. We observed that when long solar simulator bleaching was applied, various known doses were underestimated in an SAR-based dose recovery test. However, when blue-LEDs and short solar simulator bleaching were used (10 s and 60 s) the known doses were accurately recovered. In repeated measurement of the OSL signals induced by the same regeneration and test dose, we observed a considerable increase in quartz OSL sensitivity during or after the first OSL measurement when long solar simulator bleaching was used; this seems to provide a possible explanation for the observed underestimation of the laboratory known doses. A series of experimental results using a sample from a modern aeolian dune surface shows that there are no subsequent sensitivity changes when the naturally zeroed samples are bleached with sunlight for long time. It seems that there is a dependence of the sensitivity change on the amount of dose administered before solar simulator bleaching and on the light intensity of solar simulator. When small doses were given to the naturally zeroed sample, the sensitivity change during or after the first OSL measurement was not significant. However, when a considerable amount of beta dose (∼4000 Gy) is administered to the sample, a clear sensitivity change during or after the first OSL measurement (∼20%) was observed. Such a sensitivity change was not observed when the bleaching light intensity of solar simulator was reduced by increasing the distance between samples and the UV lamp. Our results show that, at least for the samples described here, the outcomes of dose recovery experiments are dependent on the bleaching conditions.

  7. Transient impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in relatively low-dose of acute radiation syndrome is associated with inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2008-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, which occurs constitutively, is vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), the change in the adult hippocampal function is poorly understood. This study analyzed the changes in apoptotic cell death and neurogenesis in the DGs of hippocampi from adult ICR mice with single whole-body gamma-irradiation using the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX). In addition, the hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tasks after single whole-body gamma-irradiation were examined in order to evaluate the hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction in the relatively low-dose exposure of ARS. The number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the dentate gyrus (DG) was increased 6-12 h after acute gamma-irradiation (a single dose of 0.5 to 4 Gy). In contrast, the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells began to decrease significantly 6 h postirradiation, reaching its lowest level 24 h after irradiation. The level of Ki-67 and DCX immunoreactivity decreased in a dose-dependent manner within the range of irradiation applied (0-4 Gy). In passive avoidance and object recognition memory test, the mice trained 1 day after acute irradiation (2 Gy) showed significant memory deficits, compared with the sham controls. In conclusion, the pattern of the hippocampus-dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the change in neurogenesis after acute irradiation. It is suggested that a relatively low dose of ARS in adult ICR mice is sufficiently detrimental to interrupt the functioning of the hippocampus, including learning and memory, possibly through the inhibition of neurogenesis. (author)

  8. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  9. Influência da dependência energética de dosímetros termoluminescentes na medida da dose na entrada da pele em procedimentos radiográficos Influence of thermoluminescent dosimeters energy dependence on the measurement of entrance skin dose in radiographic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia Liane de Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    greatest variation on thermoluminescent responses as a function of the effective radiation beam. CONCLUSION: The tested materials showed an appropriate performance for detecting X radiation on standard and clinical X-ray beams. Although CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Ti samples present a significant energy dependence in the considered energy range, these materials can be utilized for measuring entrance skin doses, provided appropriate correction factors are applied.

  10. Dose-rate dependence of thermoluminescence response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Chen, R.; Groom, P.J.; Durrani, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The previously observed dose-rate effect of thermoluminescence in quartz at high dose-rates is given at theoretical formulation. Computer calculations simulating the experimental conditions yield similar results to the experimental ones. (orig.)

  11. DNA methyltransferase mediates dose-dependent stimulation of neural stem cell proliferation by folate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Yu, Min; Luo, Suhui; Liu, Huan; Gao, Yuxia; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2013-07-01

    The proliferative response of neural stem cells (NSCs) to folate may play a critical role in the development, function and repair of the central nervous system. It is important to determine the dose-dependent effects of folate in NSC cultures that are potential sources of transplantable cells for therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the optimal concentration and mechanism of action of folate for stimulation of NSC proliferation in vitro, NSCs were exposed to folic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) (0-200 μmol/L) for 24, 48 or 72 h. Immunocytochemistry and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay showed that the optimal concentration of folic acid for NSC proliferation was 20-40 μmol/L. Stimulation of NSC proliferation by folic acid was associated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activation and was attenuated by the DNMT inhibitor zebularine, which implies that folate dose-dependently stimulates NSC proliferation through a DNMT-dependent mechanism. Based on these new findings and previously published evidence, we have identified a mechanism by which folate stimulates NSC growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose-Dependent and Lasting Influences of Intranasal Vasopressin on Face Processing in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Price

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginine vasopressin (AVP and related peptides have diverse effects on social behaviors in vertebrates, sometimes promoting affiliative interactions and sometimes aggressive or antisocial responses. The type of influence, in at least some species, depends on social contexts, including the sex of the individuals in the interaction and/or on the levels of peptide within brain circuits that control the behaviors. To determine if AVP promotes different responses to same- and other-sex faces in men, and if those effects are dose dependent, we measured the effects of two doses of AVP on subjective ratings of male and female faces. We also tested if any influences persist beyond the time of drug delivery. When AVP was administered intranasally on an initial test day, 20 IU was associated with decreased social assessments relative to placebo and 40 IU, and some of the effects persisted beyond the initial drug delivery and appeared to generalize to novel faces on subsequent test days. In single men, those influences were most pronounced, but not exclusive, for male faces, whereas in coupled men they were primarily associated with responses to female faces. Similar influences were not observed if AVP was delivered after placebo on a second test day. In a preliminary analysis, the differences in social assessments observed between men who received 20 and 40 IU, which we suggest primarily reflect lowered social assessments induced by the lower dose, appeared most pronounced in subjects who carry what has been identified as a risk allele for the V1a receptor gene. Together, these results suggest that AVP’s effects on face processing, and possibly other social responses, differ according to dose, depend on relationship status, and may be more prolonged than previously recognized.

  13. Pharmacogenetic analysis of opioid dependence treatment dose and dropout rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Richard C; Li, James; Doyle, Glenn A; Gilbert, Alex; Dechairo, Bryan M; Berrettini, Wade H

    2018-01-01

    Currently, no pharmacogenetic tests for selecting an opioid-dependence pharmacotherapy have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Determine the effects of variants in 11 genes on dropout rate and dose in patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00315341). Variants in six pharmacokinetic genes (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4) and five pharmacodynamic genes (HTR2A, OPRM1, ADRA2A, COMT, SLC6A4) were genotyped in samples from a 24-week, randomized, open-label trial of methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence (n = 764; 68.7% male). Genotypes were then used to determine the metabolism phenotype for each pharmacokinetic gene. Phenotypes or genotypes for each gene were analyzed for association with dropout rate and mean dose. Genotype for 5-HTTLPR in the SLC6A4 gene was nominally associated with dropout rate when the methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone groups were combined. When the most significant variants associated with dropout rate were analyzed using pairwise analyses, SLC6A4 (5-HTTLPR) and COMT (Val158Met; rs4860) had nominally significant associations with dropout rate in methadone patients. None of the genes analyzed in the study was associated with mean dose of methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. This study suggests that functional polymorphisms related to synaptic dopamine or serotonin levels may predict dropout rates during methadone treatment. Patients with the S/S genotype at 5-HTTLPR in SLC6A4 or the Val/Val genotype at Val158Met in COMT may require additional treatment to improve their chances of completing addiction treatment. Replication in other methadone patient populations will be necessary to ensure the validity of these findings.

  14. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  15. Brassinolide Increases Potato Root Growth In Vitro in a Dose-Dependent Way and Alleviates Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs are steroidal phytohormones that regulate various physiological processes, such as root development and stress tolerance. In the present study, we showed that brassinolide (BL affects potato root in vitro growth in a dose-dependent manner. Low BL concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 μg/L promoted root elongation and lateral root development, whereas high BL concentrations (1–100 μg/L inhibited root elongation. There was a significant (P<0.05 positive correlation between root activity and BL concentrations within a range from 0.01 to 100 μg/L, with the peak activity of 8.238 mg TTC·g−1 FW·h−1 at a BL concentration of 100 μg/L. Furthermore, plants treated with 50 μg/L BL showed enhanced salt stress tolerance through in vitro growth. Under this scenario, BL treatment enhanced the proline content and antioxidant enzymes’ (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activity and reduced malondialdehyde content in potato shoots. Application of BL maintain K+ and Na+ homeostasis by improving tissue K+/Na+ ratio. Therefore, we suggested that the effects of BL on root development from stem fragments explants as well as on primary root development are dose-dependent and that BL application alleviates salt stress on potato by improving root activity, root/shoot ratio, and antioxidative capacity in shoots and maintaining K+/Na+ homeostasis in potato shoots and roots.

  16. Relaxation behavior and dose dependence of radiation induced radicals in irradiated mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Kakita, Daisuke; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    Mangoes are imported to Japan after treated with hot water. Recently, irradiated mangoes imported to U. S. are widely used. This paper reports on the ESR method for analyzing the radiation induced radicals of irradiated mangoes. Upon the γ ray irradiation, a strong single peak in the flesh and skin of mangoes was observed at g=2.004. This singlet peak may be attributed to organic free radicals. The ESR spectra of the flesh and skin of mangoes showed the radiation induced radicals due to cellulose by irradiation over 12 kGy. The relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) of the singlet signal were calculated. T 2 showed dose response according to increasing the irradiation dose levels, while T 1 was almost constant. The value of (T 1 T 2 ) 1/2 showed the dependence of irradiation dose level. (author)

  17. Dependence of total dose response of bipolar linear microcircuits on applied dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, S.; Will, W.; Perry, G.; Pease, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on the total dose radiation hardness of three commercial bipolar linear microcircuits is investigated. Total dose tests of linear bipolar microcircuits show larger degradation at 0.167 rad/s than at 90 rad/s even after the high dose rate test is followed by a room temperature plus a 100 C anneal. No systematic correlation could be found for degradation at low dose rate versus high dose rate and anneal. Comparison of the low dose rate with the high dose rate anneal data indicates that MIL-STD-883, method 1019.4 is not a worst-case test method when applied to bipolar microcircuits for low dose rate space applications

  18. Phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials: proposal of a two-stage Bayesian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    We propose a new design for phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials aiming at determining a dose of an experimental treatment to satisfy safety (respectively efficacy) requirements, at treating a sufficiently large number of patients to estimate the toxicity (respectively failure) probability of the dose level with a given reliability, and at stopping the trial early if it is likely that no dose is safe (respectively efficacious). A two-stage design was derived from the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM), with implementation of Bayesian criteria to generate stopping rules. A simulation study was conducted to compare the operating characteristics of the proposed two-stage design to those reached by the traditional CRM. Finally, two applications to real data sets are provided.

  19. Sodium bicarbonate causes dose-dependent increases in cerebral blood flow in infants and children with single ventricle physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Erin M.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Goff, Donna A.; Schwab, Peter J.; Diaz, Laura K.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Lavin, Natasha A.; Durduran, Turgut; Spray, Thomas L.; Gaynor, J. William; Putt, Mary E.; Yodh, A.G.; Fogel, Mark A.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a common treatment for metabolic acidemia, however little definitive information exists regarding its treatment efficacy and cerebral hemodynamic effects. This pilot observational study quantifies relative changes in cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxy and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations (ΔHbO2 and ΔHb) due to bolus administration of NaHCO3 in patients with mild base deficits. Methods Infants and children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) were recruited prior to cardiac surgery. NaHCO3 was given as needed for treatment of base deficit. Diffuse optical spectroscopies were employed for 15 minutes post-injection to non-invasively monitor ΔHb, ΔHbO2 and rCBF relative to baseline prior to NaHCO3 administration. Results Twenty-two anesthetized and mechanically ventilated HLHS patients (1 day to 4 years old) received a median (interquartile range) dose of 1.1 (0.8, 1.8) mEq/kg NaHCO3 administered intravenously over 10–20 seconds to treat a base deficit of −4 (−6, −3) mEq/l. NaHCO3 caused significant dose-dependent increases in rCBF, however population averaged ΔHb or Δ4HbO2 compared to controls were not significant. Conclusions Dose-dependent increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) caused by bolus NaHCO3 are an important consideration in vulnerable populations wherein risk of rapid CBF fluctuations does not outweigh the benefit of treating a base deficit. PMID:23403802

  20. X-γ dose rate continuous monitor with wide range based on single-chip microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Debo; Ling Qiu; Guo Lanying; Yang Binhua

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a concept about circuit designing of X-γ dose rate continuous monitor with wide range based on single-chip microcomputer, and also presents the design procedure of hardware and software, and gives several methods for solving the design procedure of hardware and software with emphasis. (authors)

  1. Dose-dependent interaction between gemfibrozil and repaglinide in humans: strong inhibition of CYP2C8 with subtherapeutic gemfibrozil doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkalammi, Johanna; Niemi, Mikko; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Backman, Janne T

    2011-10-01

    Gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide inactivates CYP2C8 irreversibly. We investigated the effect of gemfibrozil dose on CYP2C8 activity in humans using repaglinide as a probe drug. In a randomized, five-phase crossover study, 10 healthy volunteers ingested 0.25 mg of repaglinide 1 h after different doses of gemfibrozil or placebo. Concentrations of plasma repaglinide, gemfibrozil, their metabolites, and blood glucose were measured. A single gemfibrozil dose of 30, 100, 300, and 900 mg increased the area under the concentration-time curve of repaglinide 1.8-, 4.5-, 6.7-, and 8.3-fold (P Gemfibrozil pharmacokinetics was characterized by a slightly more than dose-proportional increase in the area under the curve of gemfibrozil and its glucuronide. The gemfibrozil-repaglinide interaction could be mainly explained by gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide concentration-dependent, mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8, with a minor contribution by competitive inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 at the highest gemfibrozil dose. The findings are consistent with ∼50% inhibition of CYP2C8 already with a single 30-mg dose of gemfibrozil and >95% inhibition with 900 mg. In clinical drug-drug interaction studies, a single 900-mg dose of gemfibrozil can be used to achieve nearly complete inactivation of CYP2C8.

  2. Ocular allergy modulation to hi-dose antigen sensitization is a Treg-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Schlereth, Simona; Khandelwal, Payal; Saban, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    A reproducible method to inhibit allergic immune responses is accomplished with hi-dose Ag sensitization, via intraperitoneal (IP) injection. However, the role of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) in this process is unknown, as is whether such modulation extends to ocular allergy. We therefore determined herein whether hi-dose sensitization modulates ocular allergy, and whether CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg are involved. C57BL/6 mice were IP sensitized via low-dose (100 µg) versus hi-dose (1000 µg) ovalbumin (OVA), in aluminum hydroxide (1 mg) and pertussis-toxin (300 ng). Other mice received anti-CD25 Ab (PC61) to ablate Treg during sensitization. In another experiment, Treg from hi-dose sensitized mice were adoptively transferred into low-dose sensitized mice. Once daily OVA challenges were administered. Clinical signs, IgE, T cell cytokines, and eosinophils were assessed. Data revealed that hi-dose, but not low-dose, sensitization led to allergy modulation, indicated by decreased clinical signs, serum IgE levels, Th2 recall responses, and eosinophil recruitment. T cells from hi-dose sensitized mice showed a robust increase in TGF-b production, and Treg from these mice were able to efficiently suppress effector T cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, in vivo Treg ablation in hi-dose sensitized mice revoked allergy modulation. Lastly, Treg from hi-dose sensitized mice were able to adoptively transfer allergy modulation to their low-dose sensitized counterparts. Collectively, these findings indicate that modulation to hi-dose sensitization, which is extended to ocular allergy, occurs in a Treg-dependent manner. In addition, our data suggest that hi-dose sensitization may henceforth facilitate the further examination of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg in allergic disease.

  3. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  4. SU-E-T-96: Energy Dependence of the New GafChromic- EBT3 Film's Dose Response-Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu-Tsao, S; Massillon-Jl, G; Domingo-Muñoz, I; Chan, M

    2012-06-01

    To study and compare the dose response curves of the new GafChromic EBT3 film for megavoltage and kilovoltage x-ray beams, with different spatial resolution. Two sets of EBT3 films (lot#A101711-02) were exposed to each x-ray beam (6MV, 15MV and 50kV) at 8 dose values (50-3200cGy). The megavoltage beams were calibrated per AAPM TG-51 protocol while the kilovoltage beam was calibrated following the TG-61 using an ionization chamber calibrated at NIST. Each film piece was scanned three consecutive times in the center of Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner in transmission mode, landscape orientation, 48-bit color at two separate spatial resolutions of 75 and 300 dpi. The data were analyzed using ImageJ and, for each scanned image, a region of interest (ROI) of 2×2cm 2 at the field center was selected to obtain the mean pixel value with its standard deviation in the ROI. For each energy, dose value and spatial resolution, the average netOD and its associated uncertainty were determined. The Student's t-test was performed to evaluate the statistical differences between the netOD/dose values of the three energy modalities, with different color channels and spatial resolutions. The dose response curves for the three energy modalities were compared in three color channels with 75 and 300dpi. Weak energy dependence was found. For doses above 100cGy, no statistical differences were observed between 6 and 15MV beams, regardless of spatial resolution. However, statistical differences were observed between 50kV and the megavoltage beams. The degree of energy dependence (from MV to 50kV) was found to be function of color channel, dose level and spatial resolution. The dose response curves for GafChromic EBT3 films were found to be weakly dependent on the energy of the photon beams from 6MV to 50kV. The degree of energy dependence varies with color channel, dose and spatial resolution. GafChromic EBT3 films were supplied by Ashland Corp. This work was partially supported by DGAPA

  5. A thermoluminescence study of mineral silicates extracted from herbs in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Monaca, Sara; Fattibene, Paola; Bortolin, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    The presence of silicates in many personal objects suggests their potential use at low dose as fortuitous dosimeter in an accidental radiological exposure, when conventional dosimetry is not available. The goal of the present work is the dosimetric characterization of mineral silicates extracted from the plant Hibiscus Sabdariffa L, known as Jamaica flower, in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy. By studying the radiation-induced signal in time, the temperature integration region between 210 °C and 250 °C was found to be the most stable and also reduced the effects of thermal fading in the dose reconstruction process; the dose response curve was linear between 0.5 Gy and 5 Gy. By checking the change in sensitivity after repeated exposures to ionizing radiations and to high temperature heating, no variation in the glow curve shape or peak intensities were detected. To eliminate a pre-existing background signal, all the characterization measurements were performed with aliquots “annealed” by a preliminary readout of the TL. - Highlights: • Glow curves change in shape and intensity just in the first 3 days after irradiation. • The dose response is linear in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy. • The curve shape or intensity don't change after repeated exposures and heatings. • Encouraging results were obtained in the dose recovery test

  6. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 μm diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min -1 . For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min -1 . Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1σ) and 3% (1σ) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility (±1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 o C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also apparent that the optical fibers can be re

  7. Low-dose caffeine physical dependence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R R; Evans, S M; Heishman, S J; Preston, K L; Sannerud, C A; Wolf, B; Woodson, P P

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of terminating low dose levels of caffeine (100 mg/day) in 7 normal humans. Substitution of placebo capsules for caffeine capsules occurred under double-blind conditions while subjects rated various dimensions of their mood and behavior. In the first phase of the study, substitution of placebo for 12 consecutive days resulted in an orderly withdrawal syndrome in 4 subjects which peaked on days 1 or 2 and progressively decreased toward prewithdrawal levels over about 1 week. Data from the remaining three subjects provided no evidence of withdrawal. In the second phase of the study, the generality of the withdrawal effect was examined by repeatedly substituting placebo for 100 mg/day of caffeine for 1-day periods separated by an average of 9 days. Despite differences within and across subjects with respect to the presence, nature and magnitude of symptoms, each of the seven subjects demonstrated a statistically significant withdrawal effect. Although the phenomenon of caffeine withdrawal has been described previously, the present report documents that the incidence of caffeine withdrawal is higher (100% of subjects), the daily dose level at which withdrawal occurs is lower (roughly equivalent to the amount of caffeine in a single cup of strong brewed coffee or 3 cans of caffeinated soft drink) and the range of symptoms experienced is broader (including headache, fatigue and other dysphoric mood changes, muscle pain/stiffness, flu-like feelings, nausea/vomiting and craving for caffeine) than heretofore recognized.

  8. Improving Delay-Range-Dependent Stability Condition for Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the delay-range-dependent stability for systems with interval time-varying delay. Through defining the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and estimating the derivative of the LKF by introducing new vectors, using free matrices and reciprocally convex approach, the new delay-range-dependent stability conditions are obtained. Two well-known examples are given to illustrate the less conservatism of the proposed theoretical results.

  9. RADIOIODINE TREATMENT OF GRAVES’ DISEASE – DOSE/RESPONSE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Čepková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of 153 Graves’ disease patients treated with a wide dose range of radioactive iodine-131 (RAI was analyzed retrospectively. Six to nine months after the first dose of RAI 60 patients (39% were hypothyroid (or rather thyroxine-substituted and 26 (17% were euthyroid, while 67 patients (44% did not respond properly: in 32 (21% their antithyroid drug (ATD dose could be reduced but not withdrawn (partial response and 35 (23% remained hyperthyroid or the same dose of ATD was necessary (no response. The outcome did not correspond significantly to the administered activity of RAI (medians 259, 259, 222, and 259 MBq for hypothyroid, euthyroid, partial, and no response subgroups, respectively, or the activity retained in the gland at 24 h (medians 127, 105, 143, and 152 MBq. The effect was, however, clearly, and in a stepwise pattern, dependent on initial thyroid volume (17, 26, 33 and 35 ml, P  6 MBq/g, cure rate 80% and lower (≤ 6 MBq/g, cure rate 46% doses gave highly significant difference (P < 0.001. With our dosing range we found a dose-dependent clinical outcome that suggests an optimum delivered dose near 6.5 MBq/g, resulting in successful treatment of ca 80% patients.

  10. Dose-Dependent Cortical Thinning After Partial Brain Irradiation in High-Grade Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunamuni, Roshan [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Bartsch, Hauke; White, Nathan S. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali; Carmona, Ruben; Marshall, Deborah C.; Seibert, Tyler M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McDonald, Carrie R. [Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Farid, Nikdokht; Krishnan, Anithapriya; Kuperman, Joshua [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mell, Loren [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Brewer, James B.; Dale, Anders M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cognitive deficits may be mediated by tissue damage to cortical regions. Volumetric changes in cortex can be reliably measured using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used these methods to study the association between radiation therapy (RT) dose and change in cortical thickness in high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a voxel-wise analysis of MRI from 15 HGG patients who underwent fractionated partial brain RT. Three-dimensional MRI was acquired pre- and 1 year post RT. Cortex was parceled with well-validated segmentation software. Surgical cavities were censored. Each cortical voxel was assigned a change in cortical thickness between time points, RT dose value, and neuroanatomic label by lobe. Effects of dose, neuroanatomic location, age, and chemotherapy on cortical thickness were tested using linear mixed effects (LME) modeling. Results: Cortical atrophy was seen after 1 year post RT with greater effects at higher doses. Estimates from LME modeling showed that cortical thickness decreased by −0.0033 mm (P<.001) for every 1-Gy increase in RT dose. Temporal and limbic cortex exhibited the largest changes in cortical thickness per Gy compared to that in other regions (P<.001). Age and chemotherapy were not significantly associated with change in cortical thickness. Conclusions: We found dose-dependent thinning of the cerebral cortex, with varying neuroanatomical regional sensitivity, 1 year after fractionated partial brain RT. The magnitude of thinning parallels 1-year atrophy rates seen in neurodegenerative diseases and may contribute to cognitive decline following high-dose RT.

  11. Extent of radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib depends on its dose, the radiation dose and the integrity of the homologous recombination pathway of tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Caroline V. M.; de Haan, Rosemarie; Hageman, Floor; Oostendorp, Tim P. D.; Carli, Annalisa L. E.; O'Connor, Mark J.; Jonkers, Jos; Verheij, Marcel; van den Brekel, Michiel W.; Vens, Conchita

    2015-01-01

    The PARP inhibitor olaparib is currently tested in clinical phase 1 trials to define safe dose levels in combination with RT. However, certain clinically relevant insights are still lacking. Here we test, while comparing to single agent activity, the olaparib dose and genetic background dependence

  12. Angular dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter and its impact on in vivo surface dose measurement in breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, S; Chen, T; Wang, L; Tu, Y; Yue, N; Zhou, J

    2014-08-01

    The focus of this study is the angular dependence of two types of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters (MOSFET20 and OneDose/OneDosePlus) when used for surface dose measurements. External beam radiationat different gantry angles were delivered to a cubic solid water phantom with a MOSFET placed on the top surface at CAX. The long axis of the MOSFET was oriented along the gantry axis of rotation, with the dosimeter (bubble side) facing the radiation source. MOSFET-measured surface doses were compared against calibrated radiochromic film readings. It was found that both types of MOSFET dosimeters exhibited larger than previously reported angular dependence when measuring surface dose in beams at large oblique angles. For the MOSFET20 dosimeter the measured surface dose deviation against film readings was as high as 17% when the incident angle was 72 degrees to the norm of the phantom surface. It is concluded that some MOSFET dosimeters may have a strong angular dependence when placed on the surface of water-equivalent material, even though they may have an isotropic angular response when surrounded by uniform medium. Extra on-surface calibration maybe necessary before using MOSFET dosimeters for skin dose measurement in tangential fields.

