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Sample records for dose planning study

  1. Analysis and planning of dose-finding studies with active control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helms, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In the clinical development of radiopharmaceuticals the dose finding plays an important role. The contribution is focused on the evaluation and planning of dose finding studies with active control. It is of primary interest to find the lowest dose that yields the same efficacy as the active control. Besides the target dose confidence intervals are of importance to describe the quality of the target dose estimation. The calculation of case numbers and the determination of the dose steps to be studied are challenging under practical conditions. The contribution covers the demonstration of the statistical model the parameter estimation and the asymptotic properties based on maximum likelihood theory, the spline-based evaluation of nonlinear dose finding studies with active control and the planning of design and number of cases.

  2. A decade of comparative dose planning studies for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Specht, Lena

    2014-01-01

    , especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal...

  3. Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: A toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudieh, Alireza; Tremblay, Christine; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard; Harel, Francois; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Vigneault, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute and late complications in patients who have received HDR implant boost using inverse planning, and to determine dose volume correlations. Patients and methods: Between September 1999 and October 2002, 44 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PSA ≥10 ng/ml, and/or Gleason score ≥7, and/or Stage T2c or higher) were treated with 40-45 Gy external pelvic field followed by 2-3 fraction of inverse-planned HDR implant boost (6-9.5 Gy /fraction). Median follow-up time was 1.7 years with 81.8% of patients who had at least 12 months of follow up (range 8.6-42.5. Acute and late morbidity data were collected and graded according to RTOG criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect prostate related measures of quality of life, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) before and after treatment. Dose-volume histograms for prostate, urethra, bladder, penis bulb and rectum were analyzed. Results: The median patient age was 64 years. Of these, 32% were in the high risk group, and 61% in the intermediate risk group. 3 patients (7%) had no adverse prognostic factors. A single grade 3 GU acute toxicity was reported but no grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity. No grade 3-4 late GU or GI toxicity was reported. Acute (late) grade 2 urinary and rectal symptoms were reported in 31.8 (11.4%) and 4.6% (4.6%) of patients, respectively. A trend for predicting acute GU toxicity is seen for total HDR dose of more than 18 Gy (OR=3.6, 95%CI=[0.96-13.5], P=0.058). The evolution of toxicity is presented for acute and late GU/GI toxicity. Erectile dysfunction occurs in approximately 27% of patients who were not on hormonal deprivation, but may be taking sildenafil. The IPSS peaked on averaged 6 weeks post-implant and returned to the baseline at a median of 6 months. Conclusions: Inverse-planned HDR brachytherapy is a viable option to deliver higher dose to the prostate as a boost without increasing GU or rectal

  4. Does selective pleural irradiation of malignant pleural mesothelioma allow radiation dose escalation. A planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botticella, A.; Defraene, G.; Nackaerts, K.; Deroose, C.; Coolen, J.; Nafteux, P.; Vanstraelen, B.; Joosten, S.; Michiels, L.A.W.; Peeters, S.; Ruysscher, D. de

    2017-01-01

    After lung-sparing radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), local failure at sites of previous gross disease represents the dominant form of failure. Our aim is to investigate if selective irradiation of the gross pleural disease only can allow dose escalation. In all, 12 consecutive stage I-IV MPM patients (6 left-sided and 6 right-sided) were retrospectively identified and included. A magnetic resonance imaging-based pleural gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured. Two sets of planning target volumes (PTV) were generated for each patient: (1) a ''selective'' PTV (S-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the GTV and (2) an ''elective'' PTV (E-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the whole ipsilateral pleural space. Two sets of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated: a ''selective'' pleural irradiation plan (SPI plan) and an ''elective'' pleural irradiation plan (EPI plan, planned with a simultaneous integrated boost technique [SIB]). In the SPI plans, the average median dose to the S-PTV was 53.6 Gy (range 41-63.6 Gy). In 4 of 12 patients, it was possible to escalate the dose to the S-PTV to >58 Gy. In the EPI plans, the average median doses to the E-PTV and to the S-PTV were 48.6 Gy (range 38.5-58.7) and 49 Gy (range 38.6-59.5 Gy), respectively. No significant dose escalation was achievable. The omission of the elective irradiation of the whole ipsilateral pleural space allowed dose escalation from 49 Gy to more than 58 Gy in 4 of 12 chemonaive MPM patients. This strategy may form the basis for nonsurgical radical combined modality treatment of MPM. (orig.) [de

  5. Target dose study of effects of changes in the AAA calculation resolution on lung SABR plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Il; Son, Sang Jun; Ahn, Bum Seok; Jung, Chi Hoon; Yoo, Suk Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Changing the calculation grid of AAA in Lung SABR plan and to analyze the changes in target dose, and investigated the effects associated with it, and considered a suitable method of application. 4D CT image that was used to plan all been taken with Brilliance Big Bore CT (Philips, Netherlands) and in Lung SABR plan(Eclipse TM ver10.0.42, Varian, the USA), use anisotropic analytic algorithm(AAA, ver.10, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and, was calculated by the calculation grid 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mm in each Lung SABR plan. Lung SABR plan of 10 cases are using each of 1.0 mm, 3.0 mm, 5.0 mm calculation grid, and in case of use a 1.0 mm calculation grid V98 of the prescribed dose is about 99.5%±1.5%, Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 92.5±1.5% and Homogeneity Index(HI) is 1.0489±0.0025. In the case of use a 3.0 mm calculation grid V98 dose of the prescribed dose is about 90±4.5% , Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 87.5±3% and HI is about 1.07±1. In the case of use a 5.0 mm calculation grid V98 dose of the prescribed dose is about 63±15%, Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 83±4% and HI is about 1.13±0.2, respectively. The calculation grid of 1.0 mm is better improves the accuracy of dose calculation than using 3.0 mm and 5.mm, although calculation times increase in the case of smaller PTV relatively. As lung, spread relatively large and low density and small PTV, it is considered and good to use a calculation grid of 1.0 mm

  6. Does selective pleural irradiation of malignant pleural mesothelioma allow radiation dose escalation. A planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botticella, A.; Defraene, G. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Coolen, J. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Radiology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Nafteux, P. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Vanstraelen, B. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Joosten, S.; Michiels, L.A.W. [Fontys University of Applied Science, Institute Paramedical Studies, Medical Imaging and Radiotherapeutic Techniques, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peeters, S. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Ruysscher, D. de [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    After lung-sparing radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), local failure at sites of previous gross disease represents the dominant form of failure. Our aim is to investigate if selective irradiation of the gross pleural disease only can allow dose escalation. In all, 12 consecutive stage I-IV MPM patients (6 left-sided and 6 right-sided) were retrospectively identified and included. A magnetic resonance imaging-based pleural gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured. Two sets of planning target volumes (PTV) were generated for each patient: (1) a ''selective'' PTV (S-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the GTV and (2) an ''elective'' PTV (E-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the whole ipsilateral pleural space. Two sets of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated: a ''selective'' pleural irradiation plan (SPI plan) and an ''elective'' pleural irradiation plan (EPI plan, planned with a simultaneous integrated boost technique [SIB]). In the SPI plans, the average median dose to the S-PTV was 53.6 Gy (range 41-63.6 Gy). In 4 of 12 patients, it was possible to escalate the dose to the S-PTV to >58 Gy. In the EPI plans, the average median doses to the E-PTV and to the S-PTV were 48.6 Gy (range 38.5-58.7) and 49 Gy (range 38.6-59.5 Gy), respectively. No significant dose escalation was achievable. The omission of the elective irradiation of the whole ipsilateral pleural space allowed dose escalation from 49 Gy to more than 58 Gy in 4 of 12 chemonaive MPM patients. This strategy may form the basis for nonsurgical radical combined modality treatment of MPM. (orig.) [German] Beim malignen Pleuramesotheliom (MPM) ist nach lungenschonender Radiotherapie das lokale Scheitern an Stellen eines frueheren, sichtbaren Tumors die dominierende Form des Scheiterns. Unser Ziel ist es, zu untersuchen, ob die selektive

  7. Efficacy of virtual block objects in reducing the lung dose in helical tomotherapy planning for cervical oesophageal cancer: a planning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Makoto; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Aoyama, Takahiro; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Natsuo; Makita, Chiyoko; Koide, Yutaro; Kato, Daiki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2018-04-04

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is useful for cervical oesophageal carcinoma (CEC); however, increasing low-dose exposure to the lung may lead to radiation pneumonitis. Nevertheless, an irradiation technique that avoids the lungs has never been examined due to the high difficulty of dose optimization. In this study, we examined the efficacy of helical tomotherapy that can restrict beamlets passing virtual blocks during dose optimization computing (block plan) in reducing the lung dose. Fifteen patients with CEC were analysed. The primary/nodal lesion and prophylactic nodal region with adequate margins were defined as the planning target volume (PTV)-60 Gy and PTV-48 Gy, respectively. Nineteen plans per patient were made and compared (total: 285 plans), including non-block and block plans with several shapes and sizes. The most appropriate block model was semi-circular, 8 cm outside of the tracheal bifurcation, with a significantly lower lung dose compared to that of non-block plans; the mean lung volumes receiving 5 Gy, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, and the mean lung dose were 31.3% vs. 48.0% (p block and non-block plans were comparable in terms of the homogeneity and conformity indexes of PTV-60 Gy: 0.05 vs. 0.04 (p = 0.100) and 0.82 vs. 0.85 (p = 0.616), respectively. The maximum dose of the spinal cord planning risk volume increased slightly (49.4 Gy vs. 47.9 Gy, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the mean doses to the heart and the thyroid gland. Prolongation of the delivery time was less than 1 min (5.6 min vs. 4.9 min, p = 0.010). The block plan for CEC could significantly reduce the lung dose, with acceptable increment in the spinal dose and a slightly prolonged delivery time.

  8. Dose planning and dose delivery in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeoes, T.

    1991-01-01

    A method has been developed for calibration of CT-numbers to volumetric electron density distributions using tissue substitutes of known elemental composition and experimentally determined electron density. This information have been used in a dose calculation method based on photon and electron interaction processes. The method utilizes a convolution integral between the photon fluence matrix and dose distribution kernels. Inhomogeneous media are accounted for using the theorems of Fano and O'Connor for scaling dose distribution kernels in proportion to electron density. For clinical application of a calculated dose plan, a method for prediction of accelerator output have been developed. The methods gives the number of monitor units that has to be given to obtain a certain absorbed dose to a point inside an irregular, inhomogeneous object. The method for verification of dose distributions outlined in this study makes it possible to exclude the treatment related variance contributions, making an objective evaluation of dose calculations with experiments feasible. The methods for electron density determination, dose calculation and prediction of accelerator output discussed in this study will all contribute to an increased accuracy in the mean absorbed dose to the target volume. However, a substantial gain in the accuracy for the spatial absorbed dose distribution will also follow, especially using CT for mapping of electron density together with the dose calculation algorithm. (au)

  9. Accuracy of out-of-field dose calculation of tomotherapy and Cyberknife treatment planning systems. A dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau; Haelg, Roger A.; Hartmann, Matthias; Mack, Andreas; Storelli, Fabrizio; Besserer, Juergen; Joosten, Andreas; Moeckli, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities such as second cancer induction become more important as treatment outcome improves. Often the dose distribution calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) is used to estimate radiation carcinogenesis for the radiotherapy patient. However, for locations beyond the treatment field borders, the accuracy is not well known. The aim of this study was to perform detailed out-of-field-measurements for a typical radiotherapy treatment plan administered with a Cyberknife and a Tomotherapy machine and to compare the measurements to the predictions of the TPS. Materials and methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The measured dose distributions from 6 MV intensity-modulated treatment beams for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy machines were compared to the dose calculations from the TPS. Results: The TPS are underestimating the dose far away from the target volume. Quantitatively the Cyberknife underestimates the dose at 40 cm from the PTV border by a factor of 60, the Tomotherapy TPS by a factor of two. If a 50% dose uncertainty is accepted, the Cyberknife TPS can predict doses down to approximately 10 mGy/treatment Gy, the Tomotherapy-TPS down to 0.75 mGy/treatment Gy. The Cyberknife TPS can then be used up to 10 cm from the PTV border the Tomotherapy up to 35 cm. Conclusions: We determined that the Cyberknife and Tomotherapy TPS underestimate substantially the doses far away from the treated volume. It is recommended not to use out-of-field doses from the Cyberknife TPS for applications like modeling of second cancer induction. The Tomotherapy TPS can be used up to 35 cm from the PTV border (for a 390 cm 3 large PTV). (orig.)

  10. SU-F-T-522: Dosimetric Study of Junction Dose in Double Isocenter Flatten and Flatten Filter Free IMRT and VMAT Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuvel, K; Yadav, G; Bhushan, M; Tamilarasu, S; Kumar, L; Suhail, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of junction dose in double isocenter flattened and flatten filter free(FFF) intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) plan delivery using pelvis phantom. Methods: Five large field pelvis patients were selected for this study. Double isocenter IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were generated in Eclipse Treatment planning System (V.11.0) using 6MV FB and FFF beams. For all the plans same distance 17.0cm was kept between one isocenter to another isocenter. IMRT Plans were made with 7 coplanar fields and VMAT plans were made with full double arcs. Dose calculation was performed using AAA algorithms with dose grid size of 0.25 cm. Verification plans were calculated on Scanditronix Wellhofer pelvis slab phantom. Measurement point was selected and calculated, where two isocenter plan fields are overlapping, this measurement point was kept at distance 8.5cm from both isocenter. The plans were delivered using Varian TrueBeamTM machine on pelvis slab phantom. Point dose measurements was carried out using CC13 ion chamber volume of 0.13cm3. Results: The measured junction point dose are compared with TPS calculated dose. The mean difference observed was 4.5%, 6.0%, 4.0% and 7.0% for IMRT-FB,IMRT-FFF, VMAT-FB and VMAT-FFF respectively. The measured dose results shows closer agreement with calculated dose in Flatten beam planning in both IMRT and VMAT, whereas in FFF beam plan dose difference are more compared with flatten beam plan. Conclusion: Dosimetry accuracy of Large Field junction dose difference was found less in Flatten beam compared with FFF beam plan delivery. Even though more dosimetric studies are required to analyse junction dose for FFF beam planning using multiple point dose measurements and fluence map verification in field junction area.

  11. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Ge, Y. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hardcastle, N. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Metcalfe, P. E. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Keall, P. J. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  12. A Decade of Comparative Dose Planning Studies for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: What Can We Learn?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-12-01

    During the past 4 decades, the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma has changed dramatically, and combined modality treatment is now considered the standard of care for patients with early-stage disease. However, the risk of late effects has led to concerns regarding the use of radiation therapy, especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal dose distribution. Although studies are difficult to compare because of differences in field technique, prescribed dose, target volumes, patient population, and reported dosimetric and plan evaluation parameters, modern radiation therapy significantly reduces exposure to normal tissues and thereby the estimated risk of late effects. However, there is no such thing as a single best modern delivery technique when multiple organs at risk are considered simultaneously because of the heterogeneity in patient anatomy and disease location, and the choice of radiation therapy technique should be made individually for each patient.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  14. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 ± 0.62 Gy and 6.29 ± 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 ± 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 ± 0.7 Gy and 32.7 ± 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 ± 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  15. Influence of contrast materials on dose calculation in radiotherapy planning using computed tomography for tumors at various anatomical regions: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Naruse, Asaka; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Ayakawa, Shiho; Sugie, Chikao; Tomita, Natsuo

    2007-01-01

    Influences of iodinated contrast media on dose calculation were studied in 26 patients. Mean increases in monitor units by contrast media administration were less than 1% and considered negligible in planning of whole-brain, whole-neck, mediastinal, and whole-pelvic irradiation. However, mean increases over 2% were seen in planning of upper-abdominal radiotherapy

  16. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs

  17. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  19. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003

  20. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003.

  1. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jianghong; Li, Yan; Jiang, Qingfeng; Sun, Lan; Henderson Jr, Fraser; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Li, Guangjun; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT

  2. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  3. Fully automated treatment planning for head and neck radiotherapy using a voxel-based dose prediction and dose mimicking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Welch, Mattea; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A.; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-08-01

    Recent works in automated radiotherapy treatment planning have used machine learning based on historical treatment plans to infer the spatial dose distribution for a novel patient directly from the planning image. We present a probabilistic, atlas-based approach which predicts the dose for novel patients using a set of automatically selected most similar patients (atlases). The output is a spatial dose objective, which specifies the desired dose-per-voxel, and therefore replaces the need to specify and tune dose-volume objectives. Voxel-based dose mimicking optimization then converts the predicted dose distribution to a complete treatment plan with dose calculation using a collapsed cone convolution dose engine. In this study, we investigated automated planning for right-sided oropharaynx head and neck patients treated with IMRT and VMAT. We compare four versions of our dose prediction pipeline using a database of 54 training and 12 independent testing patients by evaluating 14 clinical dose evaluation criteria. Our preliminary results are promising and demonstrate that automated methods can generate comparable dose distributions to clinical. Overall, automated plans achieved an average of 0.6% higher dose for target coverage evaluation criteria, and 2.4% lower dose at the organs at risk criteria levels evaluated compared with clinical. There was no statistically significant difference detected in high-dose conformity between automated and clinical plans as measured by the conformation number. Automated plans achieved nine more unique criteria than clinical across the 12 patients tested and automated plans scored a significantly higher dose at the evaluation limit for two high-risk target coverage criteria and a significantly lower dose in one critical organ maximum dose. The novel dose prediction method with dose mimicking can generate complete treatment plans in 12-13 min without user interaction. It is a promising approach for fully automated treatment

  4. Dose exposure work planning using DMU kinematics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli Darmawan

    2010-01-01

    The study on the possibility of using DMU Kinematics module in CAE tools for dose exposure work planning was carried out. A case scenario was created using 3D CAD software and transferred to DMU Kinematics module in CAE software. A work plan was created using DMU Kinematics tools and animated to simulate a real time scenario. Data on the phantom position against the radioactive source was collected by activating positioning sensors in the module. The data was used to estimate dose rate exposure for the phantom. The results can be used to plan the safest and optimum procedures in carrying out the radiation related task. (author)

  5. Radiation therapy tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    To adequately plan acceptable dose distributions for radiation therapy treatments it is necessary to ensure that normal structures do not receive unacceptable doses. Acceptable doses are generally those that are below a stated tolerance dose for development of some level of complication. To support the work sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to low-LET radiation has been compiled from a number of sources. These tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represent doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same end point. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Statistical analysis of MRI-only based dose planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, M. E.; Waring, L. W.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    . MRIonly based RT eliminates these errors and reduce the time and costs of a CT scan. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences of a treatment plan when the dose calculation is based on MRI as compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Four diagnostic groups are investigated; 12...... as a clinically approved treatment plan. The treatment planning software is Eclipse v.10.0 (Varian Medical Systems). The dose calculation based on MRI data is evaluated in two different ways; a homogeneous density assigned MRI (MRI unit), where the entire body is assigned an HU equal to water and a heterogeneous...... density assigned MRI (MRI bulk) where in addition the CT segmented bone is transferred to the MRI and assigned an age dependent HU based on ICRU report 46. The CT based clinical treatment plan and structure set are registered to the corresponding MRI unit and MRI bulk. The body is outlined on both the MRI...

  7. Reducing dose calculation time for accurate iterative IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Lauterbach, Marc; Tong, Shidong; Wu Qiuwen; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    A time-consuming component of IMRT optimization is the dose computation required in each iteration for the evaluation of the objective function. Accurate superposition/convolution (SC) and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are currently considered too time-consuming for iterative IMRT dose calculation. Thus, fast, but less accurate algorithms such as pencil beam (PB) algorithms are typically used in most current IMRT systems. This paper describes two hybrid methods that utilize the speed of fast PB algorithms yet achieve the accuracy of optimizing based upon SC algorithms via the application of dose correction matrices. In one method, the ratio method, an infrequently computed voxel-by-voxel dose ratio matrix (R=D SC /D PB ) is applied for each beam to the dose distributions calculated with the PB method during the optimization. That is, D PB xR is used for the dose calculation during the optimization. The optimization proceeds until both the IMRT beam intensities and the dose correction ratio matrix converge. In the second method, the correction method, a periodically computed voxel-by-voxel correction matrix for each beam, defined to be the difference between the SC and PB dose computations, is used to correct PB dose distributions. To validate the methods, IMRT treatment plans developed with the hybrid methods are compared with those obtained when the SC algorithm is used for all optimization iterations and with those obtained when PB-based optimization is followed by SC-based optimization. In the 12 patient cases studied, no clinically significant differences exist in the final treatment plans developed with each of the dose computation methodologies. However, the number of time-consuming SC iterations is reduced from 6-32 for pure SC optimization to four or less for the ratio matrix method and five or less for the correction method. Because the PB algorithm is faster at computing dose, this reduces the inverse planning optimization time for our implementation

  8. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Carlson, Blake; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Yin Pen; Grigsby, Perry W.; Nguyen, Kim; Dempsey, James F; Lerma, Fritz A.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Vannier, Michael W.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2001-01-01

    cancer. These changes cannot be modeled by the conventional rigid landmark transformation method. In the current study, we found that the deformable anatomic template registration method, based on continuum-mechanics models of deformation, successfully described these large anatomic shape changes before and after ICT. These promising modeling results indicate that realistic registration of the cumulative dose distribution to the organs (or targets) of interest for radiation therapy of cervical cancers is achievable

  9. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  10. Single dose planning for radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied one year after radioiodine-131 therapy to assess the relationship between the effectiveness of the therapy and the radioiodine doses used. Patients were classified into three groups according to thyroid function as hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism and hypothyroidism at one year after I-131 therapy. In these groups we compared the mean values of dose, dose per thyroid weight calculated with I-123 uptake before the therapy (pre D/W), dose per thyroid weight calculated with therapeutic I-131 uptake (post D/W), and absorbed dose. No significant differences were found between the three groups in terms of dose or pre D/W. The mean values of post D/W and absorbed dose in the non-hyperthyroid (euthyroid and hypothyroid) group were significantly greater than those in the hyperthyroid group. Post D/W of 6.3 MBq/g was a threshold separating the non-hyperthyroid group from the hyperthyroid group. There was no correlation between pre D/W and post D/W; however, the mean post D/W was significantly greater than the mean pre D/W. All patients with pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g showed non-hyperthyroidism at one year after the radioiodine treatment. No indicators before the radioiodine therapy had significant relationships with the effectiveness of the therapy at one year after the treatment. However, the single therapy planned for setting the pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g will certainly make the patients non-hyperthyroid. As this proposal of dose planning is based on a small number of patients, further study is needed. (author)

  11. Prediction of iodine-131 biokinetics and radiation doses from therapy on the basis of tracer studies: an important question for therapy planning in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegaignon, José; Pelissoni, Rogério A; Lima, Beatriz C G D; Sapienza, Marcelo T; Coura-Filho, George B; Buchpiguel, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to present a comparison of iodine-131 (I) biokinetics and radiation doses to red-marrow (rm) and whole-body (wb), following the administration of tracer and therapeutic activities, as a means of confirming whether I clearance and radiation doses for therapy procedures can be predicted by tracer activities. Eleven differentiated thyroid cancer patients were followed after receiving tracer and therapeutic I activity. Whole-body I clearance was estimated using radiation detectors and OLINDA/EXM software was used to calculate radiation doses to rm and wb. Tracer I activity of 86 (±14) MBq and therapeutic activity of 8.04 (±1.18) GBq were administered to patients, thereby producing an average wb I effective half-time and residence time of, respectively, 13.51 (±4.05) and 23.13 (±5.98) h for tracer activities and 13.32 (±3.38) and 19.63 (±4.77) h for therapy. Radiation doses to rm and wb were, respectively, 0.0467 (±0.0208) and 0.0589 (±0.0207) mGy/MBq in tracer studies and 0.0396 (±0.0169) and 0.0500 (±0.0163) mGy/MBq in therapy. Although the differences were not considered statistically significant between averages, those between the values of effective half-times (P=0.906), residence times (P=0.145), and radiation doses to rm (P=0.393) and to wb (P=0.272), from tracer and therapy procedures, large differences of up to 80% in wb I clearance, and up to 50% in radiation doses were observed when patients were analyzed individually, thus impacting on the total amount of I activity calculated to be safe for application in individual therapy. I biokinetics and radiation doses to rm and wb in therapy procedures are well predicted by diagnostic activities when average values of a group of patients are compared. Nonetheless, when patients are analyzed individually, significant differences may be encountered, thus implying that nuclear medicine therapy-planning requires due consideration of changes in individual patient-body status from

  12. Prescribing and evaluating target dose in dose-painting treatment plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Katrin; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of target dose conformity in multi-dose-level treatment plans is challenging due to inevitable over/underdosage at the border zone between dose levels. Here, we evaluate different target dose prescription planning aims and approaches to evaluate the relative merit of such p......-painting and multi-dose-level plans. The tool can be useful for quality assurance of multi-center trials, and for visualizing the development of treatment planning in routine clinical practice....... of such plans. A quality volume histogram (QVH) tool for history-based evaluation is proposed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty head and neck cancer dose-painting plans with five prescription levels were evaluated, as well as clinically delivered simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) plans from 2010 and 2012. The QVH...

  13. Assessments for high dose radionuclide therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell specific targeting of cancer and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabelled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimised radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be the lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential timepoints using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organ tissues of concern, for the whole body and sometimes for selected tumours. Patient specific factors often require that dose estimates be customised for each patient. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires 'reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs' using the methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high dose studies shows that some are conducted with minimal dosimetry, that the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties. Despite the general availability of software, internal dosimetry methods often seem to be inconsistent from one clinical centre to another. (author)

  14. Method to account for dose fractionation in analysis of IMRT plans: Modified equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Clinton S.; Kim, Yongbok; Lee, Nancy; Bucci, Kara M.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Xia Ping

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) to account for dose fractionation using the biologically effective dose without losing the advantages of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and to report the calculated mEUD and gEUD in clinically used intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: The proposed mEUD replaces the dose to each voxel in the gEUD formulation by a biologically effective dose with a normalization factor. We propose to use the term mEUD D o /n o that includes the total dose (D o ) and number of fractions (n o ) and to use the term mEUD o that includes the same total dose but a standard fraction size of 2 Gy. A total of 41 IMRT plans for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer treated at our institution between October 1997 and March 2002 were selected for the study. The gEUD and mEUD were calculated for the planning gross tumor volume (pGTV), planning clinical tumor volume (pCTV), parotid glands, and spinal cord. The prescription dose for these patients was 70 Gy to >95% of the pGTV and 59.4 Gy to >95% of the pCTV in 33 fractions. Results: The calculated average gEUD was 72.2 ± 2.4 Gy for the pGTV, 54.2 ± 7.1 Gy for the pCTV, 26.7 ± 4.2 Gy for the parotid glands, and 34.1 ± 6.8 Gy for the spinal cord. The calculated average mEUD D o /n o using 33 fractions was 71.7 ± 3.5 Gy for mEUD 70/33 of the pGTV, 49.9 ± 7.9 Gy for mEUD 59.5/33 of the pCTV, 27.6 ± 4.8 Gy for mEUD 26/33 of the parotid glands, and 32.7 ± 7.8 Gy for mEUD 45/33 of the spinal cord. Conclusion: The proposed mEUD, combining the gEUD with the biologically effective dose, preserves all advantages of the gEUD while reflecting the fractionation effects and linear and quadratic survival characteristics

  15. Patient dose simulation in X-ray CT using a radiation treatment-planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Yasuo; Oda, Masahiko; Minamoto, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    Medical irradiation dosage has been increasing with the development of new radiological equipment and new techniques like interventional radiology. It is fair to say that patient dose has been increased as a result of the development of multi-slice CT. A number of studies on the irradiation dose of CT have been reported, and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is now used as a general means of determining CT dose. However, patient dose distribution in the body varies with the patient's constitution, bowel gas in the body, and conditions of exposure. In this study, patient dose was analyzed from the viewpoint of dose distribution, using a radiation treatment-planning computer. Percent depth dose (PDD) and the off-center ratio (OCR) of the CT beam are needed to calculate dose distribution by the planning computer. Therefore, X-ray CT data were measured with various apparatuses, and beam data were sent to the planning computer. Measurement and simulation doses in the elliptical phantom (Mix-Dp: water equivalent material) were collated, and the CT irradiation dose was determined for patient dose simulation. The rotational radiation treatment technique was used to obtain the patient dose distribution of CT, and patient dose was evaluated through simulation of the dose distribution. CT images of the thorax were sent to the planning computer and simulated. The result was that the patient dose distribution of the thorax was obtained for CT examination. (author)

  16. Effects of dose reduction on multi-detector computed tomographic images in evaluating the maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroshi; Sur, Jaideep; Seki, Kenji; Nakajima, Koh; Sano, Tsukasa; Okano, Tomohiro

    2010-08-01

    To assess effects of dose reduction on image quality in evaluating maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning using cadavers. Six cadavers were used for the study using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) operated at 120 kV and the variable tube current of 80, 40, 20 and 10 mA. A slice thickness of 0.625 mm and pitch 1 were used. Multi-planar images perpendicular and parallel to dentitions were created. The images were evaluated by five oral radiologists in terms of visibility of the anatomical landmarks including alveolar crest, mandibular canal, floors of the maxillary sinus and nasal cavity, contours/cortical layer of jaw bones and the details of trabecular bone. Observers were asked to determine the quality of the images in comparison with 80 mA images based on the criteria: excellent, good, fair or non-diagnostic. The average scores of all observers were calculated for each specimen in all exposure conditions. The 40 mA images could visualize such landmarks and were evaluated to be same or almost equivalent in quality to the 80 mA images. Even the 20 mA images could be accepted just for diagnostic purpose for implant with substantial deterioration of the image quality. The 10 mA images may not be accepted because of the obscured contour caused by image noise. Significant dose reduction by lowering mA can be utilized for pre-surgical implant planning in multi-detector CT.

  17. Reduction of cardiac and coronary artery doses in irradiation of left-sided breast cancer during inspiration breath hold. A planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenecker, S.; Heinz, C.; Soehn, M.; Haimerl, W.; Corradini, S.; Pazos, M.; Belka, C.; Scheithauer, H. [University Hospital of Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The radiation dose received by the heart during adjuvant left-sided breast irradiation plays a crucial role in development of late toxicity. Although the absolute risk of cardiotoxicity can be reduced with modern irradiation techniques, cardiotoxic chemotherapy increases the risk of late damage. Thus, the radiation dose to the heart should be minimized. This study evaluated the influence of different amplitudes of inspiration breath hold (IBH) during simulated left-sided breast irradiation on cardiac doses compared to free breathing (FB). CT data of 11 lung cancer patients were retrospectively used as left-sided pseudo-breast cancer cases. Two CT scans were used, one during IBH and one during FB, and two treatment plans were generated. Relevant heart, lung, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) parameters were derived from dose-volume histograms. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the heart were calculated based on the relative seriality model. Inspiration depth was quantified using chest volume and diameter, and correlated thereafter to a possible sparing of heart tissue. Mean reduction of heart dose for IBH compared to FB was 40 % (1.65 vs. 0.99 Gy; p = 0.007). Maximum dose to the heart and LAD could be decreased by 33 % (p = 0.011) and 43 % (p = 0.024), respectively. The mean anteroposterior shift was 5 mm (range 0.9-9.5 mm). Significant negative correlations between the relative change in LAD mean dose and the mean thoracic diameter and volume change, as well as with the absolute change in thoracic diameter were seen. The NTCP for cardiac mortality could be decreased by about 78 % (p = 0.017). For left-sided breast cancer patients, cardiac doses can be significantly decreased with tangential irradiation and IBH. (orig.) [German] Die Herzdosisbelastung spielt eine entscheidende Rolle in der Entwicklung einer kardialen Spaettoxizitaet nach der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie von linksseitigem Brustkrebs. Obwohl moderne strahlentherapeutische

  18. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  19. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  20. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  1. Poster - 36: Effect of Planning Target Volume Coverage on the Dose Delivered in Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekker, Chris; Wierzbicki, Marcin [McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In lung radiotherapy, breathing motion may be encompassed by contouring the internal target volume (ITV). Remaining uncertainties are included in a geometrical expansion to the planning target volume (PTV). In IMRT, the treatment is then optimized until a desired PTV fraction is covered by the appropriate dose. The resulting beams often carry high fluence in the PTV margin to overcome low lung density and to generate steep dose gradients. During treatment, the high density tumour can enter the PTV margin, potentially increasing target dose. Thus, planning lung IMRT with a reduced PTV dose may still achieve the desired ITV dose during treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out with 25 IMRT plans prescribed to 63 Gy in 30 fractions. The plans were re-normalized to cover various fractions of the PTV by different isodose lines. For each case, the isocentre was moved using 125 shifts derived from all 3D combinations of 0 mm, (PTV margin - 1 mm), and PTV margin. After each shift, the dose was recomputed to approximate the delivered dose. Results and Conclusion: Our plans typically cover 95% of the PTV by 95% of the dose. Reducing the PTV covered to 94% did not significantly reduce the delivered ITV doses for (PTV margin - 1 mm) shifts. Target doses were reduced significantly for all other shifts and planning goals studied. Thus, a reduced planning goal will likely deliver the desired target dose as long as the ITV rarely enters the last mm of the PTV margin.

  2. Real-time beam monitoring for error detection in IMRT plans and impact on dose-volume histograms. A multi-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrazzo, Livia; Arilli, Chiara; Casati, Marta [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen-Friedrichshafen (Germany); Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Fedeli, Luca; Calusi, Silvia [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Talamonti, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania [Careggi University Hospital, Medical Physic Unit, Florence (Italy); University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Simontacchi, Gabriele [Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [University of Florence, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences ' ' Mario Serio' ' , Florence (Italy); Careggi University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Unit, Florence (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    This study aimed to test the sensitivity of a transmission detector for online dose monitoring of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for detecting small delivery errors. Furthermore, the correlation of changes in detector output induced by small delivery errors with other metrics commonly employed to quantify the deviations between calculated and delivered dose distributions was investigated. Transmission detector measurements were performed at three institutions. Seven types of errors were induced in nine clinical step-and-shoot (S and S) IMRT plans by modifying the number of monitor units (MU) and introducing small deviations in leaf positions. Signal reproducibility was investigated for short- and long-term stability. Calculated dose distributions were compared in terms of γ passing rates and dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g., D{sub mean}, D{sub x%}, V{sub x%}). The correlation between detector signal variations, γ passing rates, and DVH parameters was investigated. Both short- and long-term reproducibility was within 1%. Dose variations down to 1 MU (∇signal 1.1 ± 0.4%) as well as changes in field size and positions down to 1 mm (∇signal 2.6 ± 1.0%) were detected, thus indicating high error-detection sensitivity. A moderate correlation of detector signal was observed with γ passing rates (R{sup 2} = 0.57-0.70), while a good correlation was observed with DVH metrics (R{sup 2} = 0.75-0.98). The detector is capable of detecting small delivery errors in MU and leaf positions, and is thus a highly sensitive dose monitoring device for S and S IMRT for clinical practice. The results of this study indicate a good correlation of detector signal with DVH metrics; therefore, clinical action levels can be defined based on the presented data. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Sensitivitaet bezueglich der Fehlererkennung eines Transmissionsdetektors fuer die Online-Dosisueberwachung von intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT

  3. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Linda X.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R 50% ); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D 2cm ) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ 2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V 100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V 90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D 2cm , 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  4. TH-CD-202-08: Feasibility Study of Planning Phase Optimization Using Patient Geometry-Driven Information for Better Dose Sparing of Organ at Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Park, S; Shin, D; Kim, K; Cho, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple and effective cost value function to search optimal planning phase (gating window) and demonstrated its feasibility for respiratory correlated radiation therapy. Methods: We acquired 4DCT of 10 phases for 10 lung patients who have tumor located near OARs such as esophagus, heart, and spinal cord (i.e., central lung cancer patients). A simplified mathematical optimization function was established by using overlap volume histogram (OVH) between the target and organ at risk (OAR) at each phase and the tolerance dose of selected OARs to achieve surrounding OARs dose-sparing. For all patients and all phases, delineation of the target volume and selected OARs (esophagus, heart, and spinal cord) was performed (by one observer to avoid inter-observer variation), then cost values were calculated for all phases. After the breathing phases were ranked according to cost value function, the relationship between score and dose distribution at highest and lowest cost value phases were evaluated by comparing the mean/max dose. Results: A simplified mathematical cost value function showed noticeable difference from phase to phase, implying it is possible to find optimal phases for gating window. The lowest cost value which may result in lower mean/max dose to OARs was distributed at various phases for all patients. The mean doses of the OARs significantly decreased about 10% with statistical significance for all 3 OARs at the phase with the lowest cost value. Also, the max doses of the OARs were decreased about 2∼5% at the phase with the lowest cost value compared to the phase with the highest cost value. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that optimal phases (in dose distribution perspective) for gating window could exist differently through each patient and the proposed cost value function can be a useful tool for determining such phases without performing dose optimization calculations. This research was supported by the Mid-career Researcher Program

  5. Dose-to-man studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Dose-to-Man Studies focused on developing computer data handling and computer modules which permit easy, rapid assessment of the dose to southeastern United States populations from routine or accidental releases of radionuclides to atmospheric and stream systems

  6. Non-coplanar volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for craniopharyngiomas reduces radiation doses to the bilateral hippocampus: a planning study comparing dynamic conformal arc therapy, coplanar VMAT, and non-coplanar VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uto, Megumi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that radiation-induced injuries to the hippocampus play important roles in compromising neurocognitive functioning for patients with brain tumors and it could be important to spare the hippocampus using modern planning methods for patients with craniopharyngiomas. As bilateral hippocampus are located on the same level as the planning target volume (PTV) in patients with craniopharyngioma, it seems possible to reduce doses to hippocampus using non-coplanar beams. While the use of non-coplanar beams in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of malignant intracranial tumors has recently been reported, no dosimetric comparison has yet been made between VMAT using non-coplanar arcs (ncVMAT) and VMAT employing only coplanar arcs (coVMAT) among patients with craniopharyngiomas. We performed a planning study comparing dose distributions to the PTV, hippocampus, and other organs at risk (OAR) of dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), coVMAT, and ncVMAT. DCAT, coVMAT, and ncVMAT plans were created for 10 patients with craniopharyngiomas. The prescription dose was 52.2 Gy in 29 fractions, and 99 % of each PTV was covered by 90 % of the prescribed dose. The maximum dose was held below 107 % of the prescribed dose. CoVMAT and ncVMAT plans were formulated to satisfy the following criteria: the doses to the hippocampus were minimized, and the doses to the OAR were similar to or lower than those of DCAT. The mean equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions to 40 % of the volumes of the bilateral hippocampus [EQD 2 (40% hippos )] were 15.4/10.8/6.5 Gy for DCAT/coVMAT/ncVMAT, respectively. The EQD 2 (40% hippos ) for ncVMAT were <7.3 Gy, which is the threshold predicting cognitive impairment, as defined by Gondi et al.. The mean doses to normal brain tissue and the conformity indices were similar for the three plans, and the homogeneity indices were significantly better for coVMAT and ncVMAT compared with DCAT. NcVMAT is more appropriate than DCAT and coVMAT for

  7. Saving doses by outage planning strategy and architectural arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1993-01-01

    All radiation doses come out as a result of dose rate and exposure time, and the main part of the occupational exposure is caused during outages. While every reasonable attempt should be made to lower the dose rates, the other factor, the exposure time, may not be forgotten. The paper presents possible ways of saving man-hours in the controlled zone by outage planning strategy. And every saved man-hour means a saved radiation dose. At Loviisa NPS also some special architectural arrangements contribute to shortening the outage time, thus saving doses

  8. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter bones). This study indicates that the decrease in absorbed dose is not dependent on the bone diameter with all types of bones. Thus

  9. From physical dose constraints to equivalent uniform dose constraints in inverse radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieke, Christian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Niemierko, Andrzej; Nill, Simeon

    2003-01-01

    Optimization algorithms in inverse radiotherapy planning need information about the desired dose distribution. Usually the planner defines physical dose constraints for each structure of the treatment plan, either in form of minimum and maximum doses or as dose-volume constraints. The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was designed to describe dose distributions with a higher clinical relevance. In this paper, we present a method to consider the EUD as an optimization constraint by using the method of projections onto convex sets (POCS). In each iteration of the optimization loop, for the actual dose distribution of an organ that violates an EUD constraint a new dose distribution is calculated that satisfies the EUD constraint, leading to voxel-based physical dose constraints. The new dose distribution is found by projecting the current one onto the convex set of all dose distributions fulfilling the EUD constraint. The algorithm is easy to integrate into existing inverse planning systems, and it allows the planner to choose between physical and EUD constraints separately for each structure. A clinical case of a head and neck tumor is optimized using three different sets of constraints: physical constraints for all structures, physical constraints for the target and EUD constraints for the organs at risk, and EUD constraints for all structures. The results show that the POCS method converges stable and given EUD constraints are reached closely

  10. SU-E-T-279: Realization of Three-Dimensional Conformal Dose Planning in Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z; Jiang, S; Yang, Z [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Bai, H; Zhang, X [Seeds biological Pharmacy Ltd, Tianjin (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Successful clinical treatment in prostate brachytherapy is largely dependent on the effectiveness of pre-surgery dose planning. Conventional dose planning method could hardly arrive at a satisfy result. In this abstract, a three-dimensional conformal localized dose planning method is put forward to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-implantation dose planning. Methods: Using Monte Carlo method, the pre-calculated 3-D dose map for single source is obtained. As for multiple seeds dose distribution, the maps are combined linearly to acquire the 3-D distribution. The 3-D dose distribution is exhibited in the form of isodose surface together with reconstructed 3-D organs group real-timely. Then it is possible to observe the dose exposure to target volume and normal tissues intuitively, thus achieving maximum dose irradiation to treatment target and minimum healthy tissues damage. In addition, the exfoliation display of different isodose surfaces can be realized applying multi-values contour extraction algorithm based on voxels. The needles could be displayed in the system by tracking the position of the implanted seeds in real time to conduct block research in optimizing insertion trajectory. Results: This study extends dose planning from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, realizing the three-dimensional conformal irradiation, which could eliminate the limitations of 2-D images and two-dimensional dose planning. A software platform is developed using VC++ and Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to perform dose planning. The 3-D model reconstruction time is within three seconds (on a Intel Core i5 PC). Block research could be conducted to avoid inaccurate insertion into sensitive organs or internal obstructions. Experiments on eight prostate cancer cases prove that this study could make the dose planning results more reasonable. Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal dose planning method could improve the rationality of dose planning by safely reducing