  13. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-08

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  14. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low‐dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jan E.; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal‐oxide‐semiconductor field‐effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low‐dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50–90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point‐dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k=2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low‐dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09±0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was −8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD‐comparable low‐dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However

  15. SU-F-18C-11: Diameter Dependency of the Radial Dose Distribution in a Long Polyethylene Cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalyar, D; McKenney, S [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The radial dose distribution in the central plane of a long cylinder following a long CT scan depends upon the diameter and composition of the cylinder. An understanding of this behavior is required for determining the spatial average of the dose in the central plane. Polyethylene, the material for construction of the TG200/ICRU phantom (30 cm in diameter) was used for this study. Size effects are germane to the principles incorporated in size specific dose estimates (SSDE); thus diameter dependency was explored as well. Method: ssuming a uniform cylinder and cylindrically symmetric conditions of irradiation, the dose distribution can be described using a radial function. This function must be an even function of the radial distance due to the conditions of symmetry. Two effects are accounted for: The direct beam makes its weakest contribution at the center while the contribution due to scatter is strongest at the center and drops off abruptly at the outer radius. An analytic function incorporating these features was fit to Monte Carlo results determined for infinite polyethylene cylinders of various diameters. A further feature of this function is that it is integrable. Results: Symmetry and continuity dictate a local extremum at the center which is a minimum for the larger sizes. The competing effects described above can Resultin an absolute maximum occurring between the center and outer edge of the cylinders. For the smallest cylinders, the maximum dose may occur at the center. Conclusion: An integrable, analytic function can be used to characterize the radial dependency of dose for cylindrical CT phantoms of various sizes. One use for this is to help determine average dose distribution over the central cylinder plane when equilibrium dose has been reached.

  16. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING WARFARIN DOSE TITRATION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DEPENDING ON CLINICAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Artanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the relations of clinical characteristics and individual warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation. Material and methods. Period of warfarin dose titration was analyzed in 68 patients with atrial fibrillation due to ischemic heart disease. Adjusted warfarin dose in milligram, duration of dose titration in days and maximal international normalized ratio (INR were taken into account. Sex, age, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, concomitant diseases, amiodarone therapy were considered among clinical characteristics. Results. Adjusted warfarin dose was significantly higher in obesity , and it was lower in case of experienced myocardial infarction. The INR highest levels and maximal amplitudes of its fluctuations were observed in patients with thyroid gland nodes and smokers. Period of warfarin dose titration was longer in patients treated with amiodarone. Conclusion. Warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation depends on the presence of myocardial infarction, obesity , thyroid nodular changes, smoking and amiodarone treatment.

  17. Biophysical analysis of the dose-dependent overdispersion and the restricted linear energy transfer dependence expressed in dicentric chromosome data from alpha-irradiated human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R; Harder, D

    1997-06-01

    Experimental data for the induction of dicentric chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human T lymphocytes by 241Am alpha-particles obtained by Schmid et al. have been analyzed in the light of biophysical theory. As usual in experiments with alpha-particles, the relative variance of the intercellular distribution of the number of aberrations per cell exceeds unity, and the multiplicity of the aberrations per particle traversal through the cell is understood as the basic effect causing this overdispersion. However, the clearly expressed dose dependence of the relative variance differs from the dose-independent relative variance predicted by the multiplicity effect alone. Since such dose dependence is often observed in experiments with alpha-particles, protons, and high-energy neutrons, the interpretation of the overdispersion needs to be supplemented. In a new, more general statistical model, the distribution function of the number of aberrations is interpreted as resulting from the convolution of a Poisson distribution for the spontaneous aberrations with the overdispersed distributions for the aberrations caused by intratrack or intertrack lesion interaction, and the fluctuation of the cross-sectional area of the cellular chromatin must also be considered. Using a suitable mathematical formulation of the resulting dose-dependent over-dispersion, the mean number lambda 1 of the aberrations produced by a single particle traversal through the cell nucleus and the mean number lambda 2 of the aberrations per pairwise approach between two alpha-particle tracks could be estimated. Coefficient alpha of the dose-proportional yield component, when compared between 241Am alpha-particle irradiation and 137Cs gamma-ray exposure, is found to increase approximately in proportion to dose-mean restricted linear energy transfer, which indicates an underlying pairwise molecular lesion interaction on the nanometer scale.

  18. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In most cases, the available data consisted of the patient's age at the time of administration, the patient's sex, the quantity of activity administered, the clinically-determined uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid, and the time after administration at which the uptake was determined. The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K[exp(-μ 1 t) -exp(-μ 2 t)] (μCi), where μ 1 = λ/sub r/ - λ/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), λ/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and λ/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of λ/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time or maximum uptake an the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptakes at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/μCi-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. 12 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  19. Stochastic processes and long range dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Samorodnitsky, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a gateway for researchers and graduate students to explore the profound, yet subtle, world of long-range dependence (also known as long memory). The text is organized around the probabilistic properties of stationary processes that are important for determining the presence or absence of long memory. The first few chapters serve as an overview of the general theory of stochastic processes which gives the reader sufficient background, language, and models for the subsequent discussion of long memory. The later chapters devoted to long memory begin with an introduction to the subject along with a brief history of its development, followed by a presentation of what is currently the best known approach, applicable to stationary processes with a finite second moment. The book concludes with a chapter devoted to the author’s own, less standard, point of view of long memory as a phase transition, and even includes some novel results. Most of the material in the book has not previously been publis...

  20. Dose-dependent high-resolution electron ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Allen, L. J.; Sawada, H.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of electron ptychography at atomic resolution have ushered in a new era of coherent diffractive imaging in the context of electron microscopy. We report and discuss electron ptychography under variable electron dose conditions, exploring the prospects of an approach which has considerable potential for imaging where low dose is needed

  1. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-08-26

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (pebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (pebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects.

  2. SU-F-T-561: Energy Dependence of a Scintillation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotskova, O; Xu, A; Jozsef, G [NYU Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response and dose rate dependence of a scintillation detector over a wide energy range. Methods: The energy dependence of W1 scintillation detector was tested with: 1) 50–225 keV beams generated by an animal irradiator, 2) a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion Co-60 source, 3) 6MV, 6FFF, 10FFF and 15MV photon beams, and 4) 6–20MeV electron beams from a linac. Calibrated linac beams were used to deliver 100 cGy to the detector at dmax in water under reference conditions. The gamma-knife measurement was performed in solid water (100 cGy with 16mm collimator). The low energy beams were calibrated with an ion chamber in air (TG-61), and the scintillation detector was placed at the same location as the ionization chamber during calibration. For the linac photon and electron beams, dose rate dependence was tested for 100–2400 and 100–800 MU/min. Results: The scintillation detector demonstrated strong energy dependence in the range of 50–225keV. The measured values were lower than the delivered dose and increased as the energy increased. Therapeutic photon beams showed energy independence with variations less than 1%. Therapeutic electron beams displayed the same sensitivity of ∼2–3% at their corresponding dmax depths. The change in dose-rate of photon and electron beams within the therapeutic energy range did not affect detector output (<0.5%). Measurements acquired with the gamma knife showed that the output data agreed with the delivered dose up to 3%. Conclusion: W1 scintillation detector output has a strong energy dependence in the diagnostic and orthovoltage energy range. Therapeutic photon beams exhibited energy independence with no observable dose-rate dependence. This study may aid in the implementation of a scintillation detector in QA programs by providing energy calibration factors.

  3. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T., E-mail: a.t.abdulrahman@surrey.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia (UiTM), Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Nisbet, A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); Departments of Medical Physics, the Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Edgerton Road, Guildford GU2 7XX, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 {mu}m diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min{sup -1}. For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min{sup -1}. Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1{sigma}) and 3% (1{sigma}) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility ({+-}1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 {sup o}C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also

  4. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  5. Multi-configuration time-dependent density-functional theory based on range separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromager, E.; Knecht, S.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory is extended to the time-dependent regime. An exact variational formulation is derived. The approximation, which consists in combining a long-range Multi-Configuration- Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) treatment with an adiabatic short...... (srGGA) approximations. As expected, when modeling long-range interactions with the MCSCF model instead of the adiabatic Buijse-Baerends density-matrix functional as recently proposed by Pernal [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 184105 (2012)10.1063/1.4712019], the description of both the 1D doubly-excited state...

  6. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  7. Short communication: Experimental toxocarosis in Chinese Kun Ming mice: Dose-dependent larval distribution and modulation of immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangxu; Tan, Yancai; Hu, Ling; Luo, Yongfang; Zhu, Honghong; Zhou, Rongqiong

    2015-12-01

    Toxocarosis is an important parasitic zoonosis which is mainly caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis. To identify whether there are correlations among the infectious dose, the larval migrans and immune modulation in inbred Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice, experimental infections were carried out with a range of dosages of 100, 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 embryonated eggs (EE). Pathogenic reactions were observed in terms of physical and central nervous symptoms. Distributions of T. canis larvae in liver, lung, kidney, heart and brain organs were respectively detected by scanning tissue sections. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was employed to identify the variations of Th2 immune response. The results showed that high inocula resulted in advanced larval emergences and arrested migrations in liver, lung, kidney and brain. However, no larvae were found in any of the histological sections of heart tissues. Higher levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were detected along with the increasing inoculation doses, but the heaviest inoculum (3000 EE in this study) resulted in the sharp reduction of these ILs. Although no neurological symptoms or mortalities were noticed, these results indicated dose-dependent distribution patterns and immune regulations of T. canis larvae infection in KM mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose-Response—A Challenge for Allelopathy?

    OpenAIRE

    Belz, Regina G.; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O.

    2005-01-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of no...

  9. Is It Better to Enter a Volume CT Dose Index Value before or after Scan Range Adjustment for Radiation Dose Optimization of Pediatric Cardiothoracic CT with Tube Current Modulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the body size-adapted volume computed tomography (CT) dose index (CTDvol) in pediatric cardiothoracic CT with tube current modulation is better to be entered before or after scan range adjustment for radiation dose optimization. Materials and Methods In 83 patients, cardiothoracic CT with tube current modulation was performed with the body size-adapted CTDIvol entered after (group 1, n = 42) or before (group 2, n = 41) scan range adjustment. Patient-related, radiation dose, and image quality parameters were compared and correlated between the two groups. Results The CTDIvol after the CT scan in group 1 was significantly higher than that in group 2 (1.7 ± 0.1 mGy vs. 1.4 ± 0.3 mGy; p Hounsfield units [HU] vs. 4.5 ± 0.7 HU) and image quality (1.5 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6) showed no significant differences between the two (p > 0.05). In both groups, all patient-related parameters, except body density, showed positive correlations (r = 0.49–0.94; p 0.05) in group 2. Conclusion In pediatric cardiothoracic CT with tube current modulation, the CTDIvol entered before scan range adjustment provides a significant dose reduction (18%) with comparable image quality compared with that entered after scan range adjustment.

  10. Dose-dependent effect of 8-day cisplatin administration upon the morphology of the albino guinea pig cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardinaal, RM; de Groot, JCMJ; Huizing, EH; Veldman, JE; Smoorenburg, GF

    Numerous studies investigating cisplatin ototoxicity in animals have been performed, but it is difficult to derive a clear dose-effect relation from these studies. The degree of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity depends on a multitude of,factors. Many parameters, such as dose, mode of administration,

  11. Novel application of stem cell-derived neurons to evaluate the time- and dose-dependent progression of excitotoxic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Gut

    Full Text Available Glutamate receptor (GluR-mediated neurotoxicity is implicated in a variety of disorders ranging from ischemia to neural degeneration. Under conditions of elevated glutamate, the excessive activation of GluRs causes internalization of pathologic levels of Ca(2+, culminating in bioenergetic failure, organelle degradation, and cell death. Efforts to characterize cellular and molecular aspects of excitotoxicity and conduct therapeutic screening for pharmacologic inhibitors of excitogenic progression have been hindered by limitations associated with primary neuron culture. To address this, we evaluated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in highly enriched glutamatergic neurons (ESNs derived from murine embryonic stem cells. As of 18 days in vitro (DIV 18, ESNs were synaptically coupled, exhibited spontaneous network activity with neurotypic mEPSCs and expressed NMDARs and AMPARs with physiological current:voltage behaviors. Addition of 0.78-200 μM glutamate evoked reproducible time- and dose-dependent metabolic failure in 6 h, with a calculated EC50 value of 0.44 μM at 24 h. Using a combination of cell viability assays and electrophysiology, we determined that glutamate-induced toxicity was specifically mediated by NMDARs and could be inhibited by addition of NMDAR antagonists, increased extracellular Mg(2+ or substitution of Ba(2+ for Ca(2+. Glutamate treatment evoked neurite fragmentation and focal swelling by both immunocytochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. Presentation of morphological markers of cell death was dose-dependent, with 0.78-200 μM glutamate resulting in apoptosis and 3000 μM glutamate generating a mixture of necrosis and apoptosis. Addition of neuroprotective small molecules reduced glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. These data indicate that ESNs replicate many of the excitogenic mechanisms observed in primary neuron culture, offering a moderate-throughput model of excitotoxicity that combines the

  12. Dose-dependent pheromone responses of mountain pine beetle in stands of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; B. Staffan Lindgren; John H. Borden

    2005-01-01

    We conducted seven behavioral choice tests with Lindgren multiple-funnel traps in stands of mature lodgepole pine in British Columbia, from 1988 to 1994, to determine the dosedependent responses of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, to its pheromones. Amultifunctional dose-dependent response was exhibited by D. ...

  13. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penza, M; Jeremic, M; Marrazzo, E; Maggi, A; Ciana, P; Rando, G; Grigolato, P G; Di Lorenzo, D

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5μg/kg). At higher doses (50-500μg/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ERα or ERβ, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ERα in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ERβ in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of experimental animal biological state at exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Rejtarova, T.Je.; Chernyikov, G.B.; Timoshevs'ka, Je.V.; Kozozojeva, O.O.

    1997-01-01

    New approaches to quantitative evaluation of ionizing radiation absorbed dose within the low-dose range (up to 400 mGy) according to the degree of the organism biological response was developed. The purpose of the stage of the work published in Communication 1 is to evaluate the shifts in the animal behaviour and cellular composition of the blood at irradiation by the dose of 100,200 and 400 mGy. Distinct dose dependence of behaviour reactions and hematological indices within the dose range of 100-400 mGy was not noted

  15. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  16. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT

  17. Thymocyte apoptosis in response to low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu-Zheng, Liu; Ying-Chun, Zhang; Ying, Mu; Xu, Su; Jian-Xiang, Liu

    1996-01-01

    Thymocyte apoptosis was assessed by counting apoptotic bodies with flow cytometry (FCM) and measuring DNA fragmentation with fluorescence spectrophotometry (FSP). J-shaped dose-response curves were obtained after both whole-body irradiation (WBI) of mice and in vitro irradiation of EL4 cells with doses ranging from 0.025 to 4 Gy X-rays. There was a significant reduction of apoptosis rate to below control level with doses within 0.2 Gy, and a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis with doses above 0.5 Gy. When thymocytes were cultured 24 h after WBI with 75 mGy X-rays in complete RPMI 1640 medium, a reduction in apoptosis was observed in the course of incubation for 72 h, and the presence of Con A in the medium accentuated this reduction in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The implications of these observations and the possible molecular mechanisms for future studies are proposed

  18. Clonidine as an adjunct to intravenous regional anesthesia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose ranging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence S Ivie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The addition of clonidine to lidocaine intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA has been previously reported to improve postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing upper extremity surgery. Our objective was to perform a dose ranging study in order to determine the optimal dose of clonidine used with lidocaine in IVRA. Design & Setting : We performed a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study with 60 patients scheduled for elective endoscopic carpal tunnel release under IVRA with 50 ml lidocaine 0.5%. University-affiliated outpatient surgery center. Data collected in operating rooms, recovery room, and by telephone after discharge from surgery center. Materials & Methods : Sixty adult ASA I or II patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic carpal tunnel release under intravenous regional anesthesia.Patients were randomized into five study groups receiving different doses of clonidine in addition to 50 ml 0.5% lidocaine in their IVRA. Group A received 0 mcg/kg, group B 0.25 mcg/kg, group C 0.5 mcg/kg, group D 1.0 mcg/kg and group E 1.5 mcg/kg of clonidine.Intraoperative fentanyl, recovery room pain scores, time to first postsurgical analgesic, total number of acetaminophen/codeine tablets consumed postsurgery, incidence of sedation, hypotension and bradycardia. Results & Conclusions : There was no benefit from any dose of clonidine compared to placebo. There were no clonidine-related side effects seen within the dose range studied. In short duration minor hand surgery, the addition of clonidine to lidocaine-based intravenous regional anesthesia provides no measurable benefit.

  19. Vitamin D Dependent Rickets Type II: Late Onset of Disease and Response to High Doses of Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Sachin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D dependent rickets Type II is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. The disorder is characterized by end organ hyporesponsiveness to vitamin D. Common presentation of the disorder is total body alopecia and onset of rickets during the second half of the first year of life. Patients may display progressive rachitic bone changes, hypocalcemia and secondary hyper-parathyroidism. It is differentiated from vitamin D dependent rickets type I by virtue of response to physiological doses of exogenous vitamin D in the later. Target organ hyporesponsiveness can be overcome by higher doses of vitamin D or its analogues. We report a case of vitamin D dependent rickets type II with onset of rickets at the age of thirteen years without alopecia progressing to marked disability by twenty three years of age. She responded to massive doses of vitamin D with significant clinical improvement after six months of therapy.

  20. Homeostatic balance as an indicator of prolonged technogenic exposure in low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, A.B.; Voronova, I.A.; Takhauov, R.M.; Semyonova, Yu.V.; Sherstoboev, E.Yu.; Udut, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indication of changes induced by ionizing radiation starting up a wide range of pathologic reactions in the disease developments still poses a significant problem in radiation medicine. It mainly concerns exposure to low dose-rate ionizing radiation, since its effects are still open to question, and today any researcher acknowledges that radiation induced pathological changes can accumulate at both subclinical and prenosological stages and develop not only in exposed persons, but also in their offspring. The subject of this study was workers of reactor and radiochemical productions of Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) exposed to external and combined (external and internal) radiation respectively. Two comparative groups were formed: reactor and radiochemical production workers. In the reactor production group of workers the cumulative dose of external γ-radiation was up to 300 mSv, in the radiochemical production group - up to 150 mSv. Age ranged from 40 to 50 years. The two groups were compared between each other. Above all, there were formed 'insider control' groups (workers of the same productions with zero doses) to assess the impact of radiation factor on central homeostatic mechanisms. These groups were created using pair technique in order to level somatic disorders influence on the parameters under study. Numbers of full and biochemical blood examinations, energy metabolism between cells, hormones of homeostasis by the adaptive hormone level - insulin and cortisol, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection systems, immune and vegetative systems were all analyzed. Analyses of the systems performed, it was found out that in persons having been exposed to long term occupational radiation there were significant changes indicating lipid peroxidation system activation, antioxidant protection system depression, as well as lowered energy metabolism. The higher external γ-doses the bigger these changes are. Results from the two groups of

  1. The study on pre-heat conditions in the equivalent-dose estimation of holocene loess using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Yaofeng; Huang Chunchang; Pang Jiangli; Lu Xinwei; Zhang Xu

    2008-01-01

    The thermal treatment in the equivalent-dose estimation often is carried in the OSL dating, and pre-heat is a main thermal treatment. Due to which will originate the problems of thermal transfer and thermal activation, the thermal treatment and the setup of their conditions are key problems influencing the accuracy of OSL dating. The paper combined the temperature of pre-heat and cut-heat used in the routine measurement of IRSL and Post-IR OSL, and then estimated the equivalent-dose of several loess samples. The estimated result presents that the equivalent-dose depends on the heat temperature, especially depends on the cut-heat temperature, which is to say that the equivalent-dose increases with the cut-heat temperature; a plateau of equivalent-dose appears when using the 200-240 degree C cut-heat in the range of 200-300 degree C pre-heat, and the equivalent-doses estimated by IRSL and Post-IR OSL respectively are close to each other, which resulted from the similar sensitivity change direction of optical stimulated signals and its smaller change range in the measurement cycles using the combined temperature of pre- heat and cut-heat, and the incomplete calibration of sensitivity change of optical stimulated signals in the whole measurement cycles caused the variation of estimated equivalent-dose corresponding to the cut-heat temperature. (authors)

  2. Dose- and time-dependence of the host-mediated response to paclitaxel therapy: a mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benguigui, Madeleine; Alishekevitz, Dror; Timaner, Michael; Shechter, Dvir; Raviv, Ziv; Benzekry, Sebastien; Shaked, Yuval

    2018-01-05

    It has recently been suggested that pro-tumorigenic host-mediated processes induced in response to chemotherapy counteract the anti-tumor activity of therapy, and thereby decrease net therapeutic outcome. Here we use experimental data to formulate a mathematical model describing the host response to different doses of paclitaxel (PTX) chemotherapy as well as the duration of the response. Three previously described host-mediated effects are used as readouts for the host response to therapy. These include the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood and the effect of plasma derived from PTX-treated mice on migratory and invasive properties of tumor cells in vitro . A first set of mathematical models, based on basic principles of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, did not appropriately describe the dose-dependence and duration of the host response regarding the effects on invasion. We therefore provide an alternative mathematical model with a dose-dependent threshold, instead of a concentration-dependent one, that describes better the data. This model is integrated into a global model defining all three host-mediated effects. It not only precisely describes the data, but also correctly predicts host-mediated effects at different doses as well as the duration of the host response. This mathematical model may serve as a tool to predict the host response to chemotherapy in cancer patients, and therefore may be used to design chemotherapy regimens with improved therapeutic outcome by minimizing host mediated effects.

  3. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  4. Researches, development and characterization of dosimetric materials for monitoring in irradiation processes with high doses; Pesquisa, desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de materiais dosimetricos para monitoramento em processos de irradiacao com doses altas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galante, Ana Maria Sisti

    2003-07-01

    Dosimetric materials that can be produced in Brazil with material acquired in the national market to replace the imported dosimeters used in radiation processing were developed in this work. Mixtures of potassium nitrate and sensitizers compounds as manganese dioxide, barium nitrate and potassium bromide were prepared in the pellet form. Dosimetric characteristics such as dose-response useful range, sensitivity, environmental conditions and dose rate influences were evaluated in {sup 60}Co gamma radiation fields. Dyed polymethylmethacrylate detectors were also produced and its dosimetric characteristics were evaluated. The main characteristics evaluated in this case were: dose response useful range sensitivity, environmental conditions, dose rate influences and radiation energy dependence in gamma radiation fields and accelerated electrons beam of 0.8 to 1.5 MeV. The applied analytic technique was spectrophotometry. The calibration was performed in the irradiation facilities belonging to IPEN and certified by the International Atomic Energy Agency by means of the program IDAS (International Dose Assurance Service ) using the Fricke dosimeter. The mixture of potassium nitrate and manganese dioxide presented the best results and a wide dose range between 200 and 600 kGy. The response of the developed polymethylmethacrylate detectors are similar to the imported detectors and the dose range is characteristic to each detector and depends on the dye added in its formulation. (author)

  5. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-01-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems

  7. Growth hormone therapy for children born small for gestational age: height gain is less dose dependent over the long term than over the short term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zegher, Francis; Hokken-Koelega, Anita

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 3% of children are born small for gestational age (SGA), and approximately 10% of SGA children maintain a small body size throughout childhood and often into adult life. Among short SGA children, growth hormone (GH) therapy increases short-term growth in a dose-dependent manner; experience with long-term therapy is limited. To delineate the dose dependency of long-term height gain among short SGA children receiving GH therapy. We performed an epianalysis of the first adult height data for SGA children (n = 28) enrolled in 3 randomized trials comparing the growth-promoting efficacy of 2 continuous GH regimens (33 or 67 microg/kg per day for approximately 10 years, starting at approximately 5 years of age); in addition, we performed a meta-analysis of the adult height results published previously and those presented here. Epianalysis outcomes (n = 28) suggested that adult height increased more with a higher-dose regimen than with a lower-dose regimen. In the meta-analysis (n = 82), the higher-dose regimen was found to elicit a long-term height gain superior to that achieved with the lower-dose regimen by a mean of 0.4 SD (approximately 1 inch). Children who were shorter at the start of therapy experienced more long-term height gain. These findings confirm GH therapy as an effective and safe approach to reduce the adult height deficit that short SGA children otherwise face. In addition, the first meta-analysis indicated that height gain is less dose dependent over the long term than over the short term, at least within the dose range explored to date. For SGA children whose stature is not extremely short, current data support the use of a GH dose of approximately 33 microg/kg per day from start to adult height, particularly if treatment starts at a young age; shorter children (for example, height below -3 SD) might benefit from an approach in which short-term catch-up growth is achieved with a higher dose (> or =50 microg/kg per day) and long-term growth

  8. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction of Limited-Range CT in the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Michael; Sanchez, Thomas R; Lamba, Ramit; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Corwin, Michael T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of limited-range CT prescribed from the top of L2 to the top of the pubic symphysis in children with suspected acute appendicitis. We performed a retrospective study of 210 consecutive pediatric patients from December 11, 2012, through December 11, 2014, who underwent abdominopelvic CT for suspected acute appendicitis. Two radiologists independently reviewed the theoretic limited scans from the superior L2 vertebral body to the top of the pubic symphysis, to assess for visualization of the appendix, acute appendicitis, alternative diagnoses, and incidental findings. Separately, the same parameters were assessed on the full scan by the same two reviewers. Whole-body effective doses were determined for the full- and limited-range scans and were compared using the paired t test. The appendix or entire cecum was visualized on the limited scan in all cases, and no cases of acute appendicitis were missed on the simulated limited scan compared with the full scan. Two alternative diagnoses were missed with the limited scan: one case of hydronephrosis and one of acute acalculous cholecystitis. The mean effective dose for the original scan was 5.6 mSv and that for the simulated limited scan was 3.0 mSv, resulting in a dose reduction of 46.4% (p appendicitis and reduces the dose by approximately 46%.

  9. Dose-dependent effects of lesogaberan on reflux measures in patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Philip B; Silberg, Debra G; Ruth, Magnus; Miller, Frank; Pandolfino, John

    2014-11-18

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type B-receptor agonist lesogaberan (AZD3355) has been developed for use in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (partial responders). This study aimed to explore the dose-response effect of lesogaberan on reflux episodes in partial responders. In this randomized, single-centre, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study, partial responders taking optimised PPI therapy were given 30, 90, 120 and 240 mg doses of lesogaberan. Each dose was given twice (12 h apart) during a 24-h period, during which impedance-pH measurements were taken. Twenty-five patients were included in the efficacy analysis and 27 in the safety analysis. The effect of lesogaberan on the mean number of reflux episodes was dose-dependent, and all doses significantly reduced the mean number of reflux episodes relative to placebo. Lesogaberan also dose-dependently reduced the mean number of acid reflux episodes (except the 30 mg dose) and weakly acid reflux episodes (all doses) significantly, relative to placebo. Regardless of dose, lesogaberan had a similar effect on the percentage of time with esophageal pH < 4 [mean reduction: 68.5% (30 mg), 54.2% (90 mg), 65.9% (120 mg), 72.1% (240 mg); p < 0.05 except 90 mg dose]. No adverse events led to discontinuation and no serious adverse events occurred during active treatment. Lesogaberan inhibited reflux in a dose-dependent manner in partial responders taking optimised PPI therapy, and these effects were significant versus placebo. All lesogaberan doses were well tolerated and were not associated with clinically relevant adverse events. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01043185.

  10. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  11. Effects of gamma radiation in a wide range of doses on the morphological characteristics of Lemna minor L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasskazova, M.M.; Berestina, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the morphological parameters of Lemna minor L. were studied. As the sensitive parameters were invited to use chlorosis and necrosis. Significant differences between samples begin to show after 14 days of observation. The presence of effect, irrespective of the dose in the range 0,1-30 Gy, shows the efficiency of a sufficiently small dose (0,1 Gy) was revealed.

  12. Angular dependence on the records of dose in radiochromic films strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, K. C.; Prata M, A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Campo de O, P. M., E-mail: kamilacosta1995@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Anatomia e Imagen, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Radiological images have relevant information both the diagnostic results as to treatment decisions. Then, the diagnostic quality of image that allows a proper analysis should be achieved with the lowest possible deposition of dose in a patient. CT scans produce sectional images that allow the observation of internal structures of the human body without overlap. As in conventional radiology, the contrast which allows obtaining CT images results from the difference in X-ray beam absorption, according to the characteristics of each tissue. The increased of the beam absorption by a tissue means that it appears brighter in the image. In CT scanners, X-ray tube rotates around the patient, and this rotation results in a cross-sectional image of the body. From a sectional image series is possible to obtain a 3-dimensional image that can be viewed from different angles. Among the methods of dose measurement is the use of radiochromic films, which record the energy deposition by darkening its emulsion. The radiochromic films show little sensitivity to visible light and respond better to exposure to ionizing radiation. In this work, strips of the radiochromic film GAFCHROMIC XR-QA2 were irradiated at different angular positions for radiation quality RQT8, defining a beam of X-rays generated from a voltage of 100 kV. The response of radiochromic films depending on the doses was assessed through digital images obtained by H P Scan jet G-4050 scanner. Digital images were analyzed using Image-J software, which allowed obtaining numerical values corresponding to the intensity of darkening for each film. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dose deposition in radiochromic film according to the angular variation in order how is affected the record. So, to examine the use of film strips to record doses in Computed Tomography tests. (Author)

  13. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a 60 Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  14. Dose-dependent effects of (anti)folate preinjection on 99mTc-radiofolate uptake in tumors and kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Cristina; Schibli, Roger; Forrer, Flavio; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The folate receptor (FR) is frequently overexpressed in tumors and can be targeted with folate-based (radio)pharmaceuticals. However, significant accumulation of radiofolates in FR-positive kidneys represents a drawback. We have shown that preadministration of the antifolate pemetrexed (PMX) significantly improved the tumor-to-kidney ratio of radiofolates in mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose dependence of these effects and whether the same results could be achieved with folic acid (FA) or 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-Me-THF). Methods: Biodistribution was assessed 4 h postinjection of the organometallic 99m Tc-picolylamine monoacetic acid folate in nude mice bearing FR-positive KB tumor xenografts. PMX (50-400 μg/mouse) was injected 1 h previous to radioactivity. The effects of FA and 5-Me-THF (0.5-50 μg/mouse) were investigated likewise. Tissues and organs were collected and counted for radioactivity and the values tabulated as percentage of injected dose per gram tissue (% ID/g). Results: PMX administration reduced renal retention ( 10% ID/g), while the tumor uptake (average 1.35%±0.40% ID/g vs. control: 1.79%±0.49% ID/g) was only slightly affected independent of the PMX dose. Replacement of PMX by FA or 5-Me-THF (50 μg/mouse) resulted in a significant renal blockade (<0.1% ID/g) but at the same time in an undesired reduction of tumor uptake (<0.2% ID/g). Conclusions: Selective reduction of radiofolate uptake in kidneys under retention of high tumor accumulation could be achieved in combination with PMX over a broad dose range but not with FA or 5-Me-THF

  15. Effect of dose-rate on the frequency of X-linked lethal mutation in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.

    1984-01-01

    A total X-ray dose of 50 Gy was applied to the nematode Panagrellus redivivus using dose-rates ranging from 0.23 Gy/min to 10.49 Gy/min, and the frequency of lethal X-chromosomes was determined. This frequency ranged from approximately 1.6% at the lower dose-rate to 4.3% at the highest dose-rate, indicating a dose-rate dependency of mutation frequency in the spermatogonia and oogonia of this organism. (orig.)

  16. A study on pre-heat conditions in equivalent-dose estimation of holocene loess using single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Yaofeng; Huang Chunchang; Pang Jiangli; Lu Xinwei; Zhang Xu

    2007-01-01

    Through various arrangements of pre-heat and cut-heat temperatures in the equivalent-dose estimation of Holocene loess using a Double-SAR dating protocol, the paper estimated the equivalent-doses from several loess samples by application of IRSL and Post-IR OSL signals, respectively. The measured results present that the equivalent-dose depends on the heat temperature, especially depends on the cut-heat temperature, showing the equivalent-dose increases with the cut-heat temperature; a plateau of equivalent-dose appears at the 200-300 degree C preheat temperatures and the 200-240 degree C cut-heat temperatures, furthermore, the equivalent-doses estimated by IRSL and Post-IR OSL signals respectively are close to each other, which resulted from the similar sensitivity change directions of optical stimulated signals and their smaller change ranges in the measurement cycles using the various temperatures of pre-heat and cut-heat. This suggests that the 200-300 degree C pre-heat temperatures and the 200-240 degree C cut-heat temperatures are fit for dating young Holocene loess samples. (authors)

  17. Angular dependence of dose equivalent response of an albedo neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, B.A.; Boswell, E.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The ANSI provides procedures for testing the performance of dosimetry services. Although neutron dose equivalent angular response studies are not now mandated, future standards may well require that such studies be performed. Current studies with an albedo dosimeter will yield information regarding the angular dependence of dose equivalent response for this type of personnel dosimeter. Preliminary data for bare 252 Cf fluences show a marked decrease in dosimeter reading with increasing angle. The response decreased by an approximate factor of four. For the horizontal orientation, the same response was noted from both positive and negative angles. However, for the vertical orientation, the response was unexplainably assymetric. We are also examining the response of the personnel badge in moderated 252 Cf fluences. Responses from the moderated and unmoderated 252 Cf fields and theoretical calculations of the neutron angular response will be compared. This information will assist in building a data base for future comparisons of neutron angular responses with other neutron albedo dosimeters and phantoms

  18. Changes in Rectal Dose Due to Alterations in Beam Angles for Setup Uncertainty and Range Uncertainty in Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Kubota

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer is challenging in patients with metal implants in one or both hips. Problems can be circumvented by using fields at oblique angles. To evaluate the influence of setup and range uncertainties accompanying oblique field angles, we calculated rectal dose changes with oblique orthogonal field angles, using a device with fixed fields at 0° and 90° and a rotating patient couch.Dose distributions were calculated at the standard angles of 0° and 90°, and then at 30° and 60°. Setup uncertainty was simulated with changes from -2 mm to +2 mm for fields in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and cranial-caudal directions, and dose changes from range uncertainty were calculated with a 1 mm water-equivalent path length added to the target isocenter in each angle. The dose distributions regarding the passive irradiation method were calculated using the K2 dose algorithm.The rectal volumes with 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° field angles at 95% of the prescription dose were 3.4±0.9 cm3, 2.8±1.1 cm3, 2.2±0.8 cm3, and 3.8±1.1 cm3, respectively. As compared with 90° fields, 30° and 60° fields had significant advantages regarding setup uncertainty and significant disadvantages regarding range uncertainty, but were not significantly different from the 90° field setup and range uncertainties.The setup and range uncertainties calculated at 30° and 60° field angles were not associated with a significant change in rectal dose relative to those at 90°.

  19. Gafchromic EBT-XD film: Dosimetry characterization in high-dose, volumetric-modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Fumika; Sumida, Naoki; Okazue, Toshiya; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-11-08

    Radiochromic films are important tools for assessing complex dose distributions. Gafchromic EBT-XD films have been designed for optimal performance in the 40-4,000 cGy dose range. We investigated the dosimetric characteristics of these films, including their dose-response, postexposure density growth, and dependence on scanner orientation, beam energy, and dose rate with applications to high-dose volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) verification. A 10 MV beam from a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator was used to irradiate the films with doses in the 0-4,000 cGy range. Postexposure coloration was analyzed at postirradiation times ranging from several minutes to 48 h. The films were also irradiated with 6 MV (dose rate (DR): 600 MU/min), 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) (DR: 1,400 MU/ min), and 10 MV FFF (DR: 2,400 MU/min) beams to determine the energy and dose-rate dependence. For clinical examinations, we compared the dose distribu-tion measured with EBT-XD films and calculated by the planning system for four VMAT cases. The red channel of the EBT-XD film exhibited a wider dynamic range than the green and blue channels. Scanner orientation yielded a variation of ~ 3% in the net optical density (OD). The difference between the film front and back scan orientations was negligible, with variation of ~ 1.3% in the net OD. The net OD increased sharply within the first 6 hrs after irradiation and gradually afterwards. No significant difference was observed for the beam energy and dose rate, with a variation of ~ 1.5% in the net OD. The gamma passing rates (at 3%, 3 mm) between the film- measured and treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose distributions under a high dose VMAT plan in the absolute dose mode were more than 98.9%. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Reducing the sensitivity of IMPT treatment plans to setup errors and range uncertainties via probabilistic treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Bortfeld, Thomas; Martin, Benjamin C.; Soukup, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be very sensitive to setup errors and range uncertainties. If these errors are not accounted for during treatment planning, the dose distribution realized in the patient may by strongly degraded compared to the planned dose distribution. The authors implemented the probabilistic approach to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimization of an intensity modulated treatment plan. Following this approach, the dose distribution depends on a set of random variables which parameterize the uncertainty, as does the objective function used to optimize the treatment plan. The authors optimize the expected value of the objective function. They investigate IMPT treatment planning regarding range uncertainties and setup errors. They demonstrate that incorporating these uncertainties into the optimization yields qualitatively different treatment plans compared to conventional plans which do not account for uncertainty. The sensitivity of an IMPT plan depends on the dose contributions of individual beam directions. Roughly speaking, steep dose gradients in beam direction make treatment plans sensitive to range errors. Steep lateral dose gradients make plans sensitive to setup errors. More robust treatment plans are obtained by redistributing dose among different beam directions. This can be achieved by the probabilistic approach. In contrast, the safety margin approach as widely applied in photon therapy fails in IMPT and is neither suitable for handling range variations nor setup errors.

  1. New approach to the approximation of «dose – effect» dependence during the human somatic cells irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Chekhun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New data on cytogenetic approximation of the experimental cytogenetic dependence "dose - effect" based on the spline regression model that improves biological dosimetry of human radiological exposure were received. This is achieved by reducing the error of the determination of absorbed dose as compared to the traditional use of linear and linear-quadratic models and makes it possible to predict the effect of dose curves on plateau.

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDoseTM MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  3. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael; Zink, Klemens; Durante, Marco; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam

  4. Temperature dependence of radiation effects in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G; Katsumura, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Morita, Y.; Seguchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature dependence of crosslinking and gas evolution under γ-irradiation was studied for high-density and low-density polyethylene samples in the 30-360degC range. It was found that crosslinking was the predominant process up to 300degC and the gel point decreased with increasing temperature. At above 300degC, however, the gel fraction at a given dose decreased rapidly with temperature and the action of radiation turned to enhance polyethylene degradation. Yields of H 2 and hydrocarbon gases increased with temperature and the compositions of hydrocarbons were dose dependent. (author)

  5. Peripubertal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Longitudinal Bone Growth in Immature Male Rats in a Dose- and Time-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Young; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Jisook; Choi, Hyeonhae; Shin, Jiwon; Roh, Jaesook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the dose- and time-dependent effects of caffeine consumption throughout puberty in peripubertal rats. A total of 85 male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: control and caffeine-fed groups with 20, 60, or 120 mg/kg/day through oral gavage for 10, 20, 30, or 40 days. Caffeine decreased body weight gain and food consumption in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by a reduction in muscle and body fat. In addition, it caused a shortening and lightening of leg bones and spinal column. The total height of the growth plate decreased sharply at 40 days in the controls, but not in the caffeine-fed groups, and the height of hypertrophic zone in the caffeine-fed groups was lower than in the control. Caffeine increased the height of the secondary spongiosa, whereas parameters related to bone formation, such as bone area ratio, thickness and number of trabeculae, and bone perimeter, were significantly reduced. Furthermore, serum levels of IGF-1, estradiol, and testosterone were also reduced by the dose of caffeine exposure. Our results demonstrate that caffeine consumption can dose- and time-dependently inhibit longitudinal bone growth in immature male rats, possibly by blocking the physiologic changes in body composition and hormones relevant to bone growth.

  6. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuzar Elnager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM. After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM. The 50% effective dose (ED50 of CAPE (based on DD was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted.

  7. Sex-dependent behavioral changes in rat offspring after in utero administration of a single low dose PBDE 47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, S.N.; Talsness, C.E.; Chahoud, I. [Charite Univ. Medical School Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dept. Toxicology, Campus Benjamin Franklin

    2004-09-15

    Increasing levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in environmental and human samples has resulted in intensive discussion regarding possible hazard identification and risk assessment in the last years. In rodents, exposure to PBDE mixtures or single congeners has resulted in a mixed induction of CYP450- dependent enzymes, showing increased activity of hepatic EROD and PROD. In addition, genotoxicity has been observed in recombination assays, and neurotoxicity has been reported in mice exposed during development. Acute and sub-chronic exposures of mice and rats to a PBDE mixture (DE-71) cause dose-dependent reductions in serum concentrations of thyroxin (T4), and stressinduced elevations in plasma corticosterone. Further, some hydroxylated metabolites of PBDE congeners exhibit a higher potency in vivo than T4 in competitive binding to human transthyretin (TTR), the transport protein mediating transfer of thyroid hormones across the placenta and into the brain. The available information in the literature clearly indicates that PBDEs are potent neurotoxicants, causing effects at doses lower than that able to disrupt thyroid hormone profiles and change CYP 450 activities. Neurobehavior effects, which includes defects in learning and memory, and changes in nicotinic receptors were found at doses starting at 0.45 ppm in mouse (9). The congeners, PBDE 47 and PBDE 99, have also been shown to cause permanent aberrations in spontaneous behavior in mice which was more pronounced with increasing age. PBDE 47 is the most predominant congener found in environmental and human samples, including human breast milk. Its presence in breast milk highlights the importance of evaluating possible effects following early developmental exposure and because this period represents a critical time which an organism is extremely susceptible to minor changes in hormonal milieu. Variances in terms of time point and concentration of exposure to steroids can lead to an organizational

  8. Mycorrhizal dependency of mangaba tree under increasing phosphorus levels Dependência micorrízica de mangabeira em doses crescentes de fósforo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Alves Cardoso Filho

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the mycorrhizal dependency of mangaba tree (Hancornia speciosa plantlets, under increasing levels of phosphorus fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 4×5 factorial arrangement with three mycorrhizal fungi inocula - Gigaspora margarita, Glomus etunicatum, or a pool of native mycorrhizal fungi (Acaulospora longula, Glomus clarum, Gigaspora albida, Paraglomus sp. -, and a nonmycorrhizal control, in combination with five levels of phosphorus applied to the substrate: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mg kg-1. After 180 days of growth, plantlets with inoculation of native mycorrhizal pool produced more shoot and root dry biomass and had higher shoot phosphorus content and accumulation. The noninoculated control showed the lowest values, independently of the phosphorus level. The highest relative mycorrhizal dependency occurred with the inoculation of native mycorrhizal fungi. Plants with mycorrhizal fungi did not respond to phosphorus addition above 50 mg kg-1. Mangaba tree is highly dependent on mycorrhiza, but the degree of dependency varies according to phosphorus levels and fungal inocula. In general, mangaba tree is more responsive to mycorrhizal fungi inoculation than to phosphorus addition.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a dependência micorrízica de mudas de mangaba (Hancornia speciosa, em doses crescentes de fósforo. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em arranjo fatorial 4´5 com três inóculos de fungos micorrízicos - Gigaspora margarita, Glomus etunicatum, ou uma mistura de espécies de fungos micorrízicos nativos (Acaulospora longula, Glomus clarum, Gigaspora albida e Paraglomus sp. -, e um controle não micorrízico, combinados a cinco doses de fósforo no substrato: 0, 25, 50, 75 e 100 mg kg-1. Após 180 dias, as mudas com inoculação dos fungos micorrízicos nativos produziram mais biomassa seca de parte aérea e raízes e apresentaram

  9. Experimental determination of the angular dependence factor for the dose equivalent for photons in calibration phantoms of PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, E.; Carlsson, C.A.; Pernicka, F.

    1994-01-01

    The conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent at a depth of 10 mm in both a spherical and a slab phantom of PMMA have been determined for the X ray qualities: 40, 80 and 295 kV, ISO 'narrow' spectra; and for 137 Cs γ rays. The angular dependence factors have been experimentally determined for the same qualities and for different angles between 0 o and 180 o . The absorbed doses have been measured with thermoluminescence LiF dosemeters. The conversion coefficients and the angular dependence factors are generally found to agree well with calculated ones. Some minor discrepancies are found for the angular dependence factors and the 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 PMMA slab phantom. (Author)

  10. SU-F-T-113: Inherent Functional Dependence of Spinal Cord Doses of Variable Irradiated Volumes in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Braunstein, S; Chiu, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord tolerance for SBRT has been recommended for the maximum point dose level or at irradiated volumes such as 0.35 mL or 10% of contoured volumes. In this study, we investigated an inherent functional relationship that associates these dose surrogates for irradiated spinal cord volumes of up to 3.0 mL. Methods: A hidden variable termed as Effective Dose Radius (EDR) was formulated based on a dose fall-off model to correlate dose at irradiated spinal cord volumes ranging from 0 mL (point maximum) to 3.0 mL. A cohort of 15 spine SBRT cases was randomly selected to derive an EDR-parameterized formula. The mean prescription dose for the studied cases was 21.0±8.0 Gy (range, 10–40Gy) delivered in 3±1 fractions with target volumes of 39.1 ± 70.6 mL. Linear regression and variance analysis were performed for the fitting parameters of variable EDR values. Results: No direct correlation was found between the dose at maximum point and doses at variable spinal cord volumes. For example, Pearson R{sup 2} = 0.643 and R{sup 2}= 0.491 were obtained when correlating the point maximum dose with the spinal cord dose at 1 mL and 3 mL, respectively. However, near perfect correlation (R{sup 2} ≥0.99) was obtained when corresponding parameterized EDRs. Specifically, Pearson R{sup 2}= 0.996 and R{sup 2} = 0.990 were obtained when correlating EDR (maximum point dose) with EDR (dose at 1 mL) and EDR(dose at 3 mL), respectively. As a result, high confidence level look-up tables were established to correlate spinal cord doses at the maximum point to any finite irradiated volumes. Conclusion: An inherent functional relationship was demonstrated for spine SBRT. Such a relationship unifies dose surrogates at variable cord volumes and proves that a single dose surrogate (e.g. point maximum dose) is mathematically sufficient in constraining the overall spinal cord dose tolerance for SBRT.

  11. Dose-dependent effects of intravenous lorazepam on cardiovascular activity, plasma catecholamines and psychological function during rest and mental stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); P. Moleman (Peter); F. Boomsma (Frans); H.G. van Steenis (H.); V.J.H.M. van den Heuij (Venantius)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractDose-dependent effects of intravenously administered lorazepam on psychophysiological activity during rest and mental stress were studied in order to examine differential responses to doses which may induce anxiolysis or sedation. In a double-blind randomized cross-over study, nine male

  12. Researches, development and characterization of dosimetric materials for monitoring in irradiation processes with high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galante, Ana Maria Sisti

    2003-01-01

    Dosimetric materials that can be produced in Brazil with material acquired in the national market to replace the imported dosimeters used in radiation processing were developed in this work. Mixtures of potassium nitrate and sensitizers compounds as manganese dioxide, barium nitrate and potassium bromide were prepared in the pellet form. Dosimetric characteristics such as dose-response useful range, sensitivity, environmental conditions and dose rate influences were evaluated in 60 Co gamma radiation fields. Dyed polymethylmethacrylate detectors were also produced and its dosimetric characteristics were evaluated. The main characteristics evaluated in this case were: dose response useful range sensitivity, environmental conditions, dose rate influences and radiation energy dependence in gamma radiation fields and accelerated electrons beam of 0.8 to 1.5 MeV. The applied analytic technique was spectrophotometry. The calibration was performed in the irradiation facilities belonging to IPEN and certified by the International Atomic Energy Agency by means of the program IDAS (International Dose Assurance Service ) using the Fricke dosimeter. The mixture of potassium nitrate and manganese dioxide presented the best results and a wide dose range between 200 and 600 kGy. The response of the developed polymethylmethacrylate detectors are similar to the imported detectors and the dose range is characteristic to each detector and depends on the dye added in its formulation. (author)

  13. Age-dependent radiation dose due to intake of uranium through drinking water in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Mohapatra, S.; Chakrabarty, A.; Sumesh, C.G.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to estimate the content of uranium in drinking water in various states of India by laser fluorimetry. Depending upon the rate of water intake for the different age groups, the associated radiation dose was calculated. The concentration of uranium varied between 0.1 ± 0.01 and 19.6 ± 1.8 ppb which is much lower than the drinking water guideline value of 60 ppb. The total radiation dose due to ingestion of uranium through drinking water for various age groups is found to vary from 0.14 μSv/y to 48 μSv/y. (author)

  14. Dose-dependent response of Trichoderma harzianum in improving drought tolerance in rice genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Veena; Ansari, Mohammad W; Tula, Suresh; Yadav, Sandep; Sahoo, Ranjan K; Shukla, Nandini; Bains, Gurdeep; Badal, Shail; Chandra, Subhash; Gaur, A K; Kumar, Atul; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, J; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    This study demonstrates a dose-dependent response of Trichoderma harzianum Th-56 in improving drought tolerance in rice by modulating proline, SOD, lipid peroxidation product and DHN / AQU transcript level, and the growth attributes. In the present study, the effect of colonization of different doses of T. harzianum Th-56 strain in rice genotypes were evaluated under drought stress. The rice genotypes treated with increasing dose of T. harzianum strain Th-56 showed better drought tolerance as compared with untreated control plant. There was significant change in malondialdehyde, proline, higher superoxide dismutase level, plant height, total dry matter, relative chlorophyll content, leaf rolling, leaf tip burn, and the number of scorched/senesced leaves in T. harzianum Th-56 treated rice genotypes under drought stress. This was corroborated with altered expression of aquaporin and dehydrin genes in T. harzianum Th-56 treated rice genotypes. The present findings suggest that a dose of 30 g/L was the most effective in improving drought tolerance in rice, and its potential exploitation will contribute to the advancement of rice genotypes to sustain crop productivity under drought stress. Interaction studies of T. harzianum with three aromatic rice genotypes suggested that PSD-17 was highly benefitted from T. harzianum colonization under drought stress.