  11. Analysis of Radiation Treatment Planning by Dose Calculation and Optimization Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Sup; Yoon, In Ha; Lee, Woo Seok; Baek, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Analyze the Effectiveness of Radiation Treatment Planning by dose calculation and optimization algorithm, apply consideration of actual treatment planning, and then suggest the best way to treatment planning protocol. The treatment planning system use Eclipse 10.0. (Varian, USA). PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution) and AAA (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm) Apply to Dose calculation, DVO (Dose Volume Optimizer 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), PRO II (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 8.9.17) and PRO III (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of VAMT. A phantom for experiment virtually created at treatment planning system, 30x30x30 cm sized, homogeneous density (HU: 0) and heterogeneous density that inserted air assumed material (HU: -1,000). Apply to clinical treatment planning on the basis of general treatment planning feature analyzed with Phantom planning. In homogeneous density phantom, PBC and AAA show 65.2% PDD (6 MV, 10 cm) both, In heterogeneous density phantom, also show similar PDD value before meet with low density material, but they show different dose curve in air territory, PDD 10 cm showed 75%, 73% each after penetrate phantom. 3D treatment plan in same MU, AAA treatment planning shows low dose at Lung included area. 2D POP treatment plan with 15 MV of cervical vertebral region include trachea and lung area, Conformity Index (ICRU 62) is 0.95 in PBC calculation and 0.93 in AAA. DVO DVH and Dose calculation DVH are showed equal value in IMRT treatment plan. But AAA calculation shows lack of dose compared with DVO result which is satisfactory condition. Optimizing VMAT treatment plans using PRO II obtained results were satisfactory, but lower density area showed lack of dose in dose calculations. PRO III, but optimizing the dose calculation results were similar with optimized the same conditions once more. In this study, do not judge the rightness of the dose

  12. Analysis of Radiation Treatment Planning by Dose Calculation and Optimization Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Sup; Yoon, In Ha; Lee, Woo Seok; Baek, Geum Mun

    2012-01-01

    Analyze the Effectiveness of Radiation Treatment Planning by dose calculation and optimization algorithm, apply consideration of actual treatment planning, and then suggest the best way to treatment planning protocol. The treatment planning system use Eclipse 10.0. (Varian, USA). PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution) and AAA (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm) Apply to Dose calculation, DVO (Dose Volume Optimizer 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), PRO II (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 8.9.17) and PRO III (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of VAMT. A phantom for experiment virtually created at treatment planning system, 30x30x30 cm sized, homogeneous density (HU: 0) and heterogeneous density that inserted air assumed material (HU: -1,000). Apply to clinical treatment planning on the basis of general treatment planning feature analyzed with Phantom planning. In homogeneous density phantom, PBC and AAA show 65.2% PDD (6 MV, 10 cm) both, In heterogeneous density phantom, also show similar PDD value before meet with low density material, but they show different dose curve in air territory, PDD 10 cm showed 75%, 73% each after penetrate phantom. 3D treatment plan in same MU, AAA treatment planning shows low dose at Lung included area. 2D POP treatment plan with 15 MV of cervical vertebral region include trachea and lung area, Conformity Index (ICRU 62) is 0.95 in PBC calculation and 0.93 in AAA. DVO DVH and Dose calculation DVH are showed equal value in IMRT treatment plan. But AAA calculation shows lack of dose compared with DVO result which is satisfactory condition. Optimizing VMAT treatment plans using PRO II obtained results were satisfactory, but lower density area showed lack of dose in dose calculations. PRO III, but optimizing the dose calculation results were similar with optimized the same conditions once more. In this study, do not judge the rightness of the dose

  13. Evaluation of the breast plan using the TLD and MOSFET for the skin dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Myeong; Kim, Young Bum; Bak, Sang Yun; Lee, Sang Rok; Jeong, Se Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The measurement of skin dose is very important that treatment of breast cancer. On account of the cold or hot dose as compared with prescription dose, it is necessary to analyse the skin dose occurring during the various plan of the breast cancer treatment. At our hospital, we want to apply various analyses using a diversity of dosimeters to the breast cancer treatment. In the study, the anthropomorphic phantom is used to find out the dose difference of the skin(draining site), scar and others occurring from the tangential treatment plan of breast cancer. We took computed tomography scan of the anthropomorphic phantom and made plans for the treatment planing using open and wedge, Field-in-Field, Dose fluence. Using these, we made a comparative analysis of the dose date points by using the Eclipse. For the dose comparison, we place the anthropomorphic phantom in the treatment room and compared the measurement results by using the TLD and MOSFET on the dose data points. On the central point of treatment planing basis, the upward and downward skin dose measured by the MOSFET was the highest when the fluence was used. The skin dose of inner and outer was distinguished from the figure(5.7% - 10.3%) when the measurements were fulfilled by using TLD and MOSFET. The other side of breast dose was the lowest in the open beam, on the other hand, is highest in the Dose fluence plan. In the different kinds of treatment, the dose deviation of inner and outer was the highest, and so this was the same with the TLD and MOSFET measurement case. The outer deviation was highest in the TLD, and the Inner' was highest in the MOSFET. Skin dose in relation to the treatment plan was the highest in the planing using the fluence technique in general and it was supposed that the high dose had been caused by the movement of the MLC. There's some differences among the all the treatment planning, but the sites such as IM node occurring the lack of dose, scar, drain site are needed pay

  14. Evaluation of the breast plan using the TLD and MOSFET for the skin dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Myeong; Kim, Young Bum; Bak, Sang Yun; Lee, Sang Rok; Jeong, Se Young

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of skin dose is very important that treatment of breast cancer. On account of the cold or hot dose as compared with prescription dose, it is necessary to analyse the skin dose occurring during the various plan of the breast cancer treatment. At our hospital, we want to apply various analyses using a diversity of dosimeters to the breast cancer treatment. In the study, the anthropomorphic phantom is used to find out the dose difference of the skin(draining site), scar and others occurring from the tangential treatment plan of breast cancer. We took computed tomography scan of the anthropomorphic phantom and made plans for the treatment planing using open and wedge, Field-in-Field, Dose fluence. Using these, we made a comparative analysis of the dose date points by using the Eclipse. For the dose comparison, we place the anthropomorphic phantom in the treatment room and compared the measurement results by using the TLD and MOSFET on the dose data points. On the central point of treatment planing basis, the upward and downward skin dose measured by the MOSFET was the highest when the fluence was used. The skin dose of inner and outer was distinguished from the figure(5.7% - 10.3%) when the measurements were fulfilled by using TLD and MOSFET. The other side of breast dose was the lowest in the open beam, on the other hand, is highest in the Dose fluence plan. In the different kinds of treatment, the dose deviation of inner and outer was the highest, and so this was the same with the TLD and MOSFET measurement case. The outer deviation was highest in the TLD, and the Inner' was highest in the MOSFET. Skin dose in relation to the treatment plan was the highest in the planing using the fluence technique in general and it was supposed that the high dose had been caused by the movement of the MLC. There's some differences among the all the treatment planning, but the sites such as IM node occurring the lack of dose, scar, drain site are needed pay

  15. Is uniform target dose possible in IMRT plans in the head and neck?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineberg, K.A.; Eisbruch, A.; Coselmon, M.M.; McShan, D.L.; Kessler, M.L.; Fraass, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Various published reports involving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans developed using automated optimization (inverse planning) have demonstrated highly conformal plans. These reported conformal IMRT plans involve significant target dose inhomogeneity, including both overdosage and underdosage within the target volume. In this study, we demonstrate the development of optimized beamlet IMRT plans that satisfy rigorous dose homogeneity requirements for all target volumes (e.g., ±5%), while also sparing the parotids and other normal structures. Methods and Materials: The treatment plans of 15 patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were previously treated with forward-planned multisegmental IMRT were planned again using an automated optimization system developed in-house. The optimization system allows for variable sized beamlets computed using a three-dimensional convolution/superposition dose calculation and flexible cost functions derived from combinations of clinically relevant factors (costlets) that can include dose, dose-volume, and biologic model-based costlets. The current study compared optimized IMRT plans designed to treat the various planning target volumes to doses of 66, 60, and 54 Gy with varying target dose homogeneity while using a flexible optimization cost function to minimize the dose to the parotids, spinal cord, oral cavity, brainstem, submandibular nodes, and other structures. Results: In all cases, target dose uniformity was achieved through steeply varying dose-based costs. Differences in clinical plan evaluation metrics were evaluated for individual cases (eight different target homogeneity costlets), and for the entire cohort of plans. Highly conformal plans were achieved, with significant sparing of both the contralateral and ipsilateral parotid glands. As the homogeneity of the target dose distributions was allowed to decrease, increased sparing of the parotids (and other normal tissues) may be achieved. However, it

  16. Planning for study abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, L H; Hermann, C P

    1994-01-01

    There is more to planning for study abroad than buying airplane tickets. Providing a successful course away from the host institution requires a great deal of planning by the educator. This planning includes course development, budget, marketing, travel, housing, food, and entertainment. Careful preparation provides both the educator and student a unique and enriching experience that goes beyond the traditional course.

  17. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  18. Dose/volume–response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. Materials and methods: The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. Results: The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55–70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.12–0.21; Rs = 0.11–0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power

  19. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Linda X., E-mail: lhong0812@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Kuo, Hsiang-Chi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Mynampati, Dinesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Goddard, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R{sub 50%}); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D{sub 2cm}) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ{sup 2} test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V{sub 100%} {sub PD} ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V{sub 90%} {sub PD} ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D{sub 2cm}, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives.

  20. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6 MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, − 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing

  1. Comparative treatment planning study on sequential vs. simultaneous integrated boost in head and neck cancer patients. Differences in dose distributions and potential implications for clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberger, Carmen; Ghadjar, Pirus; Marnitz, Simone; Thieme, Alexander Henry; Jahn, Ulrich; Karaj-Rossbacher, Evis; Budach, Volker [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany); Raguse, Jan D. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Boettcher, Arne [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Jamil, Basil [Communal Hospital Frankfurt Oder, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt/Oder (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to compare sequential (SeqB) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy plans delivered with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (HNSCC). SeqB and SIB plans using VMAT for 10 HNSCC patients given definitive chemoradiation were generated and analysed for differences in dose distribution, coverage, conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volumes (PTV) 1-3 and sparing of organs at risk (OAR). The mean delineated volumes ± standard deviations were 137.7 ± 44.8, 351.3 ± 83.9 and 895.6 ± 120.5 cm{sup 3} for PTV1-3. The mean volumes encompassed by the corresponding 95 % isodoses were 281 (+ 110 %) ± 73.4, 712.2 (+ 115 %) ± 146.4 and 1381.1 (+ 54 %) ± 217.3 cm{sup 3} with SeqB and 138.2 (+ 7 %) ± 40.1, 380.4 (+ 11 %) ± 91.9 and 1057.3 (+ 21 %) ± 161.4 cm{sup 3} with SIB for PTV1-3, respectively. Both strategies achieved excellent PTV coverage. SeqB provided significantly better coverage of PTV1 and 3, worse conformity for PTV1-3 and a higher mean dose than prescribed (111-115 %) to PTV2 and 3 (p ≤ 0.007). Both strategies provided satisfactory OAR sparing. This study showed significant dosimetric differences with potential clinical relevance between two VMAT boost strategies regarding coverage, conformity and dose to the PTVs. SIB might cause less toxicity. A clinical phase III/IV trial endorsed by the German Head and Neck Clinical Trials Group (IAG-KHT) will evaluate differences in acute/late toxicity as well as in locoregional recurrences between the two boost techniques. (orig.) [German] Vergleich von sequentiellem (SeqB) und simultan-integriertem Boost (SIB) mit moderner volumetrischer Arc-Therapie (VMAT) fuer Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region. Fuer 10 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region und definitiver Radiochemotherapie erfolgte eine VMAT-Planung als SeqB und SIB fuer die

  2. Work plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944, with descriptions of uncertainties inherent in such estimates. The secondary objective is to make project records--information that HEDR staff members used to estimate radiation doses--available to the public. Preliminary dose estimates for a limited geographic area and time period, certain radionuclides, and certain populations are planned to be available in 1990; complete results are planned to be reported in 1993. Project reports and references used in the reports are available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room in Richland, Washington. Project progress is documented in monthly reports, which are also available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room.

  3. Dose planning with comparison to in vivo dosimetry for epithermal neutron irradiation of the dog brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Aschan, Carita; Seren, Tom; Benczik, Judit; Snellman, Marjatta; Huiskamp, Rene; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Kankaanranta, Leena; Joensuu, Heikki; Savolainen, Sauli

    2002-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental type of radiotherapy, presently being used to treat glioblastoma and melanoma. To improve patient safety and to determine the radiobiological characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam of Finnish BNCT facility (FiR 1) dose-response studies were carried on the brain of dogs before starting the clinical trials. A dose planning procedure was developed and uncertainties of the epithermal neutron-induced doses were estimated. The accuracy of the method of computing physical doses was assessed by comparing with in vivo dosimetry. Individual radiation dose plans were computed using magnetic resonance images of the heads of 15 Beagle dogs and the computational model of the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. For in vivo dosimetry, the thermal neutron fluences were measured using Mn activation foils and the gamma-ray doses with MCP-7s type thermoluminescent detectors placed both on the skin surface of the head and in the oral cavity. The degree of uncertainty of the reference doses at the thermal neutron maximum was estimated using a dose-planning program. The estimated uncertainty (±1 standard deviation) in the total physical reference dose was ±8.9%. The calculated and the measured dose values agreed within the uncertainties at the point of beam entry. The conclusion is that the dose delivery to the tissue can be verified in a practical and reliable fashion by placing an activation dosimeter and a TL detector at the beam entry point on the skin surface with homogeneous tissues below. However, the point doses cannot be calculated correctly in the inhomogeneous area near air cavities of the head model with this type of dose-planning program. This calls for attention in dose planning in human clinical trials in the corresponding areas

  4. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  5. Therapeutic treatment plan optimization with probability density-based dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jun; Cotrutz, Cristian; Xing Lei

    2003-01-01

    The dose optimization in inverse planning is realized under the guidance of an objective function. The prescription doses in a conventional approach are usually rigid values, defining in most instances an ill-conditioned optimization problem. In this work, we propose a more general dose optimization scheme based on a statistical formalism [Xing et al., Med. Phys. 21, 2348-2358 (1999)]. Instead of a rigid dose, the prescription to a structure is specified by a preference function, which describes the user's preference over other doses in case the most desired dose is not attainable. The variation range of the prescription dose and the shape of the preference function are predesigned by the user based on prior clinical experience. Consequently, during the iterative optimization process, the prescription dose is allowed to deviate, with a certain preference level, from the most desired dose. By not restricting the prescription dose to a fixed value, the optimization problem becomes less ill-defined. The conventional inverse planning algorithm represents a special case of the new formalism. An iterative dose optimization algorithm is used to optimize the system. The performance of the proposed technique is systematically studied using a hypothetical C-shaped tumor with an abutting circular critical structure and a prostate case. It is shown that the final dose distribution can be manipulated flexibly by tuning the shape of the preference function and that using a preference function can lead to optimized dose distributions in accordance with the planner's specification. The proposed framework offers an effective mechanism to formalize the planner's priorities over different possible clinical scenarios and incorporate them into dose optimization. The enhanced control over the final plan may greatly facilitate the IMRT treatment planning process

  6. Radiation dose optimization in the decommissioning plan for Loviisa NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, R.; Eurajoki, T. [Nuclear Power Engineering (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    Finnish rules for nuclear power require a detailed decommissioning plan to be made and kept up to date already during plant operation. The main reasons for this {open_quotes}premature{close_quotes} plan, is, firstly, the need to demonstrate the feasibility of decommissioning, and, secondly, to make realistic cost estimates in order to fund money for this future operation. The decomissioning for Lovissa Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (2{times}445 MW, PWR) was issued in 1987. It must be updated about every five years. One important aspect of the plant is an estimate of radiation doses to the decomissioning workers. The doses were recently re-estimated because of a need to decrease the total collective dose estimate in the original plan, 23 manSv. In the update, the dose was reduced by one-third. Part of the reduction was due to changes in the protection and procedures, in which ALARA considerations were taken into account, and partly because of re-estimation of the doses.

  7. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.; West, K.; Bromley, R.; Szymura, K.; Fisher, S.; Sim, J.; Bailey, M.; Chrystal, D.; Deshpande, S.; Franji, I.; Nielsen, T. B.; Brink, C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce acceptable treatment plans and the dose accuracy was clinically acceptable for all plans. By sharing knowledge between the different centres, the minor protocol violations (MPV) could be significantly reduced, from an average of 1.9 MPV per plan to 0.6 after such sharing of treatment planning knowledge. In particular, for the centres with less SBRT and/or volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) experience the MPV average per plan improved. All vendor/TPS combinations were also able to successfully deliver the FF and FFF SBRT VMAT plans. The plan quality and dose accuracy were found to be clinically acceptable.

  8. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C R; Nielsen, T B; Brink, C; Sykes, J R; Barber, J; West, K; Bromley, R; Szymura, K; Fisher, S; Sim, J; Bailey, M; Chrystal, D; Deshpande, S; Franji, I; Thwaites, D I

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce acceptable treatment plans and the dose accuracy was clinically acceptable for all plans. By sharing knowledge between the different centres, the minor protocol violations (MPV) could be significantly reduced, from an average of 1.9 MPV per plan to 0.6 after such sharing of treatment planning knowledge. In particular, for the centres with less SBRT and/or volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) experience the MPV average per plan improved. All vendor/TPS combinations were also able to successfully deliver the FF and FFF SBRT VMAT plans. The plan quality and dose accuracy were found to be clinically acceptable

  9. Planning of optimal work path for minimizing exposure dose during radiation work in radwaste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Park, Won Man; Kim, Kyung Soo; Whang, Joo Ho

    2005-01-01

    Since the safety of nuclear power plant has been becoming a big social issue, the exposure dose of radiation for workers has been one of the important factors concerning the safety problem. The existing calculation methods of radiation dose used in the planning of radiation work assume that dose rate dose not depend on the location within a work space, thus the variation of exposure dose by different work path is not considered. In this study, a modified numerical method was presented to estimate the exposure dose during radiation work in radwaste storage considering the effects of the distance between a worker and sources. And a new numerical algorithm was suggested to search the optimal work path minimizing the exposure dose in pre-defined work space with given radiation sources. Finally, a virtual work simulation program was developed to visualize the exposure dose of radiation during radiation works in radwaste storage and provide the capability of simulation for work planning. As a numerical example, a test radiation work was simulated under given space and two radiation sources, and the suggested optimal work path was compared with three predefined work paths. The optimal work path obtained in the study could reduce the exposure dose for the given test work. Based on the results, the developed numerical method and simulation program could be useful tools in the planning of radiation work

  10. Independent technique of verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Korb, Leroy J.; Darnell, Brenda; Krishna, K. V.; Ulewicz, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An independent technique for verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans has been formulated and validated clinically. Methods and Materials: In HDR brachytherapy, dwell times at respective dwell positions are computed, using an optimization algorithm in a HDR treatment-planning system to deliver a specified dose to many target points simultaneously. Because of the variability of dwell times, concerns have been expressed regarding the ability of the algorithm to compute the correct dose. To address this concern, a commercially available low-dose rate (LDR) algorithm was used to compute the doses at defined distances, based on the dwell times obtained from the HDR treatment plans. The percent deviation between doses computed using the HDR and LDR algorithms were reviewed for HDR procedures performed over the last year. Results: In this retrospective study, the difference between computed doses using the HDR and LDR algorithms was found to be within 5% for about 80% of the HDR procedures. All of the reviewed procedures have dose differences of less than 10%. Conclusion: An independent technique for verifying HDR brachytherapy treatment plans has been validated based on clinical data. Provided both systems are available, this technique is universal in its applications and not limited to either a particular implant applicator, implant site, or implant type

  11. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  12. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  13. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klüter, Sebastian; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  14. Treatment plan evaluation using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and spatial dose-volume histogram (zDVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Das, Indra J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The dose-volume histogram (DVH) has been accepted as a tool for treatment-plan evaluation. However, DVH lacks spatial information. A new concept, the z-dependent dose-volume histogram (zDVH), is presented as a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning to provide the spatial variation, as well as the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional dose calculations were carried out with various plans for three disease sites: lung, breast, and prostate. DVHs were calculated for the entire volume. A zDVH is defined as a differential dose-volume histogram with respect to a computed tomographic (CT) slice position. In this study, zDVHs were calculated for each CT slice in the treatment field. DVHs and zDVHs were compared. Results: In the irradiation of lung, DVH calculation indicated that the treatment plan satisfied the dose-volume constraint placed on the lung and zDVH of the lung revealed that a sizable fraction of the lung centered about the central axis (CAX) received a significant dose, a situation that warranted a modification of the treatment plan due to the removal of one lung. In the irradiation of breast with tangential fields, the DVH showed that about 7% of the breast volume received at least 110% of the prescribed dose (PD) and about 11% of the breast received less than 98% PD. However, the zDVHs of the breast volume in each of seven planes showed the existence of high-dose regions of 34% and 15%, respectively, of the volume in the two caudal-most planes and cold spots of about 40% in the two cephalic planes. In the treatment planning of prostate, DVHs showed that about 15% of the bladder and 40% of the rectum received 102% PD, whereas about 30% of the bladder and 50% of the rectum received the full dose. Taking into account the hollow structure of both the bladder and the rectum, the dose-surface histograms (DSH) showed larger hot-spot volume, about

  15. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-01-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio® treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  16. Simulation study of radial dose due to the irradiation of a swift heavy ion aiming to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy: The effect of emission angles of secondary electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo, E-mail: moribayashi.kengo@jaea.go.jp

    2015-12-15

    A radial dose simulation model has been proposed in order to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy. Here, the radial dose is the dose due to the irradiation of a heavy ion as a function of distances from this ion path. The model proposed here may overcome weak points of paradigms that are employed to produce the conventional radial dose distributions. To provide the radial dose with higher accuracy, this paper has discussed the relationship between the emission angles of secondary electrons and the radial dose. It is found that the effect of emission angles becomes stronger on the radial dose with increasing energies of the secondary electrons.

  17. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R.; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  18. SU-F-T-600: Influence of Acuros XB and AAA Dose Calculation Algorithms On Plan Quality Metrics and Normal Lung Doses in Lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, R; Mynampati, D; Kuo, H; Garg, M; Tome, W; Kalnicki, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of superposition-beam model (AAA) and determinant-photon transport-solver (Acuros XB) dose calculation algorithms on the treatment plan quality metrics and on normal lung dose in Lung SBRT. Methods: Treatment plans of 10 Lung SBRT patients were randomly selected. Patients were prescribed to a total dose of 50-54Gy in 3–5 fractions (10?5 or 18?3). Doses were optimized accomplished with 6-MV using 2-arcs (VMAT). Doses were calculated using AAA algorithm with heterogeneity correction. For each plan, plan quality metrics in the categories- coverage, homogeneity, conformity and gradient were quantified. Repeat dosimetry for these AAA treatment plans was performed using AXB algorithm with heterogeneity correction for same beam and MU parameters. Plan quality metrics were again evaluated and compared with AAA plan metrics. For normal lung dose, V_2_0 and V_5 to (Total lung- GTV) were evaluated. Results: The results are summarized in Supplemental Table 1. PTV volume was mean 11.4 (±3.3) cm"3. Comparing RTOG 0813 protocol criteria for conformality, AXB plans yielded on average, similar PITV ratio (individual PITV ratio differences varied from −9 to +15%), reduced target coverage (−1.6%) and increased R50% (+2.6%). Comparing normal lung doses, the lung V_2_0 (+3.1%) and V_5 (+1.5%) were slightly higher for AXB plans compared to AAA plans. High-dose spillage ((V105%PD - PTV)/ PTV) was slightly lower for AXB plans but the % low dose spillage (D2cm) was similar between the two calculation algorithms. Conclusion: AAA algorithm overestimates lung target dose. Routinely adapting to AXB for dose calculations in Lung SBRT planning may improve dose calculation accuracy, as AXB based calculations have been shown to be closer to Monte Carlo based dose predictions in accuracy and with relatively faster computational time. For clinical practice, revisiting dose-fractionation in Lung SBRT to correct for dose overestimates attributable to algorithm

  19. SU-F-T-600: Influence of Acuros XB and AAA Dose Calculation Algorithms On Plan Quality Metrics and Normal Lung Doses in Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaparpalvi, R; Mynampati, D; Kuo, H; Garg, M; Tome, W; Kalnicki, S [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the influence of superposition-beam model (AAA) and determinant-photon transport-solver (Acuros XB) dose calculation algorithms on the treatment plan quality metrics and on normal lung dose in Lung SBRT. Methods: Treatment plans of 10 Lung SBRT patients were randomly selected. Patients were prescribed to a total dose of 50-54Gy in 3–5 fractions (10?5 or 18?3). Doses were optimized accomplished with 6-MV using 2-arcs (VMAT). Doses were calculated using AAA algorithm with heterogeneity correction. For each plan, plan quality metrics in the categories- coverage, homogeneity, conformity and gradient were quantified. Repeat dosimetry for these AAA treatment plans was performed using AXB algorithm with heterogeneity correction for same beam and MU parameters. Plan quality metrics were again evaluated and compared with AAA plan metrics. For normal lung dose, V{sub 20} and V{sub 5} to (Total lung- GTV) were evaluated. Results: The results are summarized in Supplemental Table 1. PTV volume was mean 11.4 (±3.3) cm{sup 3}. Comparing RTOG 0813 protocol criteria for conformality, AXB plans yielded on average, similar PITV ratio (individual PITV ratio differences varied from −9 to +15%), reduced target coverage (−1.6%) and increased R50% (+2.6%). Comparing normal lung doses, the lung V{sub 20} (+3.1%) and V{sub 5} (+1.5%) were slightly higher for AXB plans compared to AAA plans. High-dose spillage ((V105%PD - PTV)/ PTV) was slightly lower for AXB plans but the % low dose spillage (D2cm) was similar between the two calculation algorithms. Conclusion: AAA algorithm overestimates lung target dose. Routinely adapting to AXB for dose calculations in Lung SBRT planning may improve dose calculation accuracy, as AXB based calculations have been shown to be closer to Monte Carlo based dose predictions in accuracy and with relatively faster computational time. For clinical practice, revisiting dose-fractionation in Lung SBRT to correct for dose overestimates

  20. A Monte Carlo dose calculation tool for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.S.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S.B.; Deng, J.; Lee, M.C.; Koumrian, T.; Luxton, M.; Brain, S.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo user code, MCDOSE, has been developed for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) dose calculations. MCDOSE is designed as a dose calculation module suitable for adaptation to host RTP systems. MCDOSE can be used for both conventional photon/electron beam calculation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. MCDOSE uses a multiple-source model to reconstruct the treatment beam phase space. Based on Monte Carlo simulated or measured beam data acquired during commissioning, source-model parameters are adjusted through an automated procedure. Beam modifiers such as jaws, physical and dynamic wedges, compensators, blocks, electron cut-outs and bolus are simulated by MCDOSE together with a 3D rectilinear patient geometry model built from CT data. Dose distributions calculated using MCDOSE agreed well with those calculated by the EGS4/DOSXYZ code using different beam set-ups and beam modifiers. Heterogeneity correction factors for layered-lung or layered-bone phantoms as calculated by both codes were consistent with measured data to within 1%. The effect of energy cut-offs for particle transport was investigated. Variance reduction techniques were implemented in MCDOSE to achieve a speedup factor of 10-30 compared to DOSXYZ. (author)

  1. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.

    2015-01-01

    When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung...... tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce...

  2. ICRU reference dose in an era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy clinical trials: Correlation with planning target volume mean dose and suitability for intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Hong, Linda; Mah, Dennis; Shen Jin; Mutyala, Subhakar; Spierer, Marnee; Garg, Madhur; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: IMRT clinical trials lack dose prescription and specification standards similar to ICRU standards for two- and three-dimensional external beam planning. In this study, we analyzed dose distributions for patients whose treatment plans incorporated IMRT, and compared the dose determined at the ICRU reference point to the PTV doses determined from dose-volume histograms. Additionally, we evaluated if ICRU reference type single-point dose prescriptions are suitable for IMRT dose prescriptions. Materials and methods: For this study, IMRT plans of 117 patients treated at our institution were randomly selected and analyzed. The treatment plans were clinically applied to the following disease sites: abdominal (11), anal (10), brain (11), gynecological (15), head and neck (25), lung (15), male pelvis (10) and prostate (20). The ICRU reference point was located in each treatment plan following ICRU Report 50 guidelines. The reference point was placed in the central part of the PTV and at or near the isocenter. In each case, the dose was calculated and recorded to this point. For each patient - volume and dose (PTV, PTV mean, median and modal) information was extracted from the planned dose-volume histogram. Results: The ICRU reference dose vs PTV mean dose relationship in IMRT exhibited a weak positive association (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.63). In approximately 65% of the cases studied, dose at the ICRU reference point was greater than the corresponding PTV mean dose. The dose difference between ICRU reference and PTV mean doses was ≤2% in approximately 79% of the cases studied (average 1.21% (±1.55), range -4% to +4%). Paired t-test analyses showed that the ICRU reference doses and PTV median doses were statistically similar (p = 0.42). The magnitude of PTV did not influence the difference between ICRU reference and PTV mean doses. Conclusions: The general relationship between ICRU reference and PTV mean doses in IMRT is similar to that

  3. Dose reduction and optimization studies (ALARA) at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been commissioned by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at LWR plants. These studies have the following objectives: identify high-dose maintenance tasks; identify dose-reduction techniques; examine incentives for dose reduction; evaluate cost-effectiveness and optimization of dose-reduction techniques; and compile an ALARA handbook on data, engineering modifications, cost-effectiveness calculations, and other information of interest to ALARA practioners

  4. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  5. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  6. Evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose painting for localized prostate cancer using 68Ga-HBED-CC PSMA-PET/CT: A planning study based on histopathology reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Koubar, Khodor; Drendel, Vanessa; Wiehle, Rolf; Kirste, Simon; Mix, Michael; Schiller, Florian; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Meyer, Philipp T; Werner, Martin; Grosu, Anca L; Baltas, Dimos

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and to evaluate the tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of IMRT dose painting using 68 Ga-HBED-CC PSMA PET/CT for target delineation in prostate cancer (PCa). 10 patients had PSMA PET/CT scans prior to prostatectomy. GTV-PET was generated on the basis of an intraprostatic SUVmax of 30%. Two IMRT plans were generated for each patient: Plan 77 which consisted of whole-prostate IMRT to 77Gy, and Plan 95 which consisted of whole-prostate IMRT to 77Gy and a simultaneous integrated boost to the GTV-PET up to 95Gy (35 fractions). The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to adhere to the FLAME trial protocol. TCP-histo/-PET were calculated on co-registered histology (GTV-histo) and GTV-PET, respectively. NTCPs for rectum and bladder were calculated. All plans reached prescription doses whilst adhering to dose constraints. In Plan 77 and Plan 95 mean doses in GTV-histo were 75.8±0.3Gy and 96.9±1Gy, respectively. Average TCP-histo values for Plan 77 and Plan 95 were 70% (range: 15-97%), and 96% (range: 78-100%, pPET values for Plan 77 and Plan 95 were 55% (range: 27-82%), and 100% (range: 99-100%, pPET and TCP-histo in Plan 95 (p=0.25). There were no significant differences in rectal (p=0.563) and bladder (p=0.3) NTCPs. IMRT dose painting using PSMA PET/CT was technically feasible and resulted in significantly higher TCPs without higher NTCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Using the computed tomography in comparison to the orthogonal radiography based treatment planning in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in cervical uteri cancer patients; a single institution feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Yasir A; El-Sayed, Mohamed E; El-Taher, Zeinab H; Zaza, Khaled O; Moftah, Belal A; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Ghassal, Noor M

    2008-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram lpar;DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy+/-1.2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy+/-1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the corresponding p

  8. Using the Computed Tomography in Comparison to the Orthogonal Radiography Based Treatment Planning in High dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy in Cervical Uteri Cancer Patients; A Single Institution Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAHADUR, Y.A.; EL-SAYED, M.E.; HASSOUNA, A.H.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.; GHASSAL, N.M.; ZAZA, Kh.O.M.D.; OFTAH, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. Aim: To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). Methods: From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram (DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. Results: For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy±l .2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy±1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the

  9. Adaptive plan selection vs. re-optimisation in radiotherapy for bladder cancer: A dose accumulation comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Elstrøm, Ulrik Vindelev; Høyer, Morten; Petersen, Jørgen B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with urinary bladder cancer are obvious candidates for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional variation in bladder volumes. In this study we have compared the normal tissue sparing potential of two ART strategies: daily plan selection (PlanSelect) and daily plan re-optimisation (ReOpt). Materials and methods: Seven patients with bladder cancer were included in the study. For the PlanSelect strategy, a patient-specific library of three plans was generated, and the most suitable plan based on the pre-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) was selected. For the daily ReOpt strategy, plans were re-optimised based on the CBCT from each daily fraction. Bladder contours were propagated to the CBCT scan using deformable image registration (DIR). Accumulated dose distributions for the ART strategies as well as the non-adaptive RT were calculated. Results: A considerable sparing of normal tissue was achieved with both ART approaches, with ReOpt being the superior technique. Compared to non-adaptive RT, the volume receiving more than 57 Gy (corresponding to 95% of the prescribed dose) was reduced to 66% (range 48–100%) for PlanSelect and to 41% (range 33–50%) for ReOpt. Conclusion: This study demonstrated a considerable normal tissue sparing potential of ART for bladder irradiation, with clearly superior results by daily adaptive re-optimisation

  10. Current algorithms for computed electron beam dose planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and sometimes three-dimensional computer algorithms for electron beam irradiation are capable of taking all irregularities of the body cross-section and the properties of the various tissues into account. This is achieved by dividing the incoming broad beams into a number of narrow pencil beams, the penetration of which can be described by essentially one-dimensional formalisms. The constituent pencil beams are most often described by Gaussian, experimentally or theoretically derived distributions. The accuracy of different dose planning algorithms is discussed in some detail based on their ability to take the different physical interaction processes of high energy electrons into account. It is shown that those programs that take the deviations from the simple Gaussian model into account give the best agreement with experimental results. With such programs a dosimetric relative accuracy of about 5% is generally achieved except in the most complex inhomogeneity configurations. Finally, the present limitations and possible future developments of electron dose planning are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Comparison between dose values specified at the ICRU reference point and the mean dose to the planning target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukoowicz, Pawel F.; Mijnheer, Bernard J.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare dose values specified at the reference point, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, ICRU, and the mean dose to the planning target volume, PTV. Material and methods: CT-based dose calculations were performed with a 3-D treatment planning system for 6 series of patients treated for bladder, brain, breast, lung, oropharynx and parotid gland tumour. All patients were arbitrarily chosen from a set of previously treated patients irradiated with a two- or three-field technique using customised blocks. Appropriate wedge angles and beam weights were chosen to make the dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. Results: The dose at the ICRU reference point was generally higher than the mean dose to the PTV. The difference between the ICRU reference dose and the mean dose to the PTV for an individual patient was less than 3% in 88% of cases and less than 2% in 72% of the cases. The differences were larger in those patients where the dose distribution is significantly influenced by the presence of lungs or air gaps. For each series of patients the mean difference between the ICRU reference dose and the mean dose to the PTV was calculated. The difference between these two values never exceeded 2%. Because not all planning systems are able to calculate the mean dose to the PTV, the concept of the mean central dose, the mean of the dose values at the centre of the PTV in each CT slice, has been introduced. The mean central dose was also calculated for the same patients and was closer to the mean dose to the PTV than the ICRU reference dose. Conclusion: The mean dose to the PTV is well estimated by either the ICRU reference dose or the mean central dose for a variety of treatment techniques for common types of cancer

  12. Treatment plan modification using voxel-based weighting factors/dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chuan; Olivera, Gustavo H; Jeraj, Robert; Keller, Harry; Mackie, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    Under various clinical situations, it is desirable to modify the original treatment plan to better suit the clinical goals. In this work, a method to help physicians modify treatment plans based on their clinical preferences is proposed. The method uses a weighted quadratic dose objective function. The commonly used organ-/ROI-based weighting factors are expanded to a set of voxel-based weighting factors in order to obtain greater flexibility in treatment plan modification. Two different but equivalent modification schemes based on Rustem's quadratic programming algorithms -modification of a weighting matrix and modification of prescribed doses - are presented. Case studies demonstrated the effectiveness of the two methods with regard to their capability to fine-tune treatment plans

  13. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes ''end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made

  14. Assessment of individual doses and intervention planning at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, M.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Gaborit, J.C.; Menzel, H.; Roesler, S.

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1954, CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest international particle physics centres. It sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently being installed in a 27-kilometer ring tunnel, buried deep below the countryside on the outskirts of Geneva, Switzerland and the Pays de Gex, France. When its operation begins in 2007, the LHC will be the world's most power particle accelerator. The start-up and the operation of the LHC will mark a new era for CERN's operational radiation protection. The total surface of CERN's radiation areas will enlarge significantly and a large number of work places have to be regularly monitored by CERN's radiation protection group. The maintenance personnel will comprise CERN staff, outside contractors and a large number of physicists from all over the world. CERN meets this challenge by applying optimisation processes already in the design of accelerator and detector components and by an appropriate intervention and dose planning during operation. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations were performed during the design phase of the LHC and were used to identify the potential radiation hazards during future maintenance in areas with elevated beam losses (accelerator ejection and injection, beam dumps, target areas or beam cleaning insertions) and thus elevated dose rates. In an iterative way, the design of the accelerator components and the layout of these regions were optimised. The impact of the proposed modifications on the dose to personnel was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations. Calculated individual and collective doses were then compared to design constraints. (author)

  15. Assessment of Individual Doses and Intervention Planning at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, M.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Gaborit, J.C.; Menzel, H.; Roesler, S.; Vincke, H.