  15. Methyl jasmonate-induced emission of biogenic volatiles is biphasic in cucumber: a high-resolution analysis of dose dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifan; Ye, Jiayan; Li, Shuai; Niinemets, Ülo

    2017-07-20

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) is a key airborne elicitor activating jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways, including induction of stress-related volatile emissions, but how the magnitude and timing of these emissions scale with MeJA dose is not known. Treatments with exogenous MeJA concentrations ranging from mild (0.2 mM) to lethal (50 mM) were used to investigate quantitative relationships among MeJA dose and the kinetics and magnitude of volatile release in Cucumis sativus by combining high-resolution measurements with a proton-transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and GC-MS. The results highlighted biphasic kinetics of elicitation of volatiles. The early phase, peaking in 0.1-1 h after the MeJA treatment, was characterized by emissions of lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway volatiles and methanol. In the subsequent phase, starting in 6-12 h and reaching a maximum in 15-25 h after the treatment, secondary emissions of LOX compounds as well as emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were elicited. For both phases, the maximum emission rates and total integrated emissions increased with applied MeJA concentration. Furthermore, the rates of induction and decay, and the duration of emission bursts were positively, and the timing of emission maxima were negatively associated with MeJA dose for LOX compounds and terpenoids, except for the duration of the first LOX burst. These results demonstrate major effects of MeJA dose on the kinetics and magnitude of volatile response, underscoring the importance of biotic stress severity in deciphering the downstream events of biological impacts. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas CGG; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  17. Dose- and time-dependent radiation inhibition of RNA and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in embryonic cartilage: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, M.; Thierens, H.; De Ridder, L. (Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium))

    1990-05-01

    Radiation effects on the RNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis of embryonic cartilaginous tibiae were studied in vitro during a 4- or 7-day culture period. Before culture, tibiae received single radiation doses of 20, 50 or 100 Gy. A limited, dose-dependent immediate effect on RNA and GAG synthesis was found. This effect was unchanged for 2 days. After this period a time-dependent delayed effect was observed. For each radiation dose, and for each precursor, the same time-related pattern was found. At the end of the culture period acid phosphatase activity, an early indicator of apoptosis, was higher in irradiated tibiae than in controls. No other morphological ultrastructural differences were observed at this time. The authors conclude that metabolic alterations are probably due to stimulation of initial stages of the apoptotic process in the irradiated cartilage cells. (author).

  18. Dose-dependent effects of celecoxib on CB-1 agonist-induced antinociception in the mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zarrindast

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Endocannabinoid produce analgesia that is comparable which of opioids. The mechanism of antinociceptive effects of (∆ - 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is suggested to be through cyclooxygenase (COX pathway. In the present work, the effect of two extreme dose ranges of celecoxib (mg/kg and ng/kg, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 antagonist, on arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA, a selective CB1 agonist induced antinociception in mice was examined. "nMethods: We have investigated the interaction between celecoxib, at the doses of mg/kg (50, 100, 200 and 400 i.p.  and ultra low dose (ULD (25 and 50 ng/kg, i.p., on the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of ACPA (0.004, 0.0625 and 1 μg/mice, using formalin test in mice. "nResults: I.C.V. administration of ACPA induced antinociception. Intraperitoneal administration of celecoxib (mg/kg and its ULD (ng/kg attenuated and potentiated, ACPA antinociceptive effects, respectively. "nConclusion: It is concluded that the mg/kg doses of COX-2 antagonist showed opposite effects compare to the ultra-low dose of the drug.

  19. Dose-dependent effects of oral tyrosine administration on plasma tyrosine levels and cognition in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de Ondine; Bloemendaal, Mirjam; Heus, De Rianne; Aarts, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  20. Dose-Dependent Effects of Oral Tyrosine Administration on Plasma Tyrosine Levels and Cognition in Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Bloemendaal, M.; Heus, R.A.A. de; Aarts, E.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  1. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D 50% ) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies

  2. Dose- and time-dependent effects of phenobarbital on gene expression profiling in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Carine B.; Spire, Catherine; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) induces or represses a wide spectrum of genes in rodent liver. Much less is known about its effects in human liver. We used pangenomic cDNA microarrays to analyze concentration- and time-dependent gene expression profile changes induced by PB in the well-differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Changes in gene expression profiles clustered at specific concentration ranges and treatment times. The number of correctly annotated genes significantly modulated by at least three different PB concentration ranges (spanning 0.5 to 3.2 mM) at 20 h exposure amounted to 77 and 128 genes (p ≤ 0.01) at 2- and 1.8-fold filter changes, respectively. At low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM), PB-responsive genes included the well-recognized CAR- and PXR-dependent responsive cytochromes P450 (CYP2B6, CYP3A4), sulfotransferase 2A1 and plasma transporters (ABCB1, ABCC2), as well as a number of genes critically involved in various metabolic pathways, including lipid (CYP4A11, CYP4F3), vitamin D (CYP24A1) and bile (CYP7A1 and CYP8B1) metabolism. At concentrations of 3.2 mM or higher after 20 h, and especially 48 h, increased cytotoxic effects were associated with disregulation of numerous genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair and apoptosis. Primary human hepatocyte cultures were also exposed to 1 and 3.2 mM PB for 20 h and the changes were comparable to those found in HepaRG cells treated under the same conditions. Taken altogether, our data provide further evidence that HepaRG cells closely resemble primary human hepatocytes and provide new information on the effects of PB in human liver. These data also emphasize the importance of investigating dose- and time-dependent effects of chemicals when using toxicogenomic approaches

  3. Salmonella fecal shedding and immune responses are dose- and serotype- dependent in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ivanek

    Full Text Available Despite the public health importance of Salmonella infection in pigs, little is known about the associated dynamics of fecal shedding and immunity. In this study, we investigated the transitions of pigs through the states of Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response post-Salmonella inoculation as affected by the challenge dose and serotype. Continuous-time multistate Markov models were developed using published experimental data. The model for shedding had four transient states, of which two were shedding (continuous and intermittent shedding and two non-shedding (latency and intermittent non-shedding, and one absorbing state representing permanent cessation of shedding. The immune response model had two transient states representing responses below and above the seroconversion level. The effects of two doses [low (0.65×10(6 CFU/pig and high (0.65×10(9 CFU/pig] and four serotypes (Salmonella Yoruba, Salmonella Cubana, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Derby on the models' transition intensities were evaluated using a proportional intensities model. Results indicated statistically significant effects of the challenge dose and serotype on the dynamics of shedding and immune response. The time spent in the specific states was also estimated. Continuous shedding was on average 10-26 days longer, while intermittent non-shedding was 2-4 days shorter, in pigs challenged with the high compared to low dose. Interestingly, among pigs challenged with the high dose, the continuous and intermittent shedding states were on average up to 10-17 and 3-4 days longer, respectively, in pigs infected with S. Cubana compared to the other three serotypes. Pigs challenged with the high dose of S. Typhimurium or S. Derby seroconverted on average up to 8-11 days faster compared to the low dose. These findings highlight that Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response following Salmonella challenge are dose- and serotype-dependent and that the detection of

  4. An analysis of uncertainty and of dependence on season of year of ingestion population dose arising from design basis accidents in advanced thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.; Ponting, A.C.

    1985-03-01

    The results of a detailed study of ingestion collective dose from five limiting PWR design basis releases are presented, the PWR being chosen as being typical of an advanced thermal reactor for which source terms are readily available. The ingestion collective dose was calculated for a range of wind direction/weather scenarios for releases from a typical U.K. rural and a U.K. semi-urban site and scenarios identified where the ingestion pathway was of potential significance. The dependence of the ingestion collective dose for these cases on the season of year when the release occurs was investigated. An analysis was carried out of the uncertainty in the ''worst case'' ingestion calculations arising from uncertainties in foodchain input parameters. An efficient but comprehensive set of dynamic foodchain computer models was produced and the literature surveyed to produce probability distribution functions (PDF's) for all relevant independent input data items. These were used to produce output PDF's for food contamination levels and for ingestion collective dose from the five releases. Finally, the study has highlighted several areas central to ingestion collective dose assessments where the available data are inadequate. This led to the formulation of a set of future research requirements which will need to be met both to obtain a better fundamental understanding of foodchain transfer and to reduce uncertainties in ingestion collective dose assessments. (author)

  5. The Dose Rate Dependence of the Yield of Trapped Electrons in Crystalline Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Johan Daniel Göran; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1980-01-01

    in competition with other reactions and we propose a simple model where we assume that the mobile electrons can undergo bimolecular bulk reactions with protons and OH radicals. Rate constants of 3.0 × 1015 M−1 S−1 and 1.4 × 1014 M−1 S−1 for the two reactions were required in the model in order to account......The yield of localized excess electrons in crystalline H2O ice has been studied as a function of the dose rate at various temperatures in the range −10 to −40°C. The G value was found to decrease significantly with increasing dose rate. Thus it appears that the localization of electrons takes place...

  6. Page 1 ~'----------------------------- Dose-dependent effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract We cOInpared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endoInetrial Inorphology of. nOrInal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation ~th those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-. stiInulating hOrInone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin ...

  7. High-dose benzodiazepine dependence: a qualitative study of patients' perception on cessation and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrenz, Michael; Gehring, Marie-Therese; Buadze, Anna; Caflisch, Carlo

    2015-05-13

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome has been reported following attempts to withdraw even from low or therapeutic doses and has been compared to barbiturate and alcohol withdrawal. This experience is known to deter patients from future cessation attempts. Research on other psychotropic substances shows that the reasons and motivations for withdrawal attempts - as well as the experiences surrounding those attempts - at least partially predict future efforts at discontinuation as well as relapse. We therefore aimed to qualitatively explore what motivates patients to discontinue this medication as well as to examine their experiences surrounding previous and current withdrawal attempts and treatment interventions in order to positively influence future help-seeking behavior and compliance. To understand these patients better, we conducted a series of 41 unstructured, narrative, in-depth interviews among adult Swiss patients with a long-term dependent use of benzodiazepines in doses equivalent to more than 40 mg diazepam per day and/or otherwise problematic use (mixing benzodiazepines, escalating dosage, recreational use or illegal purchase). Mayring's qualitative content analysis was used to evaluate findings. These high-dose benzodiazepine-dependent patients decision to change consumption patterns were affected by health concerns, the feeling of being addicted and social factors. Discontinuation attempts were frequent and not very successful with fast relapse. Withdrawal was perceived to be a difficult, complicated, and highly unpredictable process. The first attempt at withdrawal occurred at home and typically felt better than at the clinic. Inpatient treatment was believed to be more effective with long term treatment (approaches) than short term. Patients preferred gradual reduction of usage to abrupt cessation (and had experienced both). While no clear preferences for withdrawal were found for benzodiazepines with specific pharmacokinetic properties, participants

  8. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ammonium bicarbonate over a large dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Albarran-Sanchez, M.G.; Sehested, K.

    1986-12-01

    0 2 -free aqueous solutions of 0.05 mol dm -3 ammonium bicarbonate were studied after receiving various doses of 60 Co gammas (0.001-170 Mrd) or krd pulses of 10 MeV electrons. Formate, oxalate, formaldehyde and an unidentified polymer (M w 14000-16000 daltons) were found to be the main radiolytic products. A large initial yield of formate in the γ-radiolysis, G(HCOO - ) = 2.2, is due to the reaction CO 2 - + HCO 3 - ↔ HC00 - + CO 3 - . The efficiency of organic synthesis within the large dose range studied is low and is explained by efficient pathways to the reformation of bicarbonate, where the reaction CO 2 - + CO 3 - is particurlarly significant. Computer fitting of the data obtained in the γ-radiolysis and by pulsed electron beam experiments gives k(CO 2 - + HCO 3 - ) = (2 ± 0.4)x10 3 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , k(CO 2 - + CO 3 - ) = (5 ± 1)x10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , k(NH 2 + = HCO 3 - ) 4 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and k(NH 2 + CO 3 - ) = (1.5 ± 0.5)x10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . (author)

  9. The influence of non-radiation induced ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes for dosimetry in the radiotherapy dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Lettau, C.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The yield of radicals induced by ionizing radiation in the amino acid alanine and its quantification by ESR spectroscopy has proven excellent reproducibility. Those radicals trapped in the crystal lattice are prevented from recombination providing a thermally very stable system. This allows alanine to be applied as a transfer dosemeter. With paraffin-alanine probes ESR dosimetry can be performed with a standard deviation of ± 0.5% in the dose range from 20 Gy up to 100 kGy. At 1 Gy dose level the error increases to ± 6%. This dose level is three orders of magnitude higher than the calculated detection threshold for alanine with modern X-band ESR spectrometers. It was found that the poor standard deviation at the 1 Gy dose level, is not mainly produced by a bad signal-to-noise ratio but by a variable non-radiation induced ESR background signal from the alanine probes within a batch. In the present study the main sources of error for ESR dosimetry in the dose range below 20 Gy were analyzed. The influences of the production process, UV light and humidity upon the ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes were investigated. Measurements are shown indicating a second stable structure of the alanine radical at room temperature. (author)

  10. Simulating threshold voltage shift of MOS devices due to radiation in the low-dose range

    CERN Document Server

    Wan Xin Heng; Gao Wen Yu; Huang Ru; Wang Yang Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An analytical MOSFET threshold voltage shift model due to radiation in the low-dose range has been developed for circuit simulations. Experimental data in the literature shows that the model predictions are in good agreement. It is simple in functional form and hence computationally efficient. It can be used as a basic circuit simulation tool for analysing MOSFET exposed to a nuclear environment up to about 1 Mrad(Si). In accordance with common believe, radiation induced absolute change of threshold voltage was found to be larger in irradiated PMOS devices. However, if the radiation sensitivity is defined in the way authors did it, the results indicated NMOS rather than PMOS devices are more sensitive, specially at low doses. This is important from the standpoint of their possible application in dosimetry

  11. System Estimation of Panel Data Models under Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre

    A general dynamic panel data model is considered that incorporates individual and interactive fixed effects allowing for contemporaneous correlation in model innovations. The model accommodates general stationary or nonstationary long-range dependence through interactive fixed effects...... and innovations, removing the necessity to perform a priori unit-root or stationarity testing. Moreover, persistence in innovations and interactive fixed effects allows for cointegration; innovations can also have vector-autoregressive dynamics; deterministic trends can be featured. Estimations are performed...

  12. Common long-range dependence in a panel of hourly Nord Pool electricity prices and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Haldrup, Niels; Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir

    to strong seasonal periodicity, and along the cross-sectional dimension, i.e. the hours of the day, there is a strong dependence which necessarily has to be accounted for in order to avoid spurious inference when focusing on the time series dependence alone. The long-range dependence is modelled in terms...... of a fractionally integrated panel data model and it is shown that both prices and loads consist of common factors with long memory and with loadings that vary considerably during the day. Due to the competitiveness of the Nordic power market the aggregate supply curve approximates well the marginal costs...... data approaches to analyse the time series and the cross-sectional dependence of hourly Nord Pool electricity spot prices and loads for the period 2000-2013. Hourly electricity prices and loads data are characterized by strong serial long-range dependence in the time series dimension in addition...

  13. Analysis of the response dependence of Ebt3 radiochromic film with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scanning mode and humidity; Analisis de la dependencia de la respuesta de la pelicula radiocromica EBT3 con la energia, tasa de dosis, longitud de onda, modo de escaneo y con la humedad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon M, E. Y.; Camacho L, M. A. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Laboratorio de Fotomedicina, Biofotonica y Espectroscopia Laser de Pulsos Ultracortos, Jesus Carranza y Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Herrera G, J. A.; Garcia G, O. A. [Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Unidad de Radiocirugia, 14269 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Villarreal B, J. E., E-mail: yaz_3333@hotmail.com [University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331 29th street NW Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    With the development of new modalities in radiotherapy treatments, the use of radiochromic films has increased considerably. Because the characteristics that presented, they are suitable for quality control and dose measurement. In this work and analysis of the dependence of the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scan mode and humidity, for a dose range of 0-70 Gy is presented. According to the results, the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films has low dependence on energy, dose rate, scan mode and humidity. However, the sensitivity of the response Ebt3 radiochromic films has a high dependence on the wavelength of the optical system used for reading. (Author)

  14. Dose-dependent effects of theta burst rTMS on cortical excitability and resting-state connectivity of the human motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettekoven, Charlotte; Volz, Lukas J; Kutscha, Martha; Pool, Eva-Maria; Rehme, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2014-05-14

    Theta burst stimulation (TBS), a specific protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), induces changes in cortical excitability that last beyond stimulation. TBS-induced aftereffects, however, vary between subjects, and the mechanisms underlying these aftereffects to date remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether increasing the number of pulses of intermittent TBS (iTBS) (1) increases cortical excitability as measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and (2) alters functional connectivity measured using resting-state fMRI, in a dose-dependent manner. Sixteen healthy, human subjects received three serially applied iTBS blocks of 600 pulses over the primary motor cortex (M1 stimulation) and the parieto-occipital vertex (sham stimulation) to test for dose-dependent iTBS effects on cortical excitability and functional connectivity (four sessions in total). iTBS over M1 increased MEP amplitudes compared with sham stimulation after each stimulation block. Although the increase in MEP amplitudes did not differ between the first and second block of M1 stimulation, we observed a significant increase after three blocks (1800 pulses). Furthermore, iTBS enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the stimulated M1 and premotor regions in both hemispheres. Functional connectivity between M1 and ipsilateral dorsal premotor cortex further increased dose-dependently after 1800 pulses of iTBS over M1. However, no correlation between changes in MEP amplitudes and functional connectivity was detected. In summary, our data show that increasing the number of iTBS stimulation blocks results in dose-dependent effects at the local level (cortical excitability) as well as at a systems level (functional connectivity) with a dose-dependent enhancement of dorsal premotor cortex-M1 connectivity. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/346849-11$15.00/0.

  15. A dose-effect correlation for radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, Glenn D; Chittenden, Sarah J; Buckley, Susan; Hindorf, Cecilia [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Haq, Masud; Newbold, Kate; Harmer, Clive L [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Thyroid Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the range of absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow from fixed administrations of radioiodine and to ascertain whether the success of ablation is more dependent on these absorbed doses than on the administered activity. Twenty-three patients received 3,000 MBq radioiodine following near-total thyroidectomy. The maximum absorbed dose to remnants was calculated from subsequent single photon emission tomography scans. Absorbed doses delivered to blood and red marrow were calculated from blood samples and from whole-body retention measurements. The protein bound iodine (PBI) was also calculated. Maximum absorbed doses to thyroid remnants ranged from 7 to 570 Gy. Eighteen of the 23 patients had a successful ablation. A significant difference was seen between the absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow for those patients that had a successful ablation compared to those with a failed ablation (p = 0.030, p = 0.043 and p = 0.048, respectively). The difference between the PBI values acquired at day 1 and day 6 were also indicative of response (p = 0.074). A successful ablation is strongly dependent on the absorbed dose to the thyroid remnant. Dosimetry-based personalized treatment can prevent both sub-optimal administrations, which entails further radioiodine therapy, and excessive administration of radioactivity, which increases the potential for radiation toxicity. (orig.)

  16. Dose-dependent zoning of estranged territory after the Chernobyl power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkin, M.N.

    1994-01-01

    The alienation zone was forming in May-September 1986 when the population was evacuated from the areas nearest to the Chernobyl power pilant. The presnet-day contour of the zone is a result of combination of a geographic criterion, a circular with a 30 km radius, and of radiation criteria developed at the earliest stages after the accident. The authors discuss dose-dependent regioning of the alienation zone at the latest stages of the accident and analyze radiation and hygienic aspects of possible reevacuation of the population

  17. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    this uncertainty factor, a value of 21% can be evaluated for the allowable maximum overall standard deviation for dose measurements at dose levels near the annual dose limits increasing to 45% for dose levels at the lower end of the dose range required to be monitored. A method is described for evaluating...... the overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system by combining random and systematic uncertainties in quadrature, and procedures are also given for determining each individual uncertainty connected to the dose measurement. In particular, attention is paid to the evaluation of the combined uncertainty due...... to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses...

  18. Efficacy and Safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment of Forehead Lines: A Multicenter, Randomized, Dose-Ranging Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solish, Nowell; Rivers, Jason K; Humphrey, Shannon; Muhn, Channy; Somogyi, Chris; Lei, Xiaofang; Bhogal, Meetu; Caulkins, Carrie

    2016-03-01

    Various onabotulinumtoxinA doses are effective in treating forehead lines (FHL), with a trend toward lower doses. To evaluate efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA dose-ranging treatment of FHL when the frontalis area and glabellar complex are treated together. Adults with moderate-to-severe FHL received onabotulinumtoxinA 40 U (FHL, 20 U; glabellar lines [GL], 20 U), 30 U (FHL, 10 U; GL, 20 U), or placebo. Response was assessed at weeks 1, 2, day 30, and monthly to day 180. Coprimary efficacy end points were investigator- and subject-assessed Facial Wrinkle Scale scores of none or mild (day 30). Patient-reported outcomes, onset/duration of effect, and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. Responder rates (investigator/subject, respectively) were 40-U group, 91.2%/89.5%; 30-U group, 86.4%/81.4%; placebo, 1.7%/5.1%. OnabotulinumtoxinA resulted in significantly greater responder rates than placebo (p < .001). Adverse events were mild to moderate and similar between groups (most common AEs: nasopharyngitis [4.6%] and headache [4.0%]). Treatment of FHL with onabotulinumtoxinA 40 and 30 U (in frontalis and glabellar complex muscles) was tolerable, effective, and sustained. Both doses significantly reduced FHL severity; however, the 40-U dose demonstrated a trend toward greater sustained benefit and longer duration of effect versus the 30-U dose, with similar AE rates.

  19. Metformin decreases lung cancer risk in diabetic patients in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Yang, Chih-Jen; Kung, Ya-Ting; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Shen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Pi-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2014-11-01

    Higher risk of lung cancer has been noted in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Some observational studies have shown a reduced risk of lung cancer in DM patients taking metformin, but a dose-response relationship has never been reported. The aim of this study is to exam the association between the dose of metformin and the incidence of lung cancer in a Chinese population. The dataset used for this nationwide population-based study is a cohort of 1 million subjects randomly sampled from individuals enrolled in the Taiwan National Health Insurance system. We enrolled all subjects with newly diagnosed type 2 DM between 1997 and 2007. Subjects with a diagnosis of neoplasm before DM diagnosis, those using metformin before DM diagnosis, those with polycystic ovary syndrome, and those with a DM diagnosis before their 15 years of age were excluded. The demographic data and duration, cumulative dose and intensity of metformin use were compared between patients developing lung cancer and those without lung cancer. Totally, 47,356 subjects were identified. After adjusting for age, gender, and modified Charlson Comorbidity Index score, the utilization of metformin was an independent protecting factor, and the risk of developing lung cancer decreased progressively with either the higher cumulative dose or the higher intensity of metformin use. This study revealed that the use of metformin decreased the risk of lung cancer in a dose-dependent manner in patients with type 2 DM. The chemo-preventive effect of metformin deserves further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  1. Genetic basis of haloperidol resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is complex and dose dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of most heritable traits is complex. Inhibitory compounds and their effects in model organisms have been used in many studies to gain insights into the genetic architecture underlying quantitative traits. However, the differential effect of compound concentration has not been studied in detail. In this study, we used a large segregant panel from a cross between two genetically divergent yeast strains, BY4724 (a laboratory strain and RM11_1a (a vineyard strain, to study the genetic basis of variation in response to different doses of a drug. Linkage analysis revealed that the genetic architecture of resistance to the small-molecule therapeutic drug haloperidol is highly dose-dependent. Some of the loci identified had effects only at low doses of haloperidol, while other loci had effects primarily at higher concentrations of the drug. We show that a major QTL affecting resistance across all concentrations of haloperidol is caused by polymorphisms in SWH1, a homologue of human oxysterol binding protein. We identify a complex set of interactions among the alleles of the genes SWH1, MKT1, and IRA2 that are most pronounced at a haloperidol dose of 200 µM and are only observed when the remainder of the genome is of the RM background. Our results provide further insight into the genetic basis of drug resistance.

  2. Genetic Basis of Haloperidol Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Complex and Dose Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The genetic basis of most heritable traits is complex. Inhibitory compounds and their effects in model organisms have been used in many studies to gain insights into the genetic architecture underlying quantitative traits. However, the differential effect of compound concentration has not been studied in detail. In this study, we used a large segregant panel from a cross between two genetically divergent yeast strains, BY4724 (a laboratory strain) and RM11_1a (a vineyard strain), to study the genetic basis of variation in response to different doses of a drug. Linkage analysis revealed that the genetic architecture of resistance to the small-molecule therapeutic drug haloperidol is highly dose-dependent. Some of the loci identified had effects only at low doses of haloperidol, while other loci had effects primarily at higher concentrations of the drug. We show that a major QTL affecting resistance across all concentrations of haloperidol is caused by polymorphisms in SWH1, a homologue of human oxysterol binding protein. We identify a complex set of interactions among the alleles of the genes SWH1, MKT1, and IRA2 that are most pronounced at a haloperidol dose of 200 µM and are only observed when the remainder of the genome is of the RM background. Our results provide further insight into the genetic basis of drug resistance. PMID:25521586

  3. Crystal Violet and Methylene Green as Low-Dose Liquid Dosimetry Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W.B.; Hassan, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate aim of the present work is studying of the possibility of using some organic solutions for gamma radiation monitors and to evaluate and characterize the dosimetric properties of these compounds. Crystal violet (CV) and methylene green (MG) aqueous solutions with different concentrations have been prepared and irradiated to different absorbed doses. The solutions were readout using absorption spectrophotometry technique at λ m ax 592 nm and 614 nm for CV and MG respectively. The maximum useful dose range was investigated and found to be concentration dependent. It was found that the useful dose range was from 10-160 Gy for CV and from 10-200 Gy for MG. The radiation chemical yield, G-value, was calculated for the studied solutions. The ph effect and the effect of different additives, chloral hydrate and ethanol have been also investigated. The pre- and post- irradiation stabilities of these solutions under different storage conditions were studied and the results showed different significant dependence on the storage condition

  4. Organ dose variability and trends in tomosynthesis and radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between patient attributes and organ dose for a population of computational phantoms for 20 tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. Organ dose was estimated from 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18 to 78 years, weight 52 to 117 kg) using a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a system capable of performing tomosynthesis and radiography. The geometry and field of view for each exam were modeled to match clinical protocols. For each protocol, the energy deposited in each organ was estimated by the simulations, converted to dose units, and then normalized by exposure in air. Dose to radiosensitive organs was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the region of interest and as a function of body mass index. For tomosynthesis, organ doses were also studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across a range of tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The results showed a protocol-dependent exponential decrease with an increasing patient size. There was a variability in organ dose across the patient population, which should be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose. The results can be used to prospectively and retrospectively estimate organ dose for tomosynthesis and radiography.

  5. Dose and batch-dependent hepatobiliary toxicity of 10 nm silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella De Maglie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs are widely used because of their antimicrobial properties in medical devices and in a variety of consumer products. The extensive use of AgNPs raises concerns about their potential toxicity, although it is still difficult to draw definite conclusions about their toxicity based on published data. Our preliminary studies performed to compare the effect of the AgNPs size (10-40-100 nm on toxicity, demonstrated that the smallest AgNPs determine the most severe toxicological effects. In order to best investigate the impact of physicochemical characteristics of 10 nm AgNPs on toxicity, we compare three different batches of 10 nm AgNPs slightly different in size distribution (Batch A: 8.8±1.7 nm; Batch B: 9.4±1.7 nm; Batch C: 10.0±1.8 nm. Mice were intravenously treated with two doses (5 and 10 mg/kg of the 3 AgNPs. 24 hours after the treatment, mice were euthanized and underwent complete necropsy. Tissues were collected for histopathological examination and total silver content was determined in tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. All batches induced severe hepatobiliary lesions, i.e. marked hepatocellular necrosis and massive hemorrhage of the gall bladder. The toxicity was dose-dependent and interestingly, the toxic effects were more severe in mice treated with batches A and B that contained smaller AgNPs. Since the total silver mass concentration was similar, the observed batch-dependent toxicity suggest that even subtle differences in size may contribute to relevant changes in the toxicological outcomes, confirming the fundamental involvement of physicochemical features with respect to toxicity.

  6. Extending the dose range: Probing deep traps in quartz with 3.06 eV photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2009-01-01

    stimulation. Although, the fast OSL component is measured with similar efficiency by blue and violet lights, the slower OSL components (especially S3) are measured relatively more efficiently with the latter. New insight into the origins of quartz luminescence is presented through a comparison of violet......This article demonstrates that violet (405 nm) stimulated luminescence (VSL) signal from quartz contains contribution from deep traps that are otherwise not accessible with blue light (470 nm). Additionally, it also contains the typical fast and slow components observed with the blue light...... and blue lights stimulation, and thermal stimulations. Finally, it is shown that the deep traps probed through violet light stimulation have potential for increasing the dose measurement/dating range using quartz. The post-blue VSL signal allows easy, precise measurement of dose up to at least 1 kGy in our...

  7. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  8. Estimation of effective dose for children in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Sarycheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to the estimation of effective dose for children undergoing interventional cardiology examinations. The conversion coefficients (CC from directly measured dose area product (DAP value to effective dose (ED were calculated within the approved effective dose assessment methodology (Guidelines 2.6.1. 2944-11. The CC, Ed K , [mSv / (Gy • cm2] for newborn infants and children of 1, 5, 10 and 15 years old (main(range were calculated as 2.5 (1.8-3.2; 1.1 (0.8-1.3; 0.6 (0.4-0.7; 0.4 (0.3-0.5; and 0,22 (0,18-0,30 respectively. A special Finnish computer program PCXMC 2.0 was used for calculating the dose CC. The series of calculations were made for different values of the physical and geometrical parameters based on their real-existing range of values. The value of CC from DAP to ED were calculated for all pediatric age groups. This work included 153 pediatric interventional studies carried out in two hospitals of the city of St. Petersburg for the period of one year from the summer of 2015. The dose CC dependency from the patient’s age and parameters of the examinations were under the study. The dependence from the beam quality (filtration and tube voltage and age of the patient were found. The younger is the patient, stronger is the filtration and higher is the voltage, the higher is the CC value. The CC in the younger (newborn and older (15 years age groups are different by the factor of 10. It was shown that the changes of the geometric parameters (in the scope of their real existing range have small effect on the value of the effective dose, not exceed 30-50% allowable for radiation protection purpose. The real values of effective doses of children undergoing cardiac interventions were estimated. In severe cases, the values of ED can reach several tens of mSv.

  9. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  10. Study of the Radiochromic Film for High Dose Measurement in Radiation Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yi-zhen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To establish the radiochromic film dosimeter for high dose level measurement during radiation processing, By corresponding formula and its preparation process research, batches of radiochromic film dosimeters were prepared using nylon as substrate and pararosaniline cyanide as dye. In Co-60 gamma reference radiation field, dosimetry response performance of radiochromic film was studied and results showed that the repeatability was good to 1.0%. The response curves demonstrated good linearity in the dose range of 5-210 kGy, and the signal of radiochromic film dosimeters after irradiation under the condition of low temperature storage within 2 weeks was stable. In addition, the radiochromic film dosimeters were not found to have noticeable dose rate dependence in the range of this experiment. In the linear dose range, radiochromic film dosimeter measures the absorbed dose, with extended uncertainty 4.2% (k=2 for Co-60 gamma rays. The film was suitable as dosimeters for the parameters measurement of the electron beam on the accelerator.

  11. /sup 210/Po in marine organisms: a wide range of natural radiation dose domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F P

    1988-01-01

    Marine biota is able to concentrate /sup 210/Po to high levels, as 10/sup 3/-10/sup 5/ relative to sea water concentration. /sup 210/Po concentrations in mixed zooplankton reaches 34-51 Bq.kg/sup -1/ (fresh wt), special groups such as copepods reaching even higher concentrations /similar to/ 90 Bq.kg/sup -1/, whereas gelatinous zooplankton display /similar to/ 1 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Epipelagic teleosts feeding on plankton displayed the highest concentrations found in fish muscle, 2-21 Bq.kg/sup -1/. Contrasting with this, demersal teleosts and elasmobranchs display lower /sup 210/Po concentrations, in the ranges 0.5-7 Bq.kg/sup -1/ and 0.2-1.7 Bq.kg/sup -1/, respectively. Much higher concentrations can, however, be measured in fish liver, gonad, bone and piloric caecca, and small mesopelagic fish can reach /similar to/ 800 Bq.kg/sup -1/ on a whole-body basis. Due to these /sup 210/Po activity concentrations, dose equivalent rates delivered to biological tissues in marine organisms can vary widely, from 0.4 mSv.y/sup -1/ in gelatinous plankton up to 5.6 x 10/sup 3/ mSv.y/sup -1/ in the gut wall of sardines. It is concluded that in organisms living in the same ocean layer a wide range of internal radiation doses exists and it is essentially sustained by /sup 210/Po food-chain transfer. (author).

  12. Simulation of dose reduction in tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Methods for simulating dose reduction are valuable tools in the work of optimizing radiographic examinations. Using such methods, clinical images can be simulated to have been collected at other, lower, dose levels without the need of additional patient exposure. A recent technology introduced to healthcare that needs optimization is tomosynthesis, where a number of low-dose projection images collected at different angles is used to reconstruct section images of an imaged object. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems, suitable for tomosynthesis. Methods: The developed method uses information about the noise power spectrum (NPS) at the original dose level and the simulated dose level to create a noise image that is added to the original image to produce an image that has the same noise properties as an image actually collected at the simulated dose level. As the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital detectors operating at the low dose levels used for tomosynthesis may show a strong dependency on the dose level, it is important that a method for simulating dose reduction for tomosynthesis takes this dependency into account. By applying an experimentally determined relationship between pixel mean and pixel variance, variations in both dose and DQE in relevant dose ranges are taken into account. Results: The developed method was tested on a chest tomosynthesis system and was shown to produce NPS of simulated dose-reduced projection images that agreed well with the NPS of images actually collected at the simulated dose level. The simulated dose reduction method was also applied to tomosynthesis examinations of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the obtained noise in the reconstructed section images was very similar to that of an examination actually performed at the simulated dose level. Conclusions: In conclusion, the present article describes a method for simulating dose

  13. Dose-dependent stimulation of hepatic retinoic acid hydroxylation/oxidation and glucuronidation in brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, after exposure to 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, P.M.; Ndayibagira, A.; Spear, P.A.

    2000-03-01

    Extremely low stores of vitamin A have been reported in fish and birds inhabiting regions contaminated by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other organochlorines, suggesting many possible effects on retinoid biochemical pathways. Metabolic imbalances associated with biologically active retinoids (e.g., retinoic acid) could be associated with tetratogenesis, edema, growth inhibition, reproductive impairment, immunosuppression, and susceptibility to cancer. Sexually mature brook trout were injected imtraperitoneally with the coplanar PCB 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP) and again 4 weeks later. At 8 weeks, retinoic acid metabolism was measured in liver microsomes. To the authors' knowledge, retinoic acid conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase is described here for the first time in fish. A substantial rate of glucuronidation was detected in the microsomes from control brook trout, which tended to increase over the dose range of TCBP. Glucuronidation was significantly greater in fish receiving the 10 {micro}g/g body weight dose level. Metabolism through the cytochrome P450 system was also dose-dependent, resulting in significantly greater production of 4-hydroxyretinoic acid at the 10 {micro}g/g dose level. In contrast, subsequent oxidation to 4-oxo-retinoic acid was greatest at the 1 {micro}g/g dose level and did not increase further at higher doses. Liver stores of dehydroretinyl palmitate/oleate were significantly decreased at the 5 and 10 {micro}g/g dose levels.

  14. Time-, Sex-, and Dose-Dependent Alterations of the Gut Microbiota by Consumption of Dietary Daikenchuto (TU-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Miyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Medications or dietary components can affect both the host and the host’s gut microbiota. Changes in the microbiota may influence medication efficacy and interactions. Daikenchuto (TU-100, a herbal medication, comprised of ginger, ginseng, and Japanese pepper, is widely used in Japanese traditional Kampo medicine for intestinal motility and postoperative paralytic ileus. We previously showed in mice that consumption of TU-100 for 4 weeks changed the gut microbiota and increased bioavailability of bacterial ginsenoside metabolites. Since TU-100 is prescribed in humans for months to years, we examined the time- and sex-dependent effects of TU-100 on mouse gut microbiota. Oral administration of 1.5% TU-100 for 24 weeks caused more pronounced changes in gut microbiota in female than in male mice. Changes in both sexes largely reverted to baseline upon TU-100 withdrawal. Effects were time and dose dependent. The microbial profiles reverted to baseline within 4 weeks after withdrawal of 0.75% TU-100 but were sustained after withdrawal of 3% TU-100. In summary, dietary TU-100 changed mouse microbiota in a time-, sex-, and dose-dependent manner. These findings may be taken into consideration when determining optimizing dose for conditions of human health and disease with the consideration of differences in composition and response of the human intestinal microbiota.

  15. Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

  16. Gadodiamide injection for enhancement of MRI in the CNS. Applications, dose, field and time dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakeson, P

    1996-10-01

    Gadodiamide injection was comparable to Gd-DTPA with regard to both safety and diagnostic efficiency in the central nervous system. The contrast effect of Gd contrast agents is higher at 1.5 T than at 0.3 T both in phantoms and patients with a maximum ratio (signal lesion/signal grey matter) more than 50% higher at 1.5 T. To achieve high contrast effect, heavily T1-weighted images are important. Prolonging the TR from 400 ms to 600 ms reduced the ratio by 15-45% depending on concentration. The effective time window for imaging of BBB (Blood-Brain Barrier) damage is between 2-5 and 25-30 minutes after injection and several scans can be performed without loss of enhancement. To provide maximum detectability of BBB damage in patients, higher doses of Gd contrast media should be useful, especially at low field strengths, as the doses used clinically today do not utilize the maximum contrast effect. High-dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) contrast enhanced MRI (0.3 T) with Gadodiamide injection allowed detection of significantly more and smaller metastases (i.e. BBB damage) than standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) High dose contrast-enhanced MRI (0.3 T) did not increase the diagnostic information for the evaluation of patients with failed back surgery syndrome compared to standard dose MRI. 55 refs, 9 figs, 10 tabs.

  17. Gadodiamide injection for enhancement of MRI in the CNS. Applications, dose, field and time dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakeson, P.

    1996-01-01

    Gadodiamide injection was comparable to Gd-DTPA with regard to both safety and diagnostic efficiency in the central nervous system. The contrast effect of Gd contrast agents is higher at 1.5 T than at 0.3 T both in phantoms and patients with a maximum ratio (signal lesion/signal grey matter) more than 50% higher at 1.5 T. To achieve high contrast effect, heavily T1-weighted images are important. Prolonging the TR from 400 ms to 600 ms reduced the ratio by 15-45% depending on concentration. The effective time window for imaging of BBB (Blood-Brain Barrier) damage is between 2-5 and 25-30 minutes after injection and several scans can be performed without loss of enhancement. To provide maximum detectability of BBB damage in patients, higher doses of Gd contrast media should be useful, especially at low field strengths, as the doses used clinically today do not utilize the maximum contrast effect. High-dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) contrast enhanced MRI (0.3 T) with Gadodiamide injection allowed detection of significantly more and smaller metastases (i.e. BBB damage) than standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) High dose contrast-enhanced MRI (0.3 T) did not increase the diagnostic information for the evaluation of patients with failed back surgery syndrome compared to standard dose MRI. 55 refs, 9 figs, 10 tabs

  18. Time-dependent, low-dose reporting limit for dosimeters that are taken home at the end of the workday

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.

    1994-01-01

    In routine personnel dosimetry, it is usual to report doses only where th occupational dose (measured dose with background subtracted) is greater than previously determined reporting limit. The reporting limit, although se administratively, should be justified by an assessment of the errors inherent in th personnel and background dose measurements, and estimates of the probability that a zero exposure will yield a dosimeter response equal to the reporting limit. For background subtraction and reporting limits, it was realized that the source of low-dose uncertainty is very much dependent on whether dosimeters are held in racks at the work site or remain with the employee. The External dosimetry Program for the DOE facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated such that dosimeters are taken home by the employee at the end of each workday. This report is a summary measurements of background radiation in a variety of home locations, and calculations of the effect of the variation of this background on the uncertainty low-level occupational dose and on the reporting level. When dosimeters are stored at a given location (e.g., the facility gate), it theoretically possible to determine the background there to any desired accuracy; the errors in occupational dose are then those due to measurement noise and dosimeter calibration. However, when different dosimeters are stored in different homes, th difference in background between a particular location and the average for a locations appears as an added uncertainty in the occupational dose. Since this difference is not random, but fixed for a given location, the error due to this difference increases linearly with assignment time. From the background measurements, time-dependent values of the standard deviation of occupational do and critical levels are derived and used to define an expression for the reporting limit

  19. Absolute dose measurement Gafchromic R EBT2 movies. Case Study of Kaposis sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Moral, F. del; Meilan, E.; Azevedo Gomes, J. C. de; Tejeiro Garcia, A. G.; Andrade Alvarez, B.; Vazquez, J.; Nieto, I.; Medal, D.; Lopez Medina, A.; Francisco, S.; Salgado, M.; Munoz, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of its high spatial resolution, low energy dependence and good response over a wide energy range, EBT2 Gafchromic films are widely used in many applications in radiotherapy for measuring relative dose. Despite being the most common use can be used to measure absolute dose. This text is an example of using films as EBT2 for in vivo absolute dose in a Kaposis sarcoma.

  20. Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis of human lens epithelial cells exposed to a low-dose-range of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christian Harry; Kumar, Achint; Qutob, Sami; Nyiri, Balazs; Chauhan, Vinita; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings in populations exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) indicate dose-related lens opacification occurs at much lower doses (micro-spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of varying doses of radiation, ranging from 0.01 Gy to 5 Gy, on human lens epithelial (HLE) cells which were chemically fixed 24 h post-irradiation. Raman spectra were acquired from the nucleus and cytoplasm of the HLE cells. Spectra were collected from points in a 3  ×  3 grid pattern and then averaged. The raw spectra were preprocessed and principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis was used to discriminate between dose and control for 0.25, 0.5, 2, and 5 Gy. Using leave-one-out cross-validation accuracies of greater than 74% were attained for each dose/control combination. The ultra-low doses 0.01 and 0.05 Gy were included in an analysis of band intensities for Raman bands found to be significant in the linear discrimination, and an induced repair model survival curve was fit to a band-difference-ratio plot of this data, suggesting HLE cells undergo a nonlinear response to low-doses of IR. A survival curve was also fit to clonogenic assay data done on the irradiated HLE cells, showing a similar nonlinear response.

  1. Photon dose conversion coefficients for the human teeth in standard irradiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanovsky, A; Wieser, A; Zankl, M; Jacob, P

    2005-07-01

    Photon dose conversion coefficients for the human tooth materials are computed in energy range from 0.01 to 10 MeV by the Monte Carlo method. The voxel phantom Golem of the human body with newly defined tooth region and a modified version of the EGS4 code have been used to compute the coefficients for 30 tooth cells with different locations and materials. The dose responses are calculated for cells representing buccal and lingual enamel layers. The computed coefficients demonstrate a strong dependence on energy and geometry of the radiation source and a weaker dependence on location of the enamel voxels. For isotropic and rotational radiation fields the enamel dose does not show a significant dependence on tooth sample locations. The computed coefficients are used to convert from absorbed dose in teeth to organ dose or to integral air kerma. Examples of integral conversion factors from enamel dose to air kerma are given for several photon fluences specific for the Mayak reprocessing plant in Russia. The integral conversion factors are strongly affected by the energy and angular distributions of photon fluence, which are important characteristics of an exposure scenario for reconstruction of individual occupational doses. (orig.)

  2. Reduction of the unnecessary dose from the over-range area with a spiral dynamic z-collimator: comparison of beam pitch and detector coverage with 128-detector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Funama, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Mutsukazu; Awamoto, Shinichi; Kondo, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to assess the radiation dose reduction and the actual exposed scan length of over-range areas using a spiral dynamic z-collimator at different beam pitches and detector coverage. Using glass rod dosimeters, we measured the unilateral over-range scan dose between the beginning of the planned scan range and the beginning of the actual exposed scan range. Scanning was performed at detector coverage of 80.0 and 40.0 mm, with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator. The dose-saving ratio was calculated as the ratio of the unnecessary over-range dose, with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator. In 80.0 mm detector coverage without the spiral dynamic z-collimator, the actual exposed scan length for the over-range area was 108, 120, and 126 mm, corresponding to a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99, respectively. With the spiral dynamic z-collimator, the actual exposed scan length for the over-range area was 48, 66, and 84 mm with a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99, respectively. The dose-saving ratios with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator for a beam pitch of 0.60, 0.80, and 0.99 were 35.07, 24.76, and 13.51%, respectively. With 40.0 mm detector coverage, the dose-saving ratios with and without the spiral dynamic z-collimator had the highest value of 27.23% with a low beam pitch of 0.60. The spiral dynamic z-collimator is important for a reduction in the unnecessary over-range dose and makes it possible to reduce the unnecessary dose by means of a lower beam pitch.

  3. Gafchromic EBT‐XD film: Dosimetry characterization in high‐dose, volumetric‐modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Fumika; Sumida, Naoki; Okazue, Toshiya; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Radiochromic films are important tools for assessing complex dose distributions. Gafchromic EBT‐XD films have been designed for optimal performance in the 40–4,000 cGy dose range. We investigated the dosimetric characteristics of these films, including their dose‐response, postexposure density growth, and dependence on scanner orientation, beam energy, and dose rate with applications to high‐dose volumetric‐modulated arc therapy (VMAT) verification. A 10 MV beam from a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator was used to irradiate the films with doses in the 0–4,000 cGy range. Postexposure coloration was analyzed at postirradiation times ranging from several minutes to 48 h. The films were also irradiated with 6 MV (dose rate (DR): 600 MU/min), 6 MV flattening filter‐free (FFF) (DR: 1,400 MU/ min), and 10 MV FFF (DR: 2,400 MU/min) beams to determine the energy and dose‐rate dependence. For clinical examinations, we compared the dose distribution measured with EBT‐XD films and calculated by the planning system for four VMAT cases. The red channel of the EBT‐XD film exhibited a wider dynamic range than the green and blue channels. Scanner orientation yielded a variation of ∼3% in the net optical density (OD). The difference between the film front and back scan orientations was negligible, with variation of ∼1.3% in the net OD. The net OD increased sharply within the first 6 hrs after irradiation and gradually afterwards. No significant difference was observed for the beam energy and dose rate, with a variation of ∼1.5% in the net OD. The gamma passing rates (at 3%, 3 mm) between the film‐ measured and treatment planning system (TPS)‐calculated dose distributions under a high dose VMAT plan in the absolute dose mode were more than 98.9%. PACS number(s): 87.56 Fc PMID:27929504

  4. Dependence of the annealing kinetics of A centers and divacancies on temperature, particle energy, and irradiation dose for n-Si crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagava, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    n-Si crystals grown by the float-zone method with a phosphorus concentration of ∼6 x 10 13 cm -3 and irradiated with 2-MeV electrons and 25-MeV protons were studied. It is shown that the kinetics of the isochronous annealing of the A centers and divacancies (the annealing temperature and the rearrangement of radiation defects in the situation where the dissociation of one type of defects gives rise to more stable defects) depends in a complicated way on the energy, dose, and temperature of irradiation; i.e., this kinetics depends on the relation between the concentrations of various radiation defects and on the charge state of reacting primary radiation defects when they interact with each other, with impurity atoms, and with disordered regions. An increase in the concentration of divacancies in the temperature range of 180-210 deg. C is attributed to the dissociation of disordered regions

  5. SU-E-T-577: Obliquity Factor and Surface Dose in Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, I; Andersen, A; Coutinho, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The advantage of lower skin dose in proton beam may be diminished creating radiation related sequalae usually seen with photon and electron beams. This study evaluates the surface dose as a complex function of beam parameters but more importantly the effect of beam angle. Methods: Surface dose in proton beam depends on the beam energy, source to surface distance, the air gap between snout and surface, field size, material thickness in front of surface, atomic number of the medium, beam angle and type of nozzle (ie double scattering, (DS), uniform scanning (US) or pencil beam scanning (PBS). Obliquity factor (OF) is defined as ratio of surface dose in 0° to beam angle Θ. Measurements were made in water phantom at various beam angles using very small microdiamond that has shown favorable beam characteristics for high, medium and low proton energy. Depth dose measurements were performed in the central axis of the beam in each respective gantry angle. Results: It is observed that surface dose is energy dependent but more predominantly on the SOBP. It is found that as SSD increases, surface dose decreases. In general, SSD, and air gap has limited impact in clinical proton range. High energy has higher surface dose and so the beam angle. The OF rises with beam angle. Compared to OF of 1.0 at 0° beam angle, the value is 1.5, 1.6, 1,7 for small, medium and large range respectively for 60 degree angle. Conclusion: It is advised that just like range and SOBP, surface dose should be clearly understood and a method to reduce the surface dose should be employed. Obliquity factor is a critical parameter that should be accounted in proton beam therapy and a perpendicular beam should be used to reduce surface dose

  6. Polimixina B: efeito dose e tempo dependente na nefrotoxicidade in vitro Polymyxin B: dose and time dependent nephrotoxicity effect in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barros de Moura Neiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a toxicidade da polimixina B (PmxB em células renais em dosagem e tempos diferentes. MÉTODOS: Células LLC-PK1, cultivadas em placas multiwell de 12 poços, foram divididas nos seguintes grupos: Controle (CTL - células mantidas em meio DMEM suplementado a 5%; G1 - células expostas à concentração de 75mM de PmxB; G2 - células expostas à concentração de 375mM de PmxB. Cada grupo foi avaliado nos tempos de 24, 48 e 72 horas quanto à viabilidade celular (Acridine Orange/Brometo de Etídio e apoptose (Hoechst 33342. RESULTADOS: Os dados demonstraram a viabilidade celular e a apoptose à exposição de três doses de PmxB em três intervalos de tempo, com um aumento significativo da toxicidade à elevação das doses e ao maior tempo de permanência no antibiótico para apoptose. CONCLUSÃO: A citotoxicidade pela PmxB, no modelo de cultivo celular, se mostrou tempo e dose dependente, aumentando com a maior exposição e maior dose de antibiótico.OBJECTIVE: To characterize the toxicity of polymyxin B (PmxB in renal cell in different dosage and times. METHODS: LLC-PK1 cells grown in 12 well multiwell plates were divided into the following groups: Control (CTL - cells maintained in DMEM supplemented with 5%; G1 - cells exposed to concentration of 75µM PmxB G2 - cells exposed to concentration of 375µM PmxB. Each group was assessed at 24,48 and 72 hours as for cell viability (Acridine orange/ethidium bromide and apoptosis (Hoechst 33342. RESULTS: The data demonstrate the cell viability and apoptosis exposure of three doses of PmxB in three time intervals, with a significant increase in toxicity to high doses and longer duration of stay in the antibiotic to apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Cytotoxicity by PmxB in cell culture model, showed to be time and dose dependent, increasing with increased exposure and higher dose of antibiotic.