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1954, CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest international particle physics centres. It sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (Lhc) is currently being installed in a 27-kilometer ring tunnel, buried deep below the countryside on the outskirts of Geneva, Switzerland and the Pays de Gex, France. When its operation begins in 2007, the Lhc will be the world's most powerful particle accelerator. The start-up and the operation of the Lhc will mark a new era for CERN's operational radiation protection. The total surface of CERN's radiation areas will enlarge significantly and a large number of work places have to be regularly monitored by CERN's radiation protection group. The maintenance personnel will comprise CERN staff, outside contractors and a large number of physicists from all over the world. CERN meets this challenge by applying optimisation processes already in the design of accelerator and detector components and by an appropriate intervention and dose planning during operation. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations were performed during the design phase of the Lhc and were used to identify the potential radiation hazards during future maintenance in areas with elevated beam losses (accelerator ejection and injection, beam dumps, target areas or beam cleaning insertions) and thus elevated dose rates. In an iterative way, the design of the accelerator components and the layout of these regions were optimised. The impact of the proposed modifications on the dose to personnel was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations. Calculated individual and collective doses were then compared to design constraints. (authors)

  16. On the conversion of dose to bone to dose to water in radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Reynaert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Conversion factors between dose to medium (Dm,m and dose to water (Dw,w provided by treatment planning systems that model the patient as water with variable electron density are currently based on stopping power ratios. In the current paper it will be illustrated that this conversion method is not correct. Materials and methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed in a phantom consisting of a 2 cm bone layer surrounded by water. Dw,w was obtained by modelling the bone layer as water with the electron density of bone. Conversion factors between Dw,w and Dm,m were obtained and compared to stopping power ratios and ratios of mass-energy absorption coefficients in regions of electronic equilibrium and interfaces. Calculations were performed for 6 MV and 20 MV photon beams. Results: In the region of electronic equilibrium the stopping power ratio of water to bone (1.11 largely overestimates the conversion obtained using the Monte Carlo calculations (1.06. In that region the MC dose conversion corresponds to the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients. Near the water to bone interface, the MC ratio cannot be determined from stopping powers or mass energy absorption coefficients. Conclusion: Stopping power ratios cannot be used for conversion from Dm,m to Dw,w provided by treatment planning systems that model the patient as water with variable electron density, either in regions of electronic equilibrium or near interfaces. In regions of electronic equilibrium mass energy absorption coefficient ratios should be used. Conversions at interfaces require detailed MC calculations. Keywords: Dose to water, Monte Carlo, Dosimetry, TPS comparison

  17. Monte Carlo systems used for treatment planning and dose verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla, Lorenzo [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Essen (Germany); Rodriguez, Miguel [Centro Medico Paitilla, Balboa (Panama); Lallena, Antonio M. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Granada (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    General-purpose radiation transport Monte Carlo codes have been used for estimation of the absorbed dose distribution in external photon and electron beam radiotherapy patients since several decades. Results obtained with these codes are usually more accurate than those provided by treatment planning systems based on non-stochastic methods. Traditionally, absorbed dose computations based on general-purpose Monte Carlo codes have been used only for research, owing to the difficulties associated with setting up a simulation and the long computation time required. To take advantage of radiation transport Monte Carlo codes applied to routine clinical practice, researchers and private companies have developed treatment planning and dose verification systems that are partly or fully based on fast Monte Carlo algorithms. This review presents a comprehensive list of the currently existing Monte Carlo systems that can be used to calculate or verify an external photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatment plan. Particular attention is given to those systems that are distributed, either freely or commercially, and that do not require programming tasks from the end user. These systems are compared in terms of features and the simulation time required to compute a set of benchmark calculations. (orig.) [German] Seit mehreren Jahrzehnten werden allgemein anwendbare Monte-Carlo-Codes zur Simulation des Strahlungstransports benutzt, um die Verteilung der absorbierten Dosis in der perkutanen Strahlentherapie mit Photonen und Elektronen zu evaluieren. Die damit erzielten Ergebnisse sind meist akkurater als solche, die mit nichtstochastischen Methoden herkoemmlicher Bestrahlungsplanungssysteme erzielt werden koennen. Wegen des damit verbundenen Arbeitsaufwands und der langen Dauer der Berechnungen wurden Monte-Carlo-Simulationen von Dosisverteilungen in der konventionellen Strahlentherapie in der Vergangenheit im Wesentlichen in der Forschung eingesetzt. Im Bemuehen, Monte

  18. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Visser, Jorrit; Jong, Rianne de; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Material and methods: Ten patients were treated to the bladder and lymph nodes with an adaptive full bladder strategy. Interpolated delineations of bladder and tumor on a full and empty bladder CT scan resulted in five PTVs for which VMAT plans were created. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were used for plan selection. Bowel, rectum and target volumes were delineated on these CBCTs, and delivered dose for these was calculated using both the adaptive plan, and a non-adaptive plan. Results: Target coverage for lymph nodes improved using an adaptive strategy. The full bladder strategy spared the healthy part of the bladder from a high dose. Average bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy significantly reduced with 60 and 69 ml, respectively (p < 0.01). Other parameters for bowel and rectum remained unchanged. Conclusions: Daily plan selection compared to a non-adaptive strategy yielded similar bladder coverage and improved coverage for lymph nodes, with a significant reduction in bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy only, while other sparing was limited

  19. Doses in mammography. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez P, F.; Acosta R, N.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Benavente, T.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Poma, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mammography is the most important method to detect lesions in the breast with this technique one can detect small tumours before clear clinical symptoms appear. Mammographic image of require high quality standards due that the extremely low contrast between the normal and pathological areas in the breast, eg.g., they have similar attenuation and absorption coefficient. The x-ray mammographic systems, used in this study are Senographe 500t and Senographe DMR, a detector with a RadCal ionization chambers calibrated to the qualities of mammographic x-ray beams, and a breast simulator that is a phantoms of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of several thicknesses with the equivalence of 50% of the glandular tissue. The results obtained indicate that the values of doses at the entrance surface of a breast (DES) are greater the reference value 20 mGy to 5,0 cm of PMMA and the values of the mean glandular dose (MGD) exceed the reference value of 2,1 mGy for 5,1 cm of compressed thick breast. We consider that the values high of the EDS and MGD are due that the x-ray systems no meeting in good condition or for used of x-ray spectra no suitable, so is recommendable be carried out test of quality control to the x-ray systems and also realize studies, or characterize the of x-ray mammographic spectra

  20. Impact of tumour motion compensation and delineation methods on FDG PET-based dose painting plan quality for NSCLC radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Samuel, James J.E.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2018-01-01

    To quantitatively estimate the impact of different methods for both boost volume delineation and respiratory motion compensation of [18F] FDG PET/CT images on the fidelity of planned non-uniform ‘dose painting’ plans to the prescribed boost dose distribution. Six locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were retrospectively reviewed. To assess the impact of respiratory motion, time-averaged (3D AVG), respiratory phase-gated (4D GATED) and motion-encompassing (4D MIP) PET images were used. The boost volumes were defined using manual contour (MANUAL), fixed threshold (FIXED) and gradient search algorithm (GRADIENT). The dose painting prescription of 60 Gy base dose to the planning target volume and an integral dose of 14 Gy (total 74 Gy) was discretized into seven treatment planning substructures and linearly redistributed according to the relative SUV at every voxel in the boost volume. Fifty-four dose painting plan combinations were generated and conformity was evaluated using quality index VQ0.95–1.05, which represents the sum of planned dose voxels within 5% deviation from the prescribed dose. Trends in plan quality and magnitude of achievable dose escalation were recorded. Different segmentation techniques produced statistically significant variations in maximum planned dose (P < 0.02), as well as plan quality between segmentation methods for 4D GATED and 4D MIP PET images (P < 0.05). No statistically significant differences in plan quality and maximum dose were observed between motion-compensated PET-based plans (P > 0.75). Low variability in plan quality was observed for FIXED threshold plans, while MANUAL and GRADIENT plans achieved higher dose with lower plan quality indices. The dose painting plans were more sensitive to segmentation of boost volumes than PET motion compensation in this study sample. Careful consideration of boost target delineation and motion compensation strategies should guide the design of NSCLC dose painting

  1. Impact of tumour motion compensation and delineation methods on FDG PET-based dose painting plan quality for NSCLC radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hannah Mary; Kinahan, Paul E; Samuel, James Jebaseelan E; Bowen, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    To quantitatively estimate the impact of different methods for both boost volume delineation and respiratory motion compensation of [18F] FDG PET/CT images on the fidelity of planned non-uniform 'dose painting' plans to the prescribed boost dose distribution. Six locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were retrospectively reviewed. To assess the impact of respiratory motion, time-averaged (3D AVG), respiratory phase-gated (4D GATED) and motion-encompassing (4D MIP) PET images were used. The boost volumes were defined using manual contour (MANUAL), fixed threshold (FIXED) and gradient search algorithm (GRADIENT). The dose painting prescription of 60 Gy base dose to the planning target volume and an integral dose of 14 Gy (total 74 Gy) was discretized into seven treatment planning substructures and linearly redistributed according to the relative SUV at every voxel in the boost volume. Fifty-four dose painting plan combinations were generated and conformity was evaluated using quality index VQ0.95-1.05, which represents the sum of planned dose voxels within 5% deviation from the prescribed dose. Trends in plan quality and magnitude of achievable dose escalation were recorded. Different segmentation techniques produced statistically significant variations in maximum planned dose (P plan quality between segmentation methods for 4D GATED and 4D MIP PET images (P plan quality and maximum dose were observed between motion-compensated PET-based plans (P > 0.75). Low variability in plan quality was observed for FIXED threshold plans, while MANUAL and GRADIENT plans achieved higher dose with lower plan quality indices. The dose painting plans were more sensitive to segmentation of boost volumes than PET motion compensation in this study sample. Careful consideration of boost target delineation and motion compensation strategies should guide the design of NSCLC dose painting trials. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of

  2. Long-term Outcomes With Planned Multistage Reduced Dose Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Inoperable High-Grade Arteriovenous Malformations: An Observational Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciscano, Ariel E; Huang, Judy; Tamargo, Rafael J; Hu, Chen; Khattab, Mohamed H; Aggarwal, Sameer; Lim, Michael; Redmond, Kristin J; Rigamonti, Daniele; Kleinberg, Lawrence R

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal management of inoperable high-grade arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). This long-term study of 42 patients with high-grade AVMs reports obliteration and adverse event (AE) rates using planned multistage repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). To evaluate the efficacy and safety of multistage SRS with treatment of the entire AVM nidus at each treatment session to achieve complete obliteration of high-grade AVMs. Patients with high-grade Spetzler-Martin (S-M) III-V AVMs treated with at least 2 multistage SRS treatments from 1989 to 2013. Clinical outcomes of obliteration rate, minor/major AEs, and treatment characteristics were collected. Forty-two patients met inclusion criteria (n = 26, S-M III; n = 13, S-M IV; n = 3, S-M V) with a median follow-up was 9.5 yr after first SRS. Median number of SRS treatment stages was 2, and median interval between stages was 3.5 yr. Twenty-two patients underwent pre-SRS embolization. Complete AVM obliteration rate was 38%, and the median time to obliteration was 9.7 yr. On multivariate analysis, higher S-M grade was significantly associated ( P = .04) failure to achieve obliteration. Twenty-seven post-SRS AEs were observed, and the post-SRS intracranial hemorrhage rate was 0.027 events per patient year. Treatment of high-grade AVMs with multistage SRS achieves AVM obliteration in a meaningful proportion of patients with acceptable AE rates. Lower obliteration rates were associated with higher S-M grade and pre-SRS embolization. This approach should be considered with caution, as partial obliteration does not protect from hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. Electron beam treatment planning: A review of dose computation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.; Riley, R.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of dose computations are reviewed. The equivalent path length methods used to account for body curvature and internal structure are not adequate because they ignore the lateral diffusion of electrons. The Monte Carlo method for the broad field three-dimensional situation in treatment planning is impractical because of the enormous computer time required. The pencil beam technique may represent a suitable compromise. The behavior of a pencil beam may be described by the multiple scattering theory or, alternatively, generated using the Monte Carlo method. Although nearly two orders of magnitude slower than the equivalent path length technique, the pencil beam method improves accuracy sufficiently to justify its use. It applies very well when accounting for the effect of surface irregularities; the formulation for handling inhomogeneous internal structure is yet to be developed

  4. FY 1993 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to individuals and populations. The primary objective of work to be performed in FY 1993 is to complete the source term estimates and dose estimates for key radionuclides for the air and river pathways. At the end of FY 1993, the capability will be in place to estimate doses for individuals in the extended (32-county) study area, 1944--1991. Native American research will continue to provide input for tribal dose estimates. In FY 1993, the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) will decide whether demographic and river pathways data collection should be extended beyond FY 1993 levels. The FY 1993 work scopes and milestones in this document are based on the work plan discussed at the TSP Budget/Fiscal Subcommittee meeting on August 19--20, 1991. Table 1 shows the FY 1993 milestones; Table 2 shows estimated costs. The subsequent work scope descriptions are based on the milestones. This document and the FY 1992 task plans will form the basis for a contract with Battelle and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The 2-year dose reconstruction contract is expected to begin in February 1992. This contract will replace the current arrangement, whereby the US Department of Energy directly funds the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct dose reconstruction work. In late FY 1992, the FY 1993 task plans will be more fully developed with detailed technical approaches, data quality objectives, and budgeted labor hours. The task plans will be updated again in July 1993 to reflect any scope, milestone, or cost changes directed during the year by the TSP. 2 tabs

  5. Treatment Planning for Pulsed Reduced Dose-Rate Radiotherapy in Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yi; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Howard, Steven P.; Welsh, James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a valuable method of reirradiation because of its potential to reduce late normal tissue toxicity while still yielding significant tumoricidal effect. A typical method using a conventional linear accelerator (linac) is to deliver a series of 20-cGy pulses separated by 3-min intervals to give an effective dose-rate of just under 7 cGy/min. Such a strategy is fraught with difficulties when attempted on a helical tomotherapy unit. We investigated various means to overcome this limitation. Methods and Materials: Phantom and patient cases were studied. Plans were generated with varying combinations of field width (FW), pitch, and modulation factor (MF) to administer 200 cGy per fraction to the planning target in eight subfractions, thereby mimicking the technique used on conventional linacs. Plans were compared using dose-volume histograms, homogeneity indices, conformation numbers, and treatment time. Plan delivery quality assurance was performed to assess deliverability. Results: It was observed that for helical tomotherapy, intrinsic limitations in leaf open time in the multileaf collimator deteriorate plan quality and deliverability substantially when attempting to deliver very low doses such as 20-40 cGy. The various permutations evaluated revealed that the combination of small FW (1.0 cm), small MF (1.3-1.5), and large pitch (∼0.86), along with the half-gantry-angle-blocked scheme, can generate clinically acceptable plans with acceptable delivery accuracy (±3%). Conclusion: Pulsed reduced dose-rate radiotherapy can be accurately delivered using helical tomotherapy for tumor reirradiation when the appropriate combination of FW, MF, and pitch is used.

  6. SU-E-T-87: Comparison Study of Dose Reconstruction From Cylindrical Diode Array Measurements, with TLD Measurements and Treatment Planning System Calculations in Anthropomorphic Head and Neck and Lung Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Popple, R [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Faught, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess dose calculated by the 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL) against TLD measurements and treatment planning system calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (HN) and lung phantoms were scanned and plans were generated using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) following IROC Houston procedures. For the H and N phantom, 6 MV VMAT and 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. For the lung phantom 6 MV VMAT and 15 MV 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. The plans were delivered to the phantoms and to an ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL). The head and neck phantom contained 8 TLDs located at PTV1 (4), PTV2 (2), and OAR Cord (2). The lung phantom contained 4 TLDs, 2 in the PTV, 1 in the cord, and 1 in the heart. Daily outputs were recorded before each measurement for correction. 3DVH dose reconstruction software was used to project the calculated dose to patient anatomy. Results: For the HN phantom, the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was -3.4% and between 3DVH and Eclipse was 1.2%. For the lung plan the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was 4.3%, except for the spinal cord for which 3DVH overestimated the TLD dose by 12%. The maximum difference between 3DVH and Eclipse was 0.3%. 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse because the dose reconstruction algorithm uses the diode measurements to perturb the dose calculated by the treatment planning system; therefore, if there is a problem in the modeling or heterogeneity correction, it will be carried through to 3DVH. Conclusion: 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse and TLD measurements. Comparison of 3DVH with film measurements is ongoing. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  7. Generation of Composite Dose and Biological Effective Dose (BED) Over Multiple Treatment Modalities and Multistage Planning Using Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, T-C; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Forster, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are no commercially available tools to generate composite plans across different treatment modalities and/or different planning image sets. Without a composite plan, it may be difficult to perform a meaningful dosimetric evaluation of the overall treatment course. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate composite biological effective dose (BED) plans over multiple radiotherapy treatment modalities and/or multistage plans, using deformable image registration. Two cases were used to demonstrate the method. Case I was prostate cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a permanent seed implant. Case II involved lung cancer treated with two treatment plans generated on two separate computed tomography image sets. Thin-plate spline or optical flow methods were used as appropriate to generate deformation matrices. The deformation matrices were then applied to the dose matrices and the resulting physical doses were converted to BED and added to yield the composite plan. Cell proliferation and sublethal repair were considered in the BED calculations. The difference in BED between normal tissues and tumor volumes was accounted for by using different BED models, α/β values, and cell potential doubling times. The method to generate composite BED plans presented in this paper provides information not available with the traditional simple dose summation or physical dose summation. With the understanding of limitations and uncertainties of the algorithms involved, it may be valuable for the overall treatment plan evaluation.

  8. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2008-01-01

    ...) Developed a voxel-specific penalty scheme for TRV-based inverse planning; (iv) Established a cine-EPID image retrospective dose reconstruction in IMRT dose delivery for adaptive planning and IMRT dose verification. These works are both timely and important and should lead to widespread impact on prostate cancer management.

  9. Dose response study of PVA-Fx gel for three dimensional dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindha, S.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Shen, Bin; Saw, Cheng B.

    2001-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques involve complex field arrangements using conformal and intensity modulated radiation that requires three dimensional treatment planning. The verification of these plans poses even more challenge. In 1984, Gore et al., proposed that ferrous gel dosimeters combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to measure three dimensional radiation dose distributions. Since then, there has been much interest in the development of gel dosimetry to aid the determination of three dimensional dose distributions during field arrangements. In this work, preparation and study of the MR characteristics of a PVA-Fx gel reported in the literature is presented

  10. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  11. SU-E-T-622: Identification and Improvement of Patients Eligible for Dose Escalation with Matched Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, K; Holcombe, C; Kapp, D; Buyyounouski, M; Hancock, S; Xing, L; Atwood, T; King, M

    2014-01-01

    Gy. Conclusion: Patientmatching is a promising method to identify eligible patients, and to assist in creating acceptable plans for dose-escalation. Further study will investigate other disease states. Additionally, the time-savings provided by patientmatching warrants further investigation. The following authors have equity ownership in Siris Medical, Inc: K Bush, TF Atwood

  12. Validation of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy using cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppaelae, Tiina; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Merimaa, Katja; Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, POB 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, POB 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kortesniemi, Mika, E-mail: hanna.koivunoro@helsinki.f [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki, POB 340, FI-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2010-06-21

    In this paper, the accuracy of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain and head and neck cancer was studied at the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. A cylindrical water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were applied with two beam aperture-to-surface distances (ASD). The calculations using the simulation environment for radiation application (SERA) treatment planning system were compared to neutron activation measurements with Au and Mn foils, photon dose measurements with an ionization chamber and the reference simulations with the MCNP5 code. Photon dose calculations using SERA differ from the ionization chamber measurements by 2-13% (disagreement increased along the depth in the phantom), but are in agreement with the MCNP5 calculations within 2%. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) and {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) reaction rates calculated using SERA agree within 10% and 8%, respectively, with the measurements and within 5% with the MCNP5 calculations at depths >0.5 cm from the phantom surface. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) reaction rate represents the nitrogen and boron depth dose within 1%. Discrepancy in the SERA fast neutron dose calculation (of up to 37%) is corrected if the biased fast neutron dose calculation option is not applied. Reduced voxel cell size ({<=}0.5 cm) improves the SERA calculation accuracy on the phantom surface. Despite the slight overestimation of the epithermal neutrons and underestimation of the thermal neutrons in the beam model, neutron calculation accuracy with the SERA system is sufficient for reliable BNCT treatment planning with the two studied treatment distances. The discrepancy between measured and calculated photon dose remains unsatisfactorily high for depths >6 cm from the phantom surface. Increasing discrepancy along the phantom depth is expected to be caused by the inaccurately determined effective point of the ionization chamber.

  13. Influence of Parotid from Various Dose Rate in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Joo Wan; Jeong, Yun Ju; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Choi, Ji Hun; Seok, Jin Yong

    2010-01-01

    There are various beam parameter in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to investigate how various dose rate affect the parotid in treatment plan of IMRT. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who have undergone IMRT. CT images were scanned 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The parameters for planning used 6 MV energy and 8 beams under the same dose volume constraint. The variation of dose rates were used 300, 400, 500 MU/min. The mean dose of both parotid was accessed from the calculated planning among the 10 patients. The mean dose of parotid was verificated by 2D diode array (Mapcheck from Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, Florida). Also, Total monitor unit (MU) and beam-on time was analysed. Results: According to the dose rate, the mean dose of parotid was increased by 0.8%, 2.0% each, when dose rate was changed from 300 MU/min to 400, 500 MU/min, moreover Total MU was increased by 5.4% and 10.6% each. There was also a dose upward trend in the dose measurement of parotid by 2D diode array. However, beam - on time difference of 1-2 minutes was no significant in the dose rate increases. From this study, when the dose rates increase, there was a significant increase of Total MU and the parotid dose accordingly, however the shortened treatment time was not significant. Hence, it is considered that there is a significant decrease of late side effect in parotid radiation therapy, if the precise dose rate in IMRT is used.

  14. IMRT: Improvement in treatment planning efficiency using NTCP calculation independent of the dose-volume-histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorov, Grigor N.; Chow, James C.L.; Grigorov, Lenko; Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B.

    2006-01-01

    The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the dose-volume-histogram (DVH) which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Including the NTCP in the objective function for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization would make the planning more effective in reducing the postradiation effects. However, doing so would lengthen the total planning time. The purpose of this work is to establish a method for NTCP determination, independent of a DVH calculation, as a quality assurance check and also as a mean of improving the treatment planning efficiency. In the study, the CTs of ten randomly selected prostate patients were used. IMRT optimization was performed with a PINNACLE3 V 6.2b planning system, using planning target volume (PTV) with margins in the range of 2 to 10 mm. The DVH control points of the PTV and OAR were adapted from the prescriptions of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol P-0126 for an escalated prescribed dose of 82 Gy. This paper presents a new model for the determination of the rectal NTCP ( R NTCP). The method uses a special function, named GVN (from Gy, Volume, NTCP), which describes the R NTCP if 1 cm 3 of the volume of intersection of the PTV and rectum (R int ) is irradiated uniformly by a dose of 1 Gy. The function was 'geometrically' normalized using a prostate-prostate ratio (PPR) of the patients' prostates. A correction of the R NTCP for different prescribed doses, ranging from 70 to 82 Gy, was employed in our model. The argument of the normalized function is the R int , and parameters are the prescribed dose, prostate volume, PTV margin, and PPR. The R NTCPs of another group of patients were calculated by the new method and the resulting difference was <±5% in comparison to the NTCP calculated by the PINNACLE3 software where Kutcher's dose

  15. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (∼2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ∼2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the

  16. Fast dose planning Monte Carlo simulations in inhomogeneous phantoms submerged in uniform, static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez, R.; Dempsey, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    We present studies in support of the development of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) device for the treatment of cancer patients. Fast and accurate computation of the absorbed ionizing radiation dose delivered in the presence of the MRI magnetic field are required for clinical implementation. The fast Monte Carlo simulation code DPM, optimized for radiotherapy treatment planning, is modified to simulate absorbed doses in uniform, static magnetic fields, and benchmarked against PENELOPE. Simulations of dose deposition in inhomogeneous phantoms in which a low density material is sandwiched in water shows that a lower MRI field strength (0.3 T) is to prefer in order to avoid dose build-up near material boundaries. (authors)

  17. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  18. 324 Building life cycle dose estimates for planned work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, S.D.; Peterson, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a tool for use by organizational management teams to plan, manage, and oversee personnel exposures within their organizations. The report encompasses personnel radiation exposures received from activities associated with the B-Cell Cleanout Project, Surveillance and Maintenance Project, the Mk-42 Project, and other minor activities. It is designed to provide verifiable Radiological Performance Reports. The primary area workers receive radiation exposure is the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. Entry to the airlock is necessary for maintenance of cranes and other equipment, and to set up the rail system used to move large pieces of equipment and shipping casks into and out of the airlock. Transfers of equipment and materials from the hot cells in the complex to the airlock are required to allow dose profiles of waste containers, shuffling of waste containers to allow grouting activities to go on, and to allow maintenance of in-cell cranes. Both DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are currently investing in state-of-the-art decontamination equipment. Challenging goals for exposure reduction were established for several broad areas of activity. Exposure estimates and goals developed from these scheduled activities will be compared against actual exposures for scheduled and unscheduled activities that contributed to exposures received by personnel throughout the year. Included in this report are life cycle exposure estimates by calendar year for the B-Cell Cleanout project, a three-year estimate of exposures associated with Surveillance and Maintenance, and known activities for Calendar Year (CY) 1995 associated with several smaller projects. These reports are intended to provide a foundation for future dose estimates, by year, requiring updating as exposure conditions change or new avenues of approach to performing work are developed

  19. 324 Building life cycle dose estimates for planned work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsman, S.D.; Peterson, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a tool for use by organizational management teams to plan, manage, and oversee personnel exposures within their organizations. The report encompasses personnel radiation exposures received from activities associated with the B-Cell Cleanout Project, Surveillance and Maintenance Project, the Mk-42 Project, and other minor activities. It is designed to provide verifiable Radiological Performance Reports. The primary area workers receive radiation exposure is the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. Entry to the airlock is necessary for maintenance of cranes and other equipment, and to set up the rail system used to move large pieces of equipment and shipping casks into and out of the airlock. Transfers of equipment and materials from the hot cells in the complex to the airlock are required to allow dose profiles of waste containers, shuffling of waste containers to allow grouting activities to go on, and to allow maintenance of in-cell cranes. Both DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are currently investing in state-of-the-art decontamination equipment. Challenging goals for exposure reduction were established for several broad areas of activity. Exposure estimates and goals developed from these scheduled activities will be compared against actual exposures for scheduled and unscheduled activities that contributed to exposures received by personnel throughout the year. Included in this report are life cycle exposure estimates by calendar year for the B-Cell Cleanout project, a three-year estimate of exposures associated with Surveillance and Maintenance, and known activities for Calendar Year (CY) 1995 associated with several smaller projects. These reports are intended to provide a foundation for future dose estimates, by year, requiring updating as exposure conditions change or new avenues of approach to performing work are developed.

  20. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy; Avaliacao da homogeneidade e conformidade de dose em planejamentos de IMRT de prostata em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R., E-mail: juliane.lopes@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  1. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, X.; Penagaricano, J.; Zheng, D.; Morrill, S.; Zhang, X.; Corry, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Han, E. Y.; Hardee, M.; Ratanatharathom, V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 60 Gy with 12 Gy per fraction. The plans were initially optimized using AAA algorithm, and then were recomputed using AXB using the same MUs and MLC files to compare with the dose distribution of the original plans and assess the radiobiological as well as dosimetric impact of the two different dose algorithms. The Poisson Linear-Quadatric (PLQ) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models were used for estimating the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), respectively. The influence of the model parameter uncertainties on the TCP differences and the NTCP differences between AAA and AXB plans were studied by applying different sets of published model parameters. Patients were grouped into peripheral and centrally-located tumors to evaluate the impact of tumor location. PTV dose was lower in the re-calculated AXB plans, as compared to AAA plans. The median differences of PTV(D 95% ) were 1.7 Gy (range: 0.3, 6.5 Gy) and 1.0 Gy (range: 0.6, 4.4 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. The median differences of PTV(mean) were 0.4 Gy (range: 0.0, 1.9 Gy) and 0.9 Gy (range: 0.0, 4.3 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. TCP was also found lower in AXB-recalculated plans compared with the AAA plans. The median (range) of the TCP differences for 30 month local control were 1.6 % (0.3 %, 5.8 %) for peripheral tumors and 1.3 % (0.5 %, 3.4 %) for centrally located tumors. The lower

  2. Comparison of IMRT Treatment Plans Between Linac and Helical Tomotherapy Based on Integral Dose and Inhomogeneity Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Penagaricano, Jose; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2008-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technology for radiation therapy. There are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate IMRT plans. These plans may show different inhomogeneity indices to the planning target volume (PTV) and integral dose to organs at risk (OAR). In this study, we compared clinical cases covering different anatomical treatment sites, including head and neck, brain, lung, prostate, pelvis, and cranio-spinal axis. Two treatment plans were developed for each case using Pinnacle 3 and helical tomotherapy (HT) TPS. The inhomogeneity index of the PTV and the non-tumor integral dose (NTID) were calculated and compared for each case. Despite the difference in the number of effective beams, in several cases, NTID did not increase from HT as compared to the step-and-shoot delivery method. Six helical tomotherapy treatment plans for different treatment sites have been analyzed and compared against corresponding step-and-shoot plans generated with the Pinnacle 3 planning system. Results show that HT may produce plans with smaller integral doses to healthy organs, and fairly homogeneous doses to the target as compared to linac-based step-and-shoot IMRT planning in special treatment site such as cranio-spinal

  3. Feasibility of preference-driven radiotherapy dose treatment planning to support shared decision making in anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønde, Heidi S; Wee, Leonard; Pløen, John

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Chemo-radiotherapy is an established primary curative treatment for anal cancer, but clinically equal rationale for different target doses exists. If joint preferences (physician and patient) are used to determine acceptable tradeoffs in radiotherapy treatment planning, multipl...... that preference-informed dose planning is feasible for clinical studies utilizing shared decision making....... dose plans must be simultaneously explored. We quantified the degree to which different toxicity priorities might be incorporated into treatment plan selection, to elucidate the feasible decision space for shared decision making in anal cancer radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective plans.......7%-points; (0.3; 30.6); p decision space available in anal cancer radiotherapy to incorporate preferences, although tradeoffs are highly patient-dependent. This study demonstrates...

  4. Differences among doses for neuro-axis radiotherapy planning in the gonadal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.F de; Vilela, E.C.; Oliveira, F.L.; Filho, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy can disrupt the functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, directly causing ovarian deficiencies, such as the decrease in fertility or damage that renders the uterus incapable of accommodating the growth of a fetus. However, these issues have become increasingly important to a growing number of pediatric and adolescent cancer survivors. The whole-body, cranial-spinal axis, as well as abdomen and pelvic region irradiations may expose the ovaries to radiation and may cause premature ovarian failure, whereas doses above 35 Gy cranial can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary functions. This study performed a comparison of four doses of radiotherapy planning techniques for the neural axis. For this analysis, technical simulations were performed for the treatment of medulloblastoma in four different planning, applied in a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom and dosimeters (TLD-100). The radiation fields in the 1”st and 2”nd planning were 40 x 5 cm”2 and 17 x 5 cm”2 with 4.0 cm depth, in which doses were 0.03 and 0.05 Gy / day and 0.11 and 0.09 Gy / days, on the right and left sides, respectively. The 3”rd and 4”th measured planning 32 x 7 cm”2 and 18 x 7 cm”2, with a 2 cm gap and a 4.0 and 5.0 cm depth, in which doses were 1.08 and 0.2 Gy/day and 1.14 and 0.14 Gy/day, on the left and right sides, respectively. It could be observed that the doses in the ovaries in the 3”rd and 4”th schedules proved to be larger than the doses in the 1 s t and 2 n d planning. This is caused by the spinal field width and the depth of the second spinal field, which is 1.0 cm more than the field of the 1”st and 2”nd planning. These differences should be observed in image planning, as incorrect measures can cause damage in the treatment finish. (authors)

  5. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time

  6. Regional Resource Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas and electricity commodities are among the most volatile commodities in the world. Spurred on by the recent significant increases in the price of natural gas, the BC Utilities Commission initiated an investigation into factors impacting on natural gas prices, and the validity of the Sumas index (a market trading point, or interchange where multiple pipelines interconnect, allowing the purchase and sale of gas among market participants) as a price setting mechanism. The Commission also sought the opinions and perspectives of the the province's natural gas industry regarding the high volatility of the Sumas gas prices, and as to what could be done to alleviate the wild fluctuations. Following review of the responses from stakeholders, the Commission issued a directive to BC Gas to undertake discussions on regional resource planning with full representation from all stakeholders. This study is the result of the Commission's directive, and is intended to address the issues contained in the directives. Accordingly, the study examined gas demand in the region, demand growth, including power generation, natural gas resource balance in the region, the California impacts on demand and on supply to the region, supply shortfalls on a peak day, and on a seasonal and annual basis, near term remedies, possible resource additions in the longer term, the economic justification for adding major resources and proposed actions to develop needed resource additions. The study confirmed the existence of a growing capacity deficit, which limits the supply of natural gas to the region. Near term options to alleviate the regional capacity deficit were found to be limited to discouraging power generation from serving export markets, demand side management efforts, and expansion of the WEI's systems by 105 mmcf/d. Longer term solutions would involve larger scale expansion of WEI's T-South capacity, the BC Gas' Inland Pacific Connector Project and the Washington Lateral proposed by

  7. Technical aspects of the integration of three-dimensional treatment planning dose parameters (GEC-ESTRO Working Group) into pre-implant planning for LDR gynecological interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, A; Gao, M; Nguyen, N P; Albuquerque, K

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the technical feasibility of pre-implant image-based treatment planning for LDR GYN interstitial brachytherapy(IB) based on the GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Initially, a virtual plan is generated based on the prescription dose and GEC-ESTRO defined OAR dose constraints with a pre-implant CT. After the actual implant, a regular diagnostic CT was obtained and fused with our pre-implant scan/initial treatment plan in our planning software. The Flexi-needle position changes, and treatment plan modifications were made if needed. Dose values were normalized to equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (LQED 2 Gy) derived from the linear-quadratic model with alpha/beta of 3 for late responding tissues and alpha/beta of 10 for early responding tissues. D(90) to the CTV, which was gross tumor (GTV) at the time of brachytherapy with a margin to count for microscopic disease, was 84.7 +/- 4.9% of the prescribed dose. The OAR doses were evaluated by D(2cc) (EBRT+IB). Mean D(2cc) values (LQED(2Gy)) for the rectum, bladder, sigmoid, and small bowel were the following: 63.7 +/- 8.4 Gy, 61.2 +/- 6.9 Gy, 48.0 +/- 3.5 Gy, and 49.9 +/- 4.2 Gy. This study confirms the feasibility of applying the GEC-ESTRO recommended dose parameters in pre-implant CT-based treatment planning in GYN IB. In the process, this pre-implant technique also demonstrates a good approximation of the target volume dose coverage, and doses to the OARs.

  8. SU-F-T-378: Evaluation of Dose-Volume Variability and Parameters Between Prostate IMRT and VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jiang, R [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study compared the rectal dose-volume consistency, equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: For forty prostate IMRT and fifty VMAT patients treated using the same dose prescription (78 Gy/39 fraction) and dose-volume criteria in inverse planning optimization, the rectal EUD and NTCP were calculated for each patient. The rectal dose-volume consistency, showing the variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) among patients, was defined and calculated based on the deviation between the mean and corresponding rectal DVH. Results: From both the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans, the rectal EUD and NTCP were found decreasing with the rectal volume. The decrease rates for the IMRT plans (EUD = 0.47 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 3.94 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}) were higher than those for the VMAT (EUD = 0.28 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 2.61 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}). In addition, the dependences of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency were found very similar between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. This shows that both delivery techniques have similar variations of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency. Conclusion: Dependences of the dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were compared between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. It is concluded that both rectal EUD and NTCP decreased with an increase of the rectal volume. The variation rates of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the rectal volume were higher for the IMRT plans than VMAT. However, variations of the rectal dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were found not significant for both delivery techniques.

  9. Dose prescription and treatment planning based on FMISO-PET hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Antonovic, Laura; Uhrdin, Johan; Dasu, Alexandru; Nuyts, Sandra; Dirix, Piet; Haustermans, Karin; Brahme, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The study presents the implementation of a novel method for incorporating hypoxia information from PET-CT imaging into treatment planning and estimates the efficiency of various optimization approaches. Its focuses on the feasibility of optimizing treatment plans based on the non-linear conversion of PET hypoxia images into radiosensitivity maps from the uptake properties of the tracers used. Material and methods. PET hypoxia images of seven head-and-neck cancer patients were used to determine optimal dose distributions needed to counteract the radiation resistance associated with tumor hypoxia assuming various scenarios regarding the evolution of the hypoxic compartment during the treatment. A research planning system for advanced studies has been used to optimize IMRT plans based on hypoxia information from patient PET images. These resulting plans were compared in terms of target coverage for the same fulfilled constraints regarding the organs at risk. Results. The results of a planning study indicated the clinical feasibility of the proposed method for treatment planning based on PET hypoxia. Antihypoxic strategies would lead to small improvements in all the patients, but higher effects are expected for the fraction of patients with hypoxic tumors. For these, individualization of the treatment based on hypoxia PET imaging could lead to improved treatment outcome while creating the premises for limiting the irradiation of the surrounding normal tissues. Conclusions. The proposed approach offers the possibility of improved treatment results as it takes into consideration the heterogeneity and the dynamics of the hypoxic regions. It also provides early identification of the clinical cases that might benefit from dose escalation as well as the cases that could benefit from other counter-hypoxic measures

  10. Integrated task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, June 1992 through May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to representative individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to determine the project's appropriate scope: space, time, radionuclides, pathways and representative individuals; determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy/level of uncertainty in dose estimates; complete model and data development; and estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study and representative individuals. A major objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to the thyroid of individuals who were exposed to iodine-131. A principal pathway for many of these individuals was milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 released into the air from Hanford facilities. The plan for June 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on January 7--9, 1993 and February 25--26, 1993. The activities can be divided into three broad categories: (1) computer code and data development activities, (2) calculation of doses, and (3) technical and communication support to the TSP and the TSP Native American Working Group (NAWG). The following activities will be conducted to accomplish project objectives through May 1994

  11. SU-E-T-512: Evaluation of Treatment Planning Dose Calculation Accuracy at the Interface of Prosthetic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulu, D; Alaei, P

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of treatment planning algorithm to accurately predict dose delivered at the interface of high density implanted devices. A high density (7.6 g/cc) Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum hip prosthesis was molded into an epoxy-based cylindrical leg phantom. The phantom was designed to be separated in half to access the prosthesis and to place the TLDs. Using MVCT to image the apparatus, a simple treatment plan was developed using the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. Wires were placed in the molded epoxy to allow for accurate definition of measurement sites (TLD positions) along the surface of the prosthesis. Micro-cube TLDs (1 mm 3 ) were placed at six measurement locations for which the dose had been calculated by the treatment planning system. An Elekta Synergy linear accelerator was used to deliver a 400 cGy plan to the phantom with 6 MV photons in a single fraction. A total of four 10 cm × 21 cm fields were used at 0, 90, 180, and 270 degree gantry rotations. Initial results indicate that the measured dose is 7-17% lower than the dose calculated by the treatment planning system. Further study using high energy beams are also in progress. Initial results indicate that the treatment planning system does predict the dose near a high density prosthetic device within 10-15% but underestimates the dose. The results of this study could help in designing treatment plans which would reduce the uncertainty of the dose delivered in the vicinity of prosthetic hip implants and similar devices. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Dose intercomparison studies for standardization of high-dose dosimetry in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Hoang Hoa; Duong Nguyen Dinh; Kojima, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Irradiation Center of the Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (IC-VAEC) is planning to establish a traceability system for high-dose dosimetry and to provide high-dose standards as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) level in Vietnam. For countries which do not have a standard dosimetry laboratory, the participation in the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the most common means to verify own dosimetry performance with a certain uncertainty. This is, however, only one-direction dose intercomparison with evaluation by IAEA including unknown parameter at participant laboratories. The SSDL level laboratory should have traceability as well as compatibility, ability to evaluate uncertainties of its own dosimetry performance by itself In the present paper, we reviewed our dosimetry performance through two-way dose intercomparison studies and self-evaluation of uncertainty in our dosimetry procedure. The performance of silver dichromate dosimeter as reference transfer dosimeter in IC-VAEC was studied through two-way blind dose intercomparison experiments between the IC-VAEC and JAERI. As another channel of dose intercomparison with IAEA, alanine dosimeters issued by IDAS were simultaneously irradiated with the IC-VAEC dichromate dosimeters at IC-VAEC and analyzed by IAEA. Dose intercomparison between IC-VAEC and JAERI results into a good agreement (better than ±2.5%), and IDAS results also show similar agreement within ±3.0%. The uncertainty was self-estimated on the basis of the JAERI alanine dosimetry, and a preliminary value of about 1.86% at a 68% confidence level is established. The results from these intercomparisons and our estimation of the uncertainty are consistent. We hope that our experience is valuable to other countries which do not have dosimetry standard laboratories and/or are planning to establish them. (author)

  13. Interactive dose shaping - efficient strategies for CPU-based real-time treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, P; Kamerling, C P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is based on the traditional concept of iterative optimization using an objective function specified by dose volume histogram constraints for pre-segmented VOIs. This indirect approach suffers from unavoidable shortcomings: i) The control of local dose features is limited to segmented VOIs. ii) Any objective function is a mathematical measure of the plan quality, i.e., is not able to define the clinically optimal treatment plan. iii) Adapting an existing plan to changed patient anatomy as detected by IGRT procedures is difficult. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce the method of Interactive Dose Shaping (IDS) as a new paradigm for IMRT treatment planning. IDS allows for a direct and interactive manipulation of local dose features in real-time. The key element driving the IDS process is a two-step Dose Modification and Recovery (DMR) strategy: A local dose modification is initiated by the user which translates into modified fluence patterns. This also affects existing desired dose features elsewhere which is compensated by a heuristic recovery process. The IDS paradigm was implemented together with a CPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation and a 3D GUI for dose manipulation and visualization. A local dose feature can be implemented via the DMR strategy within 1-2 seconds. By imposing a series of local dose features, equal plan qualities could be achieved compared to conventional planning for prostate and head and neck cases within 1-2 minutes. The idea of Interactive Dose Shaping for treatment planning has been introduced and first applications of this concept have been realized.

  14. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Saenz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60 with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI allows for magnetic resonance (MR-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI, conformity index (CI, and volume receiving <20% of prescription dose (DRx were calculated to assess the plans. The 95% confidence intervals were recorded for all measurements and presented with the associated bars in graphs. The homogeneity index (D5/D95 had a 1-5% inhomogeneity increase for head and neck, 3-8% for lung, and 4-16% for prostate. CI revealed a modest conformity increase for lung. The volume receiving 20% of the prescription dose increased 2-8% for head and neck and up to 4% for lung and prostate. Overall, for head and neck Co-60 ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  15. Implementation of a safety action plan: reduction of the dose limits in a research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deworm, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Belgian Regulations require an annual Action Plan to improve the Safety and health conditions of works. Taking into consideration the preliminary versions of the new ICRP-recommendations, the 1990 Action Plan of the Belgian research Centre aimed to reduce the personal dose limit to 20 mSv/year and the annual collective dose by 10%. Major means used in the campaign were sensibility through information, consultation between hierarchy and executors and the application of a policy of discouragement at certain limits. As a result, the maximum level reaches was 16.5 mSv, while only 7 people received a dose above 10 mSv (of 219 who received a measurable dose, mean value 3,4 mSv). This success is due to the commitment at all levels of responsibilities. In 1991, the 20 mSv-limit is imposed as an obligation by the management, and a feasibility study to impose 10 mSv in near future is being undertaken. (author)

  16. A methodology to investigate the impact of image distortions on the radiation dose when using magnetic resonance images for planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yue; Yang, Jinzhong; Beddar, Sam; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Wen, Zhifei; Court, Laurence E.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Kadbi, Mo; Krishnan, Sunil; Fuller, Clifton D.; Frank, Steven J.; Yang, James; Balter, Peter; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Wang, Jihong

    2018-04-01

    We developed a novel technique to study the impact of geometric distortion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. The measured 3D datasets of residual geometric distortion (a 1.5 T MRI component of an MRI linear accelerator system) was fitted with a second-order polynomial model to map the spatial dependence of geometric distortions. Then the geometric distortion model was applied to computed tomography (CT) image and structure data to simulate the distortion of MRI data and structures. Fourteen CT-based treatment plans were selected from patients treated for gastrointestinal, genitourinary, thoracic, head and neck, or spinal tumors. Plans based on the distorted CT and structure data were generated (as the distorted plans). Dose deviations of the distorted plans were calculated and compared with the original plans to study the dosimetric impact of MRI distortion. The MRI geometric distortion led to notable dose deviations in five of the 14 patients, causing loss of target coverage of up to 3.68% and dose deviations to organs at risk in three patients, increasing the mean dose to the chest wall by up to 6.19 Gy in a gastrointestinal patient, and increases the maximum dose to the lung by 5.17 Gy in a thoracic patient.

  17. SU-F-T-381: Fast Calculation of Three-Dimensional Dose Considering MLC Leaf Positional Errors for VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuta, Y [Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendal, Miyagi (Japan); Kadoya, N; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendal, Miyagi (Japan); Shimizu, E; Majima, K [Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we developed a system to calculate three dimensional (3D) dose that reflects dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration for head and neck and prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) without additional treatment planning system calculation on real time. Methods: An original system called clarkson dose calculation based dosimetric error calculation to calculate dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration was developed by MATLAB (Math Works, Natick, MA). Our program, first, calculates point doses at isocenter for baseline and modified VMAT plan, which generated by inducing MLC errors that enlarged aperture size of 1.0 mm with clarkson dose calculation. Second, error incuced 3D dose was generated with transforming TPS baseline 3D dose using calculated point doses. Results: Mean computing time was less than 5 seconds. For seven head and neck and prostate plans, between our method and TPS calculated error incuced 3D dose, the 3D gamma passing rates (0.5%/2 mm, global) are 97.6±0.6% and 98.0±0.4%. The dose percentage change with dose volume histogram parameter of mean dose on target volume were 0.1±0.5% and 0.4±0.3%, and with generalized equivalent uniform dose on target volume were −0.2±0.5% and 0.2±0.3%. Conclusion: The erroneous 3D dose calculated by our method is useful to check dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration before pre treatment patient QA dosimetry checks.

  18. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Bayouth, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving 60 Co ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system. (author)

  19. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Bayouth, John E

    2014-04-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  20. Feasibility of dose planning using CBCT images combined with MSCT images for adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Keisuke; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ogawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    If a kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system mounted on a linear accelerator becomes available for dose calculation, we can confirm the dose distribution of treatment in each day by referring it to the initially planned dose distribution. In this paper, we verified the validity of the calculation method using CBCT images combined with multi-slice CT images. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated dose distribution, γ analysis, distance-to-agreement analysis and dose-volume-histogram analysis were used as the conventional dose calculation methods using CBCT images. The results showed that the dose distribution calculated by our proposed method agreed with the initial treatment plan better compared with the other methods. In addition, our method was so stable that the calculated dose distribution was insensitive to variations in clinical conditions. We demonstrated the feasibility of our proposed method for adaptive radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT rectal and anal canal plans generated using an anterior dose avoidance structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicher, Brian, E-mail: bleicher@wpahs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Day, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    To describe a dosimetric method using an anterior dose avoidance structure (ADAS) during the treatment planning process for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with anal canal and rectal carcinomas. A total of 20 patients were planned on the Elekta/CMS XiO treatment planning system, version 4.5.1 (Maryland Heights MO) with a superposition algorithm. For each patient, 2 plans were created: one employing an ADAS (ADAS plan) and the other replanned without an ADAS (non-ADAS plan). The ADAS was defined to occupy the volume between the inguinal nodes and primary target providing a single organ at risk that is completely outside of the target volume. Each plan used the same beam parameters and was analyzed by comparing target coverage, overall plan dose conformity using a conformity number (CN) equation, bowel dose-volume histograms, and the number of segments, daily treatment duration, and global maximum dose. The ADAS and non-ADAS plans were equivalent in target coverage, mean global maximum dose, and sparing of small bowel in low-dose regions (5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy). The mean difference between the CN value for the non-ADAS plans and ADAS plans was 0.04 ± 0.03 (p < 0.001). The mean difference in the number of segments was 15.7 ± 12.7 (p < 0.001) in favor of ADAS plans. The ADAS plan delivery time was shorter by 2.0 ± 1.5 minutes (p < 0.001) than the non-ADAS one. The ADAS has proven to be a powerful tool when planning rectal and anal canal IMRT cases with critical structures partially contained inside the target volume.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT rectal and anal canal plans generated using an anterior dose avoidance structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicher, Brian; Day, Ellen; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To describe a dosimetric method using an anterior dose avoidance structure (ADAS) during the treatment planning process for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with anal canal and rectal carcinomas. A total of 20 patients were planned on the Elekta/CMS XiO treatment planning system, version 4.5.1 (Maryland Heights MO) with a superposition algorithm. For each patient, 2 plans were created: one employing an ADAS (ADAS plan) and the other replanned without an ADAS (non-ADAS plan). The ADAS was defined to occupy the volume between the inguinal nodes and primary target providing a single organ at risk that is completely outside of the target volume. Each plan used the same beam parameters and was analyzed by comparing target coverage, overall plan dose conformity using a conformity number (CN) equation, bowel dose-volume histograms, and the number of segments, daily treatment duration, and global maximum dose. The ADAS and non-ADAS plans were equivalent in target coverage, mean global maximum dose, and sparing of small bowel in low-dose regions (5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy). The mean difference between the CN value for the non-ADAS plans and ADAS plans was 0.04 ± 0.03 (p < 0.001). The mean difference in the number of segments was 15.7 ± 12.7 (p < 0.001) in favor of ADAS plans. The ADAS plan delivery time was shorter by 2.0 ± 1.5 minutes (p < 0.001) than the non-ADAS one. The ADAS has proven to be a powerful tool when planning rectal and anal canal IMRT cases with critical structures partially contained inside the target volume

  5. SU-E-T-370: Evaluating Plan Quality and Dose Delivery Accuracy of Tomotherapy SBRT Treatments for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, S; Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hansen, C [Odense University Hospital, Odense C (Denmark); Deshpande, S; Phan, P; Franji, I [Liverpool & Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Holloway, L [Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated the plan quality and dose delivery accuracy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) helical Tomotherapy (HT) treatments for lung cancer. Results were compared with those previously reported by our group for flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) VMAT treatments. This work forms part of an ongoing multicentre and multisystem planning and dosimetry audit on FFF beams for lung SBRT. Methods: CT datasets and DICOM RT structures delineating the target volume and organs at risk for 6 lung cancer patients were selected. Treatment plans were generated using the HT treatment planning system. Tumour locations were classified as near rib, near bronchial tree or in free lung with prescribed doses of 48Gy/4fr, 50Gy/5fr and 54Gy/3fr respectively. Dose constraints were specified by a modified RTOG0915 protocol used for an Australian SBRT phase II trial. Plan quality was evaluated using mean PTV dose, PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100%), target conformity (CI=VD100%/VPTV) and low dose spillage (LDS=VD50%/VPTV). Planned dose distributions were compared to those measured using an ArcCheck phantom. Delivery accuracy was evaluated using a gamma-index pass rate of 95% with 3% (of max dose) and 3mm criteria. Results: Treatment plans for all patients were clinically acceptable in terms of quality and accuracy of dose delivery. The following DVH metrics are reported as averages (SD) of all plans investigated: mean PTV dose was 115.3(2.4)% of prescription, V100% was 98.8(0.9)%, CI was 1.14(0.03) and LDS was 5.02(0.37). The plans had an average gamma-index passing rate of 99.3(1.3)%. Conclusion: The results reported in this study for HT agree within 1 SD to those previously published by our group for VMAT FF and FFF lung SBRT treatments. This suggests that HT delivers lung SBRT treatments of comparable quality and delivery accuracy as VMAT using both FF and FFF beams.

  6. Integrated Task Plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, FY 1992 through May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to (1) determine the project's appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups), (2) determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project, (3) complete model and data development, and (4) estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), representative individuals, and special populations as described herein. The plan for FY 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on August 19--20, 1991, and April 23--25, 1992. The activities can be divided into four broad categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2)additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4)technical and communication support

  7. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth@mebrown.net [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Cray, Alison [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Chander, Sarat [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Lin, Robert [Medica Oncology, Hurstville, New South Wales (Australia); Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael [Radiation Oncology Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  8. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure.

  9. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong

    2013-01-01

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure

  10. Estimation of pneumonitis risk in three-dimensional treatment planning using dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetzel, Dieter; Schraube, Peter; Hensley, Frank; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Menke, Markus; Flentje, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Investigations to study correlations between the estimations of biophysical models in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and clinical observations are scarce. The development of clinically symptomatic pneumonitis in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignomas was chosen to test the predictive power of Lyman's normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the assessment of side effects for nonuniform irradiation. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective analysis individual computed-tomography-based 3D dose distributions of a random sample of (46(20)) patients with lung/esophageal cancer were reconstructed. All patients received tumor doses between 50 and 60 Gy in a conventional treatment schedule. Biological isoeffective dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were used for the calculation of complication probabilities after applying Lyman's and Kutcher's DVH-reduction algorithm. Lung dose statistics were performed for single lung (involved ipsilateral and contralateral) and for the lung as a paired organ. Results: In the lung cancer group, about 20% of the patients (9 out of 46) developed pneumonitis 3-12 (median 7.5) weeks after completion of radiotherapy. For the majority of these lung cancer patients, the involved ipsilateral lung received a much higher dose than the contralateral lung, and the pneumonitis patients had on average a higher lung exposure with a doubling of the predicted complication risk (38% vs. 20%). The lower lung exposure for the esophagus patients resulted in a mean lung dose of 13.2 Gy (lung cancer: 20.5 Gy) averaged over all patients in correlation with an almost zero complication risk and only one observed case of pneumonitis (1 out of 20). To compare the pneumonitis risk estimations with observed complication rates, the patients were ranked into bins of mean ipsilateral lung dose. Particularly, in the bins with the highest patient numbers, a good correlation was achieved. Agreement was not reached for the lung functioning as

  11. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knoeoes, Tommy

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox(a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants

  12. Treatment planning using MRI data: an analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Mikael

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of superior soft tissue contrast, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a complement to computed tomography (CT in the target definition procedure for radiotherapy is increasing. To keep the workflow simple and cost effective and to reduce patient dose, it is natural to strive for a treatment planning procedure based entirely on MRI. In the present study, we investigate the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions when using bulk density assignments on MRI data and compare it to treatment planning that uses CT data. Methods MR and CT data were collected retrospectively for 40 patients with prostate, lung, head and neck, or brain cancers. Comparisons were made between calculations on CT data with and without inhomogeneity corrections and on MRI or CT data with bulk density assignments. The bulk densities were assigned using manual segmentation of tissue, bone, lung, and air cavities. Results The deviations between calculations on CT data with inhomogeneity correction and on bulk density assigned MR data were small. The maximum difference in the number of monitor units required to reach the prescribed dose was 1.6%. This result also includes effects of possible geometrical distortions. Conclusions The dose calculation accuracy at the investigated treatment sites is not significantly compromised when using MRI data when adequate bulk density assignments are made. With respect to treatment planning, MRI can replace CT in all steps of the treatment workflow, reducing the radiation exposure to the patient, removing any systematic registration errors that may occur when combining MR and CT, and decreasing time and cost for the extra CT investigation.

  13. SU-E-J-228: MRI-Based Planning: Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Painting for ADCDefined Intra-Prostatic Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Prior, P; Lawton, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map may help to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in prostate gland. Dose painting with external beam radiotherapy for GTV might increase the local tumor control. The purpose of this study is to explore the maximum boosting dose on GTV using VMAT without sacrificing sparing of organs at risk (OARs) in MRI based planning. Methods: VMAT plans for 5 prostate patients were generated following the commonly used dose volume (DV) criteria based on structures contoured on T2 weighted MRI with bulk electron density assignment using electron densities derived from ICRU46. GTV for each patient was manually delineated based on ADC maps and fused to T2-weighted image set for planning study. A research planning system with Monte Carlo dose engine (Monaco, Elekta) was used to generate the VMAT plans with boosting dose on GTV gradually increased from 85Gy to 100Gy. DV parameters, including V(boosting-dose) (volume covered by boosting dose) for GTV, V75.6Gy for PTV, V45Gy, V70Gy, V72Gy and D1cc (Maximum dose to 1cc volume) for rectum and bladder, were used to measure plan quality. Results: All cases achieve at least 99.0% coverage of V(boosting-dose) on GTV and 95% coverage of V75.6Gy to the PTV. All the DV criteria, V45Gy≤50% and V70Gy≤15% for bladder and rectum, D1cc ≤77Gy (Rectum) and ≤80Gy (Bladder), V72Gy≤5% (rectum and bladder) were maintained when boosting GTV to 95Gy for all cases studied. Except for two patients, all the criteria were also met when the boosting dose goes to 100Gy. Conclusion: It is dosimetrically feasible safe to boost the dose to at least 95Gy to ADC defined GTV in prostate cancer using MRI guided VMAT delivery. Conclusion: It is dosimetrically feasible safe to boost the dose to at least 95Gy to ADC defined GTV in prostate cancer using MRI guided VMAT delivery. This research is partially supported by Elekta Inc.

  14. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in μSv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  15. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  16. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2005-01-01

    .... Because of the tacit ignorance of intra-structural tradeoff, the IMRT plans generated by these systems for prostate treatment are, at best, sub-optimal and our endeavor of providing the best possible...

  17. Inverse optimization of objective function weights for treatment planning using clinical dose-volume histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babier, Aaron; Boutilier, Justin J.; Sharpe, Michael B.; McNiven, Andrea L.; Chan, Timothy C. Y.

    2018-05-01

    We developed and evaluated a novel inverse optimization (IO) model to estimate objective function weights from clinical dose-volume histograms (DVHs). These weights were used to solve a treatment planning problem to generate ‘inverse plans’ that had similar DVHs to the original clinical DVHs. Our methodology was applied to 217 clinical head and neck cancer treatment plans that were previously delivered at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Canada. Inverse plan DVHs were compared to the clinical DVHs using objective function values, dose-volume differences, and frequency of clinical planning criteria satisfaction. Median differences between the clinical and inverse DVHs were within 1.1 Gy. For most structures, the difference in clinical planning criteria satisfaction between the clinical and inverse plans was at most 1.4%. For structures where the two plans differed by more than 1.4% in planning criteria satisfaction, the difference in average criterion violation was less than 0.5 Gy. Overall, the inverse plans were very similar to the clinical plans. Compared with a previous inverse optimization method from the literature, our new inverse plans typically satisfied the same or more clinical criteria, and had consistently lower fluence heterogeneity. Overall, this paper demonstrates that DVHs, which are essentially summary statistics, provide sufficient information to estimate objective function weights that result in high quality treatment plans. However, as with any summary statistic that compresses three-dimensional dose information, care must be taken to avoid generating plans with undesirable features such as hotspots; our computational results suggest that such undesirable spatial features were uncommon. Our IO-based approach can be integrated into the current clinical planning paradigm to better initialize the planning process and improve planning efficiency. It could also be embedded in a knowledge-based planning or adaptive radiation therapy framework to

  18. A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Florin

    2012-06-01

    To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E+IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E+IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E+IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E+IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery hardware, a mixed electron/photon planning

  19. Evaluation of an electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Eve; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm included in a commercial treatment planning system and compare its performance against an electron pencil beam algorithm. Several tests were performed to explore the system's behavior in simple geometries and in configurations encountered in clinical practice. The first series of tests were executed in a homogeneous water phantom, where experimental measurements and eMC-calculated dose distributions were compared for various combinations of energy and applicator. More specifically, we compared beam profiles and depth-dose curves at different source-to-surface distances (SSDs) and gantry angles, by using dose difference and distance to agreement. Also, we compared output factors, we studied the effects of algorithm input parameters, which are the random number generator seed, as well as the calculation grid size, and we performed a calculation time evaluation. Three different inhomogeneous solid phantoms were built, using high- and low-density materials inserts, to clinically simulate relevant heterogeneity conditions: a small air cylinder within a homogeneous phantom, a lung phantom, and a chest wall phantom. We also used an anthropomorphic phantom to perform comparison of eMC calculations to measurements. Finally, we proceeded with an evaluation of the eMC algorithm on a clinical case of nose cancer. In all mentioned cases, measurements, carried out by means of XV-2 films, radiographic films or EBT2 Gafchromic films. were used to compare eMC calculations with dose distributions obtained from an electron pencil beam algorithm. eMC calculations in the water phantom were accurate. Discrepancies for depth-dose curves and beam profiles were under 2.5% and 2 mm. Dose calculations with eMC for the small air cylinder and the lung phantom agreed within 2% and 4%, respectively. eMC calculations for the chest wall phantom and the anthropomorphic phantom also

  20. Intercomparison of radiotherapy treatment planning systems using calculated and measured dose distributions for external photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.; Jaervinen, H.; Vatnitskij, S.; Ermakov, I.; Chervjakov, A.; Kulmala, J.; Pitkaenen, M.; Vaeyrynen, T.; Vaeaenaenen, A.

    1991-02-01

    The requirement of 5 % overall accuracy for the target absorbed dose in radiotherapy implies that the accuracy of the relative dose calculation should be within only a few per cent. According to the recommendation by the International Commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU), a computer-produced dose distribution can be considered to be accurate enough if it differs from the results of relative dose measurements by less than 2 %, or 2 mm in the position of isodose curves involving very steep dose gradients. In this study five treatment planning systems, currently used by the hospitals in Finland or in the USSR, were intercompared with respect to the above requirement. Five typical cases of irradiation were selected: regular fields, oblique incidence, irregular field, wedge field and inhomogeneity in a water equivalent phantom. Complete dose distributions were used for the intercomparison, and the beam data for each TPS was that pertaining to the beam where the comparative relative measurements were performed. The results indicate that the dose distributions produced by different TPS:s can differ from each other as well as from the measured dose distributions up to a level which is not acceptable in terms of the above requirement. Greatest differences seem to be related to the omission or undue consideration of the scatter components of the beam. A suitable quality assurance program for the systematic testing of the performance of the treatment planning systems could be based on a selection of tests as used in this study.(orig.)

  1. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  2. Dose-volume histograms for optimization of treatment plans illustrated by the example of oesophagus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Huenig, R.; Huegli, C.

    1995-01-01

    Using the example of oesophagus carcinoma, dose-volume histograms for diverse treatment techniques are calculated and judged by means of multiplanar isodose representations. The selected treatment plans are ranked with the aid of the dose-volume histograms. We distinguish the tissue inside and outside of the target volume. The description of the spatial dose distribution in dependence of the different volumes and the respective fractions of the tumor dose therein with the help of dose-volume histograms brings about a correlation between the physical parameters and the biological effects. In addition one has to bear in mind the consequences of measures that influence the reaction and the side-effects of radiotherapy (e.g. chemotherapy), i.e. the recuperation of the tissues that were irradiated intentionally or inevitably. Taking all that into account it is evident that the dose-volume histograms are a powerful tool for assessing the quality of treatment plans. (orig./MG) [de

  3. SU-F-T-403: Impact of Dose Reduction for Simulation CT On Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Q; Shah, P; Li, S; Miyamoto, C [Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of applying ALARA principles to current treatment planning CT scans. The study aims to quantitatively verify lower dose scans does not alter treatment planning. Method: Gammex 467 tissue characterization phantom with inserts of 14 different materials was scanned at seven different mA levels (30∼300 mA). CT numbers of different inserts were measured. Auto contouring for bone and lung in treatment planning system (Pinnacle) was used to evaluate the effect of CT number accuracy from treatment planning aspect, on the 30 and 300 mA-scanned images. A head CT scan intended for a 3D whole brain radiation treatment was evaluated. Dose calculations were performed on normal scanned images using clinical protocol (120 kVP, Smart mA, maximum 291 mA), and the images with added simulating noise mimicking a 70 mA scan. Plan parameters including isocenter, beam arrangements, block shapes, dose grid size and resolution, and prescriptions were kept the same for these two plans. The calculated monitor units (MUs) for these two plans were compared. Results: No significant degradation of CT number accuracy was found at lower dose levels from both the phantom scans, and the patient images with added noise. The CT numbers kept consistent when mA is higher than 60 mA. The auto contoured volumes for lung and cortical bone show 0.3% and 0.12% of differences between 30 mA and 300 mA respectively. The two forward plans created on regular and low dose images gave the same calculated MU, and 98.3% of points having <1% of dose difference. Conclusion: Both phantom and patient studies quantitatively verified low dose CT provides similar quality for treatment planning at 20–25% of regular scan dose. Therefore, there is the potential to optimize simulation CT scan protocol to fulfil the ALARA principle and limit unnecessary radiation exposure to non-targeted tissues.

  4. Optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning thanks to a fast dose calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mingchao

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the radiotherapy treatments planning issue which need a fast and reliable treatment planning system (TPS). The TPS is composed of a dose calculation algorithm and an optimization method. The objective is to design a plan to deliver the dose to the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy and sensitive tissues. The treatment planning aims to determine the best suited radiation parameters for each patient's treatment. In this thesis, the parameters of treatment with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) are the beam angle and the beam intensity. The objective function is multi-criteria with linear constraints. The main objective of this thesis is to demonstrate the feasibility of a treatment planning optimization method based on a fast dose-calculation technique developed by (Blanpain, 2009). This technique proposes to compute the dose by segmenting the patient's phantom into homogeneous meshes. The dose computation is divided into two steps. The first step impacts the meshes: projections and weights are set according to physical and geometrical criteria. The second step impacts the voxels: the dose is computed by evaluating the functions previously associated to their mesh. A reformulation of this technique makes possible to solve the optimization problem by the gradient descent algorithm. The main advantage of this method is that the beam angle parameters could be optimized continuously in 3 dimensions. The obtained results in this thesis offer many opportunities in the field of radiotherapy treatment planning optimization. (author) [fr

  5. Radiation dose measurement in gastrointestinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Elzaki, M.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Barium studies investigations (barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema) are the basic routine radiological examination, where barium sulphate suspension is introduced to enhance image contrast of gastrointestinal tracts. The aim of this study was to quantify the patients' radiation doses during barium studies and to estimate the organ equivalent dose and effective dose with those procedures. A total of 33 investigations of barium studies were measured by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The result showed that the patient entrance surface doses were 12.6±10, 44.5±49 and 35.7±50 mGy for barium swallow, barium meal, follow through and enema, respectively. Effective doses were 0.2, 0.35 and 1.4 mSv per procedure for barium swallow, meal and enema respectively. Radiation doses were comparable with the previous studies. A written protocol for each procedure will reduce the inter-operator variations and will help to reduce unnecessary exposure. (authors)

  6. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments. VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤ 8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D99%), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found. For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the 4DCT, the interplay effect

  7. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D 99% ), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the

  8. Socioeconomic Site Study Plan: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    Social and economic issues and concerns of the Deak Smith County site area will be evaluated during site characterization. Effects that the area could experience from a repository project include demographic, economic, community service, fiscal, and social impacts. The Socioeconomic Site Study Plan is designed to provide a strategy to assess the potential for those impacts. The Socioeconomic Site Study Plan is structured to provide an overview of the socioeconomic program requirements, objectives, and activities to be conducted during site characterization. This report will describe the study design and its rationale; data collection, management, and reporting; program schedules and milestones; site study organization and management; and quality assurance issues. 43 refs

  9. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192 Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate

  10. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  11. Assessment of I-125 seed implant accuracy when using the live-planning technique for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorrees Joshua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low risk prostate cancers are commonly treated with low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy involving I-125 seeds. The implementation of a ‘live-planning’ technique at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH in 2007 enabled the completion of the whole procedure (i.e. scanning, planning and implant in one sitting. ‘Live-planning’ has the advantage of a more reliable delivery of the planned treatment compared to the ‘traditional pre-plan’ technique (where patient is scanned and planned in the weeks prior to implant. During live planning, the actual implanted needle positions are updated real-time on the treatment planning system and the dosimetry is automatically recalculated. The aim of this investigation was to assess the differences and clinical relevance between the planned dosimetry and the updated real-time implant dosimetry. Methods A number of 162 patients were included in this dosimetric study. A paired t-test was performed on the D90, V100, V150 and V200 target parameters and the differences between the planned and implanted dose distributions were analysed. Similarly, dosimetric differences for the organs at risk (OAR were also evaluated. Results Small differences between the primary dosimetric parameters for the target were found. Still, the incidence of hotspots was increased with approximately 20% for V200. Statistically significant increases were observed in the doses delivered to the OAR between the planned and implanted data; however, these increases were consistently below 3% thus probably without clinical consequences. Conclusions The current study assessed the accuracy of prostate implants with I-125 seeds when compared to initial plans. The results confirmed the precision of the implant technique which RAH has in place. Nevertheless, geographical misses, anatomical restrictions and needle displacements during implant can have repercussions for centres without live-planning option if dosimetric changes are not

  12. Evaluation tests of treatment planning systems concerning 3D dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonian-Sauve, M.; Smart, C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of irradiation techniques in radiotherapy shows a clear tendency towards the systematic use of three-dimensional (3D) information. Great efforts are being made to set up 3D conformal radiotherapy. Consequently, in the aim of greater coherence and accuracy, 'the dosimetric tool' must also meet the requirements of 3D radiotherapy, as it plays a role in the treatment chain. To know if the treatment planning system is a '3D', '2D', or even '1D' system, one should not be satisfied with reading the technical documentation and the program algorithm description not entirely trust the constructor's assertions. It is essential to clearly and precisely evaluate the possibilities of the treatment planning system. Even if it is proved not to satisfy perfectly all the tests which would qualify it as a real 3D calculation system, the study of the test results helps to give clear explanations of the dosimetric results. Two series of test cases are proposed. The first series allows us to understand in which conditions the treatment planning system takes into account the scatter influence in a volume. The second series is designed to inform us about the capacity of the dose calculation algorithm when the medium encloses non-homogeneities. These test cases do not constitute an exhaustive 'check-list' able to tackle completely the question of 3D calculation. They are submitted as examples and should be considered as an evaluation methodology for the software implanted in the treatment planning system. (authors)

  13. SU-D-BRD-01: Cloud-Based Radiation Treatment Planning: Performance Evaluation of Dose Calculation and Plan Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Y; Kapp, D; Kim, Y; Xing, L; Suh, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the first experience on the development of a cloud-based treatment planning system and investigate the performance improvement of dose calculation and treatment plan optimization of the cloud computing platform. Methods: A cloud computing-based radiation treatment planning system (cc-TPS) was developed for clinical treatment planning. Three de-identified clinical head and neck, lung, and prostate cases were used to evaluate the cloud computing platform. The de-identified clinical data were encrypted with 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm. VMAT and IMRT plans were generated for the three de-identified clinical cases to determine the quality of the treatment plans and computational efficiency. All plans generated from the cc-TPS were compared to those obtained with the PC-based TPS (pc-TPS). The performance evaluation of the cc-TPS was quantified as the speedup factors for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and large-scale plan optimizations, as well as the performance ratios (PRs) of the amount of performance improvement compared to the pc-TPS. Results: Speedup factors were improved up to 14.0-fold dependent on the clinical cases and plan types. The computation times for VMAT and IMRT plans with the cc-TPS were reduced by 91.1% and 89.4%, respectively, on average of the clinical cases compared to those with pc-TPS. The PRs were mostly better for VMAT plans (1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.6 for the head and neck case, 1.2 ≤ PRs ≤ 13.3 for lung case, and 1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.3 for prostate cancer cases) than for IMRT plans. The isodose curves of plans on both cc-TPS and pc-TPS were identical for each of the clinical cases. Conclusion: A cloud-based treatment planning has been setup and our results demonstrate the computation efficiency of treatment planning with the cc-TPS can be dramatically improved while maintaining the same plan quality to that obtained with the pc-TPS. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute (1

  14. SU-D-BRD-01: Cloud-Based Radiation Treatment Planning: Performance Evaluation of Dose Calculation and Plan Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Y; Kapp, D; Kim, Y; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Suh, T [Catholic UniversityMedical College, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report the first experience on the development of a cloud-based treatment planning system and investigate the performance improvement of dose calculation and treatment plan optimization of the cloud computing platform. Methods: A cloud computing-based radiation treatment planning system (cc-TPS) was developed for clinical treatment planning. Three de-identified clinical head and neck, lung, and prostate cases were used to evaluate the cloud computing platform. The de-identified clinical data were encrypted with 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm. VMAT and IMRT plans were generated for the three de-identified clinical cases to determine the quality of the treatment plans and computational efficiency. All plans generated from the cc-TPS were compared to those obtained with the PC-based TPS (pc-TPS). The performance evaluation of the cc-TPS was quantified as the speedup factors for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and large-scale plan optimizations, as well as the performance ratios (PRs) of the amount of performance improvement compared to the pc-TPS. Results: Speedup factors were improved up to 14.0-fold dependent on the clinical cases and plan types. The computation times for VMAT and IMRT plans with the cc-TPS were reduced by 91.1% and 89.4%, respectively, on average of the clinical cases compared to those with pc-TPS. The PRs were mostly better for VMAT plans (1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.6 for the head and neck case, 1.2 ≤ PRs ≤ 13.3 for lung case, and 1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.3 for prostate cancer cases) than for IMRT plans. The isodose curves of plans on both cc-TPS and pc-TPS were identical for each of the clinical cases. Conclusion: A cloud-based treatment planning has been setup and our results demonstrate the computation efficiency of treatment planning with the cc-TPS can be dramatically improved while maintaining the same plan quality to that obtained with the pc-TPS. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute (1

  15. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    fLJ and at each step, we find the minimizer u,\\ of J’. The Euler-Lagrange equation for the regularized J’ functional is u- div ( 1 Vu )= f E S1,2A...GD, Agazaryan N, Solberg TD . 2003. The effects of tumor motion on planning and delivery of respiratory-gated IMRT. Med Phys 30:1052-1066. Jaffray DA...modulated) radiation therapy: a review. Phys Med Biol 51 :R403-425. Wink NM, McNitt-Gray MF, Solberg TD . 2005. Optimization of multi-slice helical

  16. Evaluation of concave dose distributions created using an inverse planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, Margie A.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Spirou, Spirodon V.; Chui, C.-S.; Amols, Howard I.; Ling, Clifton C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop optimum inverse treatment planning strategies for the treatment of concave targets adjacent to normal tissue structures. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions were designed using an idealized geometry consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a concave kidney-shaped target (PTV) and cylindrical normal tissues (NT) placed 5-13 mm from the target. Targets with radii of curvature from 1 to 2.75 cm were paired with normal tissues with radii between 0.5 and 2.25 cm. The target was constrained to a prescription dose of 100% and minimum and maximum doses of 95% and 105% with relative penalties of 25. Maximum dose constraint parameters for the NT varied from 10% to 70% with penalties from 10 to 1000. Plans were evaluated using the PTV uniformity index (PTV D max /PTV D 95 ) and maximum normal tissue doses (NT D max /PTV D 95 ). Results: In nearly all situations, the achievable PTV uniformity index and the maximum NT dose exceeded the corresponding constraints. This was particularly true for small PTV-NT separations (5-8 mm) or strict NT dose constraints (10%-30%), where the achievable doses differed from the requested by 30% or more. The same constraint parameters applied to different PTV-NT separations yielded different dose distributions. For most geometries, a range of constraints could be identified that would lead to acceptable plans. The optimization results were fairly independent of beam energy and radius of curvature, but improved as the number of beams increased, particularly for small PTV-NT separations or strict dose constraints. Conclusion: Optimized dose distributions are strongly affected by both the constraint parameters and target-normal tissue geometry. Standard site-specific constraint templates can serve as a starting point for optimization, but the final constraints must be determined iteratively for individual patients. A strategy whereby NT constraints and penalties are modified until the highest

  17. Mathematical simulation of dose fields in the planning of repair stuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, O.L.; Shcheklein, S.E.; Markelov, N.I.

    2004-01-01

    The role of planning stage in the cycle of optimization when organizing repair works at NPPs is discussed. The methods used for forecasting irradiation doses for personnel engaged in repair works are considered. The importance of the problems of simulating the doses connected with estimation of dose rate values in different points of the working area and working time period in corresponding radiation fields is shown. The calculated data on distributions of γ radiation dose rate fields from surface and linear sources are given [ru

  18. The impact of dose calculation algorithms on partial and whole breast radiation treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basran, Parminder S; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Berrang, Tanya; Olivotto, Ivo A; Beckham, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the calculated dose to target and normal tissues when using pencil beam (PBC), superposition/convolution (AAA) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for whole breast (WBI) and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) treatment plans. Plans for 10 patients who met all dosimetry constraints on a prospective APBI protocol when using PBC calculations were recomputed with AAA and MC, keeping the monitor units and beam angles fixed. Similar calculations were performed for WBI plans on the same patients. Doses to target and normal tissue volumes were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test. For WBI plans the average dose to target volumes when using PBC calculations was not significantly different than AAA calculations, the average PBC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 10.5% higher than the AAA calculations and the average MC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 11.8% lower than the PBC calculations. For ABPI plans there were no differences in dose to the planning target volume, ipsilateral breast, heart, ipsilateral lung, or contra-lateral lung. Although not significant, the maximum PBC dose to the contra-lateral breast was 1.9% higher than AAA and the PBC dose to the clinical target volume was 2.1% higher than AAA. When WBI technique is switched to APBI, there was significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast when using PBC, a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral lung when using AAA, and a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung and contra-lateral lung when using MC. There is very good agreement between PBC, AAA and MC for all target and most normal tissues when treating with APBI and WBI and most of the differences in doses to target and normal tissues are not clinically significant. However, a commonly used dosimetry constraint, as recommended by the ASTRO consensus document for APBI, that no point in the contra-lateral breast volume should receive >3% of the prescribed dose needs

  19. Plan's CCCD approach - Country study PLAN-Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, van G.J.

    2009-01-01

    PLAN Netherlands National Organisation has in coordination with PLAN International Headquarters commissioned an independent formative evaluation study to get systematic insight in the preconditions for appropriate functionality of Child Centred Community Development (CCCD) and to strengthen common

  20. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  -0.79 to  -0.85 and  -0.82 to  -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise

  1. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolae, Alexandru [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast City Hospital, Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Lu, Lin [Department of Radiation Therapy, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heath, Emily [Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.ravi@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  2. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolae, Alexandru; Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew; Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren; Lu, Lin; Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem; Heath, Emily; Ravi, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  3. Implementation of three-dimensional planning in brachytherapy of high dose rate for gynecology therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Camila Pessoa de

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to implement the three-dimensional (3D) planning for gynecological brachytherapy treatments. For this purpose, tests of acceptance and commissioning of brachytherapy equipment were performed to establish a quality and periodic assurance program. For this purpose, an important step was searching for a material to be used as a dummy source, since the applicators do not have any specific dummy. In addition, the validation of the use of applicators library was made for reconstruction in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to validate 3D planning, comparison of doses in dose assessment points used in bidimensional (2D) plans have been performed with volumetric doses to adjacent organs to the tumor. Finally, a protocol was established for 3D brachytherapy planning alternately using magnetic resonance image (MRI) and CT images, making evaluation of the dose in the tumor through the recording of MR and CT images. It was not possible to find a suitable material that could be used as dummy in MRI. However, the acquisition of the license's library for the applicators made possible the 3D planning based on MRI. No correlation was found between volumetric and specific doses analyzed, showing the importance of the implementation of 3D planning. The average ratio between D 2cc and ICRU Bladder dose was 1,74, 22% higher than the ratio found by others authors. For the rectum, D 2cc was less than dose point for 60% of fractions; the average difference was 12,5%. The average ratio between D 2cc and point dose rectum, 0,85, is equivalent to the value showed by Kim et al, 0,91. The D 2cc for sigmoid was 69% higher than point dose used, unless it was not possible compare this value, since the sigmoid point used in the 2D procedures is not used in others institutes. Relative dose in 2 cc of sigmoid was 57% of the prescription dose, the same value was found by in literature. This work enabled the implementation of a viable

  4. Minimum dose method for walking-path planning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yong-kuo; Li, Meng-kun; Xie, Chun-li; Peng, Min-jun; Wang, Shuang-yu; Chao, Nan; Liu, Zhong-kun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • For radiation environment, the environment model is proposed. • For the least dose walking path problem, a path-planning method is designed. • The path-planning virtual–real mixed simulation program is developed. • The program can plan walking path and simulate. - Abstract: A minimum dose method based on staff walking road network model was proposed for the walking-path planning in nuclear facilities. A virtual–reality simulation program was developed using C# programming language and Direct X engine. The simulation program was used in simulations dealing with virtual nuclear facilities. Simulation results indicated that the walking-path planning method was effective in providing safety for people walking in nuclear facilities

  5. First impressions of 3D visual tools and dose volume histograms for plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattray, G.; Simitcioglu, A.; Parkinson, M.; Biggs, J.

    1999-01-01

    Converting from 2D to 3D treatment planning offers numerous challenges. The practices that have evolved in the 2D environment may not be applicable when translated into the 3D environment. One such practice is the methods used to evaluate a plan. In 2D planning a plane by plane comparison method is generally practiced. This type of evaluation method would not be appropriate for plans produced by a 3D planning system. To this end 3D dose displays and Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) have been developed to facilitate the evaluation of such plans. A survey was conducted to determine the impressions of Radiation Therapists as they used these tools for the first time. The survey involved comparing a number of plans for a small group of patients and selecting the best plan for each patient. Three evaluation methods were assessed. These included the traditional plane by plane, 3D dose display, and DVHs. Those surveyed found the DVH to be the easiest of the three methods to use, with the 3D display being the next easiest. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Clinical implementation of dose-volume histogram predictions for organs-at-risk in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K L; Appenzoller, L M; Tan, J; Michalski, J M; Thorstad, W L; Mutic, S

    2014-01-01

    True quality control (QC) of the planning process requires quantitative assessments of treatment plan quality itself, and QC in IMRT has been stymied by intra-patient anatomical variability and inherently complex three-dimensional dose distributions. In this work we describe the development of an automated system to reduce clinical IMRT planning variability and improve plan quality using mathematical models that predict achievable OAR DVHs based on individual patient anatomy. These models rely on the correlation of expected dose to the minimum distance from a voxel to the PTV surface, whereby a three-parameter probability distribution function (PDF) was used to model iso-distance OAR subvolume dose distributions. DVH models were obtained by fitting the evolution of the PDF with distance. Initial validation on clinical cohorts of 40 prostate and 24 head-and-neck plans demonstrated highly accurate model-based predictions for achievable DVHs in rectum, bladder, and parotid glands. By quantifying the integrated difference between candidate DVHs and predicted DVHs, the models correctly identified plans with under-spared OARs, validated by replanning all cases and correlating any realized improvements against the predicted gains. Clinical implementation of these predictive models was demonstrated in the PINNACLE treatment planning system by use of existing margin expansion utilities and the scripting functionality inherent to the system. To maintain independence from specific planning software, a system was developed in MATLAB to directly process DICOM-RT data. Both model training and patient-specific analyses were demonstrated with significant computational accelerations from parallelization.

  7. Verification of absorbed dose calculation with XIO Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokulic, T.; Budanec, M.; Frobe, A.; Gregov, M.; Kusic, Z.; Mlinaric, M.; Mrcela, I.

    2013-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy relies on computerized treatment planning systems (TPS) for absorbed dose calculation. Most TPS require a detailed model of a given machine and therapy beams. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends acceptance testing for the TPS (IAEA-TECDOC-1540). In this study we present customization of those tests for measurements with the purpose of verification of beam models intended for clinical use in our department. Elekta Synergy S linear accelerator installation and data acquisition for Elekta CMS XiO 4.62 TPS was finished in 2011. After the completion of beam modelling in TPS, tests were conducted in accordance with the IAEA protocol for TPS dose calculation verification. The deviations between the measured and calculated dose were recorded for 854 points and 11 groups of tests in a homogenous phantom. Most of the deviations were within tolerance. Similar to previously published results, results for irregular L shaped field and asymmetric wedged fields were out of tolerance for certain groups of points.(author)

  8. A case study of IMRT planning (Plan B) subsequent to a previously treated IMRT plan (Plan A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Medical Physics and 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" >Cao, F; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Medical Physics and 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" >Leong, C; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Medical Physics and 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" >Schroeder, J; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Medical Physics and 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada))" >Lee, B

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Treatment of the contralateral neck after previous ipsilateral intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer is a challenging problem. We have developed a technique that limits the cumulative dose to the spinal cord and brainstem while maximizing coverage of a planning target volume (PTV) in the contralateral neck. Our case involves a patient with right tonsil carcinoma who was given ipsilateral IMRT with 70Gy in 35 fractions (Plan A). A left neck recurrence was detected 14 months later. The patient underwent a neck dissection followed by postoperative left neck radiation to a dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions (Plan B). Materials and Methods: The spinal cord-brainstem margin (SCBM) was defined as the spinal cord and brainstem with a 1.0 cm margin. Plan A was recalculated on the postoperative CT scan but the fluence outside of SCBM was deleted. A further modification of Plan A resulted in a base plan that was summed with Plan B to evaluate the cumulative dose received by the spinal cord and brainstem. Plan B alone was used to evaluate for coverage of the contralateral neck PTV. Results: The maximum cumulative doses to the spinal cord with 0.5cm margin and brainstem with 0.5cm margin were 51.96 Gy and 45.60 Gy respectively. For Plan B, 100% of the prescribed dose covered 95% of PTVb1. Conclusion: The use of a modified ipsilateral IMRT plan as a base plan is an effective way to limit the cumulative dose to the spinal cord and brainstem while enabling coverage of a PTV in the contralateral neck.

  9. Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Planning Techniques Using an Intravaginal Multichannel Balloon Applicator for High-Dose-Rate Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-June, E-mail: spark@mednet.ucla.edu; Chung, Melody; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Banerjee, Robyn; Steinberg, Michael; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric differences of various channel combinations of the Capri vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: The Capri consists of a single central channel (R1), an inner array of 6 channels (R2), and an outer array of 6 channels (R3). Three-dimensional plans were simulated for 6 channel arrangements (R1, R2, R12, R13, R23, and R123). Treatment plans were optimized to the applicator surface or 5-mm depth while minimizing dose to organs at risk (OARs: bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and urethra). The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as a 5-mm circumferential shell extending 4 cm in length around the applicator. Clinical target volume coverage (D{sub mean}, D{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 150}) and OAR doses (D{sub 0.1} {sub cm{sup 3}}, D{sub 1} {sub cm{sup 3}}, D{sub 2} {sub cm{sup 3}}, and D{sub mean}) were compared. A comparison between the Capri (R123) and a conventional single-channel applicator was also done. Statistical significance (P value <.05) was evaluated with a 2-tailed t test. Results: When prescribing to 5-mm depth, CTV coverage using all 13 channels (R123) versus a single channel (R1) was similar; however, when prescribing to the surface there were differences (P<.0001) in all CTV metrics except for the V{sub 150}. The R1 plans had higher doses to all OARs compared with R123 plans (P<.007). Doses to OARs were not significantly different between R23 and R123 plans (P=.05-.95), and CTV coverage differences were on the order of 1%. Capri R123 plans provided slightly lower CTV D{sub 90} and D{sub mean} but equivalent OAR doses with smaller standard deviations compared with conventional cylinder plans for both prescriptions. Conclusions: The Capri multichannel applicator provides equivalent target coverage at 5-mm depth, with significantly reduced dose to OARs relative to using a single channel. Optimal plans can be achieved using R12 (lowest V{sub 150}) or R123 or R23 (lowest OAR doses)

  10. Robotic path-finding in inverse treatment planning for stereotactic radiosurgery with continuous dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandewouw, Marlee M., E-mail: marleev@mie.utoronto.ca; Aleman, Dionne M. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Continuous dose delivery in radiation therapy treatments has been shown to decrease total treatment time while improving the dose conformity and distribution homogeneity over the conventional step-and-shoot approach. The authors develop an inverse treatment planning method for Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ that continuously delivers dose along a path in the target. Methods: The authors’ method is comprised of two steps: find a path within the target, then solve a mixed integer optimization model to find the optimal collimator configurations and durations along the selected path. Robotic path-finding techniques, specifically, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) using an extended Kalman filter, are used to obtain a path that travels sufficiently close to selected isocentre locations. SLAM is novelly extended to explore a 3D, discrete environment, which is the target discretized into voxels. Further novel extensions are incorporated into the steering mechanism to account for target geometry. Results: The SLAM method was tested on seven clinical cases and compared to clinical, Hamiltonian path continuous delivery, and inverse step-and-shoot treatment plans. The SLAM approach improved dose metrics compared to the clinical plans and Hamiltonian path continuous delivery plans. Beam-on times improved over clinical plans, and had mixed performance compared to Hamiltonian path continuous plans. The SLAM method is also shown to be robust to path selection inaccuracies, isocentre selection, and dose distribution. Conclusions: The SLAM method for continuous delivery provides decreased total treatment time and increased treatment quality compared to both clinical and inverse step-and-shoot plans, and outperforms existing path methods in treatment quality. It also accounts for uncertainty in treatment planning by accommodating inaccuracies.