  7. Generalized Efficient Inference on Factor Models with Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre

    . Short-memory dynamics are allowed in the common factor structure and possibly heteroskedastic error term. In the estimation, a generalized version of the principal components (PC) approach is proposed to achieve efficiency. Asymptotics for efficient common factor and factor loading as well as long......A dynamic factor model is considered that contains stochastic time trends allowing for stationary and nonstationary long-range dependence. The model nests standard I(0) and I(1) behaviour smoothly in common factors and residuals, removing the necessity of a priori unit-root and stationarity testing...

  8. SU-E-T-44: A Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Dose-Dependence of EBT3 GafChromicTM Films for Quantifying the Degree of Molecular Polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callens, M; Van Den Abeele, K [Department of Physics, Wave Propagation and Signal Processing, KU Leuven KULAK, Kortrijk (Belgium); Crijns, W; Depuydt, T; Maes, F; Haustermans, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Simons, V [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium); De Wolf, I [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); D’hooge, J [Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Bio-Medical Science Group, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); D’Agostino, E [DoseVue NV, Hasselt (Belgium); Pfeiffer, H [Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic films, such as the poly-diacetylene-based EBT3 GafChromic{sup TM} films (Ashland Specialty Ingredients, Wayne, NY, USA), are widely used for dosimetry applications because of their clear energy independence, high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence and easy handling. The films undergo a slight color change by radiation-induced polymerization of diacetylene monomers. But more importantly, the film becomes optically less transparent with increasing radiation dose, with a saturation starting between 10 and 20 Gy, i.e. a common SBRT dose level. In contrast to the chromatic properties, less attention has been given to the underlying molecular mechanism that induces this partial color change and strongly reduces the transparency. Therefore, the current work investigates the variation of the molecular composition of the active layer of EBT3 films for an SBRT dose range. Method: Uncoated EBT3 films were irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam using dose levels between 0 and 20 Gy. The relative variation of the polymer content as a function of the applied radiation dose was studied using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy with a 633 nm probe laser incident on the active layer allowed to identify the film constituents and to estimate the amount of poly-diacetylenes from the intensities of the unique molecular vibrations of the molecule. Results: The normalized intensity of all polymeric vibrations, and most notably the polymeric triple and double carbon-carbon bonds at 2058 cm{sup −1} and 1446 cm{sup −1} respectively, increase with increasing dose up to a saturation level starting at about 10 Gy, indicating a corresponding increase and saturation of the amount of polymers. This molecular saturation process is the main cause of the non-linear dose response (i.e. a transparency reduction) and of the limited dose range of the studied films. Conclusion: Raman spectroscopy provides new and more fundamental insights in the mechanism of the

  9. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  10. Dose determination by ESR in an accident, using cotton fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, R.; Mehta, S.K.; Iyer, M.R.; Natarajan, V.; Sastry, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Accidental exposure dose assessment by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique from the free radicals generated in a cotton handkerchief has been attempted in this investigation. The cotton handkerchief, a common material carried by individuals, was taken as the medium for free radical estimation. About 55 mg of the irradiated piece of cloth was loaded into a quartz tube and the dose dependence of the ESR signal at g = 2.0026 was measured at room temperature, using a Bruker ESP-300 ESR spectrometer in X-band (9.74 GHz). The intensity of this signal was found to be proportional to the dose in the range of 1-1000 Gy. The stability of the free radicals with time of storage was followed. Dependence of dose rate as well as the presence of water on the yield of free radicals were also investigated. (author) 5 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Dose-Response—A Challenge for Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G.; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O.

    2005-01-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions. PMID:19330161

  12. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  13. Earthquake simulations with time-dependent nucleation and long-range interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Dieterich

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A model for rapid simulation of earthquake sequences is introduced which incorporates long-range elastic interactions among fault elements and time-dependent earthquake nucleation inferred from experimentally derived rate- and state-dependent fault constitutive properties. The model consists of a planar two-dimensional fault surface which is periodic in both the x- and y-directions. Elastic interactions among fault elements are represented by an array of elastic dislocations. Approximate solutions for earthquake nucleation and dynamics of earthquake slip are introduced which permit computations to proceed in steps that are determined by the transitions from one sliding state to the next. The transition-driven time stepping and avoidance of systems of simultaneous equations permit rapid simulation of large sequences of earthquake events on computers of modest capacity, while preserving characteristics of the nucleation and rupture propagation processes evident in more detailed models. Earthquakes simulated with this model reproduce many of the observed spatial and temporal characteristics of clustering phenomena including foreshock and aftershock sequences. Clustering arises because the time dependence of the nucleation process is highly sensitive to stress perturbations caused by nearby earthquakes. Rate of earthquake activity following a prior earthquake decays according to Omori's aftershock decay law and falls off with distance.

  14. Quantifying the spatial and temporal variation in dose from external exposure to radiation: a new tool for use on free-ranging wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, Thomas G.; Byrne, Michael E.; Webster, Sarah; Beasley, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate dosimetry is often the fundamental problem in much of the controversial research dealing with radiation effects on free-ranging wildlife. Such research is difficult because of the need to measure dose from several potential pathways of exposure (i.e., internal contamination, external irradiation, and inhalation). Difficulties in quantifying external exposures can contribute significantly to the uncertainties of dose-effect relationships. Quantifying an animal's external exposure due to spatial–temporal use of habitats that can vary by orders of magnitude in radiation levels is particularly challenging. Historically, wildlife dosimetry studies have largely ignored or been unable to accurately quantify variability in external dose because of technological limitations. The difficulties of quantifying the temporal–spatial aspects of external irradiation prompted us to develop a new dosimetry instrument for field research. We merged two existing technologies [Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and electronic dosimeters] to accommodate the restrictive conditions of having a combined unit small enough to be unobtrusively worn on the neck of a free-ranging animal, and sufficiently robust to withstand harsh environmental conditions. The GPS–dosimeter quantifies the spatial and temporal variation in external dose as wildlife traverse radioactively contaminated habitats and sends, via satellites, an animal's location and short term integrated dose to the researcher at a user-defined interval. Herein we describe: (1) the GPS–dosimeters; (2) tests to compare their uniformity of response to external irradiation under laboratory conditions; (3) field tests of their durability when worn on wildlife under natural conditions; and (4) a field application of the new technology at a radioactively contaminated site. Use of coupled GPS–dosimetry will allow, for the first time, researchers to better understand the relationship of animals to their contaminated

  15. Influence of dose and its distribution in time on dose-response relationships for low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This book examines the influence of dose rate and magnitude on the genetic and carcinogenic effects of radiation exposure in animals and man. It systematically examines a broad range of biological effects in simple systems, plants, laboratory animals, and man with special attention given to the effects of prenatal irradiation, changes in life span, and tumorigenesis. An enormous volume of data is provided about human tumorigenesis and the data and shortcomings are summarized. There is an extended general discussion of the consideration in quantitative dose and dose rate relationships and of the limitations of the data and analyses which have led to a linear interpolation of risk at low doses and dose rates. An argument is made for dose rate dependence in tumorigenesis as being consistent with all other radiation effects and for the applicability of Dose Rate Effectiveness Factors (DREF) in providing a more realistic assessment of the risk of radiation carcinogenesis. The report is documented with 24 pages of references. There are numerous graphs and tables, all clear and to the point. This book is a superb review and summary of the data on radiation risks

  16. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ozyigit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group. Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and nitric oxide (NO, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (P < 0.01, levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively, and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.001 and MDA and NO levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.05 compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects.

  17. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  18. Three-dimensional photon dose distributions with and without lung corrections for tangential breast intact treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, L.M.; Cheng, C.W.; Siddon, R.L.; Rice, R.K.; Mijnheer, B.J.; Harris, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of lung volume and photon energy on the 3-dimensional dose distribution for patients treated by intact breast irradiation is not well established. To investigate this issue, we studied the 3-dimensional dose distributions calculated for an 'average' breast phantom for 60Co, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 8 MV photon beams. For the homogeneous breast, areas of high dose ('hot spots') lie along the periphery of the breast near the posterior plane and near the apex of the breast. The highest dose occurs at the inferior margin of the breast tissue, and this may exceed 125% of the target dose for lower photon energies. The magnitude of these 'hot spots' decreases for higher energy photons. When lung correction is included in the dose calculation, the doses to areas at the left and right margin of the lung volume increase. The magnitude of the increase depends on energy and the patient anatomy. For the 'average' breast phantom (lung density 0.31 g/cm3), the correction factors are between 1.03 to 1.06 depending on the energy used. Higher energy is associated with lower correction factors. Both the ratio-of-TMR and the Batho lung correction methods can predict these corrections within a few percent. The range of depths of the 100% isodose from the skin surface, measured along the perpendicular to the tangent of the skin surface, were also energy dependent. The range was 0.1-0.4 cm for 60Co and 0.5-1.4 cm for 8 MV. We conclude that the use of higher energy photons in the range used here provides lower value of the 'hot spots' compared to lower energy photons, but this needs to be balanced against a possible disadvantage in decreased dose delivered to the skin and superficial portion of the breast

  19. Short-range correlations in an extended time-dependent mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madler, P.

    1982-01-01

    A generalization is performed of the time-dependent mean-field theory by an explicit inclusion of strong short-range correlations on a level of microscopic reversibility relating them to realistic nucleon-nucleon forces. Invoking a least action principle for correlated trial wave functions, equations of motion for the correlation functions and the single-particle model wave function are derived in lowest order of the FAHT cluster expansion. Higher order effects as well as long-range correlations are consider only to the extent to which they contribute to the mean field via a readjusted phenomenological effective two-body interaction. The corresponding correlated stationary problem is investigated and appropriate initial conditions to describe a heavy ion reaction are proposed. The singleparticle density matrix is evaluated

  20. An end-to-end assessment of range uncertainty in proton therapy using animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Kang, Yixiu; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Niek

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of range uncertainty is critical in proton therapy. However, there is a lack of data and consensus on how to evaluate the appropriate amount of uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to quantify the range uncertainty in various treatment conditions in proton therapy, using transmission measurements through various animal tissues. Animal tissues, including a pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg, were used in this study. For each tissue, an end-to-end test closely imitating patient treatments was performed. This included CT scan simulation, treatment planning, image-guided alignment, and beam delivery. Radio-chromic films were placed at various depths in the distal dose falloff region to measure depth dose. Comparisons between measured and calculated doses were used to evaluate range differences. The dose difference at the distal falloff between measurement and calculation depends on tissue type and treatment conditions. The estimated range difference was up to 5, 6 and 4 mm for the pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg irradiation, respectively. Our study shows that the TPS was able to calculate proton range within about 1.5% plus 1.5 mm. Accurate assessment of range uncertainty in treatment planning would allow better optimization of proton beam treatment, thus fully achieving proton beams’ superior dose advantage over conventional photon-based radiation therapy.

  1. Real time dose rate measurements with fiber optic probes based on the RL and OSL of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, T.; Sponner, J.; Jakobi, Ch.; Henniger, J.

    2016-01-01

    This work covers the examination of fiber optical probes based on the radioluminescence and real time optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. Experiments are carried out to determine the fundamental dosimetric and temporal properties of the system and evaluate its suitability for dose rate measurements in brachytherapy and other applications using non-pulsed radiation fields. For this purpose the responses of the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence signal have been investigated in the dose rate range of 20 mGy/h to 3.6 Gy/h and for doses of 1 mGy up to 6 Gy. Furthermore, a new, efficient analysis procedure, the double phase reference summing, is introduced, leading to a real time optically stimulated luminescence signal. This method allows a complete compensation of the stem effect during the measurement. In contrast to previous works, the stimulation of the 1 mm cylindrical beryllium oxide detectors is performed with a symmetric function during irradiation. The investigated dose rates range from 0.3 to 3.6 Gy/h. The real time optically stimulated luminescence signal of beryllium oxide shows a dependency on both the dose rate and the applied dose. To overcome the problem of dose dependency, further experiments using higher stimulation intensities have to follow. - Highlights: • RL and OSL measurements with BeO extended to low dose (rate) range. • A new method to obtain the real time OSL: Dual Phase Reference Summing. • Real time OSL signal shows both dose and dose rate dependency. • Real time OSL enables a complete discrimination of the stem effect.

  2. Extremity doses to interventional radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wihtby, M.; Martin, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiologists performing interventional procedures are often required to stand close to the patient's side when carrying out manipulations under fluoroscopic control. This can result in their extremities receiving a high radiation dose, due to scattered radiation. These doses are sometimes high enough to warrant that the radiologist in question be designated a classified radiation worker. Classification in the UK is a result of any worker receiving or likely to receive in the course of their duties in excess of 3/10ths of any annual dose limit (500mSv to extremities, skin). The doses to the legs of radiologists have received less attention than those to the hands, however the doses may be high, due to the proximity of the legs and feet to scattered radiation. The legs can be exposed to a relatively high level of scattered radiation as the radiation in produced from scatter of the un attenuated beam from the bottom of the patient couch. The routine monitoring of extremity doses in interventional radiology is difficult due to several factors. Firstly a wide range of interventional procedures in undertaken in every radiology department, and these procedures require many different techniques, equipment and skills. This means that the position the radiologist adopts in relation to scattering medium and therefore their exposure, depends heavily on the type of procedure. As the hands which manipulate the catheters within the patient are often located close to the patients side and to the area under irradiation, the distribution of dose across the hands can be variable, with very high localised doses, making routine monitoring difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude and distribution of dose to the hands and legs of interventional radiologists carrying out a wide range of both diagnostic and therapeutic interventional procedures. To ascertain the most effective method of monitoring the highest dose in accordance with the Basic safety standards

  3. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajumoke Omolara Ojo

    Full Text Available Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1 were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of

  4. Polycarbonate-based benzo-δ-sultam films for high-dose dosimetry in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizi, Shazad; Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran; Ziaie, Farhood; Ghandi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In this work characteristics of the polycarbonate films with 20 μm in thickness containing different weight percentage of Benzo-δ-sultam were studied for use as a high dose dosimetry system in radiation processing facilities. The sensitivity of the dosimeters and the linearity of dose-response curves were investigated under 60 Co γ-rays in a dose range of 0-100 kGy, and obtained results were compared with the commercial CTA and FWT film dosimeters. The results show that the absorbance at 348 nm depends linearly on the dose in the investigated dose range. The effects of pre-irradiation (shelf-life) and post-irradiation storage in dark and in indirect sunlight are also discussed. The results show that the dosimeters characteristics are stable within 1% at 25 C, 3 months after the irradiation.

  5. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Bohr, C. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D{sub mean}, D{sub max} and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D{sub mean} to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target

  6. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R.; Bohr, C.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D mean , D max and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D mean to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target volume

  7. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  8. Thermoluminescence dose response of quartz as a function of irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitis, G.; Kaldoudi, E.; Charalambous, S.

    1990-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of pure Norwegian quartz as a function of irradiation temperature (T irr ) and dose has been investigated. The TL response of the (150-230 o C) and (230-350 o C) glow curve intervals shows a strong dependence on T irr between 77 and 373 K in the dose range from 54 to 8.4 x 10 4 Gy. Both glow curve intervals also show temperature dependent dose response properties. The 150-230 o C interval is supralinear from the lowest dose (54 Gy). Its maximum supralinearity factor appears at T irr = 293 K. The 230-350 o C interval shows sublinear behaviour below T irr = + 193 K, while at T irr ≥ 273 K it shows the well known dose response curves. Its maximum supralinearity factor appears at T irr = 323 K. The linear response is extended up to 460 Gy at T irr = 273 K and falls to 80 Gy at T irr = 373 K. (author)

  9. Low-Dose Sevoflurane Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Facilitates the Development of Dentate Gyrus-Dependent Learning in Neonatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Huge body of evidences demonstrated that volatile anesthetics affect the hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive functions, and most of them showed impairment at anesthetic dose. Here, we investigated the effect of low dose (1.8% sevoflurane on hippocampal neurogenesis and dentate gyrus-dependent learning. Neonatal rats at postnatal day 4 to 6 (P4–6 were treated with 1.8% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Neurogenesis was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine labeling and electrophysiology recording. Four and seven weeks after treatment, the Morris water maze and contextual-fear discrimination learning tests were performed to determine the influence on spatial learning and pattern separation. A 6-hour treatment with 1.8% sevoflurane promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and increased the survival of newborn cells and the proportion of immature granular cells in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats. Sevoflurane-treated rats performed better during the training days of the Morris water maze test and in contextual-fear discrimination learning test. These results suggest that a subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in neonatal rats and facilitates their performance in dentate gyrus-dependent learning tasks.

  10. A new label dosimetry system based on pentacosa-diynoic acid monomer for low dose applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Abdel-Rehim, F. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. Box 8029, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Soliman, Y.S., E-mail: yasser_shabaan@hotmail.com [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. Box 8029, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-01-15

    The dosimetric characteristics of {gamma}-radiation sensitive labels based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and a conjugated diacetylene monomer, 10,12-pentacosa-diynoic acid (PCDA) have been investigated using reflectance colorimeter. Two types of labels (colourless and yellow) based on PCDA monomer were prepared using an Automatic Film Applicator System. Upon {gamma}-ray exposure, the colourless label turns progressively blue, while the yellow colour label turns to green then to dark blue. The colour intensity of the labels is proportional to the radiation absorbed dose. The useful dose range was 15 Gy-2 kGy depending on PCDA monomer concentration. The expanded uncertainty of dose measurement of the colourless label was 6.06 (2{sigma}). - Highlights: > Using 10,12-pentacosa-diynoic acid (PCDA) in preparation of label dosimeter. > PCDA polymerises upon {gamma}-rays exposure producing a blue coloured polymer. > Useful dose range is 15 Gy to 2 kGy depending on concentration of PCDA. > Overall uncertainty of label dosimeter was 6.06 at 2{sigma}.

  11. Local organ dose conversion coefficients for angiographic examinations of coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Hausleiter, J; Hoeschen, C

    2007-01-01

    New organ dose conversion coefficients for coronary angiographic interventions are presented, as well as dose distributions and resulting maximal local dose conversion coefficients in the relevant organs. For the Monte Carlo based simulations, voxel models of the human anatomy were employed which represent the average Caucasian adult man and woman as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In the 21 investigated projections, the mean organ dose conversion coefficients vary from a few 0.01 to 2 mGy(Gy cm 2 ) -1 , depending on the projections. However, especially in portions of the lungs and the active bone marrow, the conversion coefficients can locally amount up to 10 mGy(Gy cm 2 ) -1 , which is half the average conversion coefficient of the skin at the field entrance. In addition to the dose conversion coefficients, the dependence of the patient dose on the projection has been estimated. It could be shown that the patient doses are highest for left anterior oblique views with strong caudal or cranial orientation. Nevertheless, for a large range of image-intensifier positions no significant dose differences could be found

  12. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely...... to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution....... This can be estimated by measurement of a suitable analogue, e.g. a well-bleached aeolian sample, but this requires such an analogue to be available, and in addition the assumptions that the sample is in fact a) well-bleached, and b) has a similar dose rate heterogeneity to the fossil deposit. Finally...

  13. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  14. Range dependent characteristics in the head-related transfer functions of a bat-head cast: part 2. Binaural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S; Allen, R; Rowan, D

    2012-01-01

    Further innovations in bio-inspired engineering based on biosonar systems, such as bats, may arise from more detailed understanding of the underlying acoustic processes. This includes the range-dependent properties of bat heads and ears, particularly at the higher frequencies of bat vocalizations. In a companion paper Kim et al (2012 Bioinspir. Biomim.), range-dependent head-related transfer functions of a bat head cast were investigated up to 100 kHz at either ear (i.e. monaural features). The current paper extends this to consider range-dependent spectral and temporal disparities between the two ears (i.e. binaural features), using experimental data and a spherical model of a bat head to provide insights into the physical basis for these features. It was found that binaural temporal and high-frequency binaural spectral features are approximately independent of distance, having the effect of decreasing their angular resolution at close range. In contrast, low-frequency binaural spectral features are strongly distance-dependent, such that angular sensitivity can be maintained by lowering the frequency of the echolocation emission at close range. Together with the companion paper Kim et al, we speculate that distance-dependent low-frequency monaural and binaural features at short range might help explain why some species of bats that drop the frequency of their calls on target approach while approaching a target. This also provides an impetus for the design of effective emissions in sonar engineering applied to similar tasks. (paper)

  15. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    significantly in the supernatant from cells stimulated by rIL-2 in a dose-dependent manner both in patients and volunteers. Total cell-bound histamine was 49.3 +/- 4.1 ng/ml in patients compared to 78.5 +/- 7.7 ng/ml in volunteers (p ... was significantly enhanced in cancer patients compared to volunteers (*p manner in both cancer patients and volunteers. This may in part explain the severe toxicity observed during high...

  16. Characterisation of a MOSFET-based detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, W. L.; Ung, N. M.; Tiong, A. H. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Wong, J. H. D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of the MOSkin detector for megavoltage electron beam dosimetry. The reproducibility, linearity, energy dependence, dose rate dependence, depth dose measurement, output factor measurement, and surface dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam were tested. The MOSkin detector showed excellent reproducibility (>98%) and linearity (R2= 1.00) up to 2000 cGy for 4-20 MeV electron beams. The MOSkin detector also showed minimal dose rate dependence (within ±3%) and energy dependence (within ±2%) over the clinical range of electron beams, except for an energy dependence at 4 MeV electron beam. An energy dependence correction factor of 1.075 is needed when the MOSkin detector is used for 4 MeV electron beam. The output factors measured by the MOSkin detector were within ±2% compared to those measured with the EBT3 film and CC13 chamber. The measured depth doses using the MOSkin detector agreed with those measured using the CC13 chamber, except at the build-up region due to the dose volume averaging effect of the CC13 chamber. For surface dose measurements, MOSkin measurements were in agreement within ±3% to those measured using EBT3 film. Measurements using the MOSkin detector were also compared to electron dose calculation algorithms namely the GGPB and eMC algorithms. Both algorithms were in agreement with measurements to within ±2% and ±4% for output factor (except for the 4 × 4 cm2 field size) and surface dose, respectively. With the uncertainties taken into account, the MOSkin detector was found to be a suitable detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam. This has been demonstrated in the in vivo skin dose measurement on patients during electron boost to the breast tumour bed.