  11. Robotic path-finding in inverse treatment planning for stereotactic radiosurgery with continuous dose delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandewouw, Marlee M.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Continuous dose delivery in radiation therapy treatments has been shown to decrease total treatment time while improving the dose conformity and distribution homogeneity over the conventional step-and-shoot approach. The authors develop an inverse treatment planning method for Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ that continuously delivers dose along a path in the target. Methods: The authors’ method is comprised of two steps: find a path within the target, then solve a mixed integer optimization model to find the optimal collimator configurations and durations along the selected path. Robotic path-finding techniques, specifically, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) using an extended Kalman filter, are used to obtain a path that travels sufficiently close to selected isocentre locations. SLAM is novelly extended to explore a 3D, discrete environment, which is the target discretized into voxels. Further novel extensions are incorporated into the steering mechanism to account for target geometry. Results: The SLAM method was tested on seven clinical cases and compared to clinical, Hamiltonian path continuous delivery, and inverse step-and-shoot treatment plans. The SLAM approach improved dose metrics compared to the clinical plans and Hamiltonian path continuous delivery plans. Beam-on times improved over clinical plans, and had mixed performance compared to Hamiltonian path continuous plans. The SLAM method is also shown to be robust to path selection inaccuracies, isocentre selection, and dose distribution. Conclusions: The SLAM method for continuous delivery provides decreased total treatment time and increased treatment quality compared to both clinical and inverse step-and-shoot plans, and outperforms existing path methods in treatment quality. It also accounts for uncertainty in treatment planning by accommodating inaccuracies.

  12. SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S; Zheng, D; Ma, R; Lin, C; Zhu, X; Lei, Y; Enke, C; Zhou, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been suggested to provide high rates of local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the close proximity of highly radiosensitive normal tissues usually causes the labor-intensive planning process, and may impede further escalation of the prescription dose. The present study evaluates the potential of an automatic planning system as a dose escalation strategy. Methods: Ten pancreatic cancer patients treated with SBRT were studied retrospectively. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions with 6 ∼ 8Gy/fraction. Two plans were generated by Pinnacle Auto-Planning with the original prescription and escalated prescription, respectively. Escalated prescription adds 1 Gy/fraction to the original prescription. Manually-created planning volumes were excluded in the optimization goals in order to assess the planning efficiency and quality simultaneously. Critical organs with closest proximity were used to determine the plan normalization to ensure the OAR sparing. Dosimetric parameters including D100, and conformity index (CI) were assessed. Results: Auto-plans directly generate acceptable plans for 70% of the cases without necessity of further improvement, and two more iterations at most are necessary for the rest of the cases. For the pancreas SBRT plans with the original prescription, autoplans resulted in favorable target coverage and PTV conformity (D100 = 96.3% ± 1.48%; CI = 0.88 ± 0.06). For the plans with the escalated prescriptions, no significant target under-dosage was observed, and PTV conformity remains reasonable (D100 = 93.3% ± 3.8%, and CI = 0.84 ± 0.05). Conclusion: Automatic planning, without substantial human-intervention process, results in reasonable PTV coverage and PTV conformity on the premise of adequate OAR sparing for the pancreas SBRT plans with escalated prescription. The results highlight the potential of autoplanning as a dose escalation strategy for pancreas

  13. SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S; Zheng, D; Ma, R; Lin, C; Zhu, X; Lei, Y; Enke, C; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been suggested to provide high rates of local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the close proximity of highly radiosensitive normal tissues usually causes the labor-intensive planning process, and may impede further escalation of the prescription dose. The present study evaluates the potential of an automatic planning system as a dose escalation strategy. Methods: Ten pancreatic cancer patients treated with SBRT were studied retrospectively. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions with 6 ∼ 8Gy/fraction. Two plans were generated by Pinnacle Auto-Planning with the original prescription and escalated prescription, respectively. Escalated prescription adds 1 Gy/fraction to the original prescription. Manually-created planning volumes were excluded in the optimization goals in order to assess the planning efficiency and quality simultaneously. Critical organs with closest proximity were used to determine the plan normalization to ensure the OAR sparing. Dosimetric parameters including D100, and conformity index (CI) were assessed. Results: Auto-plans directly generate acceptable plans for 70% of the cases without necessity of further improvement, and two more iterations at most are necessary for the rest of the cases. For the pancreas SBRT plans with the original prescription, autoplans resulted in favorable target coverage and PTV conformity (D100 = 96.3% ± 1.48%; CI = 0.88 ± 0.06). For the plans with the escalated prescriptions, no significant target under-dosage was observed, and PTV conformity remains reasonable (D100 = 93.3% ± 3.8%, and CI = 0.84 ± 0.05). Conclusion: Automatic planning, without substantial human-intervention process, results in reasonable PTV coverage and PTV conformity on the premise of adequate OAR sparing for the pancreas SBRT plans with escalated prescription. The results highlight the potential of autoplanning as a dose escalation strategy for pancreas

  14. Graves' disease radioiodine-therapy: Choosing target absorbed doses for therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, J., E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com; Sapienza, M. T.; Coura-Filho, G. B.; Buchpiguel, C. A. [Cancer Institute of São Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, A. C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The precise determination of organ mass (m{sub th}) and total number of disintegrations within the thyroid gland (A{sup ~}) are essential for thyroid absorbed-dose calculations for radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, these parameters may vary according to the method employed for their estimation, thus introducing uncertainty in the estimated thyroid absorbed dose and in any dose–response relationship derived using such estimates. In consideration of these points, thyroid absorbed doses for Graves’ disease (GD) treatment planning were calculated using different approaches to estimating the m{sub th} and the A{sup ~}. Methods: Fifty patients were included in the study. Thyroid{sup 131}I uptake measurements were performed at 2, 6, 24, 48, 96, and 220 h postadministration of a tracer activity in order to estimate the effective half-time (T{sub eff}) of {sup 131}I in the thyroid; the thyroid cumulated activity was then estimated using the T{sub eff} thus determined or, alternatively, calculated by numeric integration of the measured time-activity data. Thyroid mass was estimated by ultrasonography (USG) and scintigraphy (SCTG). Absorbed doses were calculated with the OLINDA/EXM software. The relationships between thyroid absorbed dose and therapy response were evaluated at 3 months and 1 year after therapy. Results: The average ratio (±1 standard deviation) betweenm{sub th} estimated by SCTG and USG was 1.74 (±0.64) and that between A{sup ~} obtained by T{sub eff} and the integration of measured activity in the gland was 1.71 (±0.14). These differences affect the calculated absorbed dose. Overall, therapeutic success, corresponding to induction of durable hypothyroidism or euthyroidism, was achieved in 72% of all patients at 3 months and in 90% at 1 year. A therapeutic success rate of at least 95% was found in the group of patients receiving doses of 200 Gy (p = 0.0483) and 330 Gy (p = 0.0131) when m{sub th} was measured by either USG or SCTG and A

  15. Statistical evaluation of the dose-distribution charts of the National Computerized Irradiation Planning Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjas, Geza; Jozsef, Gabor; Gyenes, Gyoergy; Petranyi, Julia; Bozoky, Laszlo; Pataki, Gezane

    1985-01-01

    The establishment of the National Computerized Irradiation Planning Network allowed to perform the statistical evaluation presented in this report. During the first 5 years 13389 dose-distribution charts were calculated for the treatment of 5320 patients, i.e. in average, 2,5 dose-distribution chart-variants per patient. This number practically did not change in the last 4 years. The irradiation plan of certain tumour localizations was performed on the basis of the calculation of, in average, 1.6-3.0 dose-distribution charts. Recently, radiation procedures assuring optimal dose-distribution, such as the use of moving fields, and two- or three-irradiation fields, are gaining grounds. (author)

  16. Multimodality Image Fusion and Planning and Dose Delivery for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Beatty, Ron E.; Wagner, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) relies on the quality of fused images to yield accurate and reproducible patient setup prior to dose delivery. The registration of 2 image datasets can be characterized as hardware-based or software-based image fusion. Hardware-based image fusion is performed by hybrid scanners that combine 2 distinct medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) into a single device. In hybrid scanners, the patient maintains the same position during both studies making the fusion of image data sets simple. However, it cannot perform temporal image registration where image datasets are acquired at different times. On the other hand, software-based image fusion technique can merge image datasets taken at different times or with different medical imaging modalities. Software-based image fusion can be performed either manually, using landmarks, or automatically. In the automatic image fusion method, the best fit is evaluated using mutual information coefficient. Manual image fusion is typically performed at dose planning and for patient setup prior to dose delivery for IGRT. The fusion of orthogonal live radiographic images taken prior to dose delivery to digitally reconstructed radiographs will be presented. Although manual image fusion has been routinely used, the use of fiducial markers has shortened the fusion time. Automated image fusion should be possible for IGRT because the image datasets are derived basically from the same imaging modality, resulting in further shortening the fusion time. The advantages and limitations of both hardware-based and software-based image fusion methodologies are discussed

  17. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia); Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  18. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.; Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  19. Methods for Reducing Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Dose Reduction or Planning Target Volume Elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Vineberg, Karen; Lee, Jae; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Brock, Kristy K., E-mail: kbrock@med.umich.edu

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Strategies to reduce the toxicities of head and neck radiation (ie, dysphagia [difficulty swallowing] and xerostomia [dry mouth]) are currently underway. However, the predicted benefit of dose and planning target volume (PTV) reduction strategies is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to compare the normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for swallowing and salivary structures in standard plans (70 Gy [P70]), dose-reduced plans (60 Gy [P60]), and plans eliminating the PTV margin. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) plans were analyzed. Standard organ-sparing volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (P70) were created and then modified by eliminating the PTVs and treating the clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) only (C70) or maintaining the PTV but reducing the dose to 60 Gy (P60). NTCP dose models for the pharyngeal constrictors, glottis/supraglottic larynx, parotid glands (PGs), and submandibular glands (SMGs) were analyzed. The minimal clinically important benefit was defined as a mean change in NTCP of >5%. The P70 NTCP thresholds and overlap percentages of the organs at risk with the PTVs (56-59 Gy, vPTV{sub 56}) were evaluated to identify the predictors for NTCP improvement. Results: With the P60 plans, only the ipsilateral PG (iPG) benefited (23.9% vs 16.2%; P<.01). With the C70 plans, only the iPG (23.9% vs 17.5%; P<.01) and contralateral SMG (cSMG) (NTCP 32.1% vs 22.9%; P<.01) benefited. An iPG NTCP threshold of 20% and 30% predicted NTCP benefits for the P60 and C70 plans, respectively (P<.001). A cSMG NTCP threshold of 30% predicted for an NTCP benefit with the C70 plans (P<.001). Furthermore, for the iPG, a vPTV{sub 56} >13% predicted benefit with P60 (P<.001) and C70 (P=.002). For the cSMG, a vPTV{sub 56} >22% predicted benefit with C70 (P<.01). Conclusions: PTV elimination and dose-reduction lowered the NTCP of the iPG, and PTV elimination lowered the NTCP of the cSMG. NTCP thresholds and the

  20. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  1. Interobserver variation in rectal and bladder doses in orthogonal film-based treatment planning of cancer of the uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghukumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal film-based treatment planning is the most commonly adopted standard practice of treatment planning for cancer of the uterine cervix using high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR. This study aims at examining the variation in rectal and bladder doses when the same set of orthogonal films was given to different observers. Five physicists were given 35 pairs of orthogonal films obtained from patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy. They were given the same instructions and asked to plan the case assuming the tumor was centrally placed, using the treatment-planning system, PLATO BPS V13.2. A statistically significant difference was observed in the average rectal (F = 3.407, P = 0.01 and bladder (F = 3.284, P = 0.013 doses and the volumes enclosed by the 100% isodose curve ( P < 0.01 obtained by each observer. These variations may be attributed to the differences in the reconstruction of applicators, the selection of source positions in ovoids and the intrauterine (IU tube, and the differences in the selection of points especially for the rectum, from lateral radiographs. These variations in planning seen within a department can be avoided if a particular source pattern is followed in the intrauterine tube, unless a specific situation demands a change. Variations in the selection of rectal points can be ruled out if the posterior vaginal surface is clearly seen.

  2. Incorporating organ movements in inverse planning: assessing dose uncertainties by Bayesian inference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, J; Oelfke, U

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to calculate dose uncertainties due to inter-fraction organ movements in fractionated radiotherapy, i.e. in addition to the expectation value of the dose distribution a variance distribution is calculated. To calculate the expectation value of the dose distribution in the presence of organ movements, one estimates a probability distribution of possible patient geometries. The respective variance of the expected dose distribution arises for two reasons: first, the patient is irradiated with a finite number of fractions only and second, the probability distribution of patient geometries has to be estimated from a small number of images and is therefore not exactly known. To quantify the total dose variance, we propose a method that is based on the principle of Bayesian inference. The method is of particular interest when organ motion is incorporated in inverse IMRT planning by means of inverse planning performed on a probability distribution of patient geometries. In order to make this a robust approach, it turns out that the dose variance should be considered (and minimized) in the optimization process. As an application of the presented concept of Bayesian inference, we compare three approaches to inverse planning based on probability distributions that account for an increasing degree of uncertainty. The Bayes theorem further provides a concept to interpolate between patient specific data and population-based knowledge on organ motion which is relevant since the number of CT images of a patient is typically small

  3. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael; Hollensen, Christian; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Kjær, Andreas; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N 4 )-methylsemithiocarbazone (Cu-ATSM) using spontaneous clinical canine tumor models. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of five spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas were obtained; FDG on day 1 and 64 Cu-ATSM on day 2 and 3 (approx. 3 and 24 hours pi.). Sub-volumes for dose escalation were defined by a threshold-based method for both tracers and five dose escalation levels were formed in each sub-volume. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were optimized based on the dose escalation regions for each scan for a total of three dose plans for each dog. The prescription dose for the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with construction of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients. Comparison of dose plans revealed varying degree of correlation between cases. Some cases displayed a separation of high-dose regions in the comparison of FDG vs. 64 Cu-ATSM dose plans at both time points. Among the Dice correlation coefficients, the high dose regions showed the lowest degree of agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region definitions based on FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM 3 h and 24 h uptake in canine tumors had different localization of the regional dose escalation levels. This indicates that 64 Cu-ATSM at two

  4. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    sessions for the parotid gland, optic track, and the temporal lobe when they were in extreme proximity with the PTV. The comparisons of the dose...gross target volume; L = left; OC = optic chiasm; ON = optic nerve; PARO = parotid gland; pCT = planning computed tomography; PTV = planning target...chiasm/nerves, optic lens, left parotid , larynx and spinal cord. The mandible and right parotid were not used because these structures significantly

  5. Evaluation of dose prediction errors and optimization convergence errors of deliverable-based head-and-neck IMRT plans computed with a superposition/convolution dose algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Siebers, J. V.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose prediction errors (DPEs) and optimization convergence errors (OCEs) resulting from use of a superposition/convolution dose calculation algorithm in deliverable intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for head-and-neck (HN) patients. Thirteen HN IMRT patient plans were retrospectively reoptimized. The IMRT optimization was performed in three sequential steps: (1) fast optimization in which an initial nondeliverable IMRT solution was achieved and then converted to multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences; (2) mixed deliverable optimization that used a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm to account for the incident photon fluence modulation by the MLC, whereas a superposition/convolution (SC) dose calculation algorithm was utilized for the patient dose calculations; and (3) MC deliverable-based optimization in which both fluence and patient dose calculations were performed with a MC algorithm. DPEs of the mixed method were quantified by evaluating the differences between the mixed optimization SC dose result and a MC dose recalculation of the mixed optimization solution. OCEs of the mixed method were quantified by evaluating the differences between the MC recalculation of the mixed optimization solution and the final MC optimization solution. The results were analyzed through dose volume indices derived from the cumulative dose-volume histograms for selected anatomic structures. Statistical equivalence tests were used to determine the significance of the DPEs and the OCEs. Furthermore, a correlation analysis between DPEs and OCEs was performed. The evaluated DPEs were within ±2.8% while the OCEs were within 5.5%, indicating that OCEs can be clinically significant even when DPEs are clinically insignificant. The full MC-dose-based optimization reduced normal tissue dose by as much as 8.5% compared with the mixed-method optimization results. The DPEs and the OCEs in the targets had correlation coefficients greater

  6. Sensitivity of dose-finding studies to observation errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; O'Quigley, John

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of Phase I designs is to estimate the MTD (maximum tolerated dose, in practice a dose with some given acceptable rate of toxicity) while, at the same time, minimizing the number of patients treated at doses too far removed from the MTD. Our purpose here is to investigate the sensitivity of conclusions from dose-finding designs to recording or observation errors. Certain toxicities may go undetected and, conversely, certain non-toxicities may be incorrectly recorded as dose-limiting toxicities. Recording inaccuracies would be expected to have an influence on final and within trial recommendations and, in this paper, we study in greater depth this question. We focus, in particular on three designs used currently; the standard '3+3' design, the grouped up-and-down design [M. Gezmu, N. Flournoy, Group up-and-down designs for dose finding. Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference 2006; 136 (6): 1749-1764.] and the continual reassessment method (CRM, [J. O'Quigley, M. Pepe, L. Fisher, Continual reassessment method: a practical design for phase 1 clinical trials in cancer. Biometrics 1990; 46 (1): 33-48.]). A non-toxicity incorrectly recorded as a toxicity (error of first kind) has a greater influence in general than the converse (error of second kind). These results are illustrated via figures which suggest that the standard '3+3' design in particular is sensitive to errors of the second kind. Such errors can have a very important impact on drug development in that, if carried through to the Phase 2 and Phase 3 studies, we can significantly increase the probability of failure to detect efficacy as a result of having delivered an inadequate dose.

  7. A comparison of two dose calculation algorithms-anisotropic analytical algorithm and Acuros XB-for radiation therapy planning of canine intranasal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koichi; Pethel, Timothy D

    2017-07-01

    Although anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) are both radiation dose calculation algorithms that take into account the heterogeneity within the radiation field, Acuros XB is inherently more accurate. The purpose of this retrospective method comparison study was to compare them and evaluate the dose discrepancy within the planning target volume (PTV). Radiation therapy (RT) plans of 11 dogs with intranasal tumors treated by radiation therapy at the University of Georgia were evaluated. All dogs were planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using nine coplanar X-ray beams that were equally spaced, then dose calculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm. The same plan with the same monitor units was then recalculated using Acuros XB for comparisons. Each dog's planning target volume was separated into air, bone, and tissue and evaluated. The mean dose to the planning target volume estimated by Acuros XB was 1.3% lower. It was 1.4% higher for air, 3.7% lower for bone, and 0.9% lower for tissue. The volume of planning target volume covered by the prescribed dose decreased by 21% when Acuros XB was used due to increased dose heterogeneity within the planning target volume. Anisotropic analytical algorithm relatively underestimates the dose heterogeneity and relatively overestimates the dose to the bone and tissue within the planning target volume for the radiation therapy planning of canine intranasal tumors. This can be clinically significant especially if the tumor cells are present within the bone, because it may result in relative underdosing of the tumor. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Schedule optimization study implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This Implementation Plan is intended to provide a basis for improvements in the conduct of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Hanford. The Plan is based on the findings of the Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) team which was convened for two weeks in September 1992 at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL). The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit (OU) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan. The SOS team was comprised of independent professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration within the federal system. The objective of the team was to examine reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process and recommend ways to expedite it. The SOS team issued their Final Report in December 1992. The report found the most serious impediments to cleanup relate to a series of management and policy issues which are within the control of the three parties managing and monitoring Hanford -- the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology). The SOS Report identified the following eight cross-cutting issues as the root of major impediments to the Hanford Site cleanup. Each of these eight issues is quoted from the SOS Report followed by a brief, general description of the proposed approach being developed

  9. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  10. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-06-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general, the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 and 3 min on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  11. Dose verification with different ion chambers for SRT/SBRT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, I. F.; Tas, B.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    Verification of patient plan is very important in stereotactic treatments. VMAT plans were prepared with 6MV-FFF or 10MV-FFF energies for 25 intracranial and extracranial stereotactic patients. Absolute dose was measured for dose verification in each plans. Iba® CC01, Iba® CC04, Iba® CC13 ion chambers placed at a depth of 5cm in solid phantom (RW3). Also we scanned this phantom with ion chambers by Siemens® Biograph mCT. QA plans were prepared by transferring twenty five patient plans to phantom assemblies for three ion chambers. All plans were performed separately for three ion chambers at Elekta® Versa HD linear accelerator. Statistical analysis of results were made by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Difference between dose values were determined %1.84±3.4 (p: 0.001) with Iba CC13 ion chamber, %1.80±3.4 (p: 0.002) with Iba CC04 ion chamber and %0.29±4.6 (p: 0.667) with Iba CC01 ion chamber. In stereotactic treatments, dosimetric uncertainty increases in small areas. We determined more accurate results with small sized detectors. Difference between TPS calculations and all measurements were founded lower than %2.

  12. Poster - 56: Preliminary comparison of FF- and FFF-VMAT for prostate plans with higher rectal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Baochang; Darko, Johnson; Osei, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A recent retrospective study found 53 patients previously treated to 78Gy/39 using flattened filtered (FF) 6X-VMAT at GRRCC had rectal DVH more than one standard deviation higher than the average. This study was to investigate if using 6FFFor10FFF beams could reduce these DVHs without compromising target coverage. Methods: Twenty patients’ plans were re-planed with 2-arc 6X-VMAT, 6FFF-VMAT and 10FFF-VMAT using the Eclipse TPS following departmental protocol. All plans had the same optimization and normalization, and were evaluated against the acceptance criteria from the QUANTEC and Emami. Statistical differences in the mean dose to OARs (D m ) and PTV homogeneity index (HI) between energies were tested using the paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank statistical method (p<0.05). Beam delivery accuracy was checked on five patients using portal dosimetry (PD). Results: The PTV HI for the 10FFF shows no statistical difference from the 6X. All the OARs, except left femoral head with 6FFF, have significantly lower Dm using 6FFF and 10FFF .There is no difference in the maximum doses to rectum and bladder and are limited by the prescribed doses. Measurements show good agreements in the gamma evaluation (3%/3mm) for all energies. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that doses to the OARs are reduced using 10FFF for the same target coverage. The plans using 6FFF result in lower doses to some OARs, and statistically different PTV HI. All plans showed very good agreement with measurements.

  13. Poster - 56: Preliminary comparison of FF- and FFF-VMAT for prostate plans with higher rectal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Baochang; Darko, Johnson; Osei, Ernest [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A recent retrospective study found 53 patients previously treated to 78Gy/39 using flattened filtered (FF) 6X-VMAT at GRRCC had rectal DVH more than one standard deviation higher than the average. This study was to investigate if using 6FFFor10FFF beams could reduce these DVHs without compromising target coverage. Methods: Twenty patients’ plans were re-planed with 2-arc 6X-VMAT, 6FFF-VMAT and 10FFF-VMAT using the Eclipse TPS following departmental protocol. All plans had the same optimization and normalization, and were evaluated against the acceptance criteria from the QUANTEC and Emami. Statistical differences in the mean dose to OARs (D{sub m}) and PTV homogeneity index (HI) between energies were tested using the paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank statistical method (p<0.05). Beam delivery accuracy was checked on five patients using portal dosimetry (PD). Results: The PTV HI for the 10FFF shows no statistical difference from the 6X. All the OARs, except left femoral head with 6FFF, have significantly lower Dm using 6FFF and 10FFF .There is no difference in the maximum doses to rectum and bladder and are limited by the prescribed doses. Measurements show good agreements in the gamma evaluation (3%/3mm) for all energies. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that doses to the OARs are reduced using 10FFF for the same target coverage. The plans using 6FFF result in lower doses to some OARs, and statistically different PTV HI. All plans showed very good agreement with measurements.

  14. SU-F-T-440: The Feasibility Research of Checking Cervical Cancer IMRT Pre- Treatment Dose Verification by Automated Treatment Planning Verification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X; Yin, Y; Lin, X [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, China, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the preliminary feasibility of automated treatment planning verification system in cervical cancer IMRT pre-treatment dose verification. Methods: The study selected randomly clinical IMRT treatment planning data for twenty patients with cervical cancer, all IMRT plans were divided into 7 fields to meet the dosimetric goals using a commercial treatment planning system(PianncleVersion 9.2and the EclipseVersion 13.5). The plans were exported to the Mobius 3D (M3D)server percentage differences of volume of a region of interest (ROI) and dose calculation of target region and organ at risk were evaluated, in order to validate the accuracy automated treatment planning verification system. Results: The difference of volume for Pinnacle to M3D was less than results for Eclipse to M3D in ROI, the biggest difference was 0.22± 0.69%, 3.5±1.89% for Pinnacle and Eclipse respectively. M3D showed slightly better agreement in dose of target and organ at risk compared with TPS. But after recalculating plans by M3D, dose difference for Pinnacle was less than Eclipse on average, results were within 3%. Conclusion: The method of utilizing the automated treatment planning system to validate the accuracy of plans is convenientbut the scope of differences still need more clinical patient cases to determine. At present, it should be used as a secondary check tool to improve safety in the clinical treatment planning.

  15. Does the fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator improve dose homogeneity in bilateral field plan of head and neck patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator (ETC on the dose homogeneity for head and neck cancer patients. Treatment planning using 6-MV X-rays and bilateral field arrangement employing ETC was carried out on the computed tomography (CT datasets of 20 patients with head and neck cancer. All the patients were planned in Varian Eclipse three-dimensional treatment planning system (3DTPS with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC. The treatment plans, with and without fluence editing, was compared and the effect of pre-editing and post-editing the fluence maps in the treatment field was evaluated. The skin dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs and was compared with the skin dose estimated by TPS. The mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 5.4 (range 1.5-10; SD 2.4. Post-editing fluence map showed that the mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 0.47 (range 0.1-0.9; SD 0.3. The mean skin dose measured with TLD was found to be 74% (range 71-80% of the prescribed dose while the TPS showed the mean skin dose as 85% (range 80-90%. The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 11%. Fluence map editing thus proved to be a potential tool for improving dose homogeneity in head and neck cancer patients planned with ETC, thus reducing the hot spots in the treatment region as well. The treatment with ETC is feasible with DMLC and does not take any additional time for setup or delivery. The method used to edit the fluence maps is simple and time efficient. Manual control over a plan is essential to create the best treatment plan possible.

  16. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  17. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  18. Dose domain regularization of MLC leaf patterns for highly complex IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y.; Ruan, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); O’Connor, Daniel [Department of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The advent of automated beam orientation and fluence optimization enables more complex intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning using an increasing number of fields to exploit the expanded solution space. This has created a challenge in converting complex fluences to robust multileaf collimator (MLC) segments for delivery. A novel method to regularize the fluence map and simplify MLC segments is introduced to maximize delivery efficiency, accuracy, and plan quality. Methods: In this work, we implemented a novel approach to regularize optimized fluences in the dose domain. The treatment planning problem was formulated in an optimization framework to minimize the segmentation-induced dose distribution degradation subject to a total variation regularization to encourage piecewise smoothness in fluence maps. The optimization problem was solved using a first-order primal-dual algorithm known as the Chambolle-Pock algorithm. Plans for 2 GBM, 2 head and neck, and 2 lung patients were created using 20 automatically selected and optimized noncoplanar beams. The fluence was first regularized using Chambolle-Pock and then stratified into equal steps, and the MLC segments were calculated using a previously described level reducing method. Isolated apertures with sizes smaller than preset thresholds of 1–3 bixels, which are square units of an IMRT fluence map from MLC discretization, were removed from the MLC segments. Performance of the dose domain regularized (DDR) fluences was compared to direct stratification and direct MLC segmentation (DMS) of the fluences using level reduction without dose domain fluence regularization. Results: For all six cases, the DDR method increased the average planning target volume dose homogeneity (D95/D5) from 0.814 to 0.878 while maintaining equivalent dose to organs at risk (OARs). Regularized fluences were more robust to MLC sequencing, particularly to the stratification and small aperture removal. The maximum and

  19. Protocol for adaptation of internal dosimetry techniques for planning of individualized doses of 131I in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancardi, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of radiation doses is emphasized in diseases with good prognosis, as differentiated thyroid carcinomas, especially in pediatric patients, since the radiation risk is conversely proportional to age. Aiming to establish individual treatment planning, it has been studied four dosimetry methodologies (external dose monitoring, image quantification, urine and blood bioassay) for four 13.3 ± 1.5-year-old female patients, who received 107 ± 15 MBq (2,9 ± 0,4 mCi) for tracer dose and 5.5 ± 0.3 GBq (149 ± 8 mCi) for thyroid ablation. Effective half-lives, residence times and cumulated activities were estimated in organs and tissues with iodine uptake, through planar images quantification by conjugate-view and attenuation correction, in order to compare biokinetic behavior in tracer dose and ablative dose phases. For external monitoring, two patients had similar whole-body effective half-lives in both phases. For this methodology, despite the uncertainties associated to measurements, equipment used and procedures performed were adequate. For urine bioassay, there were not similarities among the patients whole-body effective half-lives. Through blood bioassay, it was observed that 0.2 % of the administered activity for ablative dose remained in the blood until 76 hours after administration. The external monitoring allowed estimating effective doses in patients mothers by conversion of the environmental equivalent dose. In the ablative dose phase, the effective doses resulted in 1.3 ± 0.3 mSv in the hospital and 0.3 ± 0.1 mSv in patients houses. (author)

  20. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  1. Towards the elimination of Monte Carlo statistical fluctuation from dose volume histograms for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, J.; Bielajew, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo calculation of dose for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes introduces unavoidable statistical noise into the prediction of dose in a given volume element (voxel). When the doses in these voxels are summed to produce dose volume histograms (DVHs), this noise translates into a broadening of differential DVHs and correspondingly flatter DVHs. A brute force approach would entail calculating dose for long periods of time - enough to ensure that the DVHs had converged. In this paper we introduce an approach for deconvolving the statistical noise from DVHs, thereby obtaining estimates for converged DVHs obtained about 100 times faster than the brute force approach described above. There are two important implications of this work: (a) decisions based upon DVHs may be made much more economically using the new approach and (b) inverse treatment planning or optimization methods may employ Monte Carlo dose calculations at all stages of the iterative procedure since the prohibitive cost of Monte Carlo calculations at the intermediate calculation steps can be practically eliminated. (author)

  2. Planning of occupational dose reduction at BWR power plant by past dose record analysis combined with on-site workers' idea analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, T.; Taira, J.; Hayashida, T.; Suzuki, A.; Hayashi, K.; Kato, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Konno, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish a plan for occupational dose reduction at operating plants, outage inspection works that involve high-dose exposure were selected and a determination of the major causes of high-dose exposure made by plant-by-plant comparison of doses received during inspection works. The comparison was made to investigate the relationship between exposure and the volume of objects to be inspected, working time and man-hour of each work process and ambient dose rates at work areas. In parallel with this, an analysis has also been carried out on 400 data items in a questionnaire survey conducted on relevant individuals, including foremen, radiation safety personnel, on-site workers and plant designers regarding ideas for dose reduction methods. With combination of these two analyses, matters that require improvement will be highlighted, then modification of equipment or revision of work procedures necessary for occupational dose reduction will be planned by plant designers through review. (authors)

  3. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993

  4. Does IMRT increase the peripheral radiation dose? A comparison of treatment plans 2000 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salz, Henning; Eichner, Regina; Wiezorek, Tilo

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported in several papers and textbooks that IMRT treatments increase the peripheral dose in comparison with non-IMRT fields. But in clinical practice not only open fields have been used in the pre-IMRT era, but also fields with physical wedges or composed fields. The aim of this work is to test the hypothesis of increased peripheral dose when IMRT is used compared to standard conformal radiotherapy. Furthermore, the importance of the measured dose differences in clinical practice is discussed and compared with other new technologies for the cases where an increase of the peripheral dose was observed. For cancers of the head and neck, the cervix, the rectum and for the brain irradiation due to acute leukaemia, one to four plans have been calculated with IMRT or conformal standard technique (non-IMRT). In an anthropomorphic phantom the dose at a distance of 30 cm in cranio-caudal direction from the target edge was measured with TLDs using a linear accelerator Oncor registered (Siemens) for both techniques. IMRT was performed using step-and-shoot technique (7 to 11 beams), non-IMRT plans with different techniques. The results depended on the site of irradiation. For head and neck cancers IMRT resulted in an increase of 0.05 - 0.09% of the prescribed total dose (Dptv) or 40 - 70 mGy (Dptv = 65 Gy), compared to non-IMRT technique without wedges or a decrease of 0.16% (approx. 100 mGy) of the prescribed total dose compared to non-IMRT techniques with wedges. For the cervical cancer IMRT resulted in an increased dose in the periphery (+ 0.07% - 0.15% of Dptv or 30 - 70 mGy at Dptv = 45 Gy), for the rectal cancer in a dose reduction (0.21 - 0.26% of Dptv or 100 - 130 mGy at Dptv = 50 Gy) and for the brain irradiation in an increase dose (+ 0.05% of Dptv = 18 Gy or 9 mSv). In summary IMRT does not uniformly cause increased radiation dose in the periphery in the model used. It can be stated that these dose values are smaller than reported in earlier papers

  5. Study of dose calculation and beam parameters optimization with genetic algorithm in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chaomin; Tang Mutao; Zhou Linghong; Lv Qingwen; Wang Zhuoyu; Chen Guangjie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the construction of dose calculation model and the method of automatic beam parameters selection in IMRT. Methods: The three-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon was constructed with the methods of Fast Fourier Transform. The objective function based on dose constrain was used to evaluate the fitness of individuals. The beam weights were optimized with genetic algorithm. Results: After 100 iterative analyses, the treatment planning system produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions. Conclusion: the throe-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon gave more accurate results than the conventional models; genetic algorithm is valid and efficient in IMRT beam parameters optimization. (authors)

  6. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  7. Influence of increment of gantry angle and number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy planning in Monaco planning system: A planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the increment of gantry angle and the number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with 80 multileaf collimator (MLC. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans were done with different increment of gantry angle like 15 o , 20 o , 30 o and 40 o . The remaining parameters were similar for all the plans. The results were compared. To compare the plan quality with number of arcs, VMAT plans were done with single and dual arc with increment of gantry angle of 20 o . The dose to gross tumor volume (GTV for 60 Gy and planning target volume (PTV for 48 Gy was compared. The dosimetric parameters D 98% , D 95% , D 50% and D max of GTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and conformity index (CI of GTV were studied and the dose to 98% and 95% of PTV was analyzed. Maximum dose to spinal cord and planning risk volume of cord (PRV cord was compared. The Volume of lung receiving 10 Gy, 20 Gy and mean dose was analyzed. The volume of heart receiving 30 Gy and 45 Gy was compared. The volume of normal tissue receiving greater than 2 Gy and 5 Gy was compared. The number of monitor units (MU required to deliver the plans were compared. The plan with larger increment of gantry angle proved to be superior to smaller increment of gantry angle plans in terms of dose coverage, HI, CI and normal tissue sparing. The number of arcs did not make any difference in the quality of the plan.

  8. Radiation Dose Reduction in CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection by Modifying Scout and Planning Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Background and PurposeIn CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI), the majority of radiation dose is contributed by the planning CT scan rather than the CTF procedure itself. We replaced the planning helical CT with a spot CTF and accordingly changed the patient posture during scout and planning scans. The aim of this study was to test whether radiation dose reduction would be achieved by this protocol modification while still maintaining technical performance.MethodsOverall, 338 consecutive procedures before (control group: n = 163) and after (study group: n = 175) instituting the above-mentioned protocol modification were analyzed retrospectively, comparing patient characteristics (age, sex, neck diameter, and level injected) and technical performance [technical success rate, dose-length product (DLP), inadvertent contrast flow incidence, number of CTF acquisitions, and procedural time] between the two groups.ResultsAll injections were technically successful at every level from C3–C4 to C7–T1 without serious complications in both groups. The median DLP of the study group (7.92 mGy·cm) was significantly reduced compared to that of the control group (39.05 mGy·cm, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the incidence of inadvertent contrast flow (20.6 vs. 17.2 %, P = 0.426), number of CTF acquisitions (median 5 vs. 4, P = 0.123), and the procedural time (median 6.62 vs. 6.90 min, P = 0.100).ConclusionsWhen conducting CTF-guided cervical TFESIs, a significant radiation dose reduction (median 79.7 % in DLP) can be achieved by modifying scout and planning steps, without compromising the technical performance.

  9. SU-D-BRB-02: Combining a Commercial Autoplanning Engine with Database Dose Predictions to Further Improve Plan Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, SP; Moore, JA; Hui, X; Cheng, Z; McNutt, TR [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); DeWeese, TL; Tran, P; Quon, H [John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bzdusek, K [Philips, Fitchburg, WI (United States); Kumar, P [Philips India Limited, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Database dose predictions and a commercial autoplanning engine both improve treatment plan quality in different but complimentary ways. The combination of these planning techniques is hypothesized to further improve plan quality. Methods: Four treatment plans were generated for each of 10 head and neck (HN) and 10 prostate cancer patients, including Plan-A: traditional IMRT optimization using clinically relevant default objectives; Plan-B: traditional IMRT optimization using database dose predictions; Plan-C: autoplanning using default objectives; and Plan-D: autoplanning using database dose predictions. One optimization was used for each planning method. Dose distributions were normalized to 95% of the planning target volume (prostate: 8000 cGy; HN: 7000 cGy). Objectives used in plan optimization and analysis were the larynx (25%, 50%, 90%), left and right parotid glands (50%, 85%), spinal cord (0%, 50%), rectum and bladder (0%, 20%, 50%, 80%), and left and right femoral heads (0%, 70%). Results: All objectives except larynx 25% and 50% resulted in statistically significant differences between plans (Friedman’s χ{sup 2} ≥ 11.2; p ≤ 0.011). Maximum dose to the rectum (Plans A-D: 8328, 8395, 8489, 8537 cGy) and bladder (Plans A-D: 8403, 8448, 8527, 8569 cGy) were significantly increased. All other significant differences reflected a decrease in dose. Plans B-D were significantly different from Plan-A for 3, 17, and 19 objectives, respectively. Plans C-D were also significantly different from Plan-B for 8 and 13 objectives, respectively. In one case (cord 50%), Plan-D provided significantly lower dose than plan C (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Combining database dose predictions with a commercial autoplanning engine resulted in significant plan quality differences for the greatest number of objectives. This translated to plan quality improvements in most cases, although special care may be needed for maximum dose constraints. Further evaluation is warranted

  10. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam [Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group, School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  11. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  12. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchalal, M.; Leseur, J.; Chajon, E.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Simon, A.; Bellec, J.; Lena, H.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  13. Effect of contrast on treatment planning system dose calculations in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, J.; Holloway, L.; Fuller, M.; Forstner, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Contrast-enhanced x-ray computed tomography is utilised in the planning of radiotherapy lung treatments to allow greater accuracy in defining tumour volume and nodal areas. The use of contrast results in increased density in the region of the tumour and may result in an overall increased density in the lung volume. It is possible that this change in density may affect the accuracy of any dose calculations based on this CT data. As yet, the effect of the contrast agent on the calculations performed by the treatment planning computer is unclear. Ideally, a study would be undertaken using pre- and post- contrast patient data, however this may be considered unethical as an extra CT scan would be required. For this reason, the following study was undertaken to assess the possible impact in a simulated environment. The object of this study was to explore the effect of the contrast agent upon the isodose curves and the monitor units calculated by the treatment planning system. Two investigations were made. Initially, pre- and post-contrast images were acquired using an anthropomorphic phantom. Contrast-enhancement was simulated by replacing cylindrical sections of the lung with lengths of drinking straw containing contrast agent. The effect of increased density in the tumour volume was considered in this comparison. Secondly, block density corrections were used in an existing patient dataset to simulate an increase in lung density and compared with the original dataset. In the two investigations, a treatment was generated using both datasets. Fields were placed on the non contrast-enhanced scan, and then transferred onto the contrast-enhanced scan. The numbers of monitor units calculated in each of the plans were compared, as were the resulting isodose curves. In the first investigation, the relative electron density in the contrast-enhanced scan varied between 0.523 and 1.705 within the tumour volume. This resulted from the presence of undiluted contrast agent

  14. SU-F-T-128: Dose-Volume Constraints for Particle Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R; Smith, W; Hendrickson, K; Meyer, J; Cao, N; Lee, E; Gopan, O; Sandison, G; Parvathaneni, U; Laramore, G [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Determine equivalent Organ at Risk (OAR) tolerance dose (TD) constraints for MV x-rays and particle therapy. Methods: Equivalent TD estimates for MV x-rays are determined from an isoeffect, regression-analysis of published and in-house constraints for various fractionation schedules (n fractions). The analysis yields an estimate of (α/β) for an OAR. To determine equivalent particle therapy constraints, the MV x-ray TD(n) values are divided by the RBE for DSB induction (RBE{sub DSB}) or cell survival (RBE{sub S}). Estimates of (RBE{sub DSB}) are computed using the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation, and estimates of RBES are computed using the Repair-Misrepair-Fixation (RMF) model. A research build of the RayStation™ treatment planning system implementing the above model is used to estimate (RBE{sub DSB}) for OARs of interest in 16 proton therapy patient plans (head and neck, thorax, prostate and brain). Results: The analysis gives an (α/β) estimate of about 20 Gy for the trachea and heart and 2–4 Gy for the esophagus, spine, and brachial plexus. Extrapolation of MV x-ray constraints (n = 1) to fast neutrons using RBE{sub DSB} = 2.7 are in excellent agreement with clinical experience (n = 10 to 20). When conventional (n > 30) x-ray treatments are used as the reference radiation, fast neutron RBE increased to a maximum of 6. For comparison to a constant RBE of 1.1, the RayStation™ analysis gave estimates of proton RBE{sub DSB} from 1.03 to 1.33 for OARs of interest. Conclusion: The presented system of models is a convenient formalism to synthesize from multiple sources of information a set of self-consistent plan constraints for MV x-ray and hadron therapy treatments. Estimates of RBE{sub DSB} from the RayStation™ analysis differ substantially from 1.1 and vary among patients and treatment sites. A treatment planning system that incorporates patient and anatomy-specific corrections in proton RBE would create opportunities to increase the therapeutic

  15. Origins Space Telescope: Study Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its spectrographs will enable 3D surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the OST STDT, the OST Study Team based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, study partners, and the advisory panel to the study. This presentation will also summarize recent activities, including the process used to reach a decision on the mission architecture, the identification of key science drivers, and the key study milestones between 2017 and 2020.

  16. Parotid Gland Dose in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Is What You Plan What You Get?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.; Wang He; Ang, Kian K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H.; Asper, Joshua A.; Zhang Lifei; Tung Shihming; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the differences between planned and delivered parotid gland and target doses, and to assess the benefits of daily bone alignment for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eleven head and neck cancer patients received two CT scans per week with an in-room CT scanner over the course of their radiotherapy. The clinical IMRT plans, designed with 3-mm to 4-mm planning margins, were recalculated on the repeat CT images. The plans were aligned using the actual treatment isocenter marked with radiopaque markers (BB) and bone alignment to the cervical vertebrae to simulate image-guided setup. In-house deformable image registration software was used to map daily dose distributions to the original treatment plan and to calculate a cumulative delivered dose distribution for each patient. Results: Using conventional BB alignment led to increases in the parotid gland mean dose above the planned dose by 5 to 7 Gy in 45% of the patients (median, 3.0 Gy ipsilateral, p = 0.026; median, 1.0 Gy contralateral, p = 0.016). Use of bone alignment led to reductions relative to BB alignment in 91% of patients (median, 2 Gy; range, 0.3-8.3 Gy; 15 of 22 parotids improved). However, the parotid dose from bone alignment was still greater than planned (median, 1.0 Gy, p = 0.007). Neither approach affected tumor dose coverage. Conclusions: With conventional BB alignment, the parotid gland mean dose was significantly increased above the planned mean dose. Using daily bone alignment reduced the parotid dose compared with BB alignment in almost all patients. A 3- to 4-mm planning margin was adequate for tumor dose coverage

  17. Dose-volume and biological-model based comparison between helical tomotherapy and (inverse-planned) IMAT for prostate tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iori, Mauro; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cagni, Elisabetta; Fiorino, Claudio; Borasi, Gianni; Riccardo, Calandrino; Iotti, Cinzia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Nahum, Alan E.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Helical tomotherapy (HT) and intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) are two arc-based approaches to the delivery of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Through plan comparisons we have investigated the potential of IMAT, both with constant (conventional or IMAT-C) and variable (non-conventional or IMAT-NC, a theoretical exercise) dose-rate, to serve as an alternative to helical tomotherapy. Materials and methods: Six patients with prostate tumours treated by HT with a moderately hypo-fractionated protocol, involving a simultaneous integrated boost, were re-planned as IMAT treatments. A method for IMAT inverse-planning using a commercial module for static IMRT combined with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) arc-sequencing was developed. IMAT plans were compared to HT plans in terms of dose statistics and radiobiological indices. Results: Concerning the planning target volume (PTV), the mean doses for all PTVs were similar for HT and IMAT-C plans with minimum dose, target coverage, equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) values being generally higher for HT; maximum dose and degree of heterogeneity were instead higher for IMAT-C. In relation to organs at risk, mean doses and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values were similar between the two modalities, except for the penile bulb where IMAT was significantly better. Re-normalizing all plans to the same rectal toxicity (NTCP = 5%), the HT modality yielded higher TCP than IMAT-C but there was no significant difference between HT and IMAT-NC. The integral dose with HT was higher than that for IMAT. Conclusions: with regards to the plan analysis, the HT is superior to IMAT-C in terms of target coverage and dose homogeneity within the PTV. Introducing dose-rate variation during arc-rotation, not deliverable with current linac technology, the simulations result in comparable plan indices between (IMAT-NC) and HT

  18. Comparative study of eye dose and chest dose received during radiopharmaceutical production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chindarkar, A.S.; Chavan, S.V.; Sawant, D.K.; Sahoo, L.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Sneha, C.; Sachdev, S.S.; Dey, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical laboratory, BRIT, Vashi produces different radiopharmaceuticals of 131 I, 153 Sm, 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and 177 Lu. Principle gamma energies of these isotopes vary from 103 to 740 KeV and their maximum beta energies vary from 384 to 1214 KeV. In the light of the revised eye lens dose limit recommended in IAEA Basic Safety Standard Interim Edition No. GSR Part 3 (IAEA-2011), the study of radiation dose for eye lens was carried out using CaSO 4 : Dy based Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). This TLD was worn at center of the forehead to measure eye lens dose. This TLD dose was then compared with chest TLD dose to deduce any correlation between these TLD doses. These TLD doses were assessed on quarterly basis. Eight quarter data of these TLD doses were compared

  19. Optimization of stereotactically-guided conformal treatment planning of sellar and parasellar tumors, based on normal brain dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Julian R.; Jalali, Rakesh; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Shepherd, Stephen F.; Warrington, Alan P.; Brada, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal treatment plan for stereo tactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) of sellar and parasellar lesions, with respect to sparing normal brain tissue, in the context of routine treatment delivery, based on dose volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) data sets for 8 patients with sellar- and parasellar-based tumors (6 pituitary adenomas and 2 meningiomas) have been used in this study. Treatment plans were prepared for 3-coplanar and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 30-noncoplanar-field arrangements to obtain 95% isodose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) for each plan. Conformal shaping was achieved by customized blocks generated with the beams eye view (BEV) facility. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the normal brain (excluding the PTV), and comparisons made for normal tissue sparing for all treatment plans at ≥80%, ≥60%, and ≥40% of the prescribed dose. Results: The mean volume of normal brain receiving ≥80% and ≥60% of the prescribed dose decreased by 22.3% (range 14.8-35.1%, standard deviation σ = 7.5%) and 47.6% (range 25.8-69.1%, σ 13.2%), respectively, with a 4-field noncoplanar technique when compared with a conventional 3-field coplanar technique. Adding 2 further fields, from 4-noncoplanar to 6-noncoplanar fields reduced the mean normal brain volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose by a further 4.1% (range -6.5-11.8%, σ = 6.4%), and the volume receiving ≥60% by 3.3% (range -5.5-12.2%, σ = 5.4%), neither of which were statistically significant. Each case must be considered individually however, as a wide range is seen in the volume spared when increasing the number of fields from 4 to 6. Comparing the 4- and 6-field noncoplanar techniques to a 30-field conformal field approach (simulating a dynamic arc plan) revealed near-equivalent normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: Four to six widely spaced, fixed-conformal fields provide the optimum class solution

  20. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungun, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Fu, A; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Boyd, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  1. SU-F-T-340: Direct Editing of Dose Volume Histograms: Algorithms and a Unified Convex Formulation for Treatment Planning with Dose Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungun, B; Fu, A; Xing, L; Boyd, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for including dose constraints in convex programming-based approaches to treatment planning, and to support dynamic modification of such constraints during planning. Methods: We present a mathematical approach that allows mean dose, maximum dose, minimum dose and dose volume (i.e., percentile) constraints to be appended to any convex formulation of an inverse planning problem. The first three constraint types are convex and readily incorporated. Dose volume constraints are not convex, however, so we introduce a convex restriction that is related to CVaR-based approaches previously proposed in the literature. To compensate for the conservatism of this restriction, we propose a new two-pass algorithm that solves the restricted problem on a first pass and uses this solution to form exact constraints on a second pass. In another variant, we introduce slack variables for each dose constraint to prevent the problem from becoming infeasible when the user specifies an incompatible set of constraints. We implement the proposed methods in Python using the convex programming package cvxpy in conjunction with the open source convex solvers SCS and ECOS. Results: We show, for several cases taken from the clinic, that our proposed method meets specified constraints (often with margin) when they are feasible. Constraints are met exactly when we use the two-pass method, and infeasible constraints are replaced with the nearest feasible constraint when slacks are used. Finally, we introduce ConRad, a Python-embedded free software package for convex radiation therapy planning. ConRad implements the methods described above and offers a simple interface for specifying prescriptions and dose constraints. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of using modifiable dose constraints in a convex formulation, making it practical to guide the treatment planning process with interactively specified dose constraints. This work was supported by the

  2. FY 1992 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Phase 1 of the HEDR Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations from limited radionuclides, in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 1 ended in FY 1990. In February 1991, the TSP decided to shift the project planning approach away from phases--which were centered around completion of major portions of technical activities--to individual fiscal years (FYs), which span October of one year through September of the next. Therefore, activities that were previously designated to occur in phases are now designated in an integrated schedule to occur in one or more of the next fiscal years into FY 1995. Task plans are updated every 6 months. In FY 1992, scientists will continue to improve Phase 1 data and models to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. The plan for FY 1992 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meeting on August 19--20, 1991. The activities can be divided into four categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2) additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4) technical and communication support. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  4. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H. [Clinton Power Station Illinois Power Co., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system`s ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed.

  5. SU-F-19A-01: APBI Brachytherapy Treatment Planning: The Impact of Heterogeneous Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupot, S; Han, T; Salehpour, M; Gifford, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in dose to PTV-EVAL and OARs (skin and rib) as calculated by (TG43) and heterogeneous calculations (CCC). Methods: 25 patient plans (5 Contura and 20 SAVI) were selected for analysis. Clinical dose distributions were computed with a commercially available treatment planning algorithm (TG43-D-(w,w)) and then recomputed with a pre-clinical collapsed cone convolution algorithm (CCCD-( m,m)). PTV-EVAL coverage (V90%, V95%), and rib and skin maximum dose were compared via percent difference. Differences in dose to normal tissue (V150cc, V200cc of PTV-EVAL) were also compared. Changes in coverage and maximum dose to organs at risk are reported in percent change, (100*(TG43 − CCC) / TG43)), and changes in maximum dose to normal tissue are absolute change in cc (TG43 − CCC). Results: Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the SAVI cases were −0.2%, −0.4%, −0.03cc, and −0.14cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −0.78%, −1.7%, 1.28cc, and 1.01cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −1.4% and −0.22%, respectively, with maximum differences of −4.5% and 16%, respectively. Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the Contura cases were −1.2%, −2.1%, −1.8cc, and −0.59cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −2.0%, −3.16%, −2.9cc, and −0.76cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −2.6% and −3.9%, respectively, with maximum differences of −3.2% and −5.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The effects of translating clinical knowledge based on D-(w,w) to plans reported in D-(m,m) are minimal (2% or less) on average, but vary based on the type and placement of the device, source, and heterogeneity information

  6. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-12-16

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm(3), the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  7. FY 1991 Task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The objectives of work in Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 are to analyze data and models used in Phase 1 and restructure the models to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty in dose estimation capability. Databases will be expanded and efforts will begin to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Project scope and accuracy requirements, once defined, can be translated into additional model and data requirements later in the project. Task plans for FY 1991 have been prepared based on activities approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in October 1990 and mid-year revisions discussed at the TSP planning/budget workshop in February 1991. The activities can be divided into two broad categories: (1) model and data development and evaluation, (2) project, technical and communication support. 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. The dose-volume constraint satisfaction problem for inverse treatment planning with field segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Darek; Xiao, Ying; Censor, Yair; Galvin, James M

    2004-01-01

    The prescribed goals of radiation treatment planning are often expressed in terms of dose-volume constraints. We present a novel formulation of a dose-volume constraint satisfaction search for the discretized radiation therapy model. This approach does not rely on any explicit cost function. Inverse treatment planning uses the aperture-based approach with predefined, according to geometric rules, segmental fields. The solver utilizes the simultaneous version of the cyclic subgradient projection algorithm. This is a deterministic iterative method designed for solving the convex feasibility problems. A prescription is expressed with the set of inequalities imposed on the dose at the voxel resolution. Additional constraint functions control the compliance with selected points of the expected cumulative dose-volume histograms. The performance of this method is tested on prostate and head-and-neck cases. The relationships with other models and algorithms of similar conceptual origin are discussed. The demonstrated advantages of the method are: the equivalence of the algorithmic and prescription parameters, the intuitive setup of free parameters, and the improved speed of the method as compared to similar iterative as well as other techniques. The technique reported here will deliver approximate solutions for inconsistent prescriptions

  9. Intercoder Reliability of Mapping Between Pharmaceutical Dose Forms in the German Medication Plan and EDQM Standard Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Julian; Becker, Kim; Ludmann, Dominik; Pantazoglou, Elisabeth; Dewenter, Heike; Thun, Sylvia

    2018-01-01

    A nationally uniform medication plan has recently been part of German legislation. The specification for the German medication plan was developed in cooperation between various stakeholders of the healthcare system. Its' goal is to enhance usability and interoperability while also providing patients and physicians with the necessary information they require for a safe and high-quality therapy. Within the research and development project named Medication Plan PLUS, the specification of the medication plan was tested and reviewed for semantic interoperability in particular. In this study, the list of pharmaceutical dose forms provided in the specification was mapped to the standard terms of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare by different coders. The level of agreement between coders was calculated using Cohen's Kappa (κ). Results show that less than half of the dose forms could be coded with EDQM standard terms. In addition to that Kappa was found to be moderate, which means rather unconvincing agreement among coders. In conclusion, there is still vast room for improvement in utilization of standardized international vocabulary and unused potential considering cross-border eHealth implementations in the future.

  10. A preliminary study on cone beam CT image based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Jeevanandham, Prakash; Boopathy, Raghavendiran; Sukumar, Prabakar; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Kunjithapatham, Bhuvana; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan

    2008-01-01

    Kilovolt Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) based on flat panel technology is primarily used for positioning verification. However it is required to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on CBCT images for the purpose of re-planning in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). In this study, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were done using both the planning CT and CBCT images and the corresponding variations in dose and MUs were analyzed, hence evaluating the feasibility of using kilovolt CBCT for dose calculation and patient dose verification. (author)

  11. A study on gamma dose rate in Seoul (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Chang Kyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Jeong Min

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out gamma dose rate in Seoul, from January to December in 2000, and the following results were achieved : The annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was 17.24 μR/hr as average. The annual gamma dose rate in subway of Seoul was 14.96 μR/hr as average. The highest annual gamma dose rate was Dong-daemon ku. Annual gamma dose rate in Seoul was higher autumn than winter

  12. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  13. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  14. WE-AB-207B-07: Dose Cloud: Generating “Big Data” for Radiation Therapy Treatment Plan Optimization Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, MM [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Long, T; Tian, Z; Jia, X; Chen, M; Lu, W; Jiang, SB [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Radke, RJ [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a tool to generate large sets of realistic virtual patient geometries and beamlet doses for treatment optimization research. This tool enables countless studies exploring the fundamental interplay between patient geometry, objective functions, weight selections, and achievable dose distributions for various algorithms and modalities. Methods: Generating realistic virtual patient geometries requires a small set of real patient data. We developed a normalized patient shape model (PSM) which captures organ and target contours in a correspondence-preserving manner. Using PSM-processed data, we perform principal component analysis (PCA) to extract major modes of variation from the population. These PCA modes can be shared without exposing patient information. The modes are re-combined with different weights to produce sets of realistic virtual patient contours. Because virtual patients lack imaging information, we developed a shape-based dose calculation (SBD) relying on the assumption that the region inside the body contour is water. SBD utilizes a 2D fluence-convolved scatter kernel, derived from Monte Carlo simulations, and can compute both full dose for a given set of fluence maps, or produce a dose matrix (dose per fluence pixel) for many modalities. Combining the shape model with SBD provides the data needed for treatment plan optimization research. Results: We used PSM to capture organ and target contours for 96 prostate cases, extracted the first 20 PCA modes, and generated 2048 virtual patient shapes by randomly sampling mode scores. Nearly half of the shapes were thrown out for failing anatomical checks, the remaining 1124 were used in computing dose matrices via SBD and a standard 7-beam protocol. As a proof of concept, and to generate data for later study, we performed fluence map optimization emphasizing PTV coverage. Conclusions: We successfully developed and tested a tool for creating customizable sets of virtual patients suitable for

  15. WE-AB-207B-07: Dose Cloud: Generating “Big Data” for Radiation Therapy Treatment Plan Optimization Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkerts, MM; Long, T; Tian, Z; Jia, X; Chen, M; Lu, W; Jiang, SB; Radke, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a tool to generate large sets of realistic virtual patient geometries and beamlet doses for treatment optimization research. This tool enables countless studies exploring the fundamental interplay between patient geometry, objective functions, weight selections, and achievable dose distributions for various algorithms and modalities. Methods: Generating realistic virtual patient geometries requires a small set of real patient data. We developed a normalized patient shape model (PSM) which captures organ and target contours in a correspondence-preserving manner. Using PSM-processed data, we perform principal component analysis (PCA) to extract major modes of variation from the population. These PCA modes can be shared without exposing patient information. The modes are re-combined with different weights to produce sets of realistic virtual patient contours. Because virtual patients lack imaging information, we developed a shape-based dose calculation (SBD) relying on the assumption that the region inside the body contour is water. SBD utilizes a 2D fluence-convolved scatter kernel, derived from Monte Carlo simulations, and can compute both full dose for a given set of fluence maps, or produce a dose matrix (dose per fluence pixel) for many modalities. Combining the shape model with SBD provides the data needed for treatment plan optimization research. Results: We used PSM to capture organ and target contours for 96 prostate cases, extracted the first 20 PCA modes, and generated 2048 virtual patient shapes by randomly sampling mode scores. Nearly half of the shapes were thrown out for failing anatomical checks, the remaining 1124 were used in computing dose matrices via SBD and a standard 7-beam protocol. As a proof of concept, and to generate data for later study, we performed fluence map optimization emphasizing PTV coverage. Conclusions: We successfully developed and tested a tool for creating customizable sets of virtual patients suitable for

  16. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  17. Absorbed and effective dose from spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Beong Hee; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the absorbed and effective doses of spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning. For radiographic projection. TLD chips were placed in 22 sites of humanoid phantom to record the exposure to skin and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow, thyroid, pituitary, parotid and submandibular glands and nesophages. Effective dose was calculated, using the method suggested by Frederiksen at al.. Patient situations of a single tooth gap in upper and lower midline region, edentulous maxilla and mandible were simulated for spiral tomography. 35 axial slices (maxilla) and 40 axial slices (mandible) with low and standard dose setting were used for computed tomography. All the radiographic procedures were repeated three times. The mean effective dose in case of maxilla was 0.865 mSv, 0.452 mSv, 0.136 mSv and 0.025 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous maxilla, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). That in case of mandible was 0.614 mSv, 0.448 mSv, 0.137 mSv and 0.036 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous mandible, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). Based on these results, it can be concluded that low mAs computed tomography is recommended instead of spiral tomography for the complete edentulous maxilla and mandible dental implant treatment planning

  18. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr

  19. Adult Health Study: provisional research plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, J W; Beebe, G W

    1960-12-14

    The study is planned as an intensive search for the late effects of single, whole-body radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. Although dosimetry information is by no means definitive at this time, preliminary information suggests that the effects of radiation doses up to 600 rads can be effectively studied in the surviving samples. The lower limit is moot, depending on the magnitude of the effect produced and the sensitivity of the study. The upper limit is also somewhat uncertain, as the most closely exposed individuals were more often heavily shielded. The potential radiation effects may be classified as follows: (1) alterations in the incidence of disease; (2) alterations in the natural history of disease, with or without alteration in incidence; (3) development of physiological or biochemical changes, or markers, short of actual disease; (4) nonspecific changes in vigor, acceleration of aging; and (5) occurrence of new diseases. It is proposed to conduct a search sufficiently intensive to detect effects of all five types. It is also a specific objective of this investigation to illuminate the pathogenesis of diseases of increased incidence, or of new diseases, if such be found. Also of interest is the matter of genetic or biochemical factors associated with survival and with the appearance of acute radiation symptoms. Survivors represent a truncated sample and selective host factors may have played a part in both survival and the liklihood of acute radiation symptoms. 17 reference.

  20. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baltas, D. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, 15701 Athens (Greece); Karabis, A. [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens 10676 (Greece); Mavroidis, P. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 17176 (Sweden); Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N. [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Shi, C. [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, 2800 Main Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut 06606 (United States); Papanikolaou, N. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  1. SU-D-207-07: Implementation of Full/half Bowtie Filter Model in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for Kilovoltage X-Ray Imaging Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S; Alaei, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To implement full/half bowtie filter models in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to calculate kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging dose of Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) cone beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods: Full/half bowtie filters of Varian OBI were created as compensator models in Pinnacle TPS (version 9.6) using Matlab software (version 2011a). The profiles of both bowtie filters were acquired from the manufacturer, imported into the Matlab system and hard coded in binary file format. A Pinnacle script was written to import each bowtie filter data into a Pinnacle treatment plan as a compensator. A kV x-ray beam model without including the compensator model was commissioned per each bowtie filter setting based on percent depth dose and lateral profile data acquired from Monte Carlo simulations. To validate the bowtie filter models, a rectangular water phantom was generated in the planning system and an anterior/posterior beam with each bowtie filter was created. Using the Pinnacle script, each bowtie filter compensator was added to the treatment plan. Lateral profile at the depth of 3cm and percent depth dose were measured using an ion chamber and compared with the data extracted from the treatment plans. Results: The kV x-ray beams for both full and half bowtie filter have been modeled in a commercial TPS. The difference of lateral and depth dose profiles between dose calculations and ion chamber measurements were within 6%. Conclusion: Both full/half bowtie filter models provide reasonable results in kV x-ray dose calculations in the water phantom. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a model-based treatment planning system to calculate the kV imaging dose for both full and half bowtie filter modes. Further study is to be performed to evaluate the models in clinical situations

  2. Evolution of calculation models for the proton-therapy dose planning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie Proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams. (author) [fr

  3. Evolution of dose calculation models for proton-therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams [fr

  4. Results of dose control and measurement plans applied for SPEAR3 commissioning year (FY04)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khater, Hesham [Radiation Protection Department, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)]. E-mail: khater1@llnl.gov; Liu, James [Radiation Protection Department, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Prinz, Alyssa [Radiation Protection Department, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Allan, Jim [Radiation Protection Department, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Rokni, Sayed [Radiation Protection Department, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Dose control and measurement plans for the SPEAR3 Booster and storage ring have taken place during the SPEAR3 commissioning. The initial commissioning period (SPEAR3 start-up) covered the time period from the beginning of November 2003 to the early part of March 2004. The period from the beginning of March to the beginning of August 2004 has been mostly dedicated to the scientific program. The initial commissioning period was characterized with frequent injection and significantly higher losses. In comparison, the scientific program period was characterized with more stable beam operation with limited number of injections per day and lower beam losses. Three types of dose measurements, passive, active and special measurements, were implemented around the SPEAR3 Booster and storage ring. Based on the expected radiation hazards, several dose control measures were adopted at several stages of the commissioning. In the early stages of commissioning, areas within 4.5 m from the walls of the Booster and storage ring were designated as radiation areas (RA). Areas outside RA were classified as radiologically controlled area (RCA). Access to these areas required less training than the RA. A monthly review of the accelerator operation conditions and radiation measurement results were used to determine the changes needed for the RA classification status and associated dose control measures.

  5. Scrotal Irradiation in Primary Testicular Lymphoma: Review of the Literature and In Silico Planning Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Wiesendanger, Esther M.; Hulst, Peter C. van der; Imhoff, Gustaaf W. van; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Beijert, Max

    2013-01-01

    We examined adjuvant irradiation of the scrotum in primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) by means of a literature review in MEDLINE, a telephone survey among Dutch institutes, and an in silico planning comparative study on scrotal irradiation in PTL. We did not find any uniform adjuvant irradiation technique assuring a safe planning target volume (PTV) coverage in published reports, and the definition of the clinical target volume is unclear. Histopathologic studies of PTL show a high invasion rate of the tunica albuginea, the epididymis, and the spermatic cord. In retrospective studies, a prescribed dose of at least 30 Gy involving the scrotum is associated with best survival. The majority of Dutch institutes irradiate the whole scrotum without using a planning computed tomography scan, with a single electron beam and a total dose of 30 Gy. The in silico planning comparative study showed that all evaluated approaches met a D 95% scrotal dose of at least 85% of the prescription dose, without exceeding the dose limits of critical organs. Photon irradiation with 2 oblique beams using wedges resulted in the best PTV coverage, with a mean value of 95% of the prescribed dose, with lowest maximum dose. Adjuvant photon or electron irradiation of the whole scrotum including the contralateral testicle with a minimum dose of 30 Gy is recommended in PTL. Computed tomography-based radiation therapy treatment planning with proper patient positioning and position verification guarantees optimal dose coverage.

  6. Radiation dose estimates from a mining plan for a high-grade uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The significance of gamma exposure to uranium miners has been recognized only in the last few years. Most ore deposits which have been underground mined, were 1% or less U 3 O 8 . Full-time mining of this grade ore can result in exposure exceeding 1 Rem per year. Several companies in Saskatchewan are planning to mine recently discovered ore bodies which contain ore pods in excess of 10% U 3 O 8 . The purpose of this paper is to present dose data which can be used to estimate gamma exposure from high-grade ore deposits, and to present mining techniques which will minimize miner exposure

  7. TU-F-BRF-03: Effect of Radiation Therapy Planning Scan Registration On the Dose in Lung Cancer Patient CT Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunliffe, A; Contee, C; White, B; Justusson, J; Armato, S; Malik, R; Al-Hallaq, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of deformable registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60Gy, 2Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map calculated in Pinnacle were collected. To establish baseline correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pre-therapy scans were co-registered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the Plastimatch demons and Fraunhofer MEVIS deformable registration algorithms. Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from both registration algorithms. The absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) between manually and automatically mapped landmark points was calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of the distance between manually and automatically matched points (registration error, E), the dose standard deviation (SD-dose) in the eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: 52–92 landmark point pairs (median: 82) were identified in each patient's scans. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.66Gy (range: 1.2–7.2Gy). |ΔD| was significantly reduced by 0.53Gy using Plastimatch demons compared with Fraunhofer MEVIS. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of E (0.39Gy/mm) and SD-dose (2.23Gy/Gy). Conclusion: An average error of <4Gy in radiation dose was introduced when points were mapped between CT scan pairs using deformable registration. Dose differences following registration were significantly increased when the Fraunhofer MEVIS registration algorithm was used

  8. Neuromuscular dose-response studies: determining sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Lien, C A; Naguib, M

    2011-02-01

    Investigators planning dose-response studies of neuromuscular blockers have rarely used a priori power analysis to determine the minimal sample size their protocols require. Institutional Review Boards and peer-reviewed journals now generally ask for this information. This study outlines a proposed method for meeting these requirements. The slopes of the dose-response relationships of eight neuromuscular blocking agents were determined using regression analysis. These values were substituted for γ in the Hill equation. When this is done, the coefficient of variation (COV) around the mean value of the ED₅₀ for each drug is easily calculated. Using these values, we performed an a priori one-sample two-tailed t-test of the means to determine the required sample size when the allowable error in the ED₅₀ was varied from ±10-20%. The COV averaged 22% (range 15-27%). We used a COV value of 25% in determining the sample size. If the allowable error in finding the mean ED₅₀ is ±15%, a sample size of 24 is needed to achieve a power of 80%. Increasing 'accuracy' beyond this point requires increasing greater sample sizes (e.g. an 'n' of 37 for a ±12% error). On the basis of the results of this retrospective analysis, a total sample size of not less than 24 subjects should be adequate for determining a neuromuscular blocking drug's clinical potency with a reasonable degree of assurance.

  9. Entrances skin dose distribution maps for interventional neuroradiological procedures: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2005-01-01

    Does estimation in interventional neuroradiology can be useful to limit skin radiation injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of entrance skin dose (ESD) maps in planning exposure condition optimisation. Thirteen cerebral angiography and five embolisation procedures were monitored, measuring ESD, dose-area product (DAP) and other operational parameters. A transmission ionisation chamber, simultaneously measuring air kerma and DAP, measured dose-related quantities. Data acquisition software collected dosimetric and geometrical data during the interventional procedure and provided a distribution map of ESD on a standard phantom digital image, with maximum value estimation. Values of 88-1710 mGy for maximum skin dose and 16.7-343 Gy cm 2 for DAP were found. These data confirm the possibility of deterministic effects during therapeutic interventional neuroradiological procedures like cerebral embolisation. ESD maps are useful to retrospectively study the exposure characteristics of a procedure and plan patient exposure optimisation. (authors)

  10. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  11. Dose attenuation effect of hip prostheses in a 9-MV photon beam. Commercial treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesbahi, A.; Nejad, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effect of various hip prostheses on pelvis lateral fields treated by a 9-MV photon beam using Monte Carlo (MC) and effective path-length (EPL) methods. The head of the Neptun 10 pc linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the MC model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The Alfard treatment planning system (TPS) was used for EPL calculations. A virtual water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 and a cube with dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 cm 3 made of various metals centered in 12 cm depth was used for MC and EPL calculations. Various materials including titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys were used as hip prostheses. Our results showed significant attenuation in absorbed dose for points after and inside the prostheses. Attenuations of 32%, 54% and 55% were seen for titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys, respectively, at a distance of 5 cm from the prosthesis. Considerable dose increase (up to 18%) was found at the water-prosthesis interface due to back-scattered electrons using the MC method. The results of EPL calculations for the titanium implant were comparable to the MC calculations. This method, however, was not able to predict the interface effect or calculate accurately the absorbed dose in the presence of the Co-Cr-Mo and steel prostheses. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses is significant and cannot be predicted accurately by the EPL method for Co-Cr-Mo or steel prostheses. The use of MC-based TPS is recommended for treatments requiring fields passing through hip prostheses. (author)

  12. TH-AB-201-01: A Feasibility Study of Independent Dose Verification for CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, A; Noda, T; Keduka, Y; Kawajiri, T; Itano, M; Yamazaki, T; Tachibana, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CyberKnife irradiation is composed of tiny-size, multiple and intensity-modulated beams compared to conventional linacs. Few of the publications for Independent dose calculation verification for CyberKnife have been reported. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of independent dose verification for CyberKnife treatment as Secondary check. Methods: The followings were measured: test plans using some static and single beams, clinical plans in a phantom and using patient’s CT. 75 patient plans were collected from several treatment sites of brain, lung, liver and bone. In the test plans and the phantom plans, a pinpoint ion-chamber measurement was performed to assess dose deviation for a treatment planning system (TPS) and an independent verification program of Simple MU Analysis (SMU). In the clinical plans, dose deviation between the SMU and the TPS was performed. Results: In test plan, the dose deviations were 3.3±4.5%, and 4.1±4.4% for the TPS and the SMU, respectively. In the phantom measurements for the clinical plans, the dose deviations were −0.2±3.6% for the TPS and −2.3±4.8% for the SMU. In the clinical plans using the patient’s CT, the dose deviations were −3.0±2.1% (Mean±1SD). The systematic difference was partially derived from inverse square law and penumbra calculation. Conclusion: The independent dose calculation for CyberKnife shows −3.0±4.2% (Mean±2SD) and our study, the confidence limit was achieved within 5% of the tolerance level from AAPM task group 114 for non-IMRT treatment. Thus, it may be feasible to use independent dose calculation verification for CyberKnife treatment as the secondary check. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)

  13. Radiation doses in mammography as planning parameters for premature breast cancer tracking programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Ferreira, Rubemar de.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation doses are the main parameters applied to the evaluation of mammographic radiological impact. This study, for a sample of 407 women, were analyzed, through the thermoluminescent dosimetry, radiation doses in the surface of skin and glandular absorbed doses for cranio-caudal view. The results show the presence of a large dose range to the same mammographic procedure, which, analyzed enclosed with 585 facilities, suggest be necessary the standardization of the mammographic technique. From that results, with the additive model, the excess of breast cancer (radioinduced) and lifetime loss risk, for age groups between 30 and 70 years were estimated. Is demonstrated that the benefits from dedicated mammography, overcome the relationship among the epidemiological aspects of breast cancer and ionizing radiation as an harmful agent, which may show an important correlation for large exposed populations, point out the importance of the continuous risk and benefit evaluation to the new technologies introduced. (author). 86 refs., 40 figs., 14 tabs

  14. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, G.G. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Kinoshita, A. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coração, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, H.F. de; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L. [Serviço de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, O. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-26

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses.

  15. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, G G; Kinoshita, A; Oliveira, H F de; Guimarães, F S; Amaral, L L; Baffa, O

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses.

  16. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; Oliveira, H.F. de; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses

  17. A validation of carbon fiber imaging couch top modeling in two radiation therapy treatment planning systems: Philips Pinnacle3 and BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njeh, Christopher F; Parker, Jason; Spurgin, Joseph; Rhoe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) is now the material of choice for radiation therapy couch tops. Initial designs included side metal bars for rigidity; however, with the advent of IGRT, involving on board imaging, new thicker CF couch tops without metal bars have been developed. The new design allows for excellent imaging at the expense of potentially unacceptable dose attenuation and perturbation. We set out to model the BrainLAB imaging couch top (ICT) in Philips Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system (TPS), to validate the already modeled ICT in BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose treatment planning system and to compute the magnitude of the loss in skin sparing. Using CF density of 0.55 g/cm 3 and foam density of 0.03 g/cm 3 , we demonstrated an excellent agreement between measured dose and Pinnacle 3 TPS computed dose using 6 MV beam. The agreement was within 1% for all gantry angle measured except for 120 o , which was 1.8%. The measured and iPlan RT Dose TPS computed dose agreed to within 1% for all gantry angles and field sizes measured except for 100 o where the agreement was 1.4% for 10 cm × 10 cm field size. Predicted attenuation through the couch by iPlan RT Dose TPS (3.4% - 9.5%) and Pinnacle 3 TPS (2% - 6.6%) were within the same magnitude and similar to previously reported in the literature. Pinnacle 3 TPS estimated an 8% to 20% increase in skin dose with increase in field size. With the introduction of the CF couch top, it estimated an increase in skin dose by approximately 46 - 90%. The clinical impact of omitting the couch in treatment planning will be dependent on the beam arrangement, the percentage of the beams intersecting the couch and their angles of incidence. We have successfully modeled the ICT in Pinnacle 3 TPS and validated the modeled ICT in iPlan RT Dose. It is recommended that the ICT be included in treatment planning for all treatments that involve posteriors beams. There is a significant increase in skin dose that is dependent on the percentage of the beam

  18. A validation of carbon fiber imaging couch top modeling in two radiation therapy treatment planning systems: Philips Pinnacle3 and BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njeh Christopher F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon fiber (CF is now the material of choice for radiation therapy couch tops. Initial designs included side metal bars for rigidity; however, with the advent of IGRT, involving on board imaging, new thicker CF couch tops without metal bars have been developed. The new design allows for excellent imaging at the expense of potentially unacceptable dose attenuation and perturbation. Objectives We set out to model the BrainLAB imaging couch top (ICT in Philips Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS, to validate the already modeled ICT in BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose treatment planning system and to compute the magnitude of the loss in skin sparing. Results Using CF density of 0.55 g/cm3 and foam density of 0.03 g/cm3, we demonstrated an excellent agreement between measured dose and Pinnacle3 TPS computed dose using 6 MV beam. The agreement was within 1% for all gantry angle measured except for 120o, which was 1.8%. The measured and iPlan RT Dose TPS computed dose agreed to within 1% for all gantry angles and field sizes measured except for 100o where the agreement was 1.4% for 10 cm × 10 cm field size. Predicted attenuation through the couch by iPlan RT Dose TPS (3.4% - 9.5% and Pinnacle3 TPS (2% - 6.6% were within the same magnitude and similar to previously reported in the literature. Pinnacle3 TPS estimated an 8% to 20% increase in skin dose with increase in field size. With the introduction of the CF couch top, it estimated an increase in skin dose by approximately 46 - 90%. The clinical impact of omitting the couch in treatment planning will be dependent on the beam arrangement, the percentage of the beams intersecting the couch and their angles of incidence. Conclusion We have successfully modeled the ICT in Pinnacle3 TPS and validated the modeled ICT in iPlan RT Dose. It is recommended that the ICT be included in treatment planning for all treatments that involve posteriors beams. There is a significant

  19. Uncertainties in planned dose due to the limited voxel size of the planning CT when treating lung tumors with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Dose calculation for lung tumors can be challenging due to the low density and the fine structure of the geometry. The latter is not fully considered in the CT image resolution used in treatment planning causing the prediction of a more homogeneous tissue distribution. In proton therapy, this could result in predicting an unrealistically sharp distal dose falloff, i.e. an underestimation of the distal dose falloff degradation. The goal of this work was the quantification of such effects. Two computational phantoms resembling a two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung geometry and a swine lung were considered applying a variety of voxel sizes for dose calculation. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compare the dose distributions predicted with the voxel size typically used for the treatment planning procedure with those expected to be delivered using the finest resolution. The results show, for example, distal falloff position differences of up to 4 mm between planned and expected dose at the 90% level for the heterogeneous random lung (assuming treatment plan on a 2 x 2 x 2.5 mm 3 grid). For the swine lung, differences of up to 38 mm were seen when airways are present in the beam path when the treatment plan was done on a 0.8 x 0.8 x 2.4 mm 3 grid. The two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung phantom apparently does not describe the impact of the geometry adequately because of the lack of heterogeneities in the axial direction. The differences observed in the swine lung between planned and expected dose are presumably due to the poor axial resolution of the CT images used in clinical routine. In conclusion, when assigning margins for treatment planning for lung cancer, proton range uncertainties due to the heterogeneous lung geometry and CT image resolution need to be considered.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of interactive planned and dynamic dose calculated prostate seed brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Gert J; van den Berg, Hetty A; Hurkmans, Coen W; Stijns, Pascal E; Weterings, Jan H

    2006-09-01

    To compare the dosimetrical results of an interactive planning procedure and a procedure based on dynamic dose calculation for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Between 6/2000 and 11/2005, 510 patients underwent (125)I implants for T1-T2 prostate cancer. Before 4/2003, 187 patients were treated using an interactive technique that included needle updating. After that period, 323 patients were treated with a more refined dynamic technique that included constant updating of the deposited seed position. The comparison is based on postimplant dose - volume parameters such as the V(100) and d(90) for the target, V(100)(r) for the rectum and d(10)(u) for the urethra. Furthermore, the target volume ratios (TVR identical with V(100)(body)/V(100)), and the homogeneity indices (HI identical with [V(100)-V(150)]/V(100)) were calculated as additional quality parameters. The dose outside the target volume was significantly reduced, the V(100)(r) decreased from 1.4 cm(3) for the interactive technique to 0.6 cm(3) for the dynamic technique. Similarly the mean TVR reduced from 1.66 to 1.44. In addition, the mean V(100) increased from 92% for the interactive procedure to 95% for the dynamic procedure. More importantly, the percentage of patients with a V(100) < 80% reduced from 5% to 1%. A slight decline was observed with regard to the d(10)(u) (136% vs. 140%) and the HI (0.58 vs. 0.51). The dynamic implant procedure resulted in improved implants. Almost ideal dose coverage was achieved, while minimizing the dose outside the prostate.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of interactive planned and dynamic dose calculated prostate seed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Gert J.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Stijns, Pascal E.; Weterings, Jan H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetrical results of an interactive planning procedure and a procedure based on dynamic dose calculation for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Materials and methods: Between 6/2000 and 11/2005, 510 patients underwent 125 I implants for T1-T2 prostate cancer. Before 4/2003, 187 patients were treated using an interactive technique that included needle updating. After that period, 323 patients were treated with a more refined dynamic technique that included constant updating of the deposited seed position. The comparison is based on postimplant dose-volume parameters such as the V 100 and d 90 for the target, V 100 r for the rectum and d 10 u for the urethra. Furthermore, the target volume ratios (TVR=V 100 body /V 100 ), and the homogeneity indices (HI=[V 100 -V 150 ]/V 100 ) were calculated as additional quality parameters. Results: The dose outside the target volume was significantly reduced, the V 100 r decreased from 1.4cm 3 for the interactive technique to 0.6cm 3 for the dynamic technique. Similarly the mean TVR reduced from 1.66 to 1.44. In addition, the mean V 100 increased from 92% for the interactive procedure to 95% for the dynamic procedure. More importantly, the percentage of patients with a V 100 10 u (136% vs. 140%) and the HI (0.58 vs. 0.51). Conclusion: The dynamic implant procedure resulted in improved implants. Almost ideal dose coverage was achieved, while minimizing the dose outside the prostate

  2. Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Gertner, Mark R; Bogaards, Arjen; Sherar, Michael D; Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Weersink, Robert A; Giewercer, David [Laboratory for Applied Biophysics, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Scherz, Avigdor [Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Elhilali, Mostafa [Department of Surgery, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Chin, Joseph L [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, 800 Commissioners Road East, PO Box 5010, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Trachtenberg, John [Department of Urology, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca

    2009-04-21

    With the development of new photosensitizers that are activated by light at longer wavelengths, interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a feasible alternative for the treatment of larger volumes of tissue. Described here is the application of PDT treatment planning software developed by our group to ensure complete coverage of larger, geometrically complex target volumes such as the prostate. In a phase II clinical trial of TOOKAD vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) for prostate cancer in patients who failed prior radiotherapy, the software was used to generate patient-specific treatment prescriptions for the number of treatment fibres, their lengths, their positions and the energy each delivered. The core of the software is a finite element solution to the light diffusion equation. Validation against in vivo light measurements indicated that the software could predict the location of an iso-fluence contour to within approximately {+-}2 mm. The same software was used to reconstruct the treatments that were actually delivered, thereby providing an analysis of the threshold light dose required for TOOKAD-VTP of the post-irradiated prostate. The threshold light dose for VTP-induced prostate damage, as measured one week post-treatment using contrast-enhanced MRI, was found to be highly heterogeneous, both within and between patients. The minimum light dose received by 90% of the prostate, D{sub 90}, was determined from each patient's dose-volume histogram and compared to six-month sextant biopsy results. No patient with a D{sub 90} less than 23 J cm{sup -2} had complete biopsy response, while 8/13 (62%) of patients with a D{sub 90} greater than 23 J cm{sup -2} had negative biopsies at six months. The doses received by the urethra and the rectal wall were also investigated.