  17. Revised age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides using the new tissue weighting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, S.C.; Gupta, M.M.; Nagaratnam, A.; Reddy, A.R.; Mehta, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    ICRP 56 gave age-dependent dose coefficients to members of the public from intake of most radiologically significant radionuclides that might be released to the environment due to various human activities. It has computed effective dose equivalent (now called effective dose) from these dose coefficients utilising the tissue weighting factors as given by ICRP 26. The recent ICRP 1990 recommendations have revised the tissue weighting factors based on new information on risk estimates of fatal cancer and hereditary disorders. This change in the tissue weighting factors will subsequently affect the computation of effective dose due to intake of various radio-nuclides considered by ICRP 56. The revised effective doses for ingested as well as inhaled radionuclides have been worked out and compared from corresponding earlier values. No change was found in the case of tritiated water, organically bound tritium and 14 C. For the majority of the radionuclides, the revised effective dose was within ± 20% of the earlier values. Larger variations in effective dose were noted for radionuclides which deposit preferentially in one or two organs. (author)

  18. Equine scintigraphy: assessment of the dose received by the personnel; Scintigraphie equine: estimation de la dose recue par le personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairand, I.; Bottollier, J.F.; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2003-03-01

    Following a request from the Permanent Secretary of the French Commission for Artificial Radioelements (CIREA) engaged to investigate a request for a licence related to a new scintigraphy unit dedicated to equidae, a dosimetric assessment concerning the personnel attending the examination was carried out. This scintigraphy unit depends on the Goustranville Centre for Imaging and Research on the Locomotive Diseases of Equidae (CIRALE) in the Calvados region. The dosimetric assessment was carried out for the different operators during the successive stages of the scintigraphic examination. Assuming 150 examinations per year, the annual equivalent dose to the fingers skin is 150 mSv maximum for the technologist and 2 mSv for the veterinary surgeon; the annual effective dose ranges from 0.15 to 0.45 mSv, depending on the operators. (authors)

  19. Quantitative analysis of biological responses to low dose-rate γ-radiation, including dose, irradiation time, and dose-rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Because biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose, it is necessary to include dose, dose-rate and irradiation time simultaneously to predict the risk of low dose-rate irradiation. In this study, we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, irradiation time and dose-rate, using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells. For evaluation of chromosome breakage we assessed micronuclei induced by radiation. U2OS cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were exposed to gamma-ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60 Co. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide, and the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was determined by fluorescent microscopy. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [3H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. Dose-rate in the irradiation room was measured with photoluminescence dosimeter. While irradiation time less than 24 h did not affect dose-response curves for both biological responses, they were remarkably attenuated as exposure time increased to more than 7 days. These biological responses were dependent on dose-rate rather than dose when cells were irradiated for 30 days. Moreover, percentage of micronucleus-forming cells cultured continuously for more than 60 days at the constant dose-rate, was gradually decreased in spite of the total dose accumulation. These results suggest that biological responses at low dose-rate, are remarkably affected by exposure time, that they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in the case of long-term irradiation, and that cells are getting resistant to radiation after the continuous irradiation for 2 months. It is necessary to include effect of irradiation time and dose-rate sufficiently to evaluate risk

  20. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the thymus-dependent humoral immune response and the polyclonal activation of B-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharetskij, A.N.; Surinov, B.P.; Abramova, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies on the effect of the low-dose (10 cGy with the dose rate of 1cGy/min) γ-radiation on the indices of the mice system and local immune response are presented. The sheep erythrocytes were used as a thymus-dependent antigen. It is shown that the total irradiation with the above dose rate induced the increase in the primary thymus-dependent humoral immune response on the sheep erythrocytes and polyclonal activation of the B-lymphocytes. The sharp oppression of the antibody formation was observed in the immune response dynamics after the phase of the radiation-induced elevation. The injection of hydroquinone right after the irradiation resulted in elimination of the radiation stimulation of the polyclonal response of the B-cells. The essential decrease in the immunoantilogarithmic radiation effect took place in the animals treated with thymogen. The possible negative consequences of the low-dose ionizing radiation impact on the body immune system are discussed [ru

  1. Long Range Dependence Prognostics for Bearing Vibration Intensity Chaotic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the chaotic features and typical fractional order characteristics of the bearing vibration intensity time series, a forecasting approach based on long range dependence (LRD is proposed. In order to reveal the internal chaotic properties, vibration intensity time series are reconstructed based on chaos theory in phase-space, the delay time is computed with C-C method and the optimal embedding dimension and saturated correlation dimension are calculated via the Grassberger–Procaccia (G-P method, respectively, so that the chaotic characteristics of vibration intensity time series can be jointly determined by the largest Lyapunov exponent and phase plane trajectory of vibration intensity time series, meanwhile, the largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated by the Wolf method and phase plane trajectory is illustrated using Duffing-Holmes Oscillator (DHO. The Hurst exponent and long range dependence prediction method are proposed to verify the typical fractional order features and improve the prediction accuracy of bearing vibration intensity time series, respectively. Experience shows that the vibration intensity time series have chaotic properties and the LRD prediction method is better than the other prediction methods (largest Lyapunov, auto regressive moving average (ARMA and BP neural network (BPNN model in prediction accuracy and prediction performance, which provides a new approach for running tendency predictions for rotating machinery and provide some guidance value to the engineering practice.

  2. An efficient dose-compensation method for proximity effect correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Han Weihua; Yang Xiang; Zhang Yang; Yang Fuhua; Zhang Renping

    2010-01-01

    A novel simple dose-compensation method is developed for proximity effect correction in electron-beam lithography. The sizes of exposed patterns depend on dose factors while other exposure parameters (including accelerate voltage, resist thickness, exposing step size, substrate material, and so on) remain constant. This method is based on two reasonable assumptions in the evaluation of the compensated dose factor: one is that the relation between dose factors and circle-diameters is linear in the range under consideration; the other is that the compensated dose factor is only affected by the nearest neighbors for simplicity. Four-layer-hexagon photonic crystal structures were fabricated as test patterns to demonstrate this method. Compared to the uncorrected structures, the homogeneity of the corrected hole-size in photonic crystal structures was clearly improved. (semiconductor technology)

  3. Reduced oxygen enhancement ratio at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen depletion rate in cell suspensions was measured using a Clark electrode. It was found that under experimental conditions used in this laboratory for hypoxic irradiations, the oxygen levels before the start of irradiation are always below 0.1μm, the levels which could give any significant enhancement to radiation inactivation by x-rays. The measured O/sub 2/ depletion rates were comparable to those reported in the literature. Chinese hamster cells (CHO) were made hypoxic by gas exchange, combined with metabolic consumption of oxygen by cells at 37 0 C. Full survival curves were determined in the dose range 0 to 3Gy using the low dose survival assay. The results confirmed the authors' earlier finding that the OER decreases at low doses. The authors therefore believe that the dose-dependent OER is a true radiobiological phenomenon and not an artifact of the experimental method used in the low dose survival assay

  4. Drug- not carrier-dependent haematological and biochemical changes in a repeated dose study of cyclosporine encapsulated polyester nano- and micro-particles: Size does not matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatpurwar, V.P.; Rhodes, S.; Oien, K.A.; Elliott, M.A.; Tekwe, C.D.; Jørgensen, H.G.; Kumar, M.N.V. Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The particulate delivery allows an increase in dose range without accrual of toxicities. • The altered haematological and biochemical changes are drug, but not particle dependent. • PLGA nano/microparticles are safe on subacute peroral dosing over 28 days. • Nano-toxicology, drug needs to be considered. - Abstract: Biodegradable nanoparticles are being considered more often as drug carriers to address pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic issues, yet nano-product safety has not been systematically proven. In this study, haematological, biochemical and histological parameters were examined on 28 day daily dosing of rats with nano- or micro-particle encapsulated cyclosporine (CsA) to confirm if any changes observed were drug or carrier dependent. CsA encapsulated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) [PLGA] nano- (nCsA) and micro-particles (mCsA) were prepared by emulsion techniques. CsA (15, 30, 45 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage to Sprague Dawley (SD) rats over 28 days. Haematological and biochemical metrics were followed with tissue histology performed on sacrifice. Whether presented as nCsA or mCsA, 45 mg/kg dose caused significant loss of body weight and lowered food consumption compared to untreated control. Across the doses, both nCsA and mCsA produce significant decreases in lymphocyte numbers compared to controls, commensurate with the proprietary product, Neoral ® 15. Dosing with nCsA showed higher serum drug levels than mCsA presumably owing to the smaller particle size facilitating absorption. The treatment had no noticeable effects on inflammatory/oxidative stress markers or antioxidant enzyme levels, except an increase in ceruloplasmin (CP) levels for high dose nCsA/mCsA group. Further, only subtle, sub-lethal changes were observed in histology of nCsA/mCsA treated rat organs. Blank (drug-free) particles did not induce changes in the parameters studied. Therefore, it is extremely important that the encapsulated drug in the nano-products is

  5. Polycarbonate-based benzo-δ-sultam films for high-dose dosimetry in radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizi, Shazad [University of Tehran, Tehran (India). School of Chemistry; Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Ziaie, Farhood [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Ghandi, Mehdi [University of Tehran, Tehran (India). School of Chemistry

    2015-05-01

    In this work characteristics of the polycarbonate films with 20 μm in thickness containing different weight percentage of Benzo-δ-sultam were studied for use as a high dose dosimetry system in radiation processing facilities. The sensitivity of the dosimeters and the linearity of dose-response curves were investigated under {sup 60}Co γ-rays in a dose range of 0-100 kGy, and obtained results were compared with the commercial CTA and FWT film dosimeters. The results show that the absorbance at 348 nm depends linearly on the dose in the investigated dose range. The effects of pre-irradiation (shelf-life) and post-irradiation storage in dark and in indirect sunlight are also discussed. The results show that the dosimeters characteristics are stable within 1% at 25 C, 3 months after the irradiation.

  6. Dose-Dependent AMPK-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms of Berberine and Metformin Inhibition of mTORC1, ERK, DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ming

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a rich reservoir of potential small chemical molecules exhibiting anti-proliferative and chemopreventive properties. Here, we show that treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells (PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2 with the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine (0.3-6 µM inhibited DNA synthesis and proliferation of these cells and delay the progression of their cell cycle in G1. Berberine treatment also reduced (by 70% the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cell growth when implanted into the flanks of nu/nu mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that berberine decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels and induced potent AMPK activation, as shown by phosphorylation of AMPK α subunit at Thr-172 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79. Furthermore, berberine dose-dependently inhibited mTORC1 (phosphorylation of S6K at Thr389 and S6 at Ser240/244 and ERK activation in PDAC cells stimulated by insulin and neurotensin or fetal bovine serum. Knockdown of α1 and α2 catalytic subunit expression of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effect produced by treatment with low concentrations of berberine on mTORC1, ERK and DNA synthesis in PDAC cells. However, at higher concentrations, berberine inhibited mitogenic signaling (mTORC1 and ERK and DNA synthesis through an AMPK-independent mechanism. Similar results were obtained with metformin used at doses that induced either modest or pronounced reductions in intracellular ATP levels, which were virtually identical to the decreases in ATP levels obtained in response to berberine. We propose that berberine and metformin inhibit mitogenic signaling in PDAC cells through dose-dependent AMPK-dependent and independent pathways.

  7. Radioprotection by murine and human tumor-necrosis factor; Dose-dependent effects on hematopoiesis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, L; Muench, M O; Warren, D J; Moore, M A.S. [James Ewing Laboratory of Developmental Hematopoiesis, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to confer significant radioprotection in murine models. Herein, we demonstrate a dose-dependent enhancement of hematological recovery when single doses of either murine or human recombinant TNF are administered prior to irradiation. In addition to its action upon leukocytes and erythocytes, TNF also alleviates radiation-induced thrombocytopenia in the mouse. These effects on circulating blood constituents are further reflected in increased numbers of both primitive (CFU-S) and more differentiated (CFU-GM, CFU-Mega) hematopoietic progenitors in TNF-treated animals. This suggests that TNF exerts it radioprotective effects on a pool of primitive multi-potential hematopoietic cells. (author).

  8. Dose-dependent LDL-cholesterol lowering effect by plant stanol ester consumption: clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laitinen Kirsi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elevated serum lipids are linked to cardiovascular diseases calling for effective therapeutic means to reduce particularly LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C levels. Plant stanols reduce levels of LDL-C by partly blocking cholesterol absorption. Accordingly the consumption of foods with added plant stanols, typically esterified with vegetable oil fatty acids in commercial food products, are recommended for lowering serum cholesterol levels. A daily intake of 1.5 to 2.4 g of plant stanols has been scientifically evaluated to lower LDL-C by 7 to 10% in different populations, ages and with different diseases. Based on earlier studies, a general understanding is that no further reduction may be achieved in intakes in excess of approximately 2.5 g/day. Recent studies however suggest that plant stanols show a continuous dose–response effect in serum LDL-C lowering. This review discusses the evidence for a dose-effect relationship between plant stanol ester consumption and reduction of LDL-C concentrations with daily intakes of plant stanols of 4 g/day or more. We identified five such studies and the overall data demonstrate a linear dose-effect relationship with the most pertinent LDL-Cholesterol lowering outcome, 18%, achieved by a daily intake of 9 to 10 g of plant stanols. Along with reduction in LDL-C, the studies demonstrated a decrease in cholesterol absorption markers, the serum plant sterol to cholesterol ratios, by increasing the dose of plant stanol intake. None of the studies with daily intakes up to 10 g of plant stanols reported adverse clinical or biochemical effects from plant stanols. In a like manner, the magnitude of decrease in serum antioxidant vitamins was not related to the dose of plant stanols consumed and the differences between plant stanol ester consumers and controls were minor and insignificant or nonexisting. Consumption of plant stanols in high doses is feasible as a range of food products are commercially available for

  9. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  10. Annual individual hygienic assessment of natural exposure doses of the Altai territory model areas population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Potseluev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to determine ionizing radiation natural sources exposure regularities of Altai Territory model areas population. The materials and methods. 11376 radon measurements, 1247 gamma radiation meas-urements in an open area and in residential and office buildings were performed, selection of 189 drinking water tests was carried out. Results. Complex radiation and hygienic examination of the region with the most large municipalities number with model areas allocation was conducted. The assessment of the Altai Territory population’s individual annual radiation doses from natural radionuclides has revealed a number of the regularities depending on the terrain’s ecological and geographical type. Following the research results, ranging the region territories taking into account of annual effective doses of the population from natural sources for 2009-2015 was carried out. The annual individual effective dose of the Altai Territory upland areas population presented by the highest values and ranges from 7.36 mSv / year to 8.19 mSv / year. Foothill regions of Altai and in Salair ridge are characterized by increased population exposure from natural sources. Here the dose ranges from 5.09 mSv / year to 6.22 mSv / year. Steppe and forest-steppe territories are characterized by the lowest level of the natural radiation which is ranging from 3.23 mSv / year to 4.11 mSv / year, that doesn’t exceed the all-Russian levels. Most of the hygienic radon equivalent equilibrium volume activity standards exceedances were registered in mountain and foothill areas buildings. A number of radon anomalies is revealed also in steppe areas. Med exceedances ranged from 203 ± 17.8 Bq / m3 to 480 ± 37.9 Bq / m3. Given the fact that most of these buildings belong to the administrative or educational institutions with an eight-hour working day, the dose of radiation for people there can be up to 10 mSv / year. Conclusion. Spreading of individual annual effective

  11. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Pham, Christopher [University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). MD Anderson Cancer Center; Georgescu, Walter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Deschamps, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine [Univ. of Namur (Belgium). Namur Research inst. for Life Sciences (NARILIS), Research Center for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR); Tang, Jonathan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Costes, Sylvain V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  12. Randomised clinical trial: a dose-ranging study of vonoprazan, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, vs. lansoprazole for the treatment of erosive oesophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, K; Sakurai, Y; Nishimura, A; Kudou, K; Hiramatsu, N; Umegaki, E; Iwakiri, K; Chiba, T

    2015-09-01

    The potassium-competitive acid blocker vonoprazan (VPZ) has potent acid-inhibitory effects and may offer clinical advantages over conventional therapy for acid-related disorders. To investigate the efficacy and safety of VPZ in patients with erosive oesophagitis (EO). In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, dose-ranging study, patients ≥20 years with endoscopically confirmed EO [Los Angeles (LA) grades A-D] received VPZ 5, 10, 20 or 40 mg, or lansoprazole (LPZ) 30 mg once daily for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of healed EO subjects as shown by endoscopy at week 4. A total of 732 subjects received VPZ or LPZ. The proportion of healed EO subjects at week 4 was 92.3%, 92.5%, 94.4%, 97.0% and 93.2%, respectively, with VPZ 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg and LPZ 30 mg. All VPZ doses were non-inferior to LPZ when adjusted for baseline LA grades A/B and C/D. Among those with LA grades C/D, the proportions of healed EO subjects were 87.3%, 86.4%, 100%, 96.0% and 87.0%, respectively, with VPZ 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg and LPZ 30 mg. The incidence of adverse events was similar across the groups. Vonoprazan was effective and non-inferior to LPZ in healing EO. VPZ 20 mg or higher was highly efficacious for severe EO (LA grades C/D). VPZ was associated with no safety concern during this 8-week study, while there was a dose-dependent increase in serum gastrin. Once-daily VPZ 20 mg is the recommended clinical dose for treating EO. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The effect of chronic corticosterone on fear learning and memory depends on dose and the testing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, W N; Fenton, E Y; Guskjolen, A J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-03-19

    Chronic exposure to the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) is known to alter plasticity within hippocampal and amygdalar circuits that mediate fear learning and memory. The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of chronic CORT on Pavlovian fear conditioning, which is dependent on intact hippocampal and amygdalar activity. In particular, we assessed whether the effect of chronic CORT on fear learning and memory is influenced by two factors-the dose of CORT and the order in which rats are tested for freezing to context versus tone cues. Male Long-Evans rats received low-dose CORT (5mg/kg), high-dose CORT (40mg/kg), or vehicle injections once daily for 21days. On day 22, the rats were trained in a fear-conditioning paradigm. On days 23 and 24, the rats were tested for the retrieval of fear memories to context and tone cues in a counterbalanced way-half the rats received context testing on day 23 and then tone testing on day 24 and half the rats received tone testing on day 23 followed by context testing on day 24. Our results revealed dose-dependent effects of CORT on memory retrieval: Rats injected with high-dose CORT froze significantly more than control rats to both context and tone cues regardless of what testing day these cues were presented. However, rats injected with low-dose CORT froze significantly more than control rats to tone cues only. We also found an order effect in that the effects of CORT on freezing were greater on the second day of testing, regardless of whether that testing was to context or tones cues. This order effect may be due to a lack of extinction in the CORT rats. Overall, these results suggest a relationship between stress intensity and testing conditions that should be taken into account when assessing the effect of stress on fear memories. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring flavor-dependent long-range forces in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sabya Sachi; Dasgupta, Arnab; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The Standard Model gauge group can be extended with minimal matter content by introducing anomaly free U(1) symmetry, such as L e - L μ or L e - L τ . If the neutral gauge boson corresponding to this abelian symmetry is ultra-light, then it will give rise to flavor-dependent long-range leptonic force, which can have significant impact on neutrino oscillations. For an instance, the electrons inside the Sun can generate a flavor-dependent long-range potential at the Earth surface, which can suppress the ν μ → ν e appearance probability in terrestrial experiments. The sign of this potential is opposite for anti-neutrinos, and affects the oscillations of (anti-)neutrinos in different fashion. This feature invokes fake CP-asymmetry like the SM matter effect and can severely affect the leptonic CP-violation searches in long-baseline experiments. In this paper, we study in detail the possible impacts of these long-range flavor-diagonal neutral current interactions due to L e - L μ symmetry, when (anti-)neutrinos travel from Fermilab to Homestake (1300 km) and CERN to Pyhäsalmi (2290 km) in the context of future high-precision superbeam facilities, DUNE and LBNO respectively. If there is no signal of long-range force, DUNE (LBNO) can place stringent constraint on the effective gauge coupling α eμ < 1.9 × 10-53 (7.8 × 10-54) at 90% C.L., which is almost 30 (70) times better than the existing bound from the Super-Kamiokande experiment. We also observe that if α eμ ≥ 2 × 10-52, the CP-violation discovery reach of these future facilities vanishes completely. The mass hierarchy measurement remains robust in DUNE (LBNO) if α eμ < 5 × 10-52 (10-52).

  15. Dose-Dependent Effects of Radiation Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow, Metabolism, and Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Carol A.; Zhou Sumin; Raynor, Renee; Tisch, Andrea; Light, Kim; Shafman, Timothy; Wong, Terence; Kirkpatrick, John; Turkington, Timothy; Hollis, Donna; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study was performed to formally relate dose-dependent radiologically defined changes in normal brain induced by radiotherapy (RT) to neurocognitive dysfunction in subjects with primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Adult patients receiving three-dimensional RT for central nervous system (CNS) tumors were enrolled. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and neuropsychological testing were performed before RT and 3 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Analyses were performed for correlations between changes in 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET (metabolism), 15 O-PET (relative blood flow), regional radiation dose, follow-up time, and neuropsychological test scores. Results: Eleven subjects were enrolled and 6 completed follow-up studies. The PET data showed reduced FDG uptake, with average decreases of 2-6% in regions of the brain receiving greater than 40 Gy at 3 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The 15 O-H 2 O PET showed increases (<10%) at 3 weeks in relative regional blood flow in brain receiving greater than 30 Gy, but less at the 6-month follow-up studies. There were significant correlations between decreases in FDG uptake and increased scores from the Symptom Checklist-90-R, with an average increase in T score of 2 (p < 0.0001). The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test showed a significant correlation of decreased FDG uptake with increased errors and perseveration in test performance, with an average decrease in T score of 11 (p = 0.037). Conclusions: A dose-dependent response of CNS tissue was detected using FDG PET in this small number of patients. Decreases in CNS metabolism correlated with decreased performance on neuropsychological tests for problem solving, cognitive flexibility, and global measures of psychopathology. Additional research is needed to verify and define these findings

  16. Absorbed dose rate meter for β-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingo, K.

    1977-01-01

    The absorbed dose of β-ray depends on the energy of β-rays and the epidermal thickness of tissue in interest. In order to measure the absorbed dose rate at the interested tissue directly, the ratio of counting rate to absorbed dose should be constant independent of β-ray energy. In this purpose, a thin plastic scintillator was used as a detector with a single channel analyzer. The pulse height distribution, obtained using the scintillator whose thickness is less than the range of β-rays, shows a peak at a particular pulse height depending on the thickness of scintillator used. This means an increase of the number of pulses at lower pulse height. The lower level of discrimination and window width of the single channel analyzer are chosen according to the epidermal thickness of the tissue. In the experiment, scintillators of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 mm thick were tested. It was found that desirable pulse height distribution, to obtain a constant dose sensitivity, could be obtained using the 2 mm thick scintillator. The sensitivity of the absorbed dose rate meter is constant within +-15% for β-ray with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV, when the absorbed dose rate for skin (epidermal thickness 7mg/cm 2 ) is measured. In order to measure the dose rate for a hand (epithermal thickness 40mg/cm 2 ) the lower level of discrimination is changed to be higher and at the same time the window width is also changed. Combining these techniques, one can get an absorbed dose rate meter for the tissue dose of various thickness, which has the constant dose sensitivity within +-15% for β-rays with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV

  17. Age and sex dependent inhalation doses to members of the public from indoor thoron progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L; Tschiersch, J [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Li, W B [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Medical Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Li, J L, E-mail: bilei1983@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-12-01

    The increased indoor thoron level in Europe, North America and Asia has shown that the exposure to thoron and its decay products cannot be ignored in some environments. The contribution of thoron and its progeny can be a significant component of the total exposure from radon and thoron. In the present paper, radiation dose assessment of members of the public of different age and sex exposed to {sup 220}Rn progeny under different daily life activities is performed through a dosimetric approach. Dose conversion coefficients under typical indoor conditions were estimated to be in the range of 107 nSv (Bq h m{sup -3}){sup -1} for infant to 81.7 nSv (Bq h m{sup -3}){sup -1} for adult. The results of this work emphasized that small children receive a radiation dose of 25% more than adults under the same conditions, and people performing exercise receive a radiation dose 100% more than when sleeping. The results of this work are appropriate to the risk assessment of thoron exposure to members of the public who live in areas with high radon and thoron concentrations.

  18. Dose-response characteristics of an amorphous silicon EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Peter; Hefner, Alfred; Georg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for the purpose of patient setup verification. Nowadays, they are increasingly used as dosimeters (e.g., for IMRT verification and linac-specific QA). A prerequisite for any clinical dosimetric application is a detailed understanding of the detector's dose-response behavior. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon EPID (Elekta IVIEWGT) with respect to three photon beam qualities: 6, 10, and 25 MV. The EPID showed an excellent temporal stability on short term as well as on long term scales. The stability throughout the day was strongly influenced by warming up, which took several hours and affected EPID response by 2.5%. Ghosting effects increased the sensitivity of the EPID. They became more pronounced with decreasing time intervals between two exposures as well as with increasing dose. Due to ghosting, changes in pixel sensitivity amounted up to 16% (locally) for the 25 MV photon beam. It was observed that the response characteristics of our EPID depended on dose as well as on dose rate. Doubling the dose rate increased the EPID sensitivity by 1.5%. This behavior was successfully attributed to a dose per frame effect, i.e., a nonlinear relationship between the EPID signal and the dose which was delivered to the panel between two successive readouts. The sensitivity was found to vary up to 10% in the range of 1 to 1000 monitor units. This variation was governed by two independent effects. For low doses, the EPID signal was reduced due to the linac's changing dose rate during startup. Furthermore, the detector reading was influenced by intrabeam variations of EPID sensitivity, namely, an increase of detector response during uniform exposure. For the beam qualities which were used, the response characteristics of the EPID did not depend on energy. Differences in relative dose-response curves resulted from energy dependent temporal output

  19. Investigation of cortisole levels at exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation at working out and identification of mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yishkhanova, M.A.; Anyipko, O.B.; Myitryajeva, N.A.; Gubs'kij, V.Yi.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report primary data to create the model of animals irradiation in the doses of 0.13 - 1.15 Gy during 0.5 - 42 days. Dependence of blood cortisole level on the dose of irradiation (0.13 - 1.15 Gy) during 0.5 - 1.5 days was determined. The dependence of cortisole level on the doses and the length of the period after the irradiation was found to be a complicated function. Within the dose range of 0.13 - 1.15 Gy during 0.5 -1.5 days cortisole level does not depend on the dose value. The study of influence of the terms duration on cortisole level has showed that within 0.5 - 1.5 days it increases irrespective of the dose of irradiation, and within 4 - 42 days it decreases

  20. Investigations on the influence of aminopropyl-aminoethyl-phosphorothioic acid on the radio-iron utilization after a whole-body irradiation of mice in the sublethal dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenig, H.; Seiter, I.; Kofler, E.

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of the thiophosphate compound WR 2721 was investigated with regard to the radiosensitivity of X-irradiated female mice in the sublethal dose range of 50 to 150 R using the radioiron test ( 59 Fe). An increase of the radioresistance with regard to the radioiron uptake in young erythrocyte populations was obtained only beyond radiation doses of 75 R. In lower dose ranges the animals treated with thiophoshate became even more radiosensitive. At dose values of 100 R and 150 R dose reduction factors (DRF) of 1.3 and 1.5 respectively were obtained. These factors are considerably smaller than the DRF-values found for the survival rate at LDsub(50/30). A possible mechanism for this result may be due to the different dephosphorylation rate of the thiophosphate in various tissues, as described in literature. (orig.) [de

  1. Low-dose sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and facilitates the development of dentate gyrus-dependent learning in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Shen, Feng-Yan; Zhao, Xuan; Zhou, Tao; Xu, Dao-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Wang, Ying-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Huge body of evidences demonstrated that volatile anesthetics affect the hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive functions, and most of them showed impairment at anesthetic dose. Here, we investigated the effect of low dose (1.8%) sevoflurane on hippocampal neurogenesis and dentate gyrus-dependent learning. Neonatal rats at postnatal day 4 to 6 (P4-6) were treated with 1.8% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Neurogenesis was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine labeling and electrophysiology recording. Four and seven weeks after treatment, the Morris water maze and contextual-fear discrimination learning tests were performed to determine the influence on spatial learning and pattern separation. A 6-hour treatment with 1.8% sevoflurane promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and increased the survival of newborn cells and the proportion of immature granular cells in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats. Sevoflurane-treated rats performed better during the training days of the Morris water maze test and in contextual-fear discrimination learning test. These results suggest that a subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in neonatal rats and facilitates their performance in dentate gyrus-dependent learning tasks. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, Osvaldo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto; Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    than K_a_i_r and KAP, with average ratios ranging between 0.9 and 1.1 and variations for different organs and protocols below 20%. The triple phantom setup allowed us to take into account scatter dose contributions, but nonetheless, the correlation with the evaluated organ doses was not improved with this method. Conclusions: The simulation of rotational geometry and of asymmetric beam distribution by means of PCXMC 2.0 enabled us to determine patient organ doses depending on weight, height and gender. Alternatively, the measurement of an in phantom dose indicator combined with proper correction coefficients can be a useful tool for a first dose estimation of in-field organs. The data and coefficients provided in this study can be applied to any patient undergoing a scan by an Elekta XVI equipment.

  3. Long-range spatial dependence in fractured rock. Empirical evidence and implications for tracer transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, S.

    1999-02-01

    Nonclassical stochastic continuum models incorporating long-range spatial dependence are evaluated as models for fractured crystalline rock. Open fractures and fracture zones are not modeled explicitly in this approach. The fracture zones and intact rock are modeled as a single stochastic continuum. The large contrasts between the fracture zones and unfractured rock are accounted for by making use of random field models specifically designed for highly variable systems. Hydraulic conductivity data derived from packer tests in the vicinity of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory form the basis for the evaluation. The Aespoe log K data were found to be consistent with a fractal scaling model based on bounded fractional Levy motion (bfLm), a model that has been used previously to model highly variable sedimentary formations. However, the data are not sufficient to choose between this model, a fractional Brownian motion model for the normal-score transform of log K, and a conventional geostatistical model. Stochastic simulations conditioned by the Aespoe data coupled with flow and tracer transport calculations demonstrate that the models with long-range dependence predict earlier arrival times for contaminants. This demonstrates the need to evaluate this class of models when assessing the performance of proposed waste repositories. The relationship between intermediate-scale and large-scale transport properties in media with long-range dependence is also addressed. A new Monte Carlo method for stochastic upscaling of intermediate-scale field data is proposed

  4. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  5. Cavities at the Si projected range by high dose and energy Si ion implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canino, M.; Regula, G.; Lancin, M.; Xu, M.; Pichaud, B.; Ntzoenzok, E.; Barthe, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    Two series of n-type Si samples α and β are implanted with Si ions at high dose (1 x 10 16 ) and high energies, 0.3 and 1.0 MeV, respectively. Both sort of samples are then implanted with 5 x 10 16 He cm -2 (at 10 or 50 keV) and eventually with B atoms. Some of the samples are annealed at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000 deg. C to allow the thermal growth of He-cavities, located between sample surface and the projected range (R p ) of Si. After the triple ion implantation, which corresponds to defect engineering, samples were characterized by cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Voids (or bubbles) are observed not only at the R p (He) on all annealed samples, but also at the R p (Si) on β samples implanted with He at 50 keV. The samples are also studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and the spectra confirm that as-implanted samples contain di-vacancies and that the annealed ones, even at high temperature have bigger open volumes, which are assumed to be the same voids observed by XTEM. It is demonstrated that a sole Si implantation at high energy and dose is efficient to create cavities which are thermally stable up to 1000 deg. C only in the presence of He.

  6. Analysis on the entrance surface dose and contrast medium dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Hyun [Dept. of Cardiovascular Center, Yeocheon Jeonnam Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Choi, Nam Gil; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to identify dose reduction measures by retrospectively analyzing the entrance surface dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination and to contribute the patients with renal impairmend and a high probability of side effects to determine the inspection's direction by measuring the contrast usages actually to active actions for the dose by actually measuring the contrast medium dose. The CTDIvol value and air kerma value, which are the entrance surface doses of the two examinations, and the contrast medium dose depending on the number of slides were compared and analyzed. This study was conducted in 21 subjects (11 males; 10 females) who underwent Cardiac Computed Tomographic Angiography (CCTA) and Coronary Angiography (CAG) in this hospital during the period from May 2014 to May 2016. The subject's age was 48-85 years old (mean 65±10 years old), and the weight was 37.6~83.3 kg (mean 63±6 kg). Dose reduction could be expected in the cardiovascular examination using CCTA rather than in the examination using CAG. In terms of contrast medium dose, CAG used a smaller dose than CCTA. In particular, as the number of slides increases at CAG, the contrast medium dose increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the contrast medium dose, the number of slides suitable for the scan range must be selected.

  7. Plumbagin Nanoparticles Induce Dose and pH Dependent Toxicity on Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan A; Snima, K S; Kamath, Ravindranath C; Nair, Shantikumar V; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Stable nano-formulation of Plumbagin nanoparticles from Plumbago zeylanica root extract was explored as a potential natural drug against prostate cancer. Size and morphology analysis by DLS, SEM and AFM revealed the average size of nanoparticles prepared was 100±50nm. In vitro cytotoxicity showed concentration and time dependent toxicity on prostate cancer cells. However, plumbagin crude extract found to be highly toxic to normal cells when compared to plumbagin nanoformulation, thus confirming nano plumbagin cytocompatibility with normal cells and dose dependent toxicity to prostate cells. In vitro hemolysis assay confirmed the blood biocompatibility of the plumbagin nanoparticles. In wound healing assay, plumbagin nanoparticles provided clues that it might play an important role in the anti-migration of prostate cancer cells. DNA fragmentation revealed that partial apoptosis induction by plumbagin nanoparticles could be expected as a potent anti-cancer effect towards prostate cancer.

  8. Dosimetry investigation of MOSFET for clinical IMRT dose verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Kumar, Rajesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Neharu, R M; Kannan, V

    2013-06-01

    In IMRT, patient-specific dose verification is followed regularly at each centre. Simple and efficient dosimetry techniques play a very important role in routine clinical dosimetry QA. The MOSFET dosimeter offers several advantages over the conventional dosimeters such as its small detector size, immediate readout, immediate reuse, multiple point dose measurements. To use the MOSFET as routine clinical dosimetry system for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT, a comprehensive set of experiments has been conducted, to investigate its linearity, reproducibility, dose rate effect and angular dependence for 6 MV x-ray beam. The MOSFETs shows a linear response with linearity coefficient of 0.992 for a dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The reproducibility of the MOSFET was measured by irradiating the MOSFET for ten consecutive irradiations in the dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The measured reproducibility of MOSFET was found to be within 4% up to 70 cGy and within 1.4% above 70 cGy. The dose rate effect on the MOSFET was investigated in the dose rate range 100 MU/min to 600 MU/min. The response of the MOSFET varies from -1.7% to 2.1%. The angular responses of the MOSFETs were measured at 10 degrees intervals from 90 to 270 degrees in an anticlockwise direction and normalized at gantry angle zero and it was found to be in the range of 0.98 ± 0.014 to 1.01 ± 0.014. The MOSFETs were calibrated in a phantom which was later used for IMRT verification. The measured calibration coefficients were found to be 1 mV/cGy and 2.995 mV/cGy in standard and high sensitivity mode respectively. The MOSFETs were used for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT. Nine dosimeters were used for each patient to measure the dose in different plane. The average variation between calculated and measured dose at any location was within 3%. Dose verification using MOSFET and IMRT phantom was found to quick and efficient and well suited for a busy radiotherapy

  9. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose‐weighted correction method for LET effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth‐dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high‐bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth‐dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth‐output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose‐weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors. PACS number: 87.56.‐v

  10. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlerman, D A.E. [Institute of Process Engineering, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  11. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlerman, D.A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  12. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  13. Radial dose distribution from carbon ion incident on liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scifoni, E.; Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report calculations of the radial dose deposited along carbon-ion tracks in liquid water using different techniques depending on the energy range of secondary electrons. The models are developed in relation with the experimental data on electron penetration lengths. For electrons with energies higher than 45 eV, we use the Katz model. However, the main focus is on the low-energy electrons, which are largely responsible for DNA damage within 10 nm from the tracks. For these electrons, the dose calculation is based on their random walk behaviour. The results of this combined approach are compared to experimental measurements. Contributions to the deposited energy by electrons of different ranges of energy are discussed. (authors)

  14. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  15. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid_rbp@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiri, Isaac [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Yazdan [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Deevband, Mohammad Reza [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Ahmad [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad, E-mail: bitarafan@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  16. WE-EF-303-09: Proton-Acoustic Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Xiang, L [University of Oklahoma (OK), Norman, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated proton-acoustic signals detection for range verification with current ultrasound instruments in typical clinical scenarios. Using simulations that included a realistic noise model, we determined the theoretical minimum dose required to generate detectable proton-acoustic signals. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distributions and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. The acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were modeled by the general 3D pressure wave equation and convolved with Gaussian kernels to simulate various proton pulse widths (0.1 – 10 ms). A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth band-pass filter, and ii) randomly generated noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons and dose required per pulse. The maximum spatial resolution was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer center frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons were on the order of 0.6–6 million per pulse, leading to 3–110 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak, depending on the spot size. The acoustic signal consisted of lower frequencies for wider pulses, leading to lower noise levels, but also worse spatial resolution. The resolution was 1-mm for a 0.1-µs pulse width, but increased to 5-mm for a 10-µs pulse width. Conclusion: We have established minimum dose detection limits for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a large detector with no losses and only detector thermal noise. Feasible proton-acoustic range detection will require at least 10{sup 7} protons per pulse and pulse widths ≤ 1-µs.

  17. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). To assess potential local RBE variations, LET distributions were calculated with Monte Carlo, and compared for different plans. The results were assessed in terms of their sensitivity to uncertainties in model parameters and delivery. Results: IFD courses included equal number of fractions boosting either hemisphere, thus, the combined physical dose was close to uniform throughout the prostate. However, for the entire course, the prostate EUD in IFD was higher than in conventional FTP by up to 14%, corresponding to the estimated increase in TCP to 96% from 88%. The extent of gain depended on the mixing factor, i.e., relative weights used to combine FTP and STP spot weights. Increased weighting of STP typically yielded a higher target EUD, but also led to increased sensitivity of dose to variations in the proton's range. Rectal and bladder EUD were same or lower (per normalization), and the NTCP for both remained below 1%. The LET distributions in IFD also depended strongly on the mixing weights: plans using higher weight of STP spots yielded higher LET, indicating a potentially higher local RBE. Conclusions: In proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning, improved therapeutic outcome can potentially be expected with delivery of IFD distributions, while administering the prescribed quasi-uniform dose to the target over the entire course. The biological effectiveness of IFD may be further enhanced by optimizing the LET distributions. IFD distributions are characterized by a dose gradient located in proximity of the prostate's midplane, thus, the fidelity of delivery would depend crucially on the precision with which the proton range could be controlled.

  18. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). To assess potential local RBE variations, LET distributions were calculated with Monte Carlo, and compared for different plans. The results were assessed in terms of their sensitivity to uncertainties in model parameters and delivery. Results: IFD courses included equal number of fractions boosting either hemisphere, thus, the combined physical dose was close to uniform throughout the prostate. However, for the entire course, the prostate EUD in IFD was higher than in conventional FTP by up to 14%, corresponding to the estimated increase in TCP to 96% from 88%. The extent of gain depended on the mixing factor, i.e., relative weights used to combine FTP and STP spot weights. Increased weighting of STP typically yielded a higher target EUD, but also led to increased sensitivity of dose to variations in the proton's range. Rectal and bladder EUD were same or lower (per normalization), and the NTCP for both remained below 1%. The LET distributions in IFD also depended strongly on the mixing weights: plans using higher weight of STP spots yielded higher LET, indicating a potentially higher local RBE. Conclusions: In proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning, improved therapeutic outcome can potentially be expected with delivery of IFD distributions, while administering the prescribed quasi-uniform dose to the target over the entire course. The biological effectiveness of IFD may be further enhanced by optimizing the LET distributions. IFD distributions are characterized by a dose gradient located in proximity of the prostate's midplane, thus, the fidelity of delivery would depend crucially on the precision with which the proton range could be controlled.

  19. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). To assess potential local RBE variations, LET distributions were calculated with Monte Carlo, and compared for different plans. The results were assessed in terms of their sensitivity to uncertainties in model parameters and delivery. IFD courses included equal number of fractions boosting either hemisphere, thus, the combined physical dose was close to uniform throughout the prostate. However, for the entire course, the prostate EUD in IFD was higher than in conventional FTP by up to 14%, corresponding to the estimated increase in TCP to 96% from 88%. The extent of gain depended on the mixing factor, i.e., relative weights used to combine FTP and STP spot weights. Increased weighting of STP typically yielded a higher target EUD, but also led to increased sensitivity of dose to variations in the proton's range. Rectal and bladder EUD were same or lower (per normalization), and the NTCP for both remained below 1%. The LET distributions in IFD also depended strongly on the mixing weights: plans using higher weight of STP spots yielded higher LET, indicating a potentially higher local RBE. In proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning, improved therapeutic outcome can potentially be expected with delivery of IFD distributions, while administering the prescribed quasi-uniform dose to the target over the entire course. The biological effectiveness of IFD may be further enhanced by optimizing the LET distributions. IFD distributions are characterized by a dose gradient located in proximity of the prostate's midplane, thus, the fidelity of delivery would depend crucially on the precision with which the proton range could be controlled.

  20. Development of direct reading dosimeters for the dose 0-3 mSv and 0-5 mSv ranges for personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaikwad, P.V.; Shirkar, Y.B.; Patil, A.S.; Madgaonkar, P.P.; Kale, K.L.; Guhagarkar, H.V.; Gandhi, D.P.; Gupta, S.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.; Sahni, V.C.

    1998-01-01

    Direct reading dosimeters (DRDs) are widely used to measure cumulative dose received by personnel working at nuclear reactor sites or in other environment having x- and gamma rays. A DRD operates on the principle of gold leaf electroscope, and is a small, rugged, hermetically sealed, self reading type device easily carried by an individual in his pocket. The development of dosimeters suitable for the dose ranges 0-3 mSv and 0-5 mSv is reported

  1. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan; Wang, Haitao; Li, Chenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10 22 n cm −2 (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected as the

  2. A new label dosimetry system based on pentacosa-diynoic acid monomer for low dose applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Abdel-Rehim, F.; Soliman, Y.S.

    2012-01-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of γ-radiation sensitive labels based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and a conjugated diacetylene monomer, 10,12-pentacosa-diynoic acid (PCDA) have been investigated using reflectance colorimeter. Two types of labels (colourless and yellow) based on PCDA monomer were prepared using an Automatic Film Applicator System. Upon γ-ray exposure, the colourless label turns progressively blue, while the yellow colour label turns to green then to dark blue. The colour intensity of the labels is proportional to the radiation absorbed dose. The useful dose range was 15 Gy-2 kGy depending on PCDA monomer concentration. The expanded uncertainty of dose measurement of the colourless label was 6.06 (2σ). - Highlights: → Using 10,12-pentacosa-diynoic acid (PCDA) in preparation of label dosimeter. → PCDA polymerises upon γ-rays exposure producing a blue coloured polymer. → Useful dose range is 15 Gy to 2 kGy depending on concentration of PCDA. → Overall uncertainty of label dosimeter was 6.06 at 2σ.

  3. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ilknur; Gunal, M Yalcin; Ayturk, Nilufer; Kilic, Ulkan; Ozansoy, Mehmet; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2017-05-01

    Recent evidence exists that enoxaparin can reduce brain injury because of its anticoagulant activity. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury, at 20 minutes after modeling, male BALB/c mouse models of cold-induced traumatic brain injury were intraperitoneally administered 3 and 10 mg/kg enoxaparin or isotonic saline solution. Twenty-four hours later, enoxaparin at 10 mg/kg greatly reduced infarct volume, decreased cell apoptosis in the cortex and obviously increased serum level of total antioxidant status. By contrast, administration of enoxaparin at 3 mg/kg did not lead to these changes. These findings suggest that enoxaparin exhibits neuroprotective effect on cold-induced traumatic brain injury in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. Juvenile Hormone Analogues, Methoprene and Fenoxycarb Dose-Dependently Enhance Certain Enzyme Activities in the Silkworm Bombyx Mori (L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajeswara Rao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of Juvenile Hormone Analogues (JHA in sericulture practices has been shown to boost good cocoon yield; their effect has been determined to be dose-dependent. We studied the impact of low doses of JHA compounds such as methoprene and fenoxycarb on selected key enzymatic activities of the silkworm Bombyx mori. Methoprene and fenoxycarb at doses of 1.0 μg and 3.0fg/larvae/48 hours showed enhancement of the 5th instar B. mori larval muscle and silkgland protease, aspartate aminotransaminase (AAT and alanine aminotransaminase (ALAT, adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATPase and cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO activity levels, indicating an upsurge in the overall oxidative metabolism of the B.mori larval tissues.

  5. Development of label dosimeters and analytical methods to verify absorbed dose in irradiated dried fruits/tree nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattar, Abdus; Ahmad, Anwar; Atta, Shaheen

    2001-01-01

    Density measurements of fresh/dried fruits and tree nuts varied depending upon the package size, type and the nature of the sample. For the development of label dosimeters, the samples of clear PMMA in the thickness range of 410 mm gave a linear response in relation to the irradiation doses (0.125-1.0 kGy) and the optical response was stable almost for 6 months at ambient storage (20-35 deg. C; R.H 40-80%). Flexible polymers (polyethylene and PVC) materials were not found suitable in the dose range of 0.1-3.0 kGy. Subjective evaluation of Sterin indicator, an ISP product from USA, revealed that this new material is generally reliable, however, they were also affected by the doses lower than their threshold values (125 and 300 Gy) as well as exposure to light during storage. The yellow PMMA dosimeter (YLPMMA) developed by China was useful in the range of 125-1000 Gy of gamma radiation. Dose distribution studies of research irradiator at NIFA and a commercial gamma source (PARAS) at Lahore, indicated almost a good dose uniformity in the product containers in each case. Among the analytical methods (thermoluminescence and gas chromatography) the thermoluminescence measurements exhibited clearly reproducible and dose dependent differences between treated (0.5-1.5 kGy) and untreated samples of dried fruits/nuts. (author)

  6. TH-AB-207A-05: A Fully-Automated Pipeline for Generating CT Images Across a Range of Doses and Reconstruction Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, S; Lo, P; Hoffman, J; Wahi-Anwar, M; Brown, M; McNitt-Gray, M; Noo, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the robustness of CAD or Quantitative Imaging methods, they should be tested on a variety of cases and under a variety of image acquisition and reconstruction conditions that represent the heterogeneity encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this work was to develop a fully-automated pipeline for generating CT images that represent a wide range of dose and reconstruction conditions. Methods: The pipeline consists of three main modules: reduced-dose simulation, image reconstruction, and quantitative analysis. The first two modules of the pipeline can be operated in a completely automated fashion, using configuration files and running the modules in a batch queue. The input to the pipeline is raw projection CT data; this data is used to simulate different levels of dose reduction using a previously-published algorithm. Filtered-backprojection reconstructions are then performed using FreeCT_wFBP, a freely-available reconstruction software for helical CT. We also added support for an in-house, model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using iterative coordinate-descent optimization, which may be run in tandem with the more conventional recon methods. The reduced-dose simulations and image reconstructions are controlled automatically by a single script, and they can be run in parallel on our research cluster. The pipeline was tested on phantom and lung screening datasets from a clinical scanner (Definition AS, Siemens Healthcare). Results: The images generated from our test datasets appeared to represent a realistic range of acquisition and reconstruction conditions that we would expect to find clinically. The time to generate images was approximately 30 minutes per dose/reconstruction combination on a hybrid CPU/GPU architecture. Conclusion: The automated research pipeline promises to be a useful tool for either training or evaluating performance of quantitative imaging software such as classifiers and CAD algorithms across the range

  7. TH-AB-207A-05: A Fully-Automated Pipeline for Generating CT Images Across a Range of Doses and Reconstruction Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S; Lo, P; Hoffman, J; Wahi-Anwar, M; Brown, M; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Noo, F [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the robustness of CAD or Quantitative Imaging methods, they should be tested on a variety of cases and under a variety of image acquisition and reconstruction conditions that represent the heterogeneity encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this work was to develop a fully-automated pipeline for generating CT images that represent a wide range of dose and reconstruction conditions. Methods: The pipeline consists of three main modules: reduced-dose simulation, image reconstruction, and quantitative analysis. The first two modules of the pipeline can be operated in a completely automated fashion, using configuration files and running the modules in a batch queue. The input to the pipeline is raw projection CT data; this data is used to simulate different levels of dose reduction using a previously-published algorithm. Filtered-backprojection reconstructions are then performed using FreeCT-wFBP, a freely-available reconstruction software for helical CT. We also added support for an in-house, model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using iterative coordinate-descent optimization, which may be run in tandem with the more conventional recon methods. The reduced-dose simulations and image reconstructions are controlled automatically by a single script, and they can be run in parallel on our research cluster. The pipeline was tested on phantom and lung screening datasets from a clinical scanner (Definition AS, Siemens Healthcare). Results: The images generated from our test datasets appeared to represent a realistic range of acquisition and reconstruction conditions that we would expect to find clinically. The time to generate images was approximately 30 minutes per dose/reconstruction combination on a hybrid CPU/GPU architecture. Conclusion: The automated research pipeline promises to be a useful tool for either training or evaluating performance of quantitative imaging software such as classifiers and CAD algorithms across the range

  8. Studies of the sensitivity dependence of float zone silicon diodes on gamma absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoalino, K.C.S.; Santos, T.C. dos; Barbosa, R.F.; Camargo, F. de; Goncalves, J.A.C.; Bueno, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Several advantages of silicon diodes which include small size, low cost, high sensitivity and wide availability, make them suitable for dosimetry and for radiation field mapping. However, the small radiation tolerance of ordinary silicon devices has imposed constraints on their application in intense radiation fields such as found in industrial radiation processes. This scenario has been changed with the development of radiation hard silicon devices to be used as track detectors in high-energy physics experiments. Particularly, in this work it i