  3. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  4. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi, Ramin; Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Ghaderi, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs) deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in 'organs-applicators', while maintaining target dose at the original level. There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients' plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  5. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  6. An epidemiological study for the reduction of population radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamo, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    The correlation of tube voltage with patient exposure was studied using effective dose as an indicator of dose reduction in intraoral radiography. The results were as follows: l. The salivary gland tissues contributed the most to the effective dose of intraoral radiography. 2. In the 50 to 90 kV range, there was no appreciable correlation between tube voltage and effective dose. 3. Therefore, it was suggested that adjusting the tube voltage for maximum image quality does not effect radiation protection. 4. This study reconfirmed the fact that increases in voltages up to 90 kV reduce skin doses. (author)

  7. In vitro study of dose rate effect on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastykova, V.; Novotny, J. jr.; Vachelova, J.; Davidkova, M.; Liscak, R.

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiobiological effect of the dose rate changes in Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) clinical conditions. In principle there are two reasons why dose rate on LGK is reduced during patient irradiation: 1) Co-60 sources decay with a half-life of 5.26 years and 2) using multiple iso-centers and conformal treatment plans (e.g. with blocked beams). This pilot study is an experimental work performed in vitro with medulloblastoma DAOY cells. Are there effects caused by low dose rate which could negatively influence the clinical outcome of the radiosurgery? (authors)

  8. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  9. WE-B-304-02: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Biologically and Not Dose/volume Based

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, J.

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations

  10. Influence of intravenous contrast agent on dose calculations of intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Jeung-Kee; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo; Hong, Young-Seoub; Park, Sungkwang; Ahn, Kijung; Cho, Heunglae

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the effect of an intravenous contrast agent (CA) on dose calculations and its clinical significance in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with head and neck cancer and involved neck nodes were enrolled. Each patient took two sets of computerized tomography (CT) in the same position before and after intravenous CA injections. Target volumes and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on the enhanced CT, and then an IMRT plan of nine equiangular beams with a 6 MV X-ray was created. After the fusion of non-enhanced and enhanced CTs, the contours and the IMRT plan created from the enhanced CT were copied and placed to the non-enhanced CT. Doses were calculated again from the non-enhanced CT by the same IMRT plan. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared with regard to planning target volumes (PTV) and the three OARs, both parotid glands and the spinal cord, by Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: The doses (maximum, mean, and the dose of 95% of PTV received (D 95% )) of PTV70 and PTV59.4 calculated from the enhanced CTs were lower than those from the non-enhanced CTs (p < 0.05), but the dose differences were less than 1% compared to the doses calculated from the enhanced CTs. The doses of PTV50.4, parotid glands, and spinal cord were not significantly different between the non-enhanced and enhanced CTs. Conclusions: The difference between the doses calculated from the CTs with and without CA enhancement was tolerably small, therefore using intravenous CA could be recommended for the planning CT of head and neck IMRT

  11. Three-dimensional portal image-based dose reconstruction in a virtual phantom for rapid evaluation of IMRT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansbacher, W.

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rapid evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans has been developed, using portal images for reconstruction of the dose delivered to a virtual three-dimensional (3D) phantom. This technique can replace an array of less complete but more time-consuming measurements. A reference dose calculation is first created by transferring an IMRT plan to a cylindrical phantom, retaining the treatment gantry angles. The isocenter of the fields is placed on or near the phantom axis. This geometry preserves the relative locations of high and low dose regions and has the required symmetry for the dose reconstruction. An electronic portal image (EPI) is acquired for each field, representing the dose in the midplane of a virtual phantom. The image is convolved with a kernel to correct for the lack of scatter, replicating the effect of the cylindrical phantom surrounding the dose plane. This avoids the need to calculate fluence. Images are calibrated to a reference field that delivers a known dose to the isocenter of this phantom. The 3D dose matrix is reconstructed by attenuation and divergence corrections and summed to create a dose matrix (PI-dose) on the same grid spacing as the reference calculation. Comparison of the two distributions is performed with a gradient-weighted 3D dose difference based on dose and position tolerances. Because of its inherent simplicity, the technique is optimally suited for detecting clinically significant variances from a planned dose distribution, rather than for use in the validation of IMRT algorithms. An analysis of differences between PI-dose and calculation, δ PI , compared to differences between conventional quality assurance (QA) and calculation, δ CQ , was performed retrospectively for 20 clinical IMRT cases. PI-dose differences at the isocenter were in good agreement with ionization chamber differences (mean δ PI =-0.8%, standard deviation σ=1.5%, against δ CQ =0.3%, σ=1.0%, respectively). PI-dose

  12. Effective Business Planning : Case Study: Company X

    OpenAIRE

    Yakovleva, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    A business planning process plays one of the most important roles in a company. A business plan can either provide stablility and prosperity to a company or drastically worsen its state. Thus, the recommendations for efficient business plans are very useful for companies that have some difficulties with their perfomance. The thesis has a deductive approach, and the qualitative research method was chosen as primary data was collected through desk study and interviews. The secondary data wa...

  13. A dose-volume histogram based decision-support system for dosimetric comparison of radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, J. C. L.; Herrero, M. A.; Núñez, L.

    2015-01-01

    The choice of any radiotherapy treatment plan is usually made after the evaluation of a few preliminary isodose distributions obtained from different beam configurations. Despite considerable advances in planning techniques, such final decision remains a challenging task that would greatly benefit from efficient and reliable assessment tools. For any dosimetric plan considered, data on dose-volume histograms supplied by treatment planning systems are used to provide estimates on planning target coverage as well as on sparing of organs at risk and the remaining healthy tissue. These partial metrics are then combined into a dose distribution index (DDI), which provides a unified, easy-to-read score for each competing radiotherapy plan. To assess the performance of the proposed scoring system, DDI figures for fifty brain cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided in three groups depending on tumor location and malignancy. For each patient, three tentative plans were designed and recorded during planning, one of which was eventually selected for treatment. We thus were able to compare the plans with better DDI scores and those actually delivered. When planning target coverage and organs at risk sparing are considered as equally important, the tentative plan with the highest DDI score is shown to coincide with that actually delivered in 32 of the 50 patients considered. In 15 (respectively 3) of the remaining 18 cases, the plan with highest DDI value still coincides with that actually selected, provided that organs at risk sparing is given higher priority (respectively, lower priority) than target coverage. DDI provides a straightforward and non-subjective tool for dosimetric comparison of tentative radiotherapy plans. In particular, DDI readily quantifies differences among competing plans with similar-looking dose-volume histograms and can be easily implemented for any tumor type and localization, irrespective of the planning system and

  14. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  15. SU-E-J-229: Quantitative Assessment for Timely Adaptive Re-Planning Using Weekly Dose Monitoring for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Li, Z [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); the 6th people' s hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with head and neck (HN) cancer, mid-course adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a common practice in our institution to accommodate anatomic changes. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether dose re-calculation on weekly verification images can provide quantitative assessment for timely adaptive re-planning with daily image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: We retrospectively selected sixty daily verification images acquired on CT-on-rail/CBCT from ten HN patients. These image sets were typically a week apart. Among these patients, six patients received a mid-course ART. Contours of the tumors and organ-at-risks (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on each verification CT. After placing the treatment iso-center on the verification CTs according to the recorded clinical shifts, daily dose was re-calculated with the same beam configuration as the original plan. For the purpose of this study, electron densities for both verification CTs and planning CTs were set to 1.0 g/cm3. Results: Two patients had D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose for more than three fractions due to remarkable tumor volume shrinkages. D-max of the spinal cord exceeded a tolerance of 45 Gy for four fractions in additional two patients. D-mean of the parotid increased within 25% of the planned value. D-max of the brainstem and D-mean of the oral cavity did not show significant variation. If the re-planning criteria included D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose and D-max of the spinal cord > 45 Gy, two out ten patients required ART at week 2 and two patients required ART at week 3, respectively. Conclusion: Weekly dose monitoring with re-calculation on verification images can provide quantitative dose guidance for timely adaptive re-planning. Future work will include accumulative dose analysis for the decision of adaptive re-planning. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  16. An IMRT dose distribution study using commercial verification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Fernando, W.; Rykers, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT requires users to confirm that the isodose distributions and relative doses calculated by their planning system match the doses delivered by their linear accelerators. To this end the commercially available software, VeriSoft TM (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was trialled to determine if the tools and functions it offered would be of benefit to this process. The CMS Xio (Computer Medical System) treatment planning system was used to generate IMRT plans that were delivered with an upgraded Elekta SL15 linac. Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched in RW3 solid water (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used to measure the IMRT fields delivered with 6 MV photons. The isodose and profiles measured with the film generally agreed to within ± 3% or ± 3 mm with the planned doses, in some regions (outside the IMRT field) the match fell to within ± 5%. The isodose distributions of the planning system and the film could be compared on screen and allows for electronic records of the comparison to be kept if so desired. The features and versatility of this software has been of benefit to our IMRT QA program. Furthermore, the VeriSoft TM software allows for quick and accurate, automated planar film analysis.Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Integration method of 3D MR spectroscopy into treatment planning system for glioblastoma IMRT dose painting with integrated simultaneous boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken, Soléakhéna; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Delannes, Martine; Celsis, Pierre; Cohen-Jonathan, Elizabeth Moyal; Laprie, Anne; Vieillevigne, Laure; Franceries, Xavier; Simon, Luc; Supper, Caroline; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Filleron, Thomas; Lubrano, Vincent; Berry, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    To integrate 3D MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) in the treatment planning system (TPS) for glioblastoma dose painting to guide simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). For sixteen glioblastoma patients, we have simulated three types of dosimetry plans, one conventional plan of 60-Gy in 3D conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT), one 60-Gy plan in IMRT and one 72-Gy plan in SIB-IMRT. All sixteen MRSI metabolic maps were integrated into TPS, using normalization with color-space conversion and threshold-based segmentation. The fusion between the metabolic maps and the planning CT scans were assessed. Dosimetry comparisons were performed between the different plans of 60-Gy 3D-CRT, 60-Gy IMRT and 72-Gy SIB-IMRT, the last plan was targeted on MRSI abnormalities and contrast enhancement (CE). Fusion assessment was performed for 160 transformations. It resulted in maximum differences <1.00 mm for translation parameters and ≤1.15° for rotation. Dosimetry plans of 72-Gy SIB-IMRT and 60-Gy IMRT showed a significantly decreased maximum dose to the brainstem (44.00 and 44.30 vs. 57.01 Gy) and decreased high dose-volumes to normal brain (19 and 20 vs. 23% and 7 and 7 vs. 12%) compared to 60-Gy 3D-CRT (p < 0.05). Delivering standard doses to conventional target and higher doses to new target volumes characterized by MRSI and CE is now possible and does not increase dose to organs at risk. MRSI and CE abnormalities are now integrated for glioblastoma SIB-IMRT, concomitant with temozolomide, in an ongoing multi-institutional phase-III clinical trial. Our method of MR spectroscopy maps integration to TPS is robust and reliable; integration to neuronavigation systems with this method could also improve glioblastoma resection or guide biopsies

  18. SU-F-T-590: Modeling PTV Dose Fall-Off for Cervical Cancer SBRT Treatment Planning Using VMAT and Step-And-Shoot IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A Brito; Cohen, D; Eng, T; Gutierrez, A [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the high dose per fraction in SBRT, dose conformity and dose fall-off are critical. In patients with cervical cancer, rapid dose fall-off is particularly important to limit dose to the nearby rectum, small bowel, and bladder. This study compares the target volume dose fall-off for two radiation delivery techniques, fixed-field IMRT & VMAT, using non-coplanar beam geometries. Further comparisons are made between 6 and 10MV photon beam energies. Methods: Eleven (n=11) patients were planned in Pinnacle3 v9.10 with a NovalisTx (HD120 MLC) machine model using 6 and 10 MV photons. The following three techniques were used: (1) IMRT (10 non-coplanar beams) (2) Dual, coplanar 360° VMAT arcs (4° spacing), and (3) Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs (1 full arc and dual partial arcs). All plans were normalized such that 98% of the PTV received at least 28Gy/4Fx. Dose was calculated using a 2.0mm isotropic dose grid. To assess dose fall-off, twenty concentric 2mm thick rings were created around the PTV. The maximum dose in each ring was recorded and the data was fitted to model dose fall-off. A separate analysis was performed by separating target volumes into small (0–50cc), medium (51–80cc), and large (81–110cc). Results: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs showed the best dose fall-off for all patients evaluated. All fitted regressions had an R{sup 2}≥0.99. At 10mm from the PTV edge, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement in dose fall-off of 3.8% and 6.9% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. At 30mm, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement of 12.0% and 7.0% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. Faster dose fall-off was observed for small volumes as opposed to medium and large ones—9.6% at 20mm. Conclusion: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs offer the sharpest dose fall-off for cervical SBRT plans. This improvement is most pronounced when treating smaller target volumes.

  19. SU-E-T-120: Analytic Dose Verification for Patient-Specific Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C; Mah, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To independently verify the QA dose of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) plans using an analytic dose calculation model. Methods: An independent proton dose calculation engine is created using the same commissioning measurements as those employed to build our commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). Each proton PBS plan is exported from the TPS in DICOM format and calculated by this independent dose engine in a standard 40 x 40 x 40 cm water tank. This three-dimensional dose grid is then compared with the QA dose calculated by the commercial TPS, using standard Gamma criterion. A total of 18 measured pristine Bragg peaks, ranging from 100 to 226 MeV, are used in the model. Intermediate proton energies are interpolated. Similarly, optical properties of the spots are measured in air over 15 cm upstream and downstream, and fitted to a second-order polynomial. Multiple Coulomb scattering in water is approximated analytically using Preston and Kohler formula for faster calculation. The effect of range shifters on spot size is modeled with generalized Highland formula. Note that the above formulation approximates multiple Coulomb scattering in water and we therefore chose not use the full Moliere/Hanson form. Results: Initial examination of 3 patient-specific prostate PBS plans shows that agreement exists between 3D dose distributions calculated by the TPS and the independent proton PBS dose calculation engine. Both calculated dose distributions are compared with actual measurements at three different depths per beam and good agreements are again observed. Conclusion: Results here showed that 3D dose distributions calculated by this independent proton PBS dose engine are in good agreement with both TPS calculations and actual measurements. This tool can potentially be used to reduce the amount of different measurement depths required for patient-specific proton PBS QA

  20. Radiation dose to the patient in radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    In medical radionuclide studies, the radiation risk has to be considered in addition to the general risk of administering a pharmaceutical. As radiation exposure is an essential factor in radiation risk estimation, some aspects of internal dose calculation, including radiation risk assessments, are treated. The formalism of current internal dose calculation is presented. The input data, especially the residence time and the absorbed dose per transformation, their origin and accuracy are discussed. Results of internal dose calculations for the ten most frequently used radionuclide studies are presented as somatically effective dose equivalents. The accuracy of internal dose calculation is treated in detail by considering the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical, the phantoms used for dose calculations, the absorbed dose per transformation, the administered activity, and the transfer of the dose, calculated for a phantom, to the patient. The internal dose calculated for a reference phantom may be assumed to be in accordance with the actual patient dose within a range described by a factor of about two to three. Finally, risk estimates for nuclear medicine procedures are quantified, being generally of sixth order. The radiation risk from the radioiodine test is comparably higher, but probably lower than calculated according to the UNSCEAR risk coefficients. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results and to improve the quantification of the radiation risk from the medical use of radionuclides. (author)

  1. A case study of strategic planning IFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Rodrigues de Camargo Dias

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to identify and characterize the initial stage of the IFB strategic planning, based on the perception of top management and planning team. The case study adopts a qualitative approach supported by bibliographic research techniques, to build a theoretical foundation, allied to the semistructure interview for later, application of the content analysis. As a result, we can identify that the institution opted to first define the strategic references, based on the construction of the mission, vision and values, and later, analysis of the organizational diagnosis, based on the Balanced Scorecard methodology. It was verified that the tool of strategic planning and its use are points that need to be better understood by the managers and technical planning team. The predominant characteristics of strategic planning are composed of a programmatic tool for projecting medium and long term goals and actions, of legal compliance, as it integrates and operationalizes the Institutional Development Plan (PDI.

  2. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  3. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J

    2013-01-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit. (paper)

  4. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L Saenz; Bhudatt R Paliwal; John E Bayouth

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This ...

  5. SU-D-BRC-03: Development and Validation of an Online 2D Dose Verification System for Daily Patient Plan Delivery Accuracy Check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J; Hu, W; Xing, Y; Wu, X; Li, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: All plan verification systems for particle therapy are designed to do plan verification before treatment. However, the actual dose distributions during patient treatment are not known. This study develops an online 2D dose verification tool to check the daily dose delivery accuracy. Methods: A Siemens particle treatment system with a modulated scanning spot beam is used in our center. In order to do online dose verification, we made a program to reconstruct the delivered 2D dose distributions based on the daily treatment log files and depth dose distributions. In the log files we can get the focus size, position and particle number for each spot. A gamma analysis is used to compare the reconstructed dose distributions with the dose distributions from the TPS to assess the daily dose delivery accuracy. To verify the dose reconstruction algorithm, we compared the reconstructed dose distributions to dose distributions measured using PTW 729XDR ion chamber matrix for 13 real patient plans. Then we analyzed 100 treatment beams (58 carbon and 42 proton) for prostate, lung, ACC, NPC and chordoma patients. Results: For algorithm verification, the gamma passing rate was 97.95% for the 3%/3mm and 92.36% for the 2%/2mm criteria. For patient treatment analysis,the results were 97.7%±1.1% and 91.7%±2.5% for carbon and 89.9%±4.8% and 79.7%±7.7% for proton using 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm criteria, respectively. The reason for the lower passing rate for the proton beam is that the focus size deviations were larger than for the carbon beam. The average focus size deviations were −14.27% and −6.73% for proton and −5.26% and −0.93% for carbon in the x and y direction respectively. Conclusion: The verification software meets our requirements to check for daily dose delivery discrepancies. Such tools can enhance the current treatment plan and delivery verification processes and improve safety of clinical treatments.

  6. SU-D-BRC-03: Development and Validation of an Online 2D Dose Verification System for Daily Patient Plan Delivery Accuracy Check

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Xing, Y [Fudan univercity shanghai proton and heavy ion center, Shanghai (China); Wu, X [Fudan university shanghai proton and heavy ion center, Shanghai, shagnhai (China); Li, Y [Department of Medical physics at Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: All plan verification systems for particle therapy are designed to do plan verification before treatment. However, the actual dose distributions during patient treatment are not known. This study develops an online 2D dose verification tool to check the daily dose delivery accuracy. Methods: A Siemens particle treatment system with a modulated scanning spot beam is used in our center. In order to do online dose verification, we made a program to reconstruct the delivered 2D dose distributions based on the daily treatment log files and depth dose distributions. In the log files we can get the focus size, position and particle number for each spot. A gamma analysis is used to compare the reconstructed dose distributions with the dose distributions from the TPS to assess the daily dose delivery accuracy. To verify the dose reconstruction algorithm, we compared the reconstructed dose distributions to dose distributions measured using PTW 729XDR ion chamber matrix for 13 real patient plans. Then we analyzed 100 treatment beams (58 carbon and 42 proton) for prostate, lung, ACC, NPC and chordoma patients. Results: For algorithm verification, the gamma passing rate was 97.95% for the 3%/3mm and 92.36% for the 2%/2mm criteria. For patient treatment analysis,the results were 97.7%±1.1% and 91.7%±2.5% for carbon and 89.9%±4.8% and 79.7%±7.7% for proton using 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm criteria, respectively. The reason for the lower passing rate for the proton beam is that the focus size deviations were larger than for the carbon beam. The average focus size deviations were −14.27% and −6.73% for proton and −5.26% and −0.93% for carbon in the x and y direction respectively. Conclusion: The verification software meets our requirements to check for daily dose delivery discrepancies. Such tools can enhance the current treatment plan and delivery verification processes and improve safety of clinical treatments.

  7. Feasibility and robustness of dose painting by numbers in proton therapy with contour-driven plan optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragán, A. M.; Differding, S.; Lee, J. A.; Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To prove the ability of protons to reproduce a dose gradient that matches a dose painting by numbers (DPBN) prescription in the presence of setup and range errors, by using contours and structure-based optimization in a commercial treatment planning system. Methods: For two patients with head and neck cancer, voxel-by-voxel prescription to the target volume (GTV PET ) was calculated from 18 FDG-PET images and approximated with several discrete prescription subcontours. Treatments were planned with proton pencil beam scanning. In order to determine the optimal plan parameters to approach the DPBN prescription, the effects of the scanning pattern, number of fields, number of subcontours, and use of range shifter were separately tested on each patient. Different constant scanning grids (i.e., spot spacing = Δx = Δy = 3.5, 4, and 5 mm) and uniform energy layer separation [4 and 5 mm WED (water equivalent distance)] were analyzed versus a dynamic and automatic selection of the spots grid. The number of subcontours was increased from 3 to 11 while the number of beams was set to 3, 5, or 7. Conventional PTV-based and robust clinical target volumes (CTV)-based optimization strategies were considered and their robustness against range and setup errors assessed. Because of the nonuniform prescription, ensuring robustness for coverage of GTV PET inevitably leads to overdosing, which was compared for both optimization schemes. Results: The optimal number of subcontours ranged from 5 to 7 for both patients. All considered scanning grids achieved accurate dose painting (1% average difference between the prescribed and planned doses). PTV-based plans led to nonrobust target coverage while robust-optimized plans improved it considerably (differences between worst-case CTV dose and the clinical constraint was up to 3 Gy for PTV-based plans and did not exceed 1 Gy for robust CTV-based plans). Also, only 15% of the points in the GTV PET (worst case) were above 5% of DPBN

  8. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio; Kudo, Seiichi; Nishimura, Kazuya

    2001-01-01

    When we assume a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, it is required for rescue activity in the plant, accident management, repair work of failed parts and evaluation of employees to obtain radiation dose rate distribution or map in the plant and estimated dose value for the above works. However it might be difficult to obtain them accurately along the progress of the accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in the areas where the accident management is planned or the repair work is thought for safety-related equipments. In this work, we analyzed diffusion of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system by modeling a specific part of components and buildings in the plant from this design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the followings: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate in any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including moving route and time for the accident management and the repair work is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these actions of the employees. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  9. Design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Irie, Takashi; Kohriyama, Tamio [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Kudo, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Kazuya [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    When we assume a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, it is required for rescue activity in the plant, accident management, repair work of failed parts and evaluation of employees to obtain radiation dose rate distribution or map in the plant and estimated dose value for the above works. However it might be difficult to obtain them accurately along the progress of the accident, because radiation monitors are not always installed in the areas where the accident management is planned or the repair work is thought for safety-related equipments. In this work, we analyzed diffusion of radioactive materials in case of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor plant, investigated a method to obtain radiation dose rate in the plant from estimated radioactive sources, made up a prototype analyzing system by modeling a specific part of components and buildings in the plant from this design study on dose evaluation method for employees at severe accident, and then evaluated its availability. As a result, we obtained the followings: (1) A new dose evaluation method was established to predict the radiation dose rate in any point in the plant during a severe accident scenario. (2) This evaluation of total dose including moving route and time for the accident management and the repair work is useful for estimating radiation dose limit for these actions of the employees. (3) The radiation dose rate map is effective for identifying high radiation areas and for choosing a route with lower radiation dose rate. (author)

  10. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.devereux@petermac.org [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Supple, Jeremy [School of Applied Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  11. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  12. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  13. Web-Based Training on Reviewing Dose Modeling Aspects of NRC Decommissioning and License Termination Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2008-01-01

    NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course was developed in 2006 and 2007 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The objective of this course is to train NRC headquarters and regional office staff on how to review sections of a licensee's DP or LTP that pertain to dose modeling. The DP generally refers to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, while the LTP refers specifically to the decommissioning of reactors. This review is part of the NRC's licensing process, in which the NRC determines if a licensee has provided a suitable technical basis to support derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs)1 or dose modeling analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with dose-based license termination rule criteria. This type of training is one component of an organizational management system. These systems 'use a range of practices to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge for reuse, awareness and learning'. This is especially important in an organization undergoing rapid change or staff turnover to retain organizational information and processes. NRC is committed to maintaining a dynamic program of training, development, and knowledge transfer to ensure that the NRC acquires and maintains the competencies needed to accomplish its mission. This paper discusses one specific project

  14. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors

  15. A study of different dose calculation methods and the impact on the dose evaluation protocol in lung stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Takahiro; Furuya, Tomohisa; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ito, Kana; Kurokawa, Chie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Miura, Kohei

    2008-01-01

    AAA (analytical anisotropic algorithm) dose calculation, which shows a better performance for heterogeneity correction, was tested for lung stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT) in comparison to conventional PBC (pencil beam convolution method) to evaluate its impact on tumor dose parameters. Eleven lung SBRT patients who were treated with photon 4 MV beams in our department between April 2003 and February 2007 were reviewed. Clinical target volume (CTV) was delineated including the spicula region on planning CT images. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined by adding the internal target volume (ITV) and set-up margin (SM) of 5 mm from CTV, and then an multileaf collimator (MLC) penumbra margin of another 5 mm was also added. Six-port non-coplanar beams were employed, and a total prescribed dose of 48 Gy was defined at the isocenter point with four fractions. The entire treatment for an individual patient was completed within 8 days. Under the same prescribed dose, calculated dose distribution, dose volume histogram (DVH), and tumor dose parameters were compared between two dose calculation methods. In addition, the fractionated prescription dose was repeatedly scaled until the monitor units (MUs) calculated by AAA reached a level of MUs nearly identical to those achieved by PBC. AAA resulted in significantly less D95 (irradiation dose that included 95% volume of PTV) and minimal dose in PTV compared to PBC. After rescaling of each MU for each beam in the AAA plan, there was no revision of the isocenter of the prescribed dose required. However, when the PTV volume was less than 20 cc, a 4% lower prescription resulted in nearly identical MUs between AAA and PBC. The prescribed dose in AAA should be the same as that in PBC, if the dose is administered at the isocenter point. However, planners should compare DVHs and dose distributions between AAA and PBC for a small lung tumor with a PTV volume less than approximately 20 cc. (author)

  16. Is the dose distribution distorted in IMRT and RapidArc treatment when patient plans are swapped across beam‐matched machines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Chandrasekaran Anu; Subramani, Vendhan; Gunasekaran, Madhan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of dose distribution distortion in advanced treatments like IMRT and RapidArc when patient plans are swapped across dosimetrically equivalent so‐called “beam‐matched” machines. For this purpose the entire work is divided into two stages. At forefront stage all basic beam properties of 6 MV X‐rays like PDD, profiles, output factors, TPR20/10 and MLC transmission of two beam‐matched machines — Varian Clinac iX and Varian 600 C/D Unique — are compared and evaluated for differences. At second stage 40 IMRT and RapidArc patient plans from the pool of head and neck (H&N) and pelvis sites are selected for the study. The plans are swapped across the machines for dose recalculation and the DVHs of target and critical organs are evaluated for dose differences. Following this, the accuracy of the beam‐matching at the TPS level for treatments like IMRT and RapidArc are compared. On PDD, profile (central 80%) and output factor comparison between the two machines, a maximum percentage disagreement value of −2.39%,−2.0% and −2.78%, respectively, has been observed. The maximum dose difference observed at volumes in IMRT and RapidArc treatments for H&N dose prescription of 69.3 Gy/33 fractions is 0.88 Gy and 0.82 Gy, respectively. Similarly, for pelvis, with a dose prescription of 50 Gy/25 fractions, a maximum dose difference of 0.55 Gy and 0.53 Gy is observed at volumes in IMRT and RapidArc treatments, respectively. Overall results of the swapped plans between two machines' 6 MV X‐rays are well within the limits of accepted clinical tolerance. PACS number(s): 87.56.bd PMID:27685106

  17. Fostering Effective Studying and Study Planning with Study Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Pascal; Pieters, Jules M.

    2007-01-01

    In a course on biological psychology and neuropsychology, study questions were provided that also appeared as test questions in the course exam. This method was introduced to support students in active processing and reproduction of the study texts, and study planning. Data were gathered to test the hypothesis that study question use would be…

  18. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with α r = 0.764 Gy −1 and β = 0.0615 Gy −2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  19. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  20. Dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation algorithm for stereotactic and conventional lung volumetric modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Petra S; Hol, Sandra; Essers, Marion

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the current study was to assess the dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for stereotactic (stage I) and conventional (stage III) lung cancer treatments planned with Eclipse version 10.0 Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm. The dosimetric impact of using AAA instead of AXB, and grid size 2.5 mm instead of 1.0 mm for VMAT treatment plans was evaluated. The clinical plan quality of AXB VMAT was assessed using 45 stage I and 73 stage III patients, and was compared with published results, planned with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The dosimetric impact on near-minimum PTV dose (D 98% ) using AAA instead of AXB was large (underdose up to 12.3%) for stage I and very small (underdose up to 0.8%) for stage III lung treatments. There were no significant differences for dose volume histogram (DVH) values between grid sizes. The calculation time was significantly higher for AXB grid size 1.0 than 2.5 mm (p < 0.01). The clinical quality of the VMAT plans was at least comparable with clinical qualities given in literature of lung treatment plans with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The average mean lung dose (MLD), lung V 20Gy and V 5Gy in this study were respectively 3.6 Gy, 4.1% and 15.7% for 45 stage I patients and 12.4 Gy, 19.3% and 46.6% for 73 stage III lung patients. The average contra-lateral lung dose V 5Gy-cont was 35.6% for stage III patients. For stereotactic and conventional lung treatments, VMAT calculated with AXB grid size 2.5 mm resulted in accurate dose calculations. No hybrid technique was needed to obtain the dose constraints. AXB is recommended instead of AAA for avoiding serious overestimation of the minimum target doses compared to the actual delivered dose

  1. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  2. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy in postprostatectomy radiotherapy patients: A planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forde, Elizabeth; Kneebone, Andrew; Bromley, Regina; Guo, Linxin; Hunt, Peter; Eade, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postprostatectomy planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with both single arc (SA) and double arcs (DA) against dynamic sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten cases were planned with IMRT, SA VMAT, and DA VMAT. All cases were planned to achieve a minimum dose of 68 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and goals to limit rectal volume >40 Gy to 35% and >65 Gy to 17%, and bladder volumes >40 Gy to 50% and >65 Gy to 25%. Plans were averaged across the 10 patients and compared for mean dose, conformity, homogeneity, rectal and bladder doses, and monitor units. The mean dose to the clinical target volume and PTV was significantly higher (p<0.05) for SA compared with DA or IMRT. The homogeneity index was not significantly different: SA = 0.09; DA = 0.08; and IMRT = 0.07. The rectal V40 was lowest for the DA plan. The rectal V20 was significantly lower (p<0.05) for both the VMAT plans compared with IMRT. There were no significant differences for bladder V40 or rectal and bladder V65. The IMRT plans required 1400 MU compared with 745 for DA and 708 for SA. This study shows that for equivalent dose coverage, SA and DA VMAT plans result in higher mean doses to the clinical target volume and PTV. This greater dose heterogeneity is balanced by improved low-range rectal doses and halving of the monitor units

  3. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy in postprostatectomy radiotherapy patients: A planning comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forde, Elizabeth, E-mail: eforde@tcd.ie [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bromley, Regina [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Guo, Linxin; Hunt, Peter [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postprostatectomy planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with both single arc (SA) and double arcs (DA) against dynamic sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten cases were planned with IMRT, SA VMAT, and DA VMAT. All cases were planned to achieve a minimum dose of 68 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and goals to limit rectal volume >40 Gy to 35% and >65 Gy to 17%, and bladder volumes >40 Gy to 50% and >65 Gy to 25%. Plans were averaged across the 10 patients and compared for mean dose, conformity, homogeneity, rectal and bladder doses, and monitor units. The mean dose to the clinical target volume and PTV was significantly higher (p<0.05) for SA compared with DA or IMRT. The homogeneity index was not significantly different: SA = 0.09; DA = 0.08; and IMRT = 0.07. The rectal V40 was lowest for the DA plan. The rectal V20 was significantly lower (p<0.05) for both the VMAT plans compared with IMRT. There were no significant differences for bladder V40 or rectal and bladder V65. The IMRT plans required 1400 MU compared with 745 for DA and 708 for SA. This study shows that for equivalent dose coverage, SA and DA VMAT plans result in higher mean doses to the clinical target volume and PTV. This greater dose heterogeneity is balanced by improved low-range rectal doses and halving of the monitor units.

  4. Computed tomography-based treatment planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the tandem and ring applicator: influence of applicator choice on organ dose and inter-fraction adaptive planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional planning for high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in cervical cancer has been highly recommended by consensus guidelines such as the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO. In this document, we describe our experience with computed tomography (CT-based planning using the tandem/ring applicator. We discuss the influence of applicator geometry on doses to organs at risk (OARs, namely the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Through example cases with dose prescribed to point A, we demonstrate how adaptive planning can help achieve constraints to the OARs as per guidelines.

  5. Fostering effective studying and study planning with study questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, P.; Pieters, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    In a course on biological psychology and neuropsychology, study questions were provided that also appeared as test questions in the course exam. This method was introduced to support students in active processing and reproduction of the study texts, and study planning. Data were gathered to test the

  6. NASA plan for international crustal dynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The international activities being planned as part of the NASA geodynamics program are described. Methods of studying the Earth's crustal movements and deformation characteristics are discussed. The significance of the eventual formalations of earthquake predictions methods is also discussed.

  7. Monte Carlo studies for irradiation process planning at the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.; Salgado, J.; Botelho, M.L.M. Luisa; Ferreira, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes a Monte Carlo study for planning the irradiation of test samples for microbiological validation of distinct products in the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility. Three different irradiation geometries have been used. Simulated and experimental results are compared and good agreement is observed. It is shown that Monte Carlo simulation improves process understanding, predicts absorbed dose distributions and calculates dose uniformity in different products. Based on these results, irradiation planning of the product can be performed

  8. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation; Comparacao da dose absorvida no tratamento do cancer ginecologico por braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose utilizando o planejamento convencional do tratamento e simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-07-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of {sup 192}Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results

  9. Intradermal Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: A Preclinical Dose-Finding Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial...

  10. The minimum knowledge base for predicting organ-at-risk dose-volume levels and plan-related complications in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao H; D'Souza, Warren D; Meyer, Robert R; Shi Leyuan

    2010-01-01

    IMRT treatment planning requires consideration of two competing objectives: achieving the required amount of radiation for the planning target volume and minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to all other tissues. It is important for planners to understand the tradeoff between competing factors so that the time-consuming human interaction loop (plan-evaluate-modify) can be eliminated. Treatment-plan-surface models have been proposed as a decision support tool to aid treatment planners and clinicians in choosing between rival treatment plans in a multi-plan environment. In this paper, an empirical approach is introduced to determine the minimum number of treatment plans (minimum knowledge base) required to build accurate representations of the IMRT plan surface in order to predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume (DV) levels and complications as a function of input DV constraint settings corresponding to all involved OARs in the plan. We have tested our approach on five head and neck patients and five whole pelvis/prostate patients. Our results suggest that approximately 30 plans were sufficient to predict DV levels with less than 3% relative error in both head and neck and whole pelvis/prostate cases. In addition, approximately 30-60 plans were sufficient to predict saliva flow rate with less than 2% relative error and to classify rectal bleeding with an accuracy of 90%.

  11. Planning Target Volume D95 and Mean Dose Should Be Considered for Optimal Local Control for Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Chan [Department of Health Service Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R.; Welsh, James D.; Lin, Steve H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the optimal dose parameters predictive for local/lobar control after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study encompassed a total of 1092 patients (1200 lesions) with NSCLC of clinical stage T1-T2 N0M0 who were treated with SABR of 50 Gy in 4 fractions or 70 Gy in 10 fractions, depending on tumor location/size, using computed tomography-based heterogeneity corrections and a convolution superposition calculation algorithm. Patients were monitored by chest CT or positron emission tomography/CT and/or biopsy after SABR. Factors predicting local/lobar recurrence (LR) were determined by competing risk multivariate analysis. Continuous variables were divided into 2 subgroups at cutoff values identified by receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: At a median follow-up time of 31.7 months (interquartile range, 14.8-51.3 months), the 5-year time to local recurrence within the same lobe and overall survival rates were 93.8% and 44.8%, respectively. Total cumulative number of patients experiencing LR was 40 (3.7%), occurring at a median time of 14.4 months (range, 4.8-46 months). Using multivariate competing risk analysis, independent predictive factors for LR after SABR were minimum biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) to 95% of planning target volume (PTVD95 BED{sub 10}) ≤86 Gy (corresponding to PTV D95 physics dose of 42 Gy in 4 fractions or 55 Gy in 10 fractions) and gross tumor volume ≥8.3 cm{sup 3}. The PTVmean BED{sub 10} was highly correlated with PTVD95 BED{sub 10.} In univariate analysis, a cutoff of 130 Gy for PTVmean BED{sub 10} (corresponding to PTVmean physics dose of 55 Gy in 4 fractions or 75 Gy in 10 fractions) was also significantly associated with LR. Conclusions: In addition to gross tumor volume, higher radiation dose delivered to the PTV predicts for better local/lobar control. We recommend that both PTVD95 BED

  12. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic body radiotherapy using 4D CT and multiphase CT images for treatment planning of lung cancer: Evaluation of the impact on daily dose coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Hayes, Shelly; Paskalev, Kamen; Jin Lihui; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Feigenberg, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of using 4D CT and multiphase (helical) CT images for treatment planning target definition and the daily target coverage in hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Materials and methods: For 10 consecutive patients treated with SBRT, a set of 4D CT images and three sets of multiphase helical CT scans, taken during free-breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold, were obtained. Three separate planning target volumes (PTVs) were created from these image sets. A PTV 4D was created from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed 4D images by adding a 3 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV). A PTV 3CT was created by generating ITV from gross target volumes (GTVs) contoured from the three multiphase images. Finally, a third conventional PTV (denoted PTV conv ) was created by adding 5 mm in the axial direction and 10 mm in the longitudinal direction to the GTV (in this work, GTV = CTV = clinical target volume) generated from free-breathing helical CT scans. Treatment planning was performed based on PTV 4D (denoted as Plan-1), and the plan was adopted for PTV 3CT and PTV conv to form Plan-2 and Plan-3, respectively, by superimposing 'Plan-1' onto the helical free-breathing CT data set using modified beam apertures that conformed to either PTV 3CT or PTV conv . We first studied the impact of PTV design on treatment planning by evaluating the dosimetry of the three PTVs under the three plans, respectively. Then we examined the effect of the PTV designs on the daily target coverage by utilizing pre-treatment localization CT (CT-on-rails) images for daily GTV contouring and dose recalculation. The changes in the dose parameters of D 95 and D 99 (the dose received by 95% and 99% of the target volume, respectively), and the V p (the volume receiving the prescription dose) of the daily GTVs were compared under the three plans before and after setup error correction

  13. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Chiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Isono, Masaru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  14. Dose attenuation by a carbon fiber linac couch and modeling with a treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Galiano, P.; Garcia Sancho, J.M.; Crelgo, D.; Pamos, M.; Fernandez, J.; Vivanco, J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the attenuation caused by a carbon fiber linac treatment couch and the ability of a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system to simulate it. The attenuation caused by an Exact treatment couch in a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D was characterized in detail. Both 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams were studied. The treatment couch was modeled and incorporated to Elekta XiO treatment planning system. Measured and computed attenuation values were compared. As a result we found that the attenuation caused by this complex treatment couch is strongly dependent on the incidence angle of the beam. The measured attenuation values reach 16% for 6 MV and 10% for 18 MV. The model incorporated to the treatment planning software allows reducing the differences between measured and calculated data below 2.5% and 2.0% for 6 MV and 18 MV respectively. In conclusion, it is strongly recommended accounting for the perturbation caused by this carbon fiber treatment couch when the beam intersects it. The treatment planning system studied can simulate this treatment couch accurately. Clinical implementation of the described method requires a reliable procedure to reproduce the same patient geometry in the treatment delivery and planning. (Author).

  15. Intradermal inactivated poliovirus vaccine: a preclinical dose-finding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2015-05-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial vaccine doses induced antibodies at titers comparable to those after immunization with full human dose delivered intramuscularly. The results suggest that intradermal delivery of IPV may lead to dose-sparing effect and reduction of the vaccination cost. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Impact of intravenous contrast used in computed tomography on radiation dose to carotid arteries and thyroid in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victor Ho Fun, E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk; Ng, Sherry Chor Yi; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Lam, Ka On; Leung, To Wai

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if intravenous contrast injection affected the radiation doses to carotid arteries and thyroid during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thirty consecutive patients with NPC underwent plain computed tomography (CT) followed by repeated scanning after contrast injection. Carotid arteries (common, external, internal), thyroid, target volumes, and other organs-at-risk (OARs), as well as IMRT planning, were based on contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images. All these structures and the IMRT plans were then copied and transferred to the non–contrast-enhanced CT (NCE-CT) images, and dose calculation without optimization was performed again. The radiation doses to the carotid arteries and the thyroid based on CE-CT and NCE-CT were then compared. Based on CE-CT, no statistical differences, despite minute numeric decreases, were noted in all dosimetric parameters (minimum, maximum, mean, median, D05, and D01) of the target volumes, the OARs, the carotid arteries, and the thyroid compared with NCE-CT. Our results suggested that compared with NCE-CT planning, CE-CT scanning should be performed during IMRT for better target and OAR delineation, without discernible change in radiation doses.

  17. Study of teflon pads as high doses dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Ines; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the Teflon, which is used as a binder in the manufacture of dosimetric tablets, for the feasibility of this material as high dose dosemeter. In this paper we used the technique of thermally stimulated luminescence (OSL) to characterize the dosimetric properties of Teflon. Teflon samples were exposed to different doses of radiation, using a source of gamma radiation ( 60 Co). It was obtained dose-response curve between 100 Gy to 50 kGy and reproducibility of OSL response. The preliminary results show that Teflon is a useful material to high dose dosimetry

  18. Estimation of dose and exposure at sentinel node study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beslic, N.; Begic, A.; Begovic-Hadzimuratovic, S.; Drazeta, Z.; Beganovic, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose end exposure in staff involved in sentinel node procedure for breast cancer patients. The Institute of Nuclear Medicine in Sarajevo uses a protocol for lymphoscintigraphy of the sentinel node whereby 13 MBq of 9 9mT c nanocoll are used. In this study, we measured radiation doses and exposure of a nuclear medicine physician and a technologist, as well as a surgeon performing sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy and biopsy. Dose and exposure were calculated using the equation in which we have gamma constant for 9 9mT c. Calculations were made for different times of exposure and distance. In Table 1. we estimated the dose and exposure during sentinel node study. Radiation levels were very low and the most exposed hospital staff performing sentinel node study were nuclear medicine physicians. The doses on the hands of surgeons were negligible 8 hours after exposure.(author)

  19. Does inverse planning applied to Iridium192 high dose rate prostate brachytherapy improve the optimization of the dose afforded by the Paris system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickers, Philippe; Lenaerts, Eric; Thissen, Benedicte; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of the work is to analyse for 192 Ir prostate brachytherapy (BT) some of the different steps in optimizing the dose delivered to the CTV, urethra and rectum. Materials and methods: Between 07/1998 and 12/2001, 166 patients were treated with 192 Ir wires providing a low dose rate, according to the Paris system philosophy and with the 2D version of the treatment planning Isis R . 40-45 Gy were delivered after an external beam radiotherapy of 40 Gy. The maximum tolerable doses for BT were 25 Gy to the anterior third of the rectum on the whole length of the implant (R dose) and 52 Gy to the urethra on a 1 cm length (U max ). A U max /CTV dose ratio >1.3 represented a pejorative value as the planned dose of 40-45 Gy could not be achieved. On the other side a ratio ≤1.25 was considered optimal and the intermediate values satisfactory. A R/CTV dose ratio 192 Ir sources. Results: At the end of a learning curve reaching a plateau after the first 71 patients, 90% of the implants with 192 Ir wires were stated at least satisfactory for a total rate of 82% for the whole population. When the 3D dosimetry for SST was used, the initial values >1.25 decreased significantly with optimization required on CTV contours and additional constraints on urethra while the R/CTV ratio was maintained under 0.55. For initial U max /CTV >1.3 or >1.25 but ≤1.3 indeed, the mean respective values of 1.41±0.16 and 1.28±0.01 decreased to 1.28±0.24 and 1.17±0.09 (P<0.001), allowing to increase the total dose to the CTV by 4 Gy. Conclusions: The Paris system which assumes a homogeneous distribution of a minimum number of catheters inside the CTV allowed to anticipate a satisfactory dosimetry in 82% of cases. However, this precision rate could be improved until 95% with an optimization approach based on an inverse planning philosophy. These new 3D optimization methods, ideally based on good quality implants at first allow to deliver the highest doses with

  20. Studies of absorbed dose determinations and spatial dose distributions for high energy proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Takeshi

    1982-01-01

    Absolute dose determinations were made with three types of ionization chamber and a Faraday cup. Methane based tissue equivalent (TE) gas, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, air were used as an ionizing gas with flow rate of 10 ml per minute. Measurements were made at the entrance position of unmodulated beams and for a beam of a spread out Bragg peak at a depth of 17.3 mm in water. For both positions, the mean value of dose determined by the ionization chambers was 0.993 +- 0.014 cGy for which the value of TE gas was taken as unity. The agreement between the doses estimated by the ionization chambers and the Faraday cup was within 5%. Total uncertainty estimated in the ionization chamber and the Faraday cup determinations is 6 and 4%, respectively. Common sources of error in calculating the dose from ionization chamber measurements are depend on the factors of ion recombination, W value, and mass stopping power ratio. These factors were studied by both experimentally and theoretically. The observed values for the factors show a good agreement to the predicted one. Proton beam dosimetry intercomparison between Japan and the United States was held. Good agreement was obtained with standard deviation of 1.6%. The value of the TE calorimeter is close to the mean value of all. In the proton spot scanning system, lateral dose distributions at any depth for one spot beam can be simulated by the Gaussian distribution. From the Gaussian distributions and the central axis depth doses for one spot beam, it is easy to calculate isodose distributions in the desired field by superposition of dose distribution for one spot beam. Calculated and observed isodose curves were agreed within 1 mm at any dose levels. (J.P.N.)

  1. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm 3 NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR 192 Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility ( 2 =1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for 192 Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2±0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0±0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments

  2. SU-E-T-381: Evaluation of Calculated Dose Accuracy for Organs-At-Risk Located at Out-Of-Field in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for High Energy Photon Beams Produced From TrueBeam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Ding, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation accuracy for the out-of-field dose is important for predicting the dose to the organs-at-risk when they are located outside primary beams. The investigations on evaluating the calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems (TPS) on out-of-field dose in existing publications have focused on low energy (6MV) photon. This study evaluates out-of-field dose calculation accuracy of AAA algorithm for 15MV high energy photon beams. Methods: We used the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes to evaluate the AAA algorithm in Varian Eclipse TPS (v.11). The incident beams start with validated Varian phase-space sources for a TrueBeam linac equipped with Millennium 120 MLC. Dose comparisons between using AAA and MC for CT based realistic patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques for prostate and lung were performed and uncertainties of organ dose predicted by AAA at out-of-field location were evaluated. Results: The results show that AAA calculations under-estimate doses at the dose level of 1% (or less) of prescribed dose for CT based patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques. In regions where dose is only 1% of prescribed dose, although AAA under-estimates the out-of-field dose by 30% relative to the local dose, it is only about 0.3% of prescribed dose. For example, the uncertainties of calculated organ dose to liver or kidney that is located out-of-field is <0.3% of prescribed dose. Conclusion: For 15MV high energy photon beams, very good agreements (<1%) in calculating dose distributions were obtained between AAA and MC. The uncertainty of out-of-field dose calculations predicted by the AAA algorithm for realistic patient VMAT plans is <0.3% of prescribed dose in regions where the dose relative to the prescribed dose is <1%, although the uncertainties can be much larger relative to local doses. For organs-at-risk located at out-of-field, the error of dose predicted by Eclipse using AAA is negligible. This work was conducted in part using the

  3. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  4. 3D calculation of absorbed dose for 131I-targeted radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedzadeh, E.; Sarkar, S.; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, A.; Ay, M. R.; Khosravi, H. R.; Loudos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various methods, such as those developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or employing dose point kernels, have been applied to the radiation dosimetry of 131 I radionuclide therapy. However, studies have not shown a strong relationship between tumour absorbed dose and its overall therapeutic response, probably due in part to inaccuracies in activity and dose estimation. In the current study, the GATE Monte Carlo computer code was used to facilitate voxel-level radiation dosimetry for organ activities measured in an. 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patient. This approach allows incorporation of the size, shape and composition of organs (in the current study, in the Zubal anthropomorphic phantom) and intra-organ and intra-tumour inhomogeneities in the activity distributions. The total activities of the tumours and their heterogeneous distributions were measured from the SPECT images to calculate the dose maps. For investigating the effect of activity distribution on dose distribution, a hypothetical homogeneous distribution of the same total activity was considered in the tumours. It was observed that the tumour mean absorbed dose rates per unit cumulated activity were 0.65 E-5 and 0.61 E-5 mGY MBq -1 s -1 for the uniform and non-uniform distributions in the tumour, respectively, which do not differ considerably. However, the dose-volume histograms (DVH) show that the tumour non-uniform activity distribution decreases the absorbed dose to portions of the tumour volume. In such a case, it can be misleading to quote the mean or maximum absorbed dose, because overall response is likely limited by the tumour volume that receives low (i.e. non-cytocidal) doses. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry, and calculation of tumour DVHs, may lead to the derivation of clinically reliable dose-response relationships and therefore may ultimately improve treatment planning as well as response assessment for radionuclide

  5. WE-F-16A-06: Using 3D Printers to Create Complex Phantoms for Dose Verification, Quality Assurance, and Treatment Planning System Commissioning in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassaee, A; Ding, X; McDonough, J; Reiche, M; Witztum, A; Teo, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To use 3D printers to design and construct complex geometrical phantoms for commissioning treatment planning systems, dose calculation algorithms, quality assurance (QA), dose delivery, and patient dose verifications. Methods: In radiotherapy, complex geometrical phantoms are often required for dose verification, dose delivery and calculation algorithm validation. Presently, fabrication of customized phantoms is limited due to time, expense and challenges in machining of complex shapes. In this work, we designed and utilized 3D printers to fabricate two phantoms for QA purposes. One phantom includes hills and valleys (HV) for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy for photons, and protons (IMRT and IMPT). The other phantom includes cylindrical cavities (CC) of various sizes for dose verification of inhomogeneities. We evaluated the HV phantoms for an IMPT beam, and the CC phantom to study various inhomogeneity configurations using photon, electron, and proton beams. Gafcromic ™ films were used to quantify the dose distributions delivered to the phantoms. Results: The HV phantom has dimensions of 12 cm × 12 cm and consists of one row and one column of five peaks with heights ranging from 2 to 5 cm. The CC phantom has a size 10 cm × 14 cm and includes 6 cylindrical cavities with length of 7.2 cm and diameters ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 cm. The IMPT evaluation using the HV phantom shows good agreement as compared to the dose distribution calculated with treatment planning system. The CC phantom also shows reasonable agreements for using different algorithms for each beam modalities. Conclusion: 3D printers with submillimiter resolutions are capable of printing complex phantoms for dose verification and QA in radiotherapy. As printing costs decrease and the technology becomes widely available, phantom design and construction will be readily available to any clinic for testing geometries that were not previously feasible

  6. Experimental verification of lung dose with radiochromic film: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and commercially available treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paelinck, L; Reynaert, N; Thierens, H; Neve, W De; Wagter, C de

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the absorbed dose in and around lung tissue by performing radiochromic film measurements, Monte Carlo simulations and calculations with superposition convolution algorithms. We considered a layered polystyrene phantom of 12 x 12 x 12 cm 3 containing a central cavity of 6 x 6 x 6 cm 3 filled with Gammex RMI lung-equivalent material. Two field configurations were investigated, a small 1 x 10 cm 2 field and a larger 10 x 10 cm 2 field. First, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the influence of radiochromic film itself on the measured dose distribution when the film intersects a lung-equivalent region and is oriented parallel to the central beam axis. To that end, the film and the lung-equivalent materials were modelled in detail, taking into account their specific composition. Next, measurements were performed with the film oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the central beam axis to verify the results of our Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we digitized the phantom in two commercially available treatment planning systems, Helax-TMS version 6.1A and Pinnacle version 6.2b, and calculated the absorbed dose in the phantom with their incorporated superposition convolution algorithms to compare with the Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing Monte Carlo simulations with measurements reveals that radiochromic film is a reliable dosimeter in and around lung-equivalent regions when the film is positioned perpendicular to the central beam axis. Radiochromic film is also able to predict the absorbed dose accurately when the film is positioned parallel to the central beam axis through the lung-equivalent region. However, attention must be paid when the film is not positioned along the central beam axis, in which case the film gradually attenuates the beam and decreases the dose measured behind the cavity. This underdosage disappears by offsetting the film a few centimetres. We find deviations of about 3.6% between

  7. Experimental verification of lung dose with radiochromic film: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and commercially available treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paelinck, L.; Reynaert, N.; Thierens, H.; DeNeve, W.; DeWagter, C.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the absorbed dose in and around lung tissue by performing radiochromic film measurements, Monte Carlo simulations and calculations with superposition convolution algorithms. We considered a layered polystyrene phantom of 12 × 12 × 12 cm3 containing a central cavity of 6 × 6 × 6 cm3 filled with Gammex RMI lung-equivalent material. Two field configurations were investigated, a small 1 × 10 cm2 field and a larger 10 × 10 cm2 field. First, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the influence of radiochromic film itself on the measured dose distribution when the film intersects a lung-equivalent region and is oriented parallel to the central beam axis. To that end, the film and the lung-equivalent materials were modelled in detail, taking into account their specific composition. Next, measurements were performed with the film oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the central beam axis to verify the results of our Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we digitized the phantom in two commercially available treatment planning systems, Helax-TMS version 6.1A and Pinnacle version 6.2b, and calculated the absorbed dose in the phantom with their incorporated superposition convolution algorithms to compare with the Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing Monte Carlo simulations with measurements reveals that radiochromic film is a reliable dosimeter in and around lung-equivalent regions when the film is positioned perpendicular to the central beam axis. Radiochromic film is also able to predict the absorbed dose accurately when the film is positioned parallel to the central beam axis through the lung-equivalent region. However, attention must be paid when the film is not positioned along the central beam axis, in which case the film gradually attenuates the beam and decreases the dose measured behind the cavity. This underdosage disappears by offsetting the film a few centimetres. We find deviations of about 3.6% between

  8. Optimization of the dose level for a given treatment plan to maximize the complication-free tumor cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, B.K.; Mavroidis, P.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    During the past decade, tumor and normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy have been increasingly quantified in radiobiological terms. For this purpose, response models describing the dependence of tumor and normal tissue reactions on the irradiated volume, heterogeneity of the delivered dose distribution and cell sensitivity variations can be taken into account. The probability of achieving a good treatment outcome can be increased by using an objective function such as P + , the probability of complication-free tumor control. A new procedure is presented, which quantifies P + from the dose delivery on 2D surfaces and 3D volumes and helps the user of any treatment planning system (TPS) to select the best beam orientations, the best beam modalities and the most suitable beam energies. The final step of selecting the prescribed dose level is made by a renormalization of the entire dose plan until the value of P + is maximized. The index P + makes use of clinically established dose-response parameters, for tumors and normal tissues of interest, in order to improve its clinical relevance. The results, using P + , are compared against the assessments of experienced medical physicists and radiation oncologists for two clinical cases. It is observed that when the absorbed dose level for a given treatment plan is increased, the treatment outcome first improves rapidly. As the dose approaches the tolerance of normal tissues the complication-free curve begins to drop. The optimal dose level is often just below this point and it depends on the geometry of each patient and target volume. Furthermore, a more conformal dose delivery to the target results in a higher control rate for the same complication level. This effect can be quantified by the increased value of the P + parameter. (orig.)

  9. Protocol for adaptation of internal dosimetry techniques for planning of individualized doses of {sup 131}I in pediatric patients; Protocolo para adaptacao de tecnicas de dosimetria interna para planejamento de doses individualizadas de {sup 131}I em pacientes pediatricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancardi, Rodrigo

    2011-07-01

    The optimization of radiation doses is emphasized in diseases with good prognosis, as differentiated thyroid carcinomas, especially in pediatric patients, since the radiation risk is conversely proportional to age. Aiming to establish individual treatment planning, it has been studied four dosimetry methodologies (external dose monitoring, image quantification, urine and blood bioassay) for four 13.3 {+-} 1.5-year-old female patients, who received 107 {+-} 15 MBq (2,9 {+-} 0,4 mCi) for tracer dose and 5.5 {+-} 0.3 GBq (149 {+-} 8 mCi) for thyroid ablation. Effective half-lives, residence times and cumulated activities were estimated in organs and tissues with iodine uptake, through planar images quantification by conjugate-view and attenuation correction, in order to compare biokinetic behavior in tracer dose and ablative dose phases. For external monitoring, two patients had similar whole-body effective half-lives in both phases. For this methodology, despite the uncertainties associated to measurements, equipment used and procedures performed were adequate. For urine bioassay, there were not similarities among the patients whole-body effective half-lives. Through blood bioassay, it was observed that 0.2 % of the administered activity for ablative dose remained in the blood until 76 hours after administration. The external monitoring allowed estimating effective doses in patients mothers by conversion of the environmental equivalent dose. In the ablative dose phase, the effective doses resulted in 1.3 {+-} 0.3 mSv in the hospital and 0.3 {+-} 0.1 mSv in patients houses. (author)

  10. Comparison of different treatment planning optimization methods for vaginal HDR brachytherapy with multichannel applicators: A reduction of the high doses to the vaginal mucosa is possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Mauro; Cusumano, Davide; Giandini, Tommaso; Tenconi, Chiara; Mazzarella, Ester; Grisotto, Simone; Massari, Eleonora; Mazzeo, Davide; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Pappalardi, Brigida; Fallai, Carlo; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    A direct planning approach with multi-channel vaginal cylinders (MVCs) used for HDR brachytherapy of vaginal cancers is particularly challenging. Purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric performances of different forward and inverse methods used for the optimization of MVC-based vaginal treatments for endometrial cancer, with a particular attention to the definition of strategies useful to limit the high doses to the vaginal mucosa. Twelve postoperative vaginal HDR brachytherapy treatments performed with MVCs were considered. Plans were retrospectively optimized with three different methods: Dose Point Optimization followed by Graphical Optimization (DPO + GrO), Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing with two different class solutions as starting conditions (surflPSA and homogIPSA) and Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization (HIPO). Several dosimetric parameters related to target coverage, hot spot extensions and sparing of organs at risk were analyzed to evaluate the quality of the achieved treatment plans. Dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformal index (COIN) and a further parameter quantifying the proportion of the central catheter loading with respect to the overall loading (i.e., the central catheter loading index: CCLI) were also quantified. The achieved PTV coverage parameters were highly correlated with each other but uncorrelated with the hot spot quantifiers. HomogIPSA and HIPO achieved higher DHIs and CCLIs and lower volumes of high doses than DPO + GrO and surflPSA. Within the investigated optimization methods, HIPO and homoglPSA showed the highest dose homogeneity to the target. In particular, homogIPSA resulted also the most effective in reducing hot spots to the vaginal mucosa. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Practical aspects and applications of the biological effective dose three-dimensional calculation for multi-phase radiotherapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin Ikaika

    The approximate BED (BEDA) is calculated for multi-phase cases due to current treatment planning systems (TPSs) being incapable of performing BED calculations. There has been no study on the mathematical accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to the true BED (BEDT), and how that might negatively impact patient care. The purpose of the first aim was to study the mathematical accuracy and precision in both hypothetical and clinical situations, while the next two aims were to create multi-phase BED optimization ideas for both multi-target liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases, and gynecological cases where patients are treated with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy along with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). MATLAB algorithms created for this work were used to mathematically analyze the accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to BEDT in both hypothetical and clinical situations on a 3D basis. The organs-at-risk (OARs) of ten head & neck and ten prostate cancer patients were studied for the clinical situations. The accuracy of BEDA was shown to vary between OARs as well as between patients. The percentage of patients with an overall BEDA percent error less than 1% were, 50% for the Optic Chiasm and Brainstem, 70% for the Left and Right Optic Nerves, as well as the Rectum and Bladder, and 80% for the Normal Brain and Spinal Cord. As seen for each OAR among different patients, there were always cases where the percent error was greater than 1%. This is a cause for concern since the goal of radiation therapy is to reduce the overall uncertainty of treatment, and calculating BEDA distributions increases the treatment uncertainty with percent errors greater than 1%. The revealed inaccuracy and imprecision of BEDA supports the argument to use BEDT. The multi-target liver study involved applying BEDT in order to reduce the number of dose limits to one rather than have one for each fractionation scheme in multi-target liver SBRT treatments. A BEDT limit

  12. Modeling of Salivary Production Recovery After Radiotherapy Using Mixed Models: Determination of Optimal Dose Constraint for IMRT Planning and Construction of Convenient Tools to Predict Salivary Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortholan, Cecile; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Benezery, Karen; Thariat, Juliette; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Bozec, Alexandre; Follana, Philippe; Peyrade, Frederique; Sudaka, Anne; Gerard, Jean Pierre; Bensadoun, Rene Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The mathematical relationship between the dose to the parotid glands and salivary gland production needs to be elucidated. This study, which included data from patients included in a French prospective study assessing the benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT), sought to elaborate a convenient and original model of salivary recovery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and December 2004, 44 patients were included (35 with oropharyngeal and 9 with nasopharyngeal cancer). Of the 44 patients, 24 were treated with intensity-modulated RT, 17 with three-dimensional conformal RT, and 2 with two-dimensional RT. Stimulated salivary production was collected for ≤24 months after RT. The data of salivary production, time of follow-up, and dose to parotid gland were modeled using a mixed model. Several models were developed to assess the best-fitting variable for the dose level to the parotid gland. Results: Models developed with the dose to the contralateral parotid fit the data slightly better than those with the dose to both parotids, suggesting that contralateral and ipsilateral parotid glands are not functionally equivalent even with the same dose level to the glands. The best predictive dose-value variable for salivary flow recovery was the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy. Conclusion: The results of this study show that the recommendation of a dose constraint for intensity-modulated RT planning should be established at the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy rather than the mean dose. For complete salivary production recovery after 24 months, the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy should be <33%. Our results permitted us to establish two convenient tools to predict the saliva production recovery function according to the dose received by the contralateral parotid gland

  13. Multicriteria plan optimization in the hands of physicians: a pilot study in prostate cancer and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Birgit S; Shih, Helen A; Efstathiou, Jason A; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2017-11-06

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of physician driven planning in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning system and template based plan optimization. Exploiting the full planning potential of MCO navigation, this alternative planning approach intends to improve planning efficiency and individual plan quality. Planning was retrospectively performed on 12 brain tumor and 10 post-prostatectomy prostate patients previously treated with MCO-IMRT. For each patient, physicians were provided with a template-based generated Pareto surface of optimal plans to navigate, using the beam angles from the original clinical plans. We compared physician generated plans to clinically delivered plans (created by dosimetrists) in terms of dosimetric differences, physician preferences and planning times. Plan qualities were similar, however physician generated and clinical plans differed in the prioritization of clinical goals. Physician derived prostate plans showed significantly better sparing of the high dose rectum and bladder regions (p(D1) plans indicated higher doses for targets and brainstem (p(D1) plan comparisons physicians preferred the clinical plans more often (brain: 6:3 out of 12, prostate: 2:6 out of 10) (not statistically significant). While times of physician involvement were comparable for prostate planning, the new workflow reduced the average involved time for brain cases by 30%. Planner times were reduced for all cases. Subjective benefits, such as a better understanding of planning situations, were observed by clinicians through the insight into plan optimization and experiencing dosimetric trade-offs. We introduce physician driven planning with MCO for brain and prostate tumors as a feasible planning workflow. The proposed approach standardizes the planning process by utilizing site specific templates and integrates physicians more tightly into treatment planning. Physicians

  14. Use of CT scans and treatment planning software for validation of the dose component of food irradiation protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, Joseph; Chu, Rod; Sun Jiansheng; Linton, Nick; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    The challenging problem of estimating the dose delivered to heterogeneous products by radiation modalities of limited penetration can be readily handled by using technologies developed for, and widely used in, radiation therapy applications. In particular, combining CT scanning with radiation treatment planning programs can simulate radiation processing with either photons or electrons, and can provide detailed, high resolution and accurate dose maps for any arbitrary product and package configuration. Such dose maps are an essential part of process validation. Comparison of the simulated dose distributions with measured dose maps verifies the soundness of this approach. The present communication presents results obtained with the simulation technique for a variety of common food items which are likely candidates for radiation processing

  15. TU-D-201-05: Validation of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Experience Working with MPPG 5.a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, J; Park, J; Kim, L; Wang, C [MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, Camden, NJ (United States); Balter, P; Ohrt, J; Kirsner, S; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Newly published medical physics practice guideline (MPPG 5.a.) has set the minimum requirements for commissioning and QA of treatment planning dose calculations. We present our experience in the validation of a commercial treatment planning system based on MPPG 5.a. Methods: In addition to tests traditionally performed to commission a model-based dose calculation algorithm, extensive tests were carried out at short and extended SSDs, various depths, oblique gantry angles and off-axis conditions to verify the robustness and limitations of a dose calculation algorithm. A comparison between measured and calculated dose was performed based on validation tests and evaluation criteria recommended by MPPG 5.a. An ion chamber was used for the measurement of dose at points of interest, and diodes were used for photon IMRT/VMAT validations. Dose profiles were measured with a three-dimensional scanning system and calculated in the TPS using a virtual water phantom. Results: Calculated and measured absolute dose profiles were compared at each specified SSD and depth for open fields. The disagreement is easily identifiable with the difference curve. Subtle discrepancy has revealed the limitation of the measurement, e.g., a spike at the high dose region and an asymmetrical penumbra observed on the tests with an oblique MLC beam. The excellent results we had (> 98% pass rate on 3%/3mm gamma index) on the end-to-end tests for both IMRT and VMAT are attributed to the quality beam data and the good understanding of the modeling. The limitation of the model and the uncertainty of measurement were considered when comparing the results. Conclusion: The extensive tests recommended by the MPPG encourage us to understand the accuracy and limitations of a dose algorithm as well as the uncertainty of measurement. Our experience has shown how the suggested tests can be performed effectively to validate dose calculation models.

  16. Surveillance on interfacility differences in dose-prescription policy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Hatano, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently become popular in Japan. Prostate cancer is indisputably one of the main targets of IMRT. However, the current status and interfacility differences in dose-prescription policies for prostate IMRT are unknown. Therefore, a nationwide survey of 43 institutions that had implemented prostate IMRT was conducted by sending a questionnaire regarding the above-mentioned issues. Thirty-three institutions (77%) had responded to the questionnaire by the end of October 2010. A total of 5245 patients with localized prostate cancer had been treated with IMRT by the end of 2009. Regular multileaf collimator-based techniques were the most common beam delivery method. Dose-prescription policies were divided into four major categories: isocenter-based (at isocenter), dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (D95)-based (D95 at PTV), mean dose to the PTV-based (Mean at PTV), and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV)-based (at CTV). The mean doses of the CTV and PTV, and the volume of the PTV receiving 95% of the dose (V95) were significantly higher with the D95 at PTV policy than with the other prescription policies. Low-dose areas and hot spots were observed within the PTV in plans with at isocenter and at CTV policies. In conclusion, there are currently considerable differences among institutions in Japan regarding target doses for prostate IMRT. The D95 at PTV prescription policy resulted in significant dose escalation compared with the other policies. These differences should be taken into consideration when interpreting treatment outcomes and creating multi-institutional protocols in the future. (author)

  17. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, Kelly A.; McMahon, Sandra M.; Long, Gillian; Bunch, Judith A.; Pandeya, Nirmala; Coakley, Kerry S.; Chang, Anne B.

    2007-01-01

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 ± 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 ± 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 ± 41.72 cGy cm 2 . Significant differences were found across three age groups (≤1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  18. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [Department of Physics, East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jones, E [Radiology and Imaging Sciences Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  19. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Jones, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  20. Identifying the most successful dose (MSD) in dose-finding studies in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; O'Quigley, John

    2006-01-01

    For a dose finding study in cancer, the most successful dose (MSD), among a group of available doses, is that dose at which the overall success rate is the highest. This rate is the product of the rate of seeing non-toxicities together with the rate of tumor response. A successful dose finding trial in this context is one where we manage to identify the MSD in an efficient manner. In practice we may also need to consider algorithms for identifying the MSD which can incorporate certain restrictions, the most common restriction maintaining the estimated toxicity rate alone below some maximum rate. In this case the MSD may correspond to a different level than that for the unconstrained MSD and, in providing a final recommendation, it is important to underline that it is subject to the given constraint. We work with the approach described in O'Quigley et al. [Biometrics 2001; 57(4):1018-1029]. The focus of that work was dose finding in HIV where both information on toxicity and efficacy were almost immediately available. Recent cancer studies are beginning to fall under this same heading where, as before, toxicity can be quickly evaluated and, in addition, we can rely on biological markers or other measures of tumor response. Mindful of the particular context of cancer, our purpose here is to consider the methodology developed by O'Quigley et al. and its practical implementation. We also carry out a study on the doubly under-parameterized model, developed by O'Quigley et al. but not

  1. Sodium phenylbutyrate in Huntington's disease: a dose-finding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Penelope; Lovrecic, Luca; Krainc, Dimitri

    2007-10-15

    Transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease (HD) is mediated in part by aberrant patterns of histone acetylation. We performed a dose-finding study in human HD of sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB), a histone deacetylase inhibitor that ameliorates the HD phenotype in animal models. We used a dose-escalation/de-escalation design, using prespecified toxicity criteria and standard clinical and laboratory safety measures. The maximum tolerated dose was 15 g/day. At higher doses, toxicity included vomiting, lightheadedness, confusion, and gait instability. We saw no significant laboratory or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Gene expression changes in blood suggested an inverse dose-response. In conclusion, SPB at 12 to 15 g/day appears to be safe and well-tolerated in human HD. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  2. Micro-dosing for early biokinetic studies in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, K.; Sydoff, M.; Mattsson, S.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-dosing is a new concept in drug development that-if implemented in the pharmaceutical industry-would mean that new drugs can be tested earlier in humans than done today. The human micro-dosing concept-or 'Phase 0'-may offer improved candidate selection, reduced failure rates in the drug development line and a reduction in the use of laboratory animals in early drug development, factors which will help to speed up drug development and also reduce the costs. Micro-dosing utilises sub-pharmacological amounts of the substance to open opportunities for early studies in man. Three technologies are used for micro-dosing: accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), positron emission tomography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This paper focuses on the principle of AMS and discusses the current status of micro-dosing with AMS. (authors)

  3. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  4. Dose evaluation and risk estimation for secondary cancer in contralateral breast and a study of correlation between thorax shape and dose to organs at risk following tangentially breast irradiation during deep inspiration breath-hold and free breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Safora; Vikstroem, Johan; Blihovde Hjelstuen, Mari Helene; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of using breathing adapted radiotherapy on contralateral breast (CB) dose, to relate the thorax shape with the dose to the organs at risk (OARs) and to predict the risk for induced malignancies in CB using linear and non-linear models, following tangential irradiation of breast. Material and methods. Sixteen patients with stage I-II breast cancer treatment planned with tangential fields using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) techniques were included in this analysis. The dose results mainly based on DVH analysis were compared. Four parameters were defined to describe thoracic shape. Excess relative risk (ERR) for cancer induction in CB, employing linear and non-linear models was calculated. Results. Average CB volumes exposed to a dose of 1 Gy is 1.3 times higher in DIBH plans than in FB plans. No significant difference in average V3Gy and V5Gy for DIBH and FB plans is observed. The average mean CB dose for DIBH and FB plans is 0.33 and 0.28 Gy, respectively. No correlation between thorax shape parameters and mean OARs dose is observed. The estimated average mean ERR with linear model is lower in FB plans (0.12) than for the DIBH plans (0.14). The estimated ERR with non-linear model is 0.14 for DIBH plans and 0.15 for FB plans. Conclusion. No significant difference in CB dose between DIBH and FB plans is observed. The four thorax shape parameters defined in this study can not be related to the dose at OARs using DIBH and FB radiation techniques. The ERR estimates for secondary CB cancer are nearly the same for FB and DIBH planning when using a linear and non-linear risk prediction models

  5. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecatti, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author) [pt

  6. Dose response of rat retinal microvessels to proton dose schedules used clinically: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, John O.; Mao, Xiao W.; McMillan, Paul J.; Gouloumet, Vanessa L.; Oeinck, Steven C.; Grove, Roger; Yonemoto, Leslie T.; Slater, Jerry D.; Slater, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: This preclinical rat pilot study quantifies retinal microvessel, endothelial, and pericyte population changes produced by proton irradiation Methods and Materials: The left eyes of rats were irradiated with single doses of 8, 14, 20, and 28 Gy protons; right eyes, with two fractions. Animals were euthanized, and eyes were removed; elastase digests were prepared, and cell populations were counted in sample fields. Results were compared with unirradiated controls. Results: Progressive time- and dose-dependent endothelial cell loss occurred following all schedules. Cell loss was significantly different from control values (p 0 phase of the mitotic cycle. 28 Gy produced photoreceptor cell loss. Conclusion: The retinal digest is an elegant bioassay to quantify the microvessel population response. Single- and split-dose schedules appear to yield similar outcomes, in terms of endothelial cell density

  7. SU-E-T-625: Robustness Evaluation and Robust Optimization of IMPT Plans Based on Per-Voxel Standard Deviation of Dose Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Mohan, R

    2012-06-01

    Proton dose distributions, IMPT in particular, are highly sensitive to setup and range uncertainties. We report a novel method, based on per-voxel standard deviation (SD) of dose distributions, to evaluate the robustness of proton plans and to robustly optimize IMPT plans to render them less sensitive to uncertainties. For each optimization iteration, nine dose distributions are computed - the nominal one, and one each for ± setup uncertainties along x, y and z axes and for ± range uncertainty. SD of dose in each voxel is used to create SD-volume histogram (SVH) for each structure. SVH may be considered a quantitative representation of the robustness of the dose distribution. For optimization, the desired robustness may be specified in terms of an SD-volume (SV) constraint on the CTV and incorporated as a term in the objective function. Results of optimization with and without this constraint were compared in terms of plan optimality and robustness using the so called'worst case' dose distributions; which are obtained by assigning the lowest among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest to normal tissue voxels outside the CTV. The SVH curve and the area under it for each structure were used as quantitative measures of robustness. Penalty parameter of SV constraint may be varied to control the tradeoff between robustness and plan optimality. We applied these methods to one case each of H&N and lung. In both cases, we found that imposing SV constraint improved plan robustness but at the cost of normal tissue sparing. SVH-based optimization and evaluation is an effective tool for robustness evaluation and robust optimization of IMPT plans. Studies need to be conducted to test the methods for larger cohorts of patients and for other sites. This research is supported by National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant P01CA021239, the University Cancer Foundation via the Institutional Research Grant program at the University of Texas MD

  8. An effective dose of ketamine for eliminating pain during injection of propofol: a dose response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Wang, Q; Yu, Y Y; Wang, W S

    2013-09-01

    Ketamine can completely eliminate pain associated with propofol injection. However, the effective dose of ketamine to eliminate propofol injection pain has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effective dose of ketamine needed to eliminate pain in 50% and 95% of patients (ED50 and ED95, respectively) during propofol injections. This study was conducted in a double-blinded fashion and included 50 patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy under general anesthesia. The initial dose of ketamine used in the first patient was 0.25mg/kg. The dosing modifications were in increments or decrements of 0.025 mg/kg. Ketamine was administered 15 seconds before injecting propofol (2.5mg/kg), which was injected at a rate of 1mL/s. Patients were asked to rate their pain during propofol injection every 5s econds using a 0-3 pain scale. The highest pain score was recorded. The ED50, ED95 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined by probit analyses. The dose of ketamine ranged from 0.175 to 0.275 mg/kg. The ED50 and ED95 of ketamine for eliminating pain during propofol injection were 0.227 mg/kg and 0.283 mg/kg, respectively (95%CI: 0.211-0.243 mg/kg and 0.26-0.364 mg/kg, respectively). Ketamine at an approximate dose of 0.3mg/kg was effective in eliminating pain during propofol injection. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose gradient analyses in linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery using paddick's gradient index. Consideration of the optimal method for plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the dose gradient characteristics of Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery using Paddick's gradient index (GI) and to elucidate the factors influencing the GI value. Seventy-three plans for brain metastases using the dynamic conformal arcs were reviewed. The GI values were calculated at the 80% and 90% isodose surfaces (IDSs) and at the different target coverage IDSs (D99, D95, D90, and D85). The GI values significantly decreased as the target coverage of the reference IDS increased (the percentage of the IDS decreased). There was a significant inverse correlation between the GI values and target volume. The plans generated with the addition of a 1-mm leaf margin had worse GI values both at the D99 and D95 relative to those without leaf margin. The number and arrangement of arcs also affected the GI value. The GI values are highly sensitive to the IDS selection variability for dose prescription or evaluation, the target volume, and the planning method. To objectively compare the quality of dose gradient between rival plans, it would be preferable to employ the GI defined at the reference IDS indicating the specific target coverage (exempli gratia (e.g.), D95), irrespective of the intended marginal dose. The modified GI (mGI), defined in this study, substituting the denominator of the original GI with the target volume, would be useful to compensate for the false superior GI value in cases of target over-coverage with the reference IDS and to objectively evaluate the dose gradient outside the target boundary. (author)

  10. SU-E-T-49: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, H; Tachibana, H; Kamima, T; Takahashi, R; Kawai, D; Sugawara, Y; Yamamoto, T; Sato, A; Yamashita, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: AAPM TG114 does not cover the independent verification for IMRT. We conducted a study of independent dose verification for IMRT in seven institutes to show the feasibility. Methods: 384 IMRT plans in the sites of prostate and head and neck (HN) were collected from the institutes, where the planning was performed using Eclipse and Pinnacle3 with the two techniques of step and shoot (S&S) and sliding window (SW). All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. An ion-chamber measurement in a water-equivalent slab phantom was performed to compare the doses computed using the TPS and an independent dose verification program. Additionally, the agreement in dose computed in patient CT images between using the TPS and using the SMU was assessed. The dose of the composite beams in the plan was evaluated. Results: The agreement between the measurement and the SMU were −2.3±1.9 % and −5.6±3.6 % for prostate and HN sites, respectively. The agreement between the TPSs and the SMU were −2.1±1.9 % and −3.0±3.7 for prostate and HN sites, respectively. There was a negative systematic difference with similar standard deviation and the difference was larger in the HN site. The S&S technique showed a statistically significant difference between the SW. Because the Clarkson-based method in the independent program underestimated (cannot consider) the dose under the MLC. Conclusion: The accuracy would be improved when the Clarkson-based algorithm should be modified for IMRT and the tolerance level would be within 5%

  11. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  12. Computed Tomography–Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Treating Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.zolciak@wp.pl [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Gruszczynska, Ewelina; Bijok, Michal [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Jonska-Gmyrek, Joanna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Dabkowski, Mateusz [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Staniaszek, Jagna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Michalski, Wojciech [Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Adam; Milanowska, Katarzyna [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of computed tomography (CT)–planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for treating cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: CT-planned HDR BT was performed according to the adapted Group European de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) recommendations in 216 consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB to IVA, who were treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy. We analyzed outcomes and late side effects evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Subjective, Objective, Management, Analysis evaluation scoring system and compared them with the results from a historical group. Results: The median age was 56 years (range, 32-83 years). The median follow-up time for living patients was 52 months (range 37-63 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence function for the local recurrence rate for patients with FIGO II and III was 5.5% and 20%, respectively (P=.001). The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 66.4% and 58.5%, respectively. The relative risk of failure for OS and DFS for FIGO III in relation to FIGO II was 2.24 (P=.003) and 2.6 (P=.000) and for lymph node enlargement was 2.3 (P=.002) and 2 (P=.006), respectively. In 2 patients, rectovaginal fistula occurred, and in 1 patient, vesicovaginal fistula occurred without local progression. Comparison of late adverse effects in patients treated according to the GEC-ESTRO recommendations and in the historical group revealed a reduction in fistula formation of 59% and also a reduction in rectal grade 3 to 4 late toxicity of >59%. Conclusions: This is the largest report with mature data of CT-planned BT HDR for the treatment of cervical cancer with good local control and

  13. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  14. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Lauri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 180, Helsinki 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  15. SU-E-T-284: Dose Plan Optimization When Using Hydrogel Prostate-Rectum Spacer: A Single Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajecki, M; Thurber, A; Catalfamo, F; Duff, M; Shah, D [Cancer Care of Western New York, Cheektowaga, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe rectal dose reduction achieved and techniques used to take advantage of the increased peri-rectal spacing provided by injected polyethylene-glycol. Methods: Thirty prostate cancer patents were 2:1 randomized during a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of injected poly-ethylene glycol hydrogel (SpaceOAR System) in creating space between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall. All patients received a baseline CT/MR scan and baseline IMRT treatment plan. Patients were randomized to receive hydrogel injection (n=20) or Control (n=10), followed by another CT/MR scan and treatment plan (single arc VMAT, 6 MV photons, 79.2 Gy, 44 fractions). Additional optimization structures were employed to constrain the dose to the rectum; specifically an avoidance structure to limit V75 <15%, and a control structure to limit the maximum relative dose <105% in the interface region of the anterior rectal wall and the prostate planning target volume. Dose volumetric data was analyzed for rectal volumes receiving 60 through 80 Gy. Results: Rectal dose reduction was observed in all patients who received the hydrogel. Volumetric analysis indicates a median rectal volume and (reduction from baseline plan) following spacer application of 4.9% (8.9%) at V60Gy, 3.8% (8.1%) at V65Gy, 2.5% (7.2%) at V70Gy, 1.6% (5.8%) at V75Gy, and 0.5% (2.5%) at V80Gy. Conclusion: Relative to planning without spacers, rectal dose constraints of 5%, 4%, 3%, 2%, 1% for V60, V65, V70, V75, and V80, should be obtainable when peri-rectal spacers are used. The combined effect of increased peri-rectal space provided by the hydrogel, with strict optimization objectives, resulted in reduced dose to the rectum. To maximize benefit, strict optimization objectives and reduced rectal dose constraints should be employed when creating plans for patients with perirectal spacers. Clinical Trial for SpaceOAR product conducted by Augmenix,Inc. The research site was paid to be a participating site.

  16. SU-E-T-284: Dose Plan Optimization When Using Hydrogel Prostate-Rectum Spacer: A Single Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajecki,