WorldWideScience

Sample records for dose modeling aspects

  1. Web-Based Training on Reviewing Dose Modeling Aspects of NRC Decommissioning and License Termination Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2008-01-01

    NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course was developed in 2006 and 2007 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The objective of this course is to train NRC headquarters and regional office staff on how to review sections of a licensee's DP or LTP that pertain to dose modeling. The DP generally refers to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, while the LTP refers specifically to the decommissioning of reactors. This review is part of the NRC's licensing process, in which the NRC determines if a licensee has provided a suitable technical basis to support derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs)1 or dose modeling analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with dose-based license termination rule criteria. This type of training is one component of an organizational management system. These systems 'use a range of practices to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge for reuse, awareness and learning'. This is especially important in an organization undergoing rapid change or staff turnover to retain organizational information and processes. NRC is committed to maintaining a dynamic program of training, development, and knowledge transfer to ensure that the NRC acquires and maintains the competencies needed to accomplish its mission. This paper discusses one specific project

  2. Some aspects of dose evaluation, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes methods of calculating the radioiodine releases and resultant doses in the ''Guide for calculation of doses to man from routine releases of effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear power plants for evaluating compliance with dose objectives around a site of LWRs'' by the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. Examples of dose calculation in the design stage of plants and releases of radioiodine from operating plants are also given. The thyroid dose objective from radioiodine in reactor effluents was determined to be 15 mrem per year by the AEC of Japan in 1975. In the guide, models and parameters are given as most realistic on the basis of current knowledge and experience; in cases involving unknown factors these are on conservative side. Calculations of annual average releases of gaseous and liquid effluents are made using the models and parameters established through operational experiences of the LWR plants. Annual thyroid doses are calculated from inhalation and ingestion of leafy vegetable and cow's milk for gaseous effluents and ingestion of marine food for liquid effluents. In calculation of the thyroid dose, fw = 0.2 is used instead of = 0.3 in ICRP publ. 2 for ingestion of foods excluding seaweed and the specific activity method for ingestion of foods including seaweed. It is because Japanese take foods with much stable iodine. Calculated annual releases of 131 I in gaseous effluents of typical BWR (1100 MWe) and PWR (800 MWe) are about 2 Ci and 0.7 Ci per year per plant and the annual thyroid doses are about 4 mrem and 9 mrem per year, respectively. Actually, however, releases of 131 I in gaseous effluents from the operating LWR plants are about less than one tenth of the above figures. (author)

  3. Low-dose, continual enzyme delivery ameliorates some aspects of established brain disease in a mouse model of a childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Setford, Meghan L; Hassiotis, Sofia; Trim, Paul J; Duplock, Stephen; Tucker, Justin N; Hattersley, Kathryn; Snel, Marten F; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the capacity of continual low-dose lysosomal enzyme infusion into the cerebrospinal fluid of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) mice to reverse established neurodegenerative disease. The rationale behind the study is that there is only limited animal model-derived evidence supporting treatment of symptomatic patients, principally because few studies have been designed to examine disease reversibility. Twelve-week old MPS IIIA mice were implanted with indwelling unilateral intra-ventricular cannulae. These were connected to subcutaneous mini-osmotic pumps infusing recombinant human sulphamidase. Pump replacement was carried out in some mice at 16-weeks of age, enabling treatment to continue for a further month. Control affected/unaffected mice received vehicle via the same method. Behavioural, neuropathological and biochemical parameters of disease were assessed. Improvement in some, but not all, behavioural parameters occurred. Sulphamidase infusion mediated a statistically significant reduction in primary (heparan sulphate) and secondary (gangliosides GM2, GM3) substrate accumulation in the brain, with small reductions in micro- but not astro-gliosis. There was no change in axonal spheroid number. All mice developed a humoural response, however the antibodies were non-neutralising and no adverse clinical effects were observed. Continual infusion of replacement enzyme partially ameliorates clinical, histological and biochemical aspects of MPS IIIA mice, when treatment begins at an early symptomatic stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dose model for inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, J.; Ninkovic, M.; Merkle, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with calculation of doses in the environment. There are in general five exposure pathways which are customarily considered within such calculations: cloud shine, ground shine, inhalation after resuspension and ingestion. Since in fact each of these exposure pathways is represented by an independent mechanism, it is usual to consider these environmental dose models separately for each exposure pathway. As one example, the inhalation of the material from the radioactive passing cloud, as well as the inhalation of the radioactive material resuspended in the air are considered, giving the same formulas which are used in the new european accident consequence assessment code system COSYMA. (author)

  5. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  6. Computational aspects of premixing modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, D.F. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Witt, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the steam explosion research field there is currently considerable effort being devoted to the modelling of premixing. Practically all models are based on the multiphase flow equations which treat the mixture as an interpenetrating continuum. Solution of these equations is non-trivial and a wide range of solution procedures are in use. This paper addresses some numerical aspects of this problem. In particular, we examine the effect of the differencing scheme for the convective terms and show that use of hybrid differencing can cause qualitatively wrong solutions in some situations. Calculations are performed for the Oxford tests, the BNL tests, a MAGICO test and to investigate various sensitivities of the solution. In addition, we show that use of a staggered grid can result in a significant error which leads to poor predictions of `melt` front motion. A correction is given which leads to excellent convergence to the analytic solution. Finally, we discuss the issues facing premixing model developers and highlight the fact that model validation is hampered more by the complexity of the process than by numerical issues. (author)

  7. Dose assessment models. Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The models presented in this chapter have been separated into 2 general categories: environmental transport models which describe the movement of radioactive materials through all sectors of the environment after their release, and dosimetric models to calculate the absorbed dose following an intake of radioactive materials or exposure to external irradiation. Various sections of this chapter also deal with atmospheric transport models, terrestrial models, and aquatic models.

  8. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  9. Comparison of Nordic dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1978-04-01

    A comparison is made between the models used in the four Nordic countries, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, for calculation of concentrations and doses from releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere. The comparison is limited to the near-zone models, i.e. the models for calculation of concentrations and doses within 50 km from the release point, and it comprises the following types of calculation: a. Concentrations of airborne material, b. External gamma doses from a plume, c. External gamma doses from radioactive material deposited on the ground. All models are based on the gaussian dispersion model (the gaussian plume model). Unit releases of specific isotopes under specific meteorological conditions are assumed. On the basis of the calculation results from the models, it is concluded that there are no essential differences. The difference between the calculation results only exceeds a factor of 3 in special cases. It thus lies within the known limits of uncertainty for the gaussian plume model. (author)

  10. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  11. Aspects of pre-dose and other luminescence phenomena in quartz absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamiec, G.

    2000-01-01

    The understanding of all luminescence processes occurring in quartz is of paramount importance in the further development of robust absorbed dose estimation techniques (for the purpose of dating and retrospective dosimetry). The findings presented in this thesis, aid future improvements of absorbed dose estimation techniques using quartz by presenting investigations in the following areas: 1) interpretation of measurement results, 2) numerical modelling of luminescence in quartz, 3) phenomena needing inclusion in future physical models of luminescence. In the first part, the variability of properties of single quartz grains is examined. Through empirical and theoretical considerations, investigations are made of various problems of measurements of luminescence using multi-grain aliquots, and specifically areas where the heterogeneity of the sample at the inter-grain level may be misinterpreted at the multi-grain-aliquot level. The results obtained suggest that the heterogeneity of samples is often overlooked, and that such differences can have a profound influence on the interpretation of measurement results. Discussed are the shape of TL glow curves, OSL decay curves, dose response curves (including consequences for using certain signals as proxies for others), normalisation procedures and D E estimation techniques. Further, a numerical model of luminescence is proposed, which includes multiple R-centres and is used to describe the pre-dose sensitisation in quartz. The numerical model exhibits a broad-scale behaviour observed experimentally in a sample of annealed quartz. The shapes of TAC for lower (20 Gy) and higher doses (1 kGy) and the evolution with temperature of the isothermal sensitisation curves are qualitatively matched for the empirical and numerical systems. In the third area, a preliminary investigation of the properties of the '110 deg. C peak' in the 550 nm emission band, in annealed quartz is presented. These properties are in sharp contrast with

  12. Urban contamination and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, E.; Barry, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear power reactors and other nuclear facilities are being built near or even within urban centres. Accidental releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere in built-up areas result in radiological exposure pathways that differ from those caused by releases in rural environments. Other than inhalation, exposure pathways involve external radiation from the plume while it passes and from radioactivity deposited onto the many and varied surfaces after it has passed. Radiation fields inside buildings are attenuated but many people are potentially exposed so while individual doses may be relatively low, population integrated doses may be high enough to cause concern. It is important, therefore, to assess the potential exposures and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dose reduction measures in urban environments. This report describes a model developed to carry out such assessments. The model draws heavily on experience gained in European cities after their contamination fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Input is time integrated concentrations of specific radionuclides in urban air, obtained either by direct measurement or by prediction using an atmospheric dispersion model. The code includes default values for site specific variables and transfer parameters but the user is invited if desired to enter other values from the keyboard. Output is the time integrated dose rates for individuals selected because of the characteristic living, working and recreational habits. An accompanying manual documents the technical background on which the model is based and leads a first-time suer through various steps and operations encountered while the model is running. (author). 60 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Immunological aspects of low doses gamma-irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovskij, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Low dose gamma-radiation effect on the nonspecific protection factors and immune reactions of agricultural birds (diurnal broiler chicks Broiler-6) was studied. Quantitative and qualitative composition of crest skin autoflora and oral cavity mucosa, level of essential antibodies in blood serum, activity of lysozyme, β-lysines, general bactericidal properties of blood serum were determined. It is shown that low dose irradiation promotes the enhancement of antimicrobial properties of skin and oral cavity mucosa, blood serum bactericidal properties due to the increase in lysozyme content as well as beta-lysines and normal antibodies. Radiation affect the formation of immune intensity and favourable result of infectious process

  14. Aspects of uncertainty analysis in accident consequence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical models are frequently used to determine probable dose to man from an accidental release of radionuclides by a nuclear facility. With increased emphasis on the accuracy of these models, the incorporation of uncertainty analysis has become one of the most crucial and sensitive components in evaluating the significance of model predictions. In the present paper, we address three aspects of uncertainty in models used to assess the radiological impact to humans: uncertainties resulting from the natural variability in human biological parameters; the propagation of parameter variability by mathematical models; and comparison of model predictions to observational data

  15. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  16. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  17. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  18. Modeling business processes: theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Dubininа

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The essence of process-oriented enterprise management has been examined in the article. The content and types of information technology have been analyzed in the article, due to the complexity and differentiation of existing methods, as well as the specificity of language, terminology of the enterprise business processes modeling. The theoretical aspects of business processes modeling have been reviewed and the modern traditional modeling techniques received practical application in the visualization model of retailers activity have been studied in the article. In the process of theoretical analysis of the modeling methods found that UFO-toolkit method that has been developed by Ukrainian scientists due to it systemology integrated opportunities, is the most suitable for structural and object analysis of retailers business processes. It was designed visualized simulation model of the business process "sales" as is" of retailers using a combination UFO-elements with the aim of the further practical formalization and optimization of a given business process.

  19. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  20. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...

  1. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  2. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  3. Combinatorial aspects of boundary loop models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper; Saleur, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    We discuss in this paper combinatorial aspects of boundary loop models, that is models of self-avoiding loops on a strip where loops get different weights depending on whether they touch the left, the right, both or no boundary. These models are described algebraically by a generalization of the Temperley–Lieb algebra, dubbed the two-boundary TL algebra. We give results for the dimensions of TL representations and the corresponding degeneracies in the partition functions. We interpret these results in terms of fusion and in the light of the recently uncovered A n large symmetry present in loop models, paving the way for the analysis of the conformal field theory properties. Finally, we propose conjectures for determinants of Gram matrices in all cases, including the two-boundary one, which has recently been discussed by de Gier and Nichols

  4. Organizational Aspects of Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Villarroel, Juan Andrei; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding of the o......Organizations are often challenged to find new ways of creating and capturing value to compete with new entrants and disruptive technologies. Several studies have addressed some of the organizational barriers that incumbents face when developing new business models, but our understanding...... of the organizational (re)design aspects inherent to business model innovation is still very incomplete. In this study, we investigate the organizational (re)design challenges for incumbent organizations in mature industries when they need to reinvent their business model in reaction to disruptive changes...... in their environment. Our empirical setting focuses on national postal operators in the European postal industry. Using an inductive case study we distinguish between two stages within business model innovation: namely, business model exploration and business model exploitation. Focusing on the former, our findings...

  5. Theoretical aspects of spatial-temporal modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a modern introductory tutorial on specialized theoretical aspects of spatial and temporal modeling. The areas covered involve a range of topics which reflect the diversity of this domain of research across a number of quantitative disciplines. For instance, the first chapter provides up-to-date coverage of particle association measures that underpin the theoretical properties of recently developed random set methods in space and time otherwise known as the class of probability hypothesis density framework (PHD filters). The second chapter gives an overview of recent advances in Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian filtering in high-dimensional spaces. In particular, the chapter explains how one may extend classical sequential Monte Carlo methods for filtering and static inference problems to high dimensions and big-data applications. The third chapter presents an overview of generalized families of processes that extend the class of Gaussian process models to heavy-tailed families known as alph...

  6. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  7. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  8. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification.

  9. The important effect of dose assessment in radiation protection aspects of design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guiling

    2010-01-01

    After executing of the basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources(GB18871-2002), NNSA requires definitely that radiation protection aspects of design for nuclear power plants should be optimized and in that process dose assessment is a important means. In this paper some fundamental of design for radiation protection in earlier nuclear power plants is introduced and then some optimized measures of design for radiation protection in newer nuclear power plants are presented. In the first Stage design targets should be made and on the base of proven design the feedback of experience analyzed by adopting the measure of dose assessment. Finally we can confirm the aspect and require of next optimization design for radiation protection. (authors)

  10. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, A; Bradley, D; Nisbet, A

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around...

  11. MODELLING PURCHASING PROCESSES FROM QUALITY ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora Arsovski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Management has a fundamental task to identify and direct primary and specific processes within purchasing function, applying the up-to-date information infrastructure. ISO 9001:2000 defines a process as a number of interrelated or interactive activities transforming inputs and outputs, and the "process approach" as a systematic identification in management processes employed with the organization and particularly - relationships among the processes. To direct a quality management system using process approach, the organization is to determine the map of its general (basic processes. Primary processes are determined on the grounds of their interrelationship and impact on satisfying customers' needs. To make a proper choice of general business processes, it is necessary to determine the entire business flow, beginning with the customer demand up to the delivery of products or service provided. In the next step the process model is to be converted into data model which is essential for implementation of the information system enabling automation, monitoring, measuring, inspection, analysis and improvement of key purchase processes. In this paper are given methodology and some results of investigation of development of IS for purchasing process from aspects of quality.

  12. Radiation doses and some aspects of image quality in mammography facilities in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Poletti, J.L.

    1990-02-01

    Until recently, mammography in New Zealand was performed largely with adapted conventional x-ray machines with tungsten anode x-ray tubes. Over the last several years these have virtually all been replaced by dedicated mammography machines with molybdenum anode x-ray tubes. To assess current trends in radiation doses to patients and central aspects of image quality, some 37 mammography x-ray machines were surveyed during 1988-89. The mean glandular dose per film for 30 and 45 mm thick breast-equivalent phantoms was determined using thermoluminescent dosimetry. Imagings of simulated microcalcifications (specks) and a contrast-detail phantom were assessed. Accuracy of calibration of the x-ray machines and quality of film processing were also tested. Details of the survey results are given. Mean glandular tissue doses per cranio-caudal films were generally well within the recommended guidelines. Mammography facilities differed in their ability to delete simulated calcification specks. Mammographic equipment was found to be generally well adjusted. Speed and contrast of film processing were found to vary widely implying that this is a major cause of the variations in dose and image quality. An annex outlines a quality assurance programme for maintenance of optimal physical image quality and control of radiation doses. 55 refs., 21 tabs., 17 figs., 2 ills

  13. Mathematical aspects of ground state tunneling models in luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Luminescence signals from a variety of natural materials have been known to decrease with storage time at room temperature due to quantum tunneling, a phenomenon known as anomalous fading. This paper is a study of several mathematical aspects of two previously published luminescence models which describe tunneling phenomena from the ground state of a donor–acceptor system. It is shown that both models are described by the same type of integral equation, and two new analytical equations are presented. The first new analytical equation describes the effect of anomalous fading on the dose response curves (DRCs) of naturally irradiated samples. The DRCs in the model were previously expressed in the form of integral equations requiring numerical integration, while the new analytical equation can be used immediately as a tool for analyzing experimental data. The second analytical equation presented in this paper describes the anomalous fading rate (g-Value per decade) as a function of the charge density in the model. This new analytical expression for the g-Value is tested using experimental anomalous fading data for several apatite crystals which exhibit high rate of anomalous fading. The two new analytical results can be useful tools for analyzing anomalous fading data from luminescence materials. In addition to the two new analytical equations, an explanation is provided for the numerical value of a constant previously introduced in the models. - Highlights: • Comparative study of two luminescence models for feldspars. • Two new analytical equations for dose response curves and anomalous fading rate. • The numerical value z=1.8 of previously introduced constant in models explained.

  14. Models and phantoms for internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Radiation doses delivered by incorporated radionuclides cannot be directly measured, and they are assessed by means of biokinetic and dosimetric models and computational phantoms. For emitters of short-range radiation like alpha-particles or Auger electrons, the doses at organ levels, as they are usually defined in internal dosimetry, are no longer relevant. Modelling the inter- and intra-cellular radiation transport and the local patterns of deposition at molecular or cellular levels are the challenging tasks of micro- and nano-dosimetry. With time, the physiological and anatomical realism of the models and phantoms have increased. However, not always the information is available that would be required to characterise the greater complexity of the recent models. Uncertainty studies in internal dose assessment provide here a valuable contribution for testing the significance of the new dose estimates and of the discrepancies from the previous values. Some of the challenges, limitations and future perspectives of the use of models and phantoms in internal dosimetry are discussed in the present manuscript. (authors)

  15. Aspect Βased Classification Model for Social Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspect based opinion mining investigates deeply, the emotions related to one’s aspects. Aspects and opinion word identification is the core task of aspect based opinion mining. In previous studies aspect based opinion mining have been applied on service or product domain. Moreover, product reviews are short and simple whereas, social reviews are long and complex. However, this study introduces an efficient model for social reviews which classifies aspects and opinion words related to social domain. The main contributions of this paper are auto tagging and data training phase, feature set definition and dictionary usage. Proposed model results are compared with CR model and Naïve Bayes classifier on same dataset having accuracy 98.17% and precision 96.01%, while recall and F1 are 96.00% and 96.01% respectively. The experimental results show that the proposed model performs better than the CR model and Naïve Bayes classifier.

  16. The MESORAD dose assessment model: Computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Bander, T.J.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    MESORAD is a dose equivalent model for emergency response applications that is designed to be run on minicomputers. It has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use as part of the Intermediate Dose Assessment System in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Operations Center in Washington, DC, and the Emergency Management System in the US Department of Energy Unified Dose Assessment Center in Richland, Washington. This volume describes the MESORAD computer code and contains a listing of the code. The technical basis for MESORAD is described in the first volume of this report (Scherpelz et al. 1986). A third volume of the documentation planned. That volume will contain utility programs and input and output files that can be used to check the implementation of MESORAD. 18 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Towards aspect-oriented functional--structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Mikolaj; Seleznyova, Alla N; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Hanan, Jim

    2011-10-01

    Functional-structural plant models (FSPMs) are used to integrate knowledge and test hypotheses of plant behaviour, and to aid in the development of decision support systems. A significant amount of effort is being put into providing a sound methodology for building them. Standard techniques, such as procedural or object-oriented programming, are not suited for clearly separating aspects of plant function that criss-cross between different components of plant structure, which makes it difficult to reuse and share their implementations. The aim of this paper is to present an aspect-oriented programming approach that helps to overcome this difficulty. The L-system-based plant modelling language L+C was used to develop an aspect-oriented approach to plant modelling based on multi-modules. Each element of the plant structure was represented by a sequence of L-system modules (rather than a single module), with each module representing an aspect of the element's function. Separate sets of productions were used for modelling each aspect, with context-sensitive rules facilitated by local lists of modules to consider/ignore. Aspect weaving or communication between aspects was made possible through the use of pseudo-L-systems, where the strict-predecessor of a production rule was specified as a multi-module. The new approach was used to integrate previously modelled aspects of carbon dynamics, apical dominance and biomechanics with a model of a developing kiwifruit shoot. These aspects were specified independently and their implementation was based on source code provided by the original authors without major changes. This new aspect-oriented approach to plant modelling is well suited for studying complex phenomena in plant science, because it can be used to integrate separate models of individual aspects of plant development and function, both previously constructed and new, into clearly organized, comprehensive FSPMs. In a future work, this approach could be further

  18. A graph-based aspect interference detection approach for UML-based aspect-oriented models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; Havinga, W.K.; Aksit, Mehmet; Bockisch, Christoph; van den Broek, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aspect Oriented Modeling (AOM) techniques facilitate separate modeling of concerns and allow for a more flexible composition of these than traditional modeling techniques. While this improves the understandability of each submodel, in order to reason about the behavior of the composed system and to

  19. Safety aspects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid in primary total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C C; Pitter, F T; Kehlet, H

    2017-01-01

    Background: Preoperative single high-dose glucocorticoid may have early outcome benefits in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA), but long-term safety aspects have not been evaluated. Methods: From October 2013, the departments reporting to the prospective Lundbeck Foundation...... Database for Fast-track Hip and Knee Replacement introduced preoperative methylprednisolone (MP) 125 mg as part of a multimodal analgesic protocol in TKA. We analysed the risk of length of hospital stay (LOS) >4 days, 30 and 90 day readmissions in patients with MP vs patients having TKA before the use...... of MP and adjusted for comorbidity and place of surgery. An unadjusted comparison was specifically done to evaluate deep prosthetic infections. Results: Of a total of 3927 TKA procedures, 1442 received MP. Median LOS was 2 days in both groups, but the fraction with LOS >4 days was 6.0% vs 11.5% (P

  20. Patentability aspects of computational cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, Iryna

    2017-07-01

    Multiscale cancer models, implemented in silico, simulate tumor progression at various spatial and temporal scales. Having the innovative substance and possessing the potential of being applied as decision support tools in clinical practice, patenting and obtaining patent rights in cancer models seems prima facie possible. What legal hurdles the cancer models need to overcome for being patented we inquire from this paper.

  1. Aspects of modelling and control of bioprocesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiachang

    1995-12-31

    The modelling and control of bioprocesses are the main subjects in this thesis. Different modelling approaches are proposed for different purposes in various bioprocesses. A conventional global model was constructed for a very complex mammalian cell culture process. A new concept of functional state and a multiple model (local models) approach were used for modelling the fed-batch baker`s yeast process for monitoring and control purposes. Finally, a combination of conventional electrical and biological models was used to simulate and to control a microbial fuel cell process. In the thesis, a yeast growth process was taken as an example to demonstrate the usefulness of the functional state concept and local models. The functional states were first defined according to the yeast metabolism. The process was then described by a set of simple local models. In different functional states, different local models were used. On the other hand, the on-line estimation of functional state and biomass of the process was discussed for process control purpose. As a consequence, both the functional state concept and the multiple model approach were applied for fuzzy logic control of yeast growth process. A fuzzy factor was calculated on the basis of a knowledge-based expert system and fuzzy logic rules. The factor was used to correct an ideal substrate feed rate. In the last part of the thesis, microbial fuel cell processes were studied. A microbial fuel cell is a device for direct conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy by using micro-organisms as catalysts. A combined model including conventional electrical and biological models was constructed for the process based on the biological and electrochemical phenomena

  2. Computed tomography in multiple trauma patients. Technical aspects, work flow, and dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellner, F.A.; Krieger, J.; Floery, D.; Lechner, N.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with severe, life-threatening trauma require a fast and accurate clinical and imaging diagnostic workup during the first phase of trauma management. Early whole-body computed tomography has clearly been proven to be the current standard of care of these patients. A similar imaging quality can be achieved in the multiple trauma setting compared with routine imaging especially using rapid, latest generation computed tomography (CT) scanners. This article encompasses a detailed view on the use of CT in patients with life-threatening trauma. A special focus is placed on radiological procedures in trauma units and on the methods for CT workup in routine cases and in challenging situations. Another focus discusses the potential of dose reduction of CT scans in multiple trauma as well as the examination of children with severe trauma. Various studies have demonstrated that early whole-body CT positively correlates with low morbidity and mortality and is clearly superior to the use of other imaging modalities. Optimal trauma unit management means a close cooperation between trauma surgeons, anesthesiologists and radiologists, whereby the radiologist is responsible for a rapid and accurate radiological workup and the rapid communication of imaging findings. However, even in the trauma setting, aspects of patient radiation doses should be kept in mind. (orig.) [de

  3. Economic aspects and models for building codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Pedersen, Dan Ove; Johnsen, Kjeld

    It is the purpose of this bulletin to present an economic model for estimating the consequence of new or changed building codes. The object is to allow comparative analysis in order to improve the basis for decisions in this field. The model is applied in a case study.......It is the purpose of this bulletin to present an economic model for estimating the consequence of new or changed building codes. The object is to allow comparative analysis in order to improve the basis for decisions in this field. The model is applied in a case study....

  4. On the Hughes model and numerical aspects

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-01-05

    We study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [11] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori estimates for the solutions. Second, we study radial solutions and identify a shock formation mechanism. Third, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. Finally, we propose a new numerical method and consider two examples.

  5. Aspect-oriented security hardening of UML design models

    CERN Document Server

    Mouheb, Djedjiga; Pourzandi, Makan; Wang, Lingyu; Nouh, Mariam; Ziarati, Raha; Alhadidi, Dima; Talhi, Chamseddine; Lima, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    This book comprehensively presents a novel approach to the systematic security hardening of software design models expressed in the standard UML language. It combines model-driven engineering and the aspect-oriented paradigm to integrate security practices into the early phases of the software development process. To this end, a UML profile has been developed for the specification of security hardening aspects on UML diagrams. In addition, a weaving framework, with the underlying theoretical foundations, has been designed for the systematic injection of security aspects into UML models. The

  6. Modelling mobility aspects of security policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; van Eck, Pascal; Etalle, Sandro; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    Security policies are rules that constrain the behaviour of a system. Different, largely unrelated sets of rules typically govern the physical and logical worlds. However, increased hardware and software mobility forces us to consider those rules in an integrated fashion. We present SPIN models of

  7. Some dynamical aspects of interacting quintessence model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Binayak S Choudhury

    2018-03-16

    Mar 16, 2018 ... show the phase-space analysis for the 'best-fit Universe' or concordance model. In our analysis, we observe the existence of late-time scaling attractors. Keywords. Accelerated expansion of the Universe; quintessence; dynamical system; Friedmann–Lemaitre–. Robertson–Walker Universe; interacting ...

  8. Aspects of general linear modelling of migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, P

    1992-01-01

    "This paper investigates the application of general linear modelling principles to analysing migration flows between areas. Particular attention is paid to specifying the form of the regression and error components, and the nature of departures from Poisson randomness. Extensions to take account of spatial and temporal correlation are discussed as well as constrained estimation. The issue of specification bears on the testing of migration theories, and assessing the role migration plays in job and housing markets: the direction and significance of the effects of economic variates on migration depends on the specification of the statistical model. The application is in the context of migration in London and South East England in the 1970s and 1980s." excerpt

  9. Ecological aspects in sustainable development model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurlapov, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    Environment problems are caused by intensive use of natural resources due to scientific progress in combination with the present structure of unlimited consumption. To prevent the impending ecological disaster a model of sustainable development has been worked out. It is aimed at satisfying the ever-growing requirements of the modern man without damaging the environment. Scientifically grounded use of nature mat contribute to solution of the problem. The acceptable use of nature should take account of the land ecosystem resources which is ensured by reliable model including flow balance in particular. Irreversible flows generate entropy which could be the universal measure of technic genetics impact. Entropic condition of the acceptable (sustainable) development are started: techno-genic entropy production must be less than natural entropy production. Particular sciences should be re-oriented towards environmental problems. Environmental monitoring strategy should provide for determination of macro properties as well as flows. (author)

  10. Computational aspects of N-mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily B; Morgan, Byron J T; Ridout, Martin S

    2015-03-01

    The N-mixture model is widely used to estimate the abundance of a population in the presence of unknown detection probability from only a set of counts subject to spatial and temporal replication (Royle, 2004, Biometrics 60, 105-115). We explain and exploit the equivalence of N-mixture and multivariate Poisson and negative-binomial models, which provides powerful new approaches for fitting these models. We show that particularly when detection probability and the number of sampling occasions are small, infinite estimates of abundance can arise. We propose a sample covariance as a diagnostic for this event, and demonstrate its good performance in the Poisson case. Infinite estimates may be missed in practice, due to numerical optimization procedures terminating at arbitrarily large values. It is shown that the use of a bound, K, for an infinite summation in the N-mixture likelihood can result in underestimation of abundance, so that default values of K in computer packages should be avoided. Instead we propose a simple automatic way to choose K. The methods are illustrated by analysis of data on Hermann's tortoise Testudo hermanni. © 2014 The Authors Biometrics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Biometric Society.

  11. Thermodynamical aspects of running vacuum models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Astronomia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Basilakos, Spyros [Academy of Athens, Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Athens (Greece); Sola, Joan [Univ. de Barcelona, High Energy Physics Group, Dept. d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    The thermal history of a large class of running vacuum models in which the effective cosmological term is described by a truncated power series of the Hubble rate, whose dominant term is Λ(H) ∝ H{sup n+2}, is discussed in detail. Specifically, by assuming that the ultrarelativistic particles produced by the vacuum decay emerge into space-time in such a way that its energy density ρ{sub r} ∝ T{sup 4}, the temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically calculated. For the whole class of vacuum models explored here we find that the primeval value of the comoving radiation entropy density (associated to effectively massless particles) starts from zero and evolves extremely fast until reaching a maximum near the end of the vacuum decay phase, where it saturates. The late-time conservation of the radiation entropy during the adiabatic FRW phase also guarantees that the whole class of running vacuum models predicts the same correct value of the present day entropy, S{sub 0} ∝ 10{sup 87}-10{sup 88} (in natural units), independently of the initial conditions. In addition, by assuming Gibbons¨CHawking temperature as an initial condition, we find that the ratio between the late-time and primordial vacuum energy densities is in agreement with naive estimates from quantum field theory, namely, ρ{sub Λ0}/ρ{sub ΛI} 10{sup -123}. Such results are independent on the power n and suggests that the observed Universe may evolve smoothly between two extreme, unstable, non-singular de Sitter phases. (orig.)

  12. Aspect-Oriented Model-Driven Software Product Line Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groher, Iris; Voelter, Markus

    Software product line engineering aims to reduce development time, effort, cost, and complexity by taking advantage of the commonality within a portfolio of similar products. The effectiveness of a software product line approach directly depends on how well feature variability within the portfolio is implemented and managed throughout the development lifecycle, from early analysis through maintenance and evolution. This article presents an approach that facilitates variability implementation, management, and tracing by integrating model-driven and aspect-oriented software development. Features are separated in models and composed of aspect-oriented composition techniques on model level. Model transformations support the transition from problem to solution space models. Aspect-oriented techniques enable the explicit expression and modularization of variability on model, template, and code level. The presented concepts are illustrated with a case study of a home automation system.

  13. Some aspects of the chronological dose distribution in the radiobiology and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, W.

    1986-06-01

    The linear quadratic model provides, when applied to standard fractionation schemes, results comparable to the Ellis-formula, but it may also be applied to problems such as multifractionations, application of high single doses and afterloading methods (interstitial and intracavitary therapy with either short-time application or continuous irradiation), where the Ellis-formula is rather questionable. A further critical point of the latter formula is the estimation of late responses. However, the limitations of the linear quadratic computation model may be determined by a comparison with a cubic survival formula S=exp (-(..cap alpha..D+..beta..D/sup 2/+deltaD/sup 3/)) or with the Bender-Gooch-formula.

  14. Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling: current practice, issues, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Lynne T; Dourson, Michael L; Allen, Bruce C; Hertzberg, Richard C; Parker, Ann; Vincent, Melissa J; Maier, Andrew; Boobis, Alan R

    2018-03-08

    Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling is now the state of the science for determining the point of departure for risk assessment. Key advantages include the fact that the modeling takes account of all of the data for a particular effect from a particular experiment, increased consistency, and better accounting for statistical uncertainties. Despite these strong advantages, disagreements remain as to several specific aspects of the modeling, including differences in the recommendations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Differences exist in the choice of the benchmark response (BMR) for continuous data, the use of unrestricted models, and the mathematical models used; these can lead to differences in the final BMDL. It is important to take confidence in the model into account in choosing the BMDL, rather than simply choosing the lowest value. The field is moving in the direction of model averaging, which will avoid many of the challenges of choosing a single best model when the underlying biology does not suggest one, but additional research would be useful into methods of incorporating biological considerations into the weights used in the averaging. Additional research is also needed regarding the interplay between the BMR and the UF to ensure appropriate use for studies supporting a lower BMR than default values, such as for epidemiology data. Addressing these issues will aid in harmonizing methods and moving the field of risk assessment forward.

  15. Aspects of system modelling in Hardware/Software partitioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Voigt; Madsen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses fundamental aspects of system modelling and partitioning algorithms in the area of Hardware/Software Codesign. Three basic system models for partitioning are presented and the consequences of partitioning according to each of these are analyzed. The analysis shows the importa......This paper addresses fundamental aspects of system modelling and partitioning algorithms in the area of Hardware/Software Codesign. Three basic system models for partitioning are presented and the consequences of partitioning according to each of these are analyzed. The analysis shows...... the importance of making a clear distinction between the model used for partitioning and the model used for evaluation It also illustrates the importance of having a realistic hardware model such that hardware sharing can be taken into account. Finally, the importance of integrating scheduling and allocation...

  16. Total dose and dose rate models for bipolar transistors in circuit simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for total dose effects in bipolar junction transistors for use in circuit simulation. The components of the model are an electrical model of device performance that includes the effects of trapped charge on device behavior, and a model that calculates the trapped charge densities in a specific device structure as a function of radiation dose and dose rate. Simulations based on this model are found to agree well with measurements on a number of devices for which data are available.

  17. Budget constraint and vaccine dosing: a mathematical modelling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standaert, Baudouin A; Curran, Desmond; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-22

    Increasing the number of vaccine doses may potentially improve overall efficacy. Decision-makers need information about choosing the most efficient dose schedule to maximise the total health gain of a population when operating under a constrained budget. The objective of this study is to identify the most efficient vaccine dosing schedule within a fixed vaccination budget from a healthcare payer perspective. An optimisation model is developed in which maximizing the disease reduction is the functional objective and the constraint is the vaccination budget. The model allows variation in vaccination dosing numbers, in cost difference per dose, in vaccine coverage rate, and in vaccine efficacy. We apply the model using the monovalent rotavirus vaccine as an example. With a fixed budget, a 2-dose schedule for vaccination against rotavirus infection with the monovalent vaccine results in a larger reduction in disease episodes than a 3-dose scheme with the same vaccine under most circumstances. A 3-dose schedule would only be better under certain conditions: a cost reduction of >26% per dose, combined with vaccine efficacy improvement of ≥5% and a target coverage rate of 75%. Substantial interaction is observed between cost reduction per dose, vaccine coverage rate, and increased vaccine efficacy. Sensitivity analysis shows that the conditions required for a 3-dose strategy to be better than a 2-dose strategy may seldom occur when the budget is fixed. The model does not consider vaccine herd effect, precise timing for additional doses, or the effect of natural immunity development. Under budget constraint, optimisation modelling is a helpful tool for a decision-maker selecting the most efficient vaccination dosing schedule. The low dosing scheme could be the optimal option to consider under the many scenarios tested. The model can be applied under many different circumstances of changing dosing schemes with single or multiple vaccines.

  18. Selected Aspects of Computer Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczecina M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some important aspects concerning material constants of concrete and stages of modeling of reinforced concrete structures. The problems taken into account are: a choice of proper material model for concrete, establishing of compressive and tensile behavior of concrete and establishing the values of dilation angle, fracture energy and relaxation time for concrete. Proper values of material constants are fixed in simple compression and tension tests. The effectiveness and correctness of applied model is checked on the example of reinforced concrete frame corners under opening bending moment. Calculations are performed in Abaqus software using Concrete Damaged Plasticity model of concrete.

  19. Population doses from natural radionuclides due to certain aspects of human activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, L.A.; Knizhnikov, V.A.; Barkhudarov, R.M.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Borisov, B.K.; Novikova, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation exposures and resulting population doses due to a number of nonnuclear technical and economic activities in the USSR are estimated and compared to exposures and doses due to natural background radiation and to nuclear technology. Local and nationwide population dose commitments to the whole body and to specific organs are calculated for a new coal-fired power station and for a nuclear power plant of similar capacity. The coal-fired power station was found to produce a larger population dose in all organs considered except the thyroid. Similar computations were made for exposures due to the use of agricultural fertilizers, with consideration given the biological mobilities of the several naturally radioactive elements involved. The use of building materials high in naturally radioactive isotopes is also examined, with particular attention to the resulting enhanced indoor radon concentrations

  20. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  1. New aspects in distribution of population dose loads in Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Pivovarov, S.; Rukhin, A.; Seredavina, T.; Sushkova, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The question on dose loads of Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) region population is not fully solved till now. There is rather different estimations of doses, received by people of nearest to SNTS settlements. It may be explain by absence of individual dosimeters during and after nuclear weapon tests and also many various ways of radiation exposure receiving. During last some years we have done a people dose loads estimations by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) tooth enamel dosimetry method - one of the best and reliable for retrospective dosimetry. It was studied tooth enamel people from settlements Dolon, Bodene, Cheremushki, Mostik, which was irradiated mainly by the first atomic explosion 1949, settlement Sarjal, irradiated by the first thermonuclear explosion in 1953, and control settlement Maysk, which is sited close to SNTS, but there was no any radioactive traces due to east wind. The results display a not expected rather surprising picture: in all settlements, including control one Maysk, the dose loads distribution was rather similar, it has ex fast bimodal form with rather high doses in the second one. The possible reasons of such situation is discussed. The results obtained is compared with last estimations of Semipalatinsk region dose loads of population, which were specially attentively discussed at International Symposiums in Hiroshima (Japan, 2005) and Bethesda (MD, USA, 2006). (author)

  2. Development of the model MAAP5-DOSE for dose analysis in Cofrentes NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Diaz, P.; Ibanez, L.; Lamela, B.; Serrano, C.

    2013-01-01

    Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion has developed a model of Cofrentes NPP with code MAAP5-DOSE in order to be able to assess in realistic conditions the the expected dose in points and radiological consequences of severe accident of local action.

  3. A Model for Assessing the Gender Aspect in Economic Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ona Rakauskienė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to develop a conceptual model for assessing the impact of the gender aspect on economic policy at macro– and microeconomic levels. The research methodology is based on analysing scientific approaches to the gender aspect in economics and gender–responsive budgeting as well as determining the impact of the gender aspect on GDP, foreign trade, the state budget and the labour market. First, the major findings encompass the main idea of a conceptual model proposing that a socio–economic picture of society can be accepted as completed only when, alongside public and private sectors, includes the care/reproductive sector that is dominated by women and creating added value in the form of educated human resources; second, macroeconomics is not neutral in terms of gender equality. Gender asymmetry is manifested not only at the level of microeconomics (labour market and business but also at the level of macroeconomics (GDP, the state budget and foreign trade, which has a negative impact on economic growth and state budget revenues. In this regard, economic decisions, according to the principles of gender equality and in order to achieve gender equality in economics, must be made, as the gender aspect has to be also implemented at the macroeconomic level.

  4. True dose from incorporated activities. Models for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breustedt, B.; Eschner, W.; Nosske, D.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of doses after incorporation of radionuclides cannot use direct measurements of the doses, as for example dosimetry in external radiation fields. The only observables are activities in the body or in excretions. Models are used to calculate the doses based on the measured activities. The incorporated activities and the resulting doses can vary by more than seven orders of magnitude between occupational and medical exposures. Nevertheless the models and calculations applied in both cases are similar. Since the models for the different applications have been developed independently by ICRP and MIRD different terminologies have been used. A unified terminology is being developed. (orig.)

  5. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Bander, T.J.; Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  6. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  7. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  8. Proposal of a probabilistic dose-response model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.

    1997-01-01

    A biologically updated dose-response model is presented as an alternative to the linear-quadratic model currently in use for cancer risk assessment. The new model is based on the probability functions for misrepair and/or unrepair of DNA lesions, in terms of the radiation damage production rate in the cell (supposedly, a stem cell) and its repair-rate constant. The model makes use, interpreting it on the basis of misrepair probabilities, of the ''dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor'' of ICRP, and provides the way for a continuous extrapolation between the high and low dose-rate regions, ratifying the ''linear non-threshold hypothesis'' as the main option. Anyhow, the model throws some doubts about the additive property of the dose. (author)

  9. Metrological aspects in estimating of radiation dose in patients of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzzarin, Anelise

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the performance of routine measurements in nuclear medicine services, LNMRI/IRD has been conducting, since 1998, a comparison program of activity measurements of radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients in nuclear medicine. Correction factors are determined from the result of performance analysis in order to determine with better accuracy the activity to be administered to the patients. The present study shows how the correction factor is determined by the ratio between the measurement of the activity at the nuclear medicine center and the activity determined by the LNMRI, which is adopted as reference. It is essential that the dose calibrator be calibrated with standards traceable to national metrology laboratories, so that the activity administered to the patient is neither greater nor smaller than the appropriate value. The corrected values of the activities can be used to calculate with greater accuracy the effective doses received by the patients as well as the risk of cancer. Information related to radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities, type of exams and patient data of three Brazilian hospitals were collected for 1496 adults and 134 children submitted to diagnostic exams employing 99m Tc and 131 I. Results showed up to a considerable difference between the administered activity and the corrected activity until 30% and 13% above the reference value, respectively, for the 131 I and 99m Tc was detected. The consequences of these differences were not very critical in this study since the activity measured in dose calibrator before administration was lower than the corrected activity, thus causing a lower effective dose in patients. However, this reduction in activity may result in problems in obtaining the image and consequently, failure diagnosis, delaying correct diagnosis. On the other hand, the overestimation would be worse, mainly in therapeutic applications, because an unnecessarily high absorbed dose would be

  10. Wind-wave modelling aspects within complicate topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Christopoulos

    Full Text Available Wave forecasting aspects for basins with complicate geomorphology, such as the Aegean Sea, are investigated through an intercomparison study. The efficiency of the available wind models (ECMWF, UKMO to reproduce wind patterns over special basins, as well as three wave models incorporating different physics and characteristics (WAM, AUT, WACCAS, are tested for selected storm cases representing the typical wind situations over the basin. From the wave results, discussed in terms of time-series and statistical parameters, the crucial role is pointed out of the wind resolution and the reliability of the different wave models to estimate the wave climate in such a basin. The necessary grid resolution is also tested, while for a specific test case (December 1991 ERS-1 satellite data are compared with those of the model.

  11. Validation of HEDR models. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Eslinger, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid.

  12. AMFIBIA: A Meta-Model for the Integration of Business Process Modelling Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axenath, Björn; Kindler, Ekkart; Rubin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    modelling formalisms of business processes and it is designed in such a way that any formalism for modelling some aspect of a business process can be plugged into AMFIBIA. Therefore, AMFIBIA is formalism-independent. Secondly, it is not biased toward any aspect of business processes; the different aspects...... implemented a prototype of a formalism-independent workflow engine based on AMFIBIA. This workflow engine, also called AMFIBIA, is open for new aspects of business processes and new formalisms can be easily integrated. In this paper, we present the concepts of AMFIBIA and discuss the principles and concepts......AMFIBIA is a meta-model that formalises the essential aspects and concepts of business processes. Though AMFIBIA is not the first approach to formalising the aspects and concepts of business processes, it is more ambitious in the following respects: Firstly, it is independent from particular...

  13. Model for assessing alpha doses for a Reference Japanese Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hisao

    1993-01-01

    In view of the development of the nuclear fuel cycle in this country, it is urgently important to establish dose assessment models and related human and environmental parameters for long-lived radionuclides. In the current program, intake and body content of actinides (Pu, Th, U) and related alpha-emitting nuclides (Ra and daughters) have been studied as well as physiological aspects of Reference Japanese Man as the basic model of man for dosimetry. The ultimate object is to examine applicability of the existing models particularly recommended by the ICRP for workers to members of the public. The result of an interlaboratory intercomparison of 239 Pu + 240 Pu determination including our result was published. Alpha-spectrometric determinations of 226 Ra in bone yielded repesentative bone concentration level in Tokyo and Ra-Ca O.R. (bone-diet) which appear consistent with the literature value for Sapporo and Kyoto by Ohno using a Rn emanation method. Specific effective energies for alpha radiation from 226 Ra and daughters were calculated using the ICRP dosimetric model for bone incorporating masses of source and target organs of Reference Japanese Man. Reference Japanese data including the adult, adolescent, child and infant of both sexes was extensively and intensively studied by Tanaka as part of the activities of the ICRP Task Group on Reference Man Revision. Normal data for the physical measurements, mass and dimension of internal organs and body surfaces and some of the body composition were analysed viewing the nutritional data in the Japanese population. Some of the above works are to be continued. (author)

  14. A Review of Modeling Bioelectrochemical Systems: Engineering and Statistical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Luo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems (BES are promising technologies to convert organic compounds in wastewater to electrical energy through a series of complex physical-chemical, biological and electrochemical processes. Representative BES such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs have been studied and advanced for energy recovery. Substantial experimental and modeling efforts have been made for investigating the processes involved in electricity generation toward the improvement of the BES performance for practical applications. However, there are many parameters that will potentially affect these processes, thereby making the optimization of system performance hard to be achieved. Mathematical models, including engineering models and statistical models, are powerful tools to help understand the interactions among the parameters in BES and perform optimization of BES configuration/operation. This review paper aims to introduce and discuss the recent developments of BES modeling from engineering and statistical aspects, including analysis on the model structure, description of application cases and sensitivity analysis of various parameters. It is expected to serves as a compass for integrating the engineering and statistical modeling strategies to improve model accuracy for BES development.

  15. Quantitative aspects and dynamic modelling of glucosinolate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vik, Daniel

    and ecologically important glucosinolate (GLS) compounds of cruciferous plants – including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana – have been studied extensively with regards to their biosynthesis and degradation. However, efforts to construct a dynamic model unifying the regulatory aspects have not been made......Advancements in ‘omics technologies now allow acquisition of enormous amounts of quantitative information about biomolecules. This has led to the emergence of new scientific sub‐disciplines e.g. computational, systems and ‘quantitative’ biology. These disciplines examine complex biological...... behaviour through computational and mathematical approaches and have resulted in substantial insights and advances in molecular biology and physiology. Capitalizing on the accumulated knowledge and data, it is possible to construct dynamic models of complex biological systems, thereby initiating the so...

  16. Aspects of Mathematical Modelling of Pressure Retarded Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissimov, Yuri G.

    2016-01-01

    In power generating terms, a pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) energy generating plant, on a river entering a sea or ocean, is equivalent to a hydroelectric dam with a height of about 60 meters. Therefore, PRO can add significantly to existing renewable power generation capacity if economical constrains of the method are resolved. PRO energy generation relies on a semipermeable membrane that is permeable to water and impermeable to salt. Mathematical modelling plays an important part in understanding flows of water and salt near and across semipermeable membranes and helps to optimize PRO energy generation. Therefore, the modelling can help realizing PRO energy generation potential. In this work, a few aspects of mathematical modelling of the PRO process are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26848696

  17. Aspects of Mathematical Modelling of Pressure Retarded Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissimov, Yuri G

    2016-02-03

    In power generating terms, a pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) energy generating plant, on a river entering a sea or ocean, is equivalent to a hydroelectric dam with a height of about 60 meters. Therefore, PRO can add significantly to existing renewable power generation capacity if economical constrains of the method are resolved. PRO energy generation relies on a semipermeable membrane that is permeable to water and impermeable to salt. Mathematical modelling plays an important part in understanding flows of water and salt near and across semipermeable membranes and helps to optimize PRO energy generation. Therefore, the modelling can help realizing PRO energy generation potential. In this work, a few aspects of mathematical modelling of the PRO process are reviewed and discussed.

  18. A unified framework for benchmark dose estimation applied to mixed models and model averaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Gerhard, Daniel; Hothorn, Ludwig A.

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a framework for benchmark dose estimation that allows intrinsically nonlinear dose-response models to be used for continuous data in much the same way as is already possible for quantal data. This means that the same dose-response model equations may be applied to both...... continuous and quantal data, facilitating benchmark dose estimation in general for a wide range of candidate models commonly used in toxicology. Moreover, the proposed framework provides a convenient means for extending benchmark dose concepts through the use of model averaging and random effects modeling...... provides slightly conservative, yet useful, estimates of benchmark dose lower limit under realistic scenarios....

  19. Nutritional and clinical aspects of parenteral nutrition in pigs irradiated on the abdomen with supralethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Duee, P.H.

    1976-01-01

    Nutritional balances of nitrogen and minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus) were established in 10 pigs receiving a continuous parenteral nutrition supplying a daily amount of 1500ml containing 1500kcal and 2.2-5.4g of protein, and in addition, 2 liters of water per day. The balances were recorded for 5 days in the animals used as controls and for 9 days in those irradiated with 1000 rd in the median plane. This dose represents the inferior limit for appearence of the gastrointestinal syndrome in this species. The irradiated subjects seemed to be able to use a relatively high supply of energy and protein. Water and nitrogen balances were easy to obtain with respect to sodium, potassium and calcium, whereas the deficiency in phosphorus was difficult to compensate for through the intravenous route only

  20. OOAspectZ and aspect-oriented UML class diagrams for Aspect-oriented software modelling (AOSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Vidal Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Regarding modularised software development, Aspect-oriented programming (AOP identifies and represents individually crosscutting concerns during the software development cycle’s programming stage. This article proposes and applies OOAspectZ to formal Aspect-oriented requirement specifications for prior stages of the software development cycle. It particularly concerns requirement specification and the structural design of data and behaviour, along with describing and applying Aspect-oriented UML class diagrams to designing classes, aspects and associations among classes and aspects during Aspect-oriented software development (AOSD.OOAspectZ is a language integrating both Object-Z and AspectZ formal languages whereas Aspect-oriented UML class diagrams represent AOP code, object class and crosscutting concern class structure by means of stereotypes. This article shows and applies the main OOAspectZ and AO UML class diagram characteristics to Aspect-oriented software modelling (AOSM using a classic example of AOP. Ideas for future work concerning an actual AOP version are also indicated.

  1. Some aspects of statistical modeling of human-error probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prairie, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Human reliability analyses (HRA) are often performed as part of risk assessment and reliability projects. Recent events in nuclear power have shown the potential importance of the human element. There are several on-going efforts in the US and elsewhere with the purpose of modeling human error such that the human contribution can be incorporated into an overall risk assessment associated with one or more aspects of nuclear power. An effort that is described here uses the HRA (event tree) to quantify and model the human contribution to risk. As an example, risk analyses are being prepared on several nuclear power plants as part of the Interim Reliability Assessment Program (IREP). In this process the risk analyst selects the elements of his fault tree that could be contributed to by human error. He then solicits the HF analyst to do a HRA on this element

  2. Aspects of Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaochuan

    This dissertation describes a few aspects of particles beyond the Standard Model, with a focus on the remaining questions after the discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson. In specific, three topics are discussed in sequence: neutrino mass and baryon asymmetry, naturalness problem of Higgs mass, and placing constraints on theoretical models from precision measurements. First, the consequence of the neutrino mass anarchy on cosmology is studied. Attentions are paid in particular to the total mass of neutrinos and baryon asymmetry through leptogenesis. With the assumption of independence among mass matrix entries in addition to the basis independence, Gaussian measure is the only choice. On top of Gaussian measure, a simple approximate U(1) flavor symmetry makes leptogenesis highly successful. Correlations between the baryon asymmetry and the light-neutrino quantities are investigated. Also discussed are possible implications of recently suggested large total mass of neutrinos by the SDSS/BOSS data. Second, the Higgs mass implies fine-tuning for minimal theories of weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Non-decoupling effects can boost the Higgs mass when new states interact with the Higgs, but new sources of SUSY breaking that accompany such extensions threaten naturalness. I will show that two singlets with a Dirac mass can increase the Higgs mass while maintaining naturalness in the presence of large SUSY breaking in the singlet sector. The modified Higgs phenomenology of this scenario, termed "Dirac NMSSM", is also studied. Finally, the sensitivities of future precision measurements in probing physics beyond the Standard Model are studied. A practical three-step procedure is presented for using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. A detailed explanation is

  3. Dose Assessment Model for Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huifang; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    An improved dose assessment model for chronic atmospheric releases of tritium was proposed. The proposed model explicitly considered two chemical forms of tritium.It was based on conservative assumption of transfer of tritiated water (HTO) from air to concentration of HTO and organic beam tritium (OBT) in vegetable and animal products.The concentration of tritium in plant products was calculated based on considering dividedly leafy plant and not leafy plant, meanwhile the concentration contribution of tritium in the different plants from the tritium in soil was taken into account.Calculating the concentration of HTO in animal products, average water fraction of animal products and the average weighted tritium concentration of ingested water based on the fraction of water supplied by each source were considered,including skin absorption, inhalation, drinking water and food.Calculating the annual doses, the ingestion doses were considered, at the same time the contribution of inhalation and skin absorption to the dose was considered. Concentrations in foodstuffs and dose of annual adult calculated with the specific activity model, NEWTRI model and the model proposed by the paper were compared. The results indicate that the model proposed by the paper can predict accurately tritium doses through the food chain from chronic atmospheric releases. (authors)

  4. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only under the

  5. Embracing model-based designs for dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sharon B; Brown, Sarah; Weir, Christopher J; Harbron, Chris; Yap, Christina; Gaschler-Markefski, Birgit; Matcham, James; Caffrey, Louise; McKevitt, Christopher; Clive, Sally; Craddock, Charlie; Spicer, James; Cornelius, Victoria

    2017-07-25

    Dose-finding trials are essential to drug development as they establish recommended doses for later-phase testing. We aim to motivate wider use of model-based designs for dose finding, such as the continual reassessment method (CRM). We carried out a literature review of dose-finding designs and conducted a survey to identify perceived barriers to their implementation. We describe the benefits of model-based designs (flexibility, superior operating characteristics, extended scope), their current uptake, and existing resources. The most prominent barriers to implementation of a model-based design were lack of suitable training, chief investigators' preference for algorithm-based designs (e.g., 3+3), and limited resources for study design before funding. We use a real-world example to illustrate how these barriers can be overcome. There is overwhelming evidence for the benefits of CRM. Many leading pharmaceutical companies routinely implement model-based designs. Our analysis identified barriers for academic statisticians and clinical academics in mirroring the progress industry has made in trial design. Unified support from funders, regulators, and journal editors could result in more accurate doses for later-phase testing, and increase the efficiency and success of clinical drug development. We give recommendations for increasing the uptake of model-based designs for dose-finding trials in academia.

  6. Ondansetron: A newer aspect of dose response relationship on ileal smooth muscles of rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Ayesha; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Bakhtiar, Salman

    2016-01-01

    There are several life threatening deadly diseases in our world but ‘Cancer’ out powers them all in recent years. Chemotherapy may be used on its own or an adjunct to other forms of therapy. Despite the advancement in cytotoxic drug therapy and supportive treatment almost 70% of patient suffer from chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Ondansetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist has now become a gold standard in the treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The central actions of ondansetron are well established but its peripheral actions are not well recognized. The aim of our study was to explore the peripheral actions of ondansetron. Experiments were performed in five groups (n=6) and ileal smooth muscles activity was recorded on power lab (USA). The effects of increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, serotonin & ondansetron alone was observed in first three groups. In the next two groups effects of acetylcholine and serotonin pretreated with fixed concentration (1ml) of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M)were studied. The maximum response obtained by acetylcholine served as a control for our study. Maximum response with acetylcholine was taken as 100% and with serotonin was 177 percent of control. Cumulative dose response curve with ondansetron was triphasic. At 10¯ψM it was 28.8%, whereas with 10¯ξM the amplitude decreased to 16.87%, it reached to plateau at 10¯ϖ M. Response of acetylcholine & serotonin was decreased to 57% and 78% respectively in the presence of fixed concentration of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M). Ondansetron reduces the acetylcholine and serotonin induced gastrointestinal motility. Our study has indicated that ondansetron apart from having central action also has marked peripheral actions that play an important role in CINV and may act as a partial agonist.

  7. Nuclear physics aspects in the parton model of Feynman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauchy Hwang, W.Y.

    1995-01-01

    The basic fact that pions couple strongly to nucleons has dominated various nuclear physics thinkings since the birth of the field more than sixty years ago. The parton model of Feynman, in which the structure of a nucleon (or a hadron) is characterized by a set of parton distributions, was proposed originally in late 1960's to treat high energy deep inelastic scattering, and later many other high energy physics experiments involving hadrons. Introduction of the concept of parton distributions signifies the departure of particle physics from nuclear physics. Following the suggestion that the sea quark distributions in a nucleon, at low and moderate Q 2 (at least up to a few GeV 2 ), can be attributed primarily to the probability of finding such quarks or antiquarks in the mesons (or recoiling baryons) associated with the nucleon, the author examines how nuclear physics aspects offer quantitative understanding of several recent experimental results, including the observed violation of the Gotfried sum rule and the so-called open-quotes proton spin crisisclose quotes. These results suggest that determination of parton distributions of a hadron at Q 2 of a few GeV 2 (and at small x) must in general take into account nuclear physics aspects. Implication of these results for other high-energy reactions, such as semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering, are also discussed

  8. Modeling of finite aspect ratio effects on current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by a full wave code. This eliminates the need to use the approximation inherent in the parameterization. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code. The accuracy of the parameterization of the current drive efficiency, η, is judged by a comparison with a direct calculation: where χ is the adjoint function, ε is the kinetic energy, and rvec Γ is the quasilinear flux. It is shown that for large aspect ratio devices (ε → 0), the parameterization is nearly identical to the direct calculation. As the aspect ratio approaches unity, visible differences between the two calculations appear

  9. Modeling of finite aspect ratio effects on current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by a full wave code. This eliminates the need to use the approximation inherent in the parameterization. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code. The accuracy of the parameterization of the current drive efficiency, {eta}, is judged by a comparison with a direct calculation: where {chi} is the adjoint function, {epsilon} is the kinetic energy, and {rvec {Gamma}} is the quasilinear flux. It is shown that for large aspect ratio devices ({epsilon} {r_arrow} 0), the parameterization is nearly identical to the direct calculation. As the aspect ratio approaches unity, visible differences between the two calculations appear.

  10. A 3-dimensional in vitro model of epithelioid granulomas induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurt Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common causes of granulomatous inflammation are persistent pathogens and poorly-degradable irritating materials. A characteristic pathological reaction to intratracheal instillation, pharyngeal aspiration, or inhalation of carbon nanotubes is formation of epithelioid granulomas accompanied by interstitial fibrosis in the lungs. In the mesothelium, a similar response is induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials, including asbestos fibers, following intraperitoneal injection. This asbestos-like behaviour of some engineered nanomaterials is a concern for their potential adverse health effects in the lungs and mesothelium. We hypothesize that high aspect ratio nanomaterials will induce epithelioid granulomas in nonadherent macrophages in 3D cultures. Results Carbon black particles (Printex 90 and crocidolite asbestos fibers were used as well-characterized reference materials and compared with three commercial samples of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Doses were identified in 2D and 3D cultures in order to minimize acute toxicity and to reflect realistic occupational exposures in humans and in previous inhalation studies in rodents. Under serum-free conditions, exposure of nonadherent primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages to 0.5 μg/ml (0.38 μg/cm2 of crocidolite asbestos fibers or MWCNTs, but not carbon black, induced macrophage differentiation into epithelioid cells and formation of stable aggregates with the characteristic morphology of granulomas. Formation of multinucleated giant cells was also induced by asbestos fibers or MWCNTs in this 3D in vitro model. After 7-14 days, macrophages exposed to high aspect ratio nanomaterials co-expressed proinflammatory (M1 as well as profibrotic (M2 phenotypic markers. Conclusions Induction of epithelioid granulomas appears to correlate with high aspect ratio and complex 3D structure of carbon nanotubes, not with their iron content or surface area. This model

  11. Phenomenological aspects of no-scale inflation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics,King’s College London,WC2R 2LS London (United Kingdom); Theory Division, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Garcia, Marcos A.G. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics andAstronomy, Texas A& M University,College Station, 77843 Texas (United States); Astroparticle Physics Group, Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Mitchell Campus, Woodlands, 77381 Texas (United States); Academy of Athens, Division of Natural Sciences, 28 Panepistimiou Avenue, 10679 Athens (Greece); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We discuss phenomenological aspects of inflationary models wiith a no-scale supergravity Kähler potential motivated by compactified string models, in which the inflaton may be identified either as a Kähler modulus or an untwisted matter field, focusing on models that make predictions for the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r that are similar to the Starobinsky model. We discuss possible patterns of soft supersymmetry breaking, exhibiting examples of the pure no-scale type m{sub 0}=B{sub 0}=A{sub 0}=0, of the CMSSM type with universal A{sub 0} and m{sub 0}≠0 at a high scale, and of the mSUGRA type with A{sub 0}=B{sub 0}+m{sub 0} boundary conditions at the high input scale. These may be combined with a non-trivial gauge kinetic function that generates gaugino masses m{sub 1/2}≠0, or one may have a pure gravity mediation scenario where trilinear terms and gaugino masses are generated through anomalies. We also discuss inflaton decays and reheating, showing possible decay channels for the inflaton when it is either an untwisted matter field or a Kähler modulus. Reheating is very efficient if a matter field inflaton is directly coupled to MSSM fields, and both candidates lead to sufficient reheating in the presence of a non-trivial gauge kinetic function.

  12. Biosphere model for assessing doses from nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.; Amiro, B.D.; Davis, P.A.; Sheppard, S.C.; Szekeley, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The biosphere model, BIOTRAC, for predicting long term nuclide concentrations and radiological doses from Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept of a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield is presented. This generic, boreal zone biosphere model is based on scenario analysis and systems variability analysis using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Conservatism is used to bridge uncertainties, even though this creates a small amount of extra nuclide mass. Environmental change over the very long assessment period is mainly handled through distributed parameter values. The dose receptors are a critical group of humans and four generic non-human target organisms. BIOTRAC includes six integrated submodels and it interfaces smoothly with a geosphere model. This interface includes a bedrock well. The geosphere model defines the discharge zones of deep groundwater where nuclides released from the vault enter the biosphere occupied by the dose receptors. The size of one of these zones is reduced when water is withdrawn from the bedrock well. Sensitivity analysis indicates 129 I is by far the most important radionuclide. Results also show bedrock-well water leads to higher doses to man than lake water, but the former doses decrease with the size of the critical group. Under comparable circumstances, doses to the non-human biota are greater than those for man

  13. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2009-10-01

    Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

  14. Geometric Aspects and Some Uses of Deformed Models of Thermostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gavrilik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider diverse deformed Bose gas models (DBGMs focusing on distributions and correlations of any order, and also on deformed thermodynamics. For so-called μ -deformed Bose gas model ( μ -DBGM, main thermodynamic aspects are treated: total number of particles, deformed partition function, etc. Using a geometric approach, we confirm the existence of critical behavior—Bose-like condensation; we find the critical temperature T c ( μ depending on μ so that T c ( μ > T c ( Bose for μ > 0 . This fact and other advantages of μ -DBGM relative to the usual Bose gas, e.g., stronger effective inter-particle attraction (controlled by the parameter μ , allow us to consider the condensate in μ -DBGM as a candidate for modeling dark matter. As another, quite successful application we discuss the usage of the two-parameter ( μ ˜ , q -deformed BGM for effective description of the peculiar (non-Bose like behavior of two-pion correlations observed in the STAR experiment at RHIC (Brookhaven. Herein, we point out the transparent role of the two deformation parameters μ ˜ and q as being responsible for compositeness and (effective account of interactions of pions, respectively.

  15. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  16. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  17. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  18. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Key aspects of stratospheric tracer modeling using assimilated winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bregman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes key aspects of global chemistry-transport models and their impact on stratospheric tracer transport. We concentrate on global models that use assimilated winds from numerical weather predictions, but the results also apply to tracer transport in general circulation models. We examined grid resolution, numerical diffusion, air parcel dispersion, the wind or mass flux update frequency, and time interpolation. The evaluation is performed with assimilated meteorology from the "operational analyses or operational data" (OD from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. We also show the effect of the mass flux update frequency using the ECMWF 40-year re-analyses (ERA40. We applied the three-dimensional chemistry-transport Tracer Model version 5 (TM5 and a trajectory model and performed several diagnoses focusing on different transport regimes. Covering different time and spatial scales, we examined (1 polar vortex dynamics during the Arctic winter, (2 the large-scale stratospheric meridional circulation, and (3 air parcel dispersion in the tropical lower stratosphere. Tracer distributions inside the Arctic polar vortex show considerably worse agreement with observations when the model grid resolution in the polar region is reduced to avoid numerical instability. The results are sensitive to the diffusivity of the advection. Nevertheless, the use of a computational cheaper but diffusive advection scheme is feasible for tracer transport when the horizontal grid resolution is equal or smaller than 1 degree. The use of time interpolated winds improves the tracer distributions, particularly in the middle and upper stratosphere. Considerable improvement is found both in the large-scale tracer distribution and in the polar regions when the update frequency of the assimilated winds is increased from 6 to 3 h. It considerably reduces the vertical dispersion of air parcels in the tropical lower stratosphere. Strong

  20. Aspects of a two-pasture — herbivore model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Åge Riseth

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Pastures for reindeer can be divided into green pastures (mainly herbs and grasses of summer time and more or less snow-covered lichen pastures of winter. Fall and spring pastures have a composition in-between these extremes, but for model purposes bisection is sufficient. For the animals the green-pasture season is an anabolic phase with a physiological building-up of protein reserves, while winter is a catabolic phase where food-intake is reduced and the animals to a considerable extent survive on the accumulated reserves from summer. While protein reserves are stored from summer to winter, lichen pastures are stored from year to year. Grasses and herbs not being grazed are wilting by the end of the growing season, while lichens not grazed can live for many years. This corresponds with fundamental differences in both growth pattern and resilience. The implications of the different features, and their interconnections, are not easy to survey without formal modeling. The point of departure is a simple pasture-herbivore model, well known from the literature building on a set of differential equations. A new two-pasture-herbivore model is developed. The model includes as basic elements the Klein (1968 hypothesis and that a residual lichen biomass is kept ungrazed due to snow-cover protection. Further the annual cycle is divided into four stylized seasons with herd rates of winter survival, spring calving, summer physiological growth and fall slaughtering. Isoclines are derived for summer pasture, winter pasture and herbivores. Stability properties are discussed in relation to various situations of seasonal pasture balance. Empirical examples, particularly that of changes in pasture balance and vegetation cover in Western Finnmark, Norway, are discussed. The article finds that the two-pasture model provides important features of reality, such as the stability aspects of pasture balance, which cannot be displayed by a one-pasture model. It is

  1. Phenomenological aspects of no-scale inflation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King' s College London, WC2R 2LS London (United Kingdom); Garcia, Marcos A.G.; Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nanopoulos, Dimitri V., E-mail: john.ellis@cern.ch, E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: dimitri@physics.tamu.edu, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, 77843 Texas (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We discuss phenomenological aspects of inflationary models wiith a no-scale supergravity Kähler potential motivated by compactified string models, in which the inflaton may be identified either as a Kähler modulus or an untwisted matter field, focusing on models that make predictions for the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r that are similar to the Starobinsky model. We discuss possible patterns of soft supersymmetry breaking, exhibiting examples of the pure no-scale type m{sub 0} = B{sub 0} = A{sub 0} = 0, of the CMSSM type with universal A{sub 0} and m{sub 0} ≠ 0 at a high scale, and of the mSUGRA type with A{sub 0} = B{sub 0} + m{sub 0} boundary conditions at the high input scale. These may be combined with a non-trivial gauge kinetic function that generates gaugino masses m{sub 1/2} ≠ 0, or one may have a pure gravity mediation scenario where trilinear terms and gaugino masses are generated through anomalies. We also discuss inflaton decays and reheating, showing possible decay channels for the inflaton when it is either an untwisted matter field or a Kähler modulus. Reheating is very efficient if a matter field inflaton is directly coupled to MSSM fields, and both candidates lead to sufficient reheating in the presence of a non-trivial gauge kinetic function.

  2. Aspects of radiative electroweak breaking in supergravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, S.; Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Pois, H.; Yuan, K.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss several aspects of state-of-the-art calculations of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in supergravity models. These models have a five-dimensional parameter space in contrast with the 21-dimensional one of the MSSM. We examine the Higgs one-loop effective potential V 1 =V 0 +ΔV, in particular how its renormalization-scale (Q) independence is affected by the approximation used to calculate ΔV and by the presence of a Higgs-field-independent term which makes V 1 (0)≠0. We show that the latter must be subtracted out to achieve Q-independence. We also discuss our own approach to the exploration of the five-dimensional parameter space and the fine-tuning constraints within this approach. We apply our methods to the determination of the allowed region in parameter space of two models which we argue to be the prototypes for conventional (SSM) and string (SISM) unified models. To this end we impose the electroweak breaking constraint by minimizing the one-loop effective potential and study the shifts in μ and B relative to the values obtained using the tree-level potential. These shifts are most significant for small values of μ and B, and induce corresponding shifts on the lightest μ- and/or B-dependent particle masses, i.e., those of the lightest stau, neutralino, chargino, and Higgs boson states. Finally, we discuss the predictions for the squark, slepton, and one-loop corrected Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  3. Genetic Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati eBanerjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that display a triad of core behavioral deficits including restricted interests, often accompanied by repetitive behavior, deficits in language and communication, and an inability to engage in reciprocal social interactions. ASD is among the most heritable disorders but is not a simple disorder with a singular pathology and has a rather complex etiology. It is interesting to note that perturbations in synaptic growth, development and stability underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including ASD, schizophrenia, epilepsy and intellectual disability. Biological characterization of an increasing repertoire of synaptic mutants in various model organisms indicates synaptic dysfunction as causal in the pathophysiology of ASD. Our understanding of the genes and genetic pathways that contribute towards the formation, stabilization and maintenance of functional synapses coupled with an in-depth phenotypic analysis of the cellular and behavioral characteristics is therefore essential to unraveling the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this review, we discuss the genetic aspects of ASD emphasizing on the well conserved set of genes and genetic pathways implicated in this disorder, many of which contribute to synapse assembly and maintenance across species. We also review how fundamental research using animal models is providing key insights into the various facets of human ASD.

  4. Models for dose assessments. Models adapted to the SFR-area, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Sara; Bergstroem, U.; Meili, M.

    2001-10-01

    This report presents a model system created to be used to predict dose rates to the most exposed individuals in case of a long-term release of radionuclides from the Final repository for radioactive operational waste (SFR) in Forsmark, Sweden. The system accounts for an underground point source emitting radionuclides to the biosphere,their transport and distribution in various ecosystem types, their uptake by various biota, and calculation of doses to man from a multitude of exposure pathways. Long-term aspects include the consideration of processes at geological time scales, such as land uplift and conversion of marine sediments to arable land. Model parameters are whenever possible based on local conditions and recent literature. The system has been used for simulations based on geospheric releases varying over time of a mixture of radionuclides. Here, the models have been subjected to various test scenarios, including different radionuclide entry points and sorption properties. Radionuclides released from SFR are efficiently diluted to low concentrations in the water of the coastal model. A large fraction of the nuclides leave the Model Area quickly as a consequence of the rapid water turnover. The total amount of radionuclides in water is about the same independent of particle affinity (K d ), and at most some percents of the amounts retained in the sediments for some time. The latter is also true for the lake model when releases of radionuclides to the water is simulated. The role of sediments as a radionuclide source seems of minor importance in lakes at least for long-term radiation doses. Modelling the sediments as a source of radionuclides most of the 'low K d radionuclides' will leave the lake whereas the 'high K d nuclides' are still present within the deeper sediments after 1 000 years. The amount of 'low K d radionuclides' present in the water and on suspended matter are about 8x10 -5 of the initial inventory in the sediments. For 'high K d nuclides

  5. Theory of thermoluminescence gamma dose response: The unified interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Y. S.

    2001-09-01

    We describe the development of a comprehensive theory of thermoluminescence (TL) dose response, the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is based on both radiation absorption stage and recombination stage mechanisms and can describe dose response for heavy charged particles (in the framework of the extended track interaction model - ETIM) as well as for isotropically ionising gamma rays and electrons (in the framework of the TC/LC geminate recombination model) in a unified and self-consistent conceptual and mathematical formalism. A theory of optical absorption dose response is also incorporated in the UNIM to describe the radiation absorption stage. The UNIM is applied to the dose response supralinearity characteristics of LiF:Mg,Ti and is especially and uniquely successful in explaining the ionisation density dependence of the supralinearity of composite peak 5 in TLD-100. The UNIM is demonstrated to be capable of explaining either qualitatively or quantitatively all of the major features of TL dose response with many of the variable parameters of the model strongly constrained by ancilliary optical absorption and sensitisation measurements.

  6. Radiation dose from Chernobyl forests: assessment using the 'forestpath' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Linkov, I.; Belinkaia, E.; Rimkevich, V.; Zmushko, Yu.; Lutsko, A.; Fifield, F.W.; Flowers, A.G.; Wells, G.

    1996-01-01

    Contaminated forests can contribute significantly to human radiation dose for a few decades after initial contamination. Exposure occurs through harvesting the trees, manufacture and use of forest products for construction materials and paper production, and the consumption of food harvested from forests. Certain groups of the population, such as wild animal hunters and harvesters of berries, herbs and mushrooms, can have particularly large intakes of radionuclides from natural food products. Forestry workers have been found to receive radiation doses several times higher than other groups in the same area. The generic radionuclide cycling model 'forestpath' is being applied to evaluate the human radiation dose and risks to population groups resulting from living and working near the contaminated forests. The model enables calculations to be made to predict the internal and external radiation doses at specific times following the accident. The model can be easily adjusted for dose calculations from other contamination scenarios (such as radionuclide deposition at a low and constant rate as well as complex deposition patterns). Experimental data collected in the forests of Southern Belarus are presented. These data, together with the results of epidemiological studies, are used for model calibration and validation

  7. Screening model for assessing doses from radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoreen, A.L.; Athey, G.F.; Sakenas, C.A.; McKenna, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    A new dose assessment model, called RASCAL, has been written for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use during response to emergencies. RASCAL is designed to provide rough estimates of the health effects from a radiological accident in progress and only limited information is available. RASCAL will be used by the NRC personnel who report to the site of a nuclear accident to conduct an independent evaluation of dose projections. It was written to correct the technical and operational problems in NRC's previous model and to be more appropriate to the personal computers presently in use by the NRC. The model has been constructed to be easy to modify, with separate modules for estimation of the quantity of radioactivity released, its transport through the atmosphere, and the resulting radiologic dose to man. RASCAL results can be displayed in graphical or ASCII form. 4 refs

  8. A demonstration of dose modeling at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, T.B.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-11-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently revising the regulatory guidance for high-level nuclear waste disposal. In its draft form, the guidelines contain dose limits. Since this is likely to be the case in the final regulations, it is essential that the US Department of Energy be prepared to calculate site-specific doses for any potential repository location. This year, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has made a first attempt to estimate doses for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada as part of a preliminary total-systems performance assessment. A set of transport scenarios was defined to assess the cumulative release of radionuclides over 10,000 years under undisturbed and disturbed conditions at Yucca Mountain. Dose estimates were provided for several of the transport scenarios modeled. The exposure scenarios used to estimate dose in this total-systems exercise should not, however, be considered a definitive set of scenarios for determining the risk of the potential repository. Exposure scenarios were defined for waterborne and surface contamination that result from both undisturbed and disturbed performance of the potential repository. The exposure scenarios used for this analysis were designed for the Hanford Site in Washington. The undisturbed performance scenarios for which exposures were modeled are gas-phase release of 14 C to the surface and natural breakdown of the waste containers with waterborne release. The disturbed performance scenario for which doses were estimated is exploratory drilling. Both surface and waterborne contamination were considered for the drilling intrusion scenario

  9. Fundamental aspects of arm repair phase in two echinoderm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Cinzia; Ben Khadra, Yousra; Czarkwiani, Anna; Zakrzewski, Anne; Martinez, Pedro; Colombo, Graziano; Bonasoro, Francesco; Candia Carnevali, Maria Daniela; Oliveri, Paola; Sugni, Michela

    2018-01-15

    Regeneration is a post-embryonic developmental process that ensures complete morphological and functional restoration of lost body parts. The repair phase is a key step for the effectiveness of the subsequent regenerative process: in vertebrates, efficient re-epithelialisation, rapid inflammatory/immune response and post-injury tissue remodelling are fundamental aspects for the success of this phase, their impairment leading to an inhibition or total prevention of regeneration. Among deuterostomes, echinoderms display a unique combination of striking regenerative abilities and diversity of useful experimental models, although still largely unexplored. Therefore, the brittle star Amphiura filiformis and the starfish Echinaster sepositus were here used to comparatively investigate the main repair phase events after injury as well as the presence and expression of immune system and extracellular matrix (i.e. collagen) molecules using both microscopy and molecular tools. Our results showed that emergency reaction and re-epithelialisation are similar in both echinoderm models, being faster and more effective than in mammals. Moreover, in comparison to the latter, both echinoderms showed delayed and less abundant collagen deposition at the wound site (absence of fibrosis). The gene expression patterns of molecules related to the immune response, such as Ese-fib-like (starfishes) and Afi-ficolin (brittle stars), were described for the first time during echinoderm regeneration providing promising starting points to investigate the immune system role in these regeneration models. Overall, the similarities in repair events and timing within the echinoderms and the differences with what has been reported in mammals suggest that effective repair processes in echinoderms play an important role for their subsequent ability to regenerate. Targeted molecular and functional analyses will shed light on the evolution of these abilities in the deuterostomian lineage. Copyright © 2017

  10. A hypothetical model for predicting the toxicity of high aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, C. L.; Tantra, R.; Donaldson, K.; Stone, V.; Hankin, S. M.; Ross, B.; Aitken, R. J.; Jones, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to predict nanoparticle (dimensional structures which are less than 100 nm in size) toxicity through the use of a suitable model is an important goal if nanoparticles are to be regulated in terms of exposures and toxicological effects. Recently, a model to predict toxicity of nanoparticles with high aspect ratio has been put forward by a consortium of scientists. The High aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN) model is a platform that relates the physical dimensions of HARN (specifically length and diameter ratio) and biopersistence to their toxicity in biological environments. Potentially, this model is of great public health and economic importance, as it can be used as a tool to not only predict toxicological activity but can be used to classify the toxicity of various fibrous nanoparticles, without the need to carry out time-consuming and expensive toxicology studies. However, this model of toxicity is currently hypothetical in nature and is based solely on drawing similarities in its dimensional geometry with that of asbestos and synthetic vitreous fibres. The aim of this review is two-fold: (a) to present findings from past literature, on the physicochemical property and pathogenicity bioassay testing of HARN (b) to identify some of the challenges and future research steps crucial before the HARN model can be accepted as a predictive model. By presenting what has been done, we are able to identify scientific challenges and research directions that are needed for the HARN model to gain public acceptance. Our recommendations for future research includes the need to: (a) accurately link physicochemical data with corresponding pathogenicity assay data, through the use of suitable reference standards and standardised protocols, (b) develop better tools/techniques for physicochemical characterisation, (c) to develop better ways of monitoring HARN in the workplace, (d) to reliably measure dose exposure levels, in order to support future epidemiological

  11. Object-oriented process dose modeling for glovebox operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerigter, S.T.; Fasel, J.H.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory supports several defense and nondefense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of gloveboxes connected to each other via trolley gloveboxes. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily declining allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, the authors discriminate three components of a worker's total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE, and background EDE. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. Los Alamos has developed the Process Modeling System (ProMoS) primarily for performing process analyses of nuclear operations. ProMoS is an object-oriented, discrete-event simulation package that has been used to analyze operations at Los Alamos and proposed facilities such as the new fabrication facilities for the Complex-21 effort. In the past, crude estimates of the process dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred), room dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in a given room), and facility dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in the facility) were used to obtain an integrated EDE for a given process. Modifications to the ProMoS package were made to utilize secondary dose information to use dose modeling to enhance the process modeling efforts

  12. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  13. TSD-DOSE : a radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingston, M.

    1998-01-01

    In May 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Operations, issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping slightly radioactive mixed waste from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. Studies were subsequently conducted to evaluate the radiological impacts associated with DOE's prior shipments through DOE's authorized release process under DOE Order 5400.5. To support this endeavor, a radiological assessment computer code--TSD-DOSE (Version 1.1)--was developed and issued by DOE in 1997. The code was developed on the basis of detailed radiological assessments performed for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. It was designed to utilize waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste handling operations at a TSD facility. The code has since been released for use by DOE field offices and was recently used by DOE to evaluate the release of septic waste containing residual radioactive material to a TSD facility licensed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Revisions to the code were initiated in 1997 to incorporate comments received from users and to increase TSD-DOSE's capability, accuracy, and flexibility. These updates included incorporation of the method used to estimate external radiation doses from DOE's RESRAD model and expansion of the source term to include 85 radionuclides. In addition, a detailed verification and benchmarking analysis was performed

  14. Use of nonlinear dose-effect models to predict consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The linear dose-effect relationship was introduced as a model for the induction of cancer from exposure to nuclear radiation. Subsequently, it has been used by analogy to assess the risk of chemical carcinogens also. Recently, however, the model for radiation carcinogenesis has come increasingly under attack because its calculations contradict the epidemiological data, such as cancer in atomic bomb survivors. Even so, its proponents vigorously defend it, often using arguments that are not so much scientific as a mix of scientific, societal, and often political arguments. At least in part, the resilience of the linear model is due to two convenient properties that are exclusive to linearity: First, the risk of an event is determined solely by the event dose; second, the total risk of a population group depends only on the total population dose. In reality, the linear model has been conclusively falsified; i.e., it has been shown to make wrong predictions, and once this fact is generally realized, the scientific method calls for a new paradigm model. As all alternative models are by necessity nonlinear, all the convenient properties of the linear model are invalid, and calculational procedures have to be used that are appropriate for nonlinear models

  15. 3-D Numerical Modelling of Oblique Continental Collisions with ASPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R.

    2017-12-01

    Among the fundamental types of tectonic plate boundaries, continent-continent collision is least well understood. Deformation of the upper and middle crustal layers can be inferred from surface structures and geophysical imaging, but the fate of lower crustal rocks and mantle lithosphere is not well resolved. Previous research suggests that shortening of mantle lithosphere generally may be occurring by either: 1) a distributed thickening with a formation of a Raleigh-Tailor (RT) type instability (possibly accompanied with lithospheric folding); or 2) plate-like subduction, which can be one- or two-sided, with or without delamination and slab break-off; a combination of both could be taking place too. 3-D features of the orogens such as along-trench material transfer, bounding subduction zones can influence the evolution of the collision zone significantly. The current study was inspired by South Island of New Zealand - a young collision system where a block of continental crust is being shortened by the relative Australian-Pacific plate motion. The collision segment of the plate boundary is relatively small ( 800 km), and is bounded by oppositely verging subduction zones to the North and South. Here, we present results of 3-D forward numerical modelling of continental collision to investigate some of these processes. To conduct the simulations, we used ASPECT - a highly parallel community-developed code based on the Finite Element method. Model setup for three different sets of models featured 2-D vertical across strike, 3-D with periodic front and back walls, and 3-D with open front and back walls, with velocities prescribed on the left and right faces. We explored the importance of values of convergent velocity, strike-slip velocity and their ratio, which defines the resulting velocity direction relative to the plate boundary (obliquity). We found that higher strike-slip motion promotes strain localization, weakens the lithosphere close to the plate boundary and

  16. Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A.; Ford, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb's ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood

  17. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  18. Modelling Socio-Technical Aspects of Organisational Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Marieta G.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of threats to organisations and risk assessment often take into consideration the pure technical aspects, overlooking the vulnerabilities originating from attacks on a social level, for example social engineering, and abstracting away the physical infrastructure. However, attacks on

  19. Quantifying annual internal effective137Cesium dose utilizing direct body-burden measurement and ecological dose modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelin, Benjamin A; Sun, Wenjie; Kravets, Alexandra; Naboka, Maryna; Stepanova, Eugenia I; Vdovenko, Vitaliy Y; Karmaus, Wilfried J; Lichosherstov, Alex; Svendsen, Erik R

    2016-11-01

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident represents one of the most significant civilian releases of 137 Cesium ( 137 Cs, radiocesium) in human history. In the Chernobyl-affected region, radiocesium is considered to be the greatest on-going environmental hazard to human health by radiobiologists and public health scientists. The goal of this study was to characterize dosimetric patterns and predictive factors for whole-body count (WBC)-derived radiocesium internal dose estimations in a CNPP-affected children's cohort, and cross-validate these estimations with a soil-based ecological dose estimation model. WBC data were used to estimate the internal effective dose using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 67 dose conversion coefficient for 137 Cs and MONDAL Version 3.01 software. Geometric mean dose estimates from each model were compared utilizing paired t-tests and intra-class correlation coefficients. Additionally, we developed predictive models for WBC-derived dose estimation in order to determine the appropriateness of EMARC to estimate dose for this population. The two WBC-derived dose predictive models identified 137 Cs soil concentration (Pmodel. The geometric mean internal effective dose estimate of the EMARC model (0.183 mSv/y) was the highest followed by the ICRP 67 dose estimates (0.165 mSv/y) and the MONDAL model estimates (0.149 mSv/y). All three models yielded significantly different geometric mean dose (Pecological model dose estimations, in conjunction with findings from animal toxicological studies, should help elucidate possible deterministic radiogenic health effects associated with chronic low-dose internal exposure to 137 Cs.

  20. Aspects of modelling classical or synchronous modelling with Solid Edge ST 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goanta Adrian Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current situation of the design activity is dependent on both the level of training of the human resources and the financial resources of companies required purchasing the design software packages and complex calculation equipment. Consequently, the situation is very diverse in the sense that there are design cases using only drawing software but also classical 3D or synchronous modelling situations, simple or integrated into software packages that meet the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM principles. The natural tendency in modelling and design is primarily to the high computing power integrated software or somewhat simplified versions that, however, allow at least FEA modelling, simulation and the related 2D documentation. The paper presents some aspects of modernity in synchronous modelling as compared to the classic one, made with 2016 version of Solid Edge software from SIEMENS. Basically there were studied and analysed aspects of modelling ease, speed of changes and also optimization of commands in the modelling process of the same piece in the two versions mentioned: classic and synchronous. It is also presented the alternative path from one method to another within the same process of piece modelling, depending on the advantages provided by each method. In other words, the work is based on a case study of modelling a piece under the two modelling versions of which some aspects were highlighted and conclusions were drawn.

  1. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  2. Aspect-Aware Latent Factor Model: Rating Prediction with Ratings and Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Ding, Ying; Zhu, Lei; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    2018-01-01

    Although latent factor models (e.g., matrix factorization) achieve good accuracy in rating prediction, they suffer from several problems including cold-start, non-transparency, and suboptimal recommendation for local users or items. In this paper, we employ textual review information with ratings to tackle these limitations. Firstly, we apply a proposed aspect-aware topic model (ATM) on the review text to model user preferences and item features from different aspects, and estimate the aspect...

  3. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  4. Modelling Socio-Technical Aspects of Organisational Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva

    Identification of threats to organisations and risk assessment often take into consideration the pure technical aspects, overlooking the vulnerabilities originating from attacks on a social level, for example social engineering, and abstracting away the physical infrastructure. However, attacks o...... it. We validate our approach using scenarios from IPTV and Cloud Infrastructure case studies....

  5. Modeling gamma radiation dose in dwellings due to building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Peter; van Dijk, Willem

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that calculates the absorbed dose rate in air of gamma radiation emitted by building materials in a rectangular body construction. The basis for these calculations is formed by a fixed set of specific absorbed dose rates (the dose rate per Bq kg(-1) 238U, 232Th, and 40K), as determined for a standard geometry with the dimensions 4 x 5 x 2.8 m3. Using the computer codes Marmer and MicroShield, correction factors are assessed that quantify the influence of several room and material related parameters on the specific absorbed dose rates. The investigated parameters are the position in the construction; the thickness, density, and dimensions of the construction parts; the contribution from the outer leave; the presence of doors and windows; the attenuation by internal partition walls; the contribution from building materials present in adjacent rooms; and the effect of non-equilibrium due to 222Rn exhalation. To verify the precision, the proposed method is applied to three Dutch reference dwellings, i.e., a row house, a coupled house, and a gallery apartment. The averaged difference with MCNP calculations is found to be 4%.

  6. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  7. Biological profiling and dose-response modeling tools ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through its ToxCast project, the U.S. EPA has developed a battery of in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays designed to assess the potential toxicity of environmental chemicals. At present, over 1800 chemicals have been tested in up to 600 assays, yielding a large number of concentration-response data sets. Standard processing of these data sets involves finding a best fitting mathematical model and set of model parameters that specify this model. The model parameters include quantities such as the half-maximal activity concentration (or “AC50”) that have biological significance and can be used to inform the efficacy or potency of a given chemical with respect to a given assay. All of this data is processed and stored in an online-accessible database and website: http://actor.epa.gov/dashboard2. Results from these in vitro assays are used in a multitude of ways. New pathways and targets can be identified and incorporated into new or existing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). Pharmacokinetic models such as those implemented EPA’s HTTK R package can be used to translate an in vitro concentration into an in vivo dose; i.e., one can predict the oral equivalent dose that might be expected to activate a specific biological pathway. Such predicted values can then be compared with estimated actual human exposures prioritize chemicals for further testing.Any quantitative examination should be accompanied by estimation of uncertainty. We are developing met

  8. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  9. On the influence of the exposure model on organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the design characteristics of the MIRD-V phantom, two sex-specific adult phantoms, ADAM and EVA were introduced especially for the calculation of organ doses resulting from external irradiation. Although the body characteristics of all the phantoms are in good agreement with those of the reference man and woman, they have some disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages and to obtain more realistic phantoms, a technique based on computer tomographic data (voxel-phantom) was developed. This technique allows any physical phantom or real body to be converted into computer files. The improvements are of special importance with regard to the skeleton, because a better modeling of the bone surfaces and separation of hard bone and bone marrow can be achieved. For photon irradiation, the sensitivity of the model on organ doses or the effective dose equivalent is important for operational radiation protection

  10. Models for dose assessments. Models adapted to the SFR-area, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Sara; Bergstroem, U.; Meili, M. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-10-01

    This report presents a model system created to be used to predict dose rates to the most exposed individuals in case of a long-term release of radionuclides from the Final repository for radioactive operational waste (SFR) in Forsmark, Sweden. The system accounts for an underground point source emitting radionuclides to the biosphere,their transport and distribution in various ecosystem types, their uptake by various biota, and calculation of doses to man from a multitude of exposure pathways. Long-term aspects include the consideration of processes at geological time scales, such as land uplift and conversion of marine sediments to arable land. Model parameters are whenever possible based on local conditions and recent literature. The system has been used for simulations based on geospheric releases varying over time of a mixture of radionuclides. Here, the models have been subjected to various test scenarios, including different radionuclide entry points and sorption properties. Radionuclides released from SFR are efficiently diluted to low concentrations in the water of the coastal model. A large fraction of the nuclides leave the Model Area quickly as a consequence of the rapid water turnover. The total amount of radionuclides in water is about the same independent of particle affinity (K{sub d} ), and at most some percents of the amounts retained in the sediments for some time. The latter is also true for the lake model when releases of radionuclides to the water is simulated. The role of sediments as a radionuclide source seems of minor importance in lakes at least for long-term radiation doses. Modelling the sediments as a source of radionuclides most of the 'low K{sub d} radionuclides' will leave the lake whereas the 'high K{sub d} nuclides' are still present within the deeper sediments after 1 000 years. The amount of 'low K{sub d} radionuclides' present in the water and on suspended matter are about 8x10{sup -5} of the

  11. Development of the model MAAP5-DOSE for dose analysis in Cofrentes NPP; Desarrollo del modelo MAAP5-DOSE para analisis de dosis en C.N. Cofrentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, C.; Diaz, P.; Ibanez, L.; Lamela, B.; Serrano, C.

    2013-07-01

    Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion has developed a model of Cofrentes NPP with code MAAP5-DOSE in order to be able to assess in realistic conditions the the expected dose in points and radiological consequences of severe accident of local action.

  12. Inverse modeling of FIB milling by dose profile optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, S.; Waid, S.; Hobler, G.; Wanzenböck, H.D.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2014-01-01

    FIB technologies possess a unique ability to form topographies that are difficult or impossible to generate with binary etching through typical photo-lithography. The ability to arbitrarily vary the spatial dose distribution and therefore the amount of milling opens possibilities for the production of a wide range of functional structures with applications in biology, chemistry, and optics. However in practice, the realization of these goals is made difficult by the angular dependence of the sputtering yield and redeposition effects that vary as the topography evolves. An inverse modeling algorithm that optimizes dose profiles, defined as the superposition of time invariant pixel dose profiles (determined from the beam parameters and pixel dwell times), is presented. The response of the target to a set of pixel dwell times in modeled by numerical continuum simulations utilizing 1st and 2nd order sputtering and redeposition, the resulting surfaces are evaluated with respect to a target topography in an error minimization routine. Two algorithms for the parameterization of pixel dwell times are presented, a direct pixel dwell time method, and an abstracted method that uses a refineable piecewise linear cage function to generate pixel dwell times from a minimal number of parameters. The cage function method demonstrates great flexibility and efficiency as compared to the direct fitting method with performance enhancements exceeding ∼10× as compared to direct fitting for medium to large simulation sets. Furthermore, the refineable nature of the cage function enables solutions to adapt to the desired target function. The optimization algorithm, although working with stationary dose profiles, is demonstrated to be applicable also outside the quasi-static approximation. Experimental data confirms the viability of the solutions for 5 × 7 μm deep lens like structures defined by 90 pixel dwell times

  13. Some aspects of modelling microbial quality of food.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Rombouts, F.M.; Riet, van 't K.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of food deterioration reactions are important for the optimization of food chains. Different model types used to predict deterioration kinetics are briefly commented on. Objectives and needs for modelling are presented. A procedure to compare different models is given together with an

  14. Chosen aspects of modeling globoid worm in CATIA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr POŁOWNIAK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods of modelling the globoid worm with rectilinear profile using CATIA system. The methods of modelling of globoid surface, among others throw extending a profile accross the screw lines of globoid (Sweep, by making the surface as multi section (Multi Section Surface are specified. Some steps by modelling the globoid surface are automated by writing macros in the CATIA system. The accuracy of the models of globoid worms obtained by different methods is presented. The capabilities of the CATIA system by modelling are presented.

  15. Translational neurocardiology: preclinical models and cardioneural integrative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, J L; Andresen, M C; Armour, J A; Billman, G E; Chen, P-S; Foreman, R D; Herring, N; O'Leary, D S; Sabbah, H N; Schultz, H D; Sunagawa, K; Zucker, I H

    2016-07-15

    Neuronal elements distributed throughout the cardiac nervous system, from the level of the insular cortex to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, are in constant communication with one another to ensure that cardiac output matches the dynamic process of regional blood flow demand. Neural elements in their various 'levels' become differentially recruited in the transduction of sensory inputs arising from the heart, major vessels, other visceral organs and somatic structures to optimize neuronal coordination of regional cardiac function. This White Paper will review the relevant aspects of the structural and functional organization for autonomic control of the heart in normal conditions, how these systems remodel/adapt during cardiac disease, and finally how such knowledge can be leveraged in the evolving realm of autonomic regulation therapy for cardiac therapeutics. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  16. Translational neurocardiology: preclinical models and cardioneural integrative aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, M. C.; Armour, J. A.; Billman, G. E.; Chen, P.‐S.; Foreman, R. D.; Herring, N.; O'Leary, D. S.; Sabbah, H. N.; Schultz, H. D.; Sunagawa, K.; Zucker, I. H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuronal elements distributed throughout the cardiac nervous system, from the level of the insular cortex to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, are in constant communication with one another to ensure that cardiac output matches the dynamic process of regional blood flow demand. Neural elements in their various ‘levels’ become differentially recruited in the transduction of sensory inputs arising from the heart, major vessels, other visceral organs and somatic structures to optimize neuronal coordination of regional cardiac function. This White Paper will review the relevant aspects of the structural and functional organization for autonomic control of the heart in normal conditions, how these systems remodel/adapt during cardiac disease, and finally how such knowledge can be leveraged in the evolving realm of autonomic regulation therapy for cardiac therapeutics. PMID:27098459

  17. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  18. Residential radon in Finland: sources, variation, modelling and dose comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-09-01

    The study deals with sources of indoor radon in Finland, seasonal variations in radon concentration, the effect of house construction and ventilation and also with the radiation dose from indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation. The results are based on radon measurements in approximately 4000 dwellings and on air exchange measurements in 250 dwellings as well as on model calculations. The results confirm that convective soil air flow is by far the most important source of indoor radon in Finnish low-rise residential housing. (97 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.)

  19. Residential radon in Finland: sources, variation, modelling and dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-09-01

    The study deals with sources of indoor radon in Finland, seasonal variations in radon concentration, the effect of house construction and ventilation and also with the radiation dose from indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation. The results are based on radon measurements in approximately 4000 dwellings and on air exchange measurements in 250 dwellings as well as on model calculations. The results confirm that convective soil air flow is by far the most important source of indoor radon in Finnish low-rise residential housing. (97 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.).

  20. Comparison of two dose and three dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules: cost effectiveness analysis based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-06

    To investigate the incremental cost effectiveness of two dose human papillomavirus vaccination and of additionally giving a third dose. Cost effectiveness study based on a transmission dynamic model of human papillomavirus vaccination. Two dose schedules for bivalent or quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines were assumed to provide 10, 20, or 30 years' vaccine type protection and cross protection or lifelong vaccine type protection without cross protection. Three dose schedules were assumed to give lifelong vaccine type and cross protection. United Kingdom. Males and females aged 12-74 years. No, two, or three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine given routinely to 12 year old girls, with an initial catch-up campaign to 18 years. Costs (from the healthcare provider's perspective), health related utilities, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Giving at least two doses of vaccine seems to be highly cost effective across the entire range of scenarios considered at the quadrivalent vaccine list price of £86.50 (€109.23; $136.00) per dose. If two doses give only 10 years' protection but adding a third dose extends this to lifetime protection, then the third dose also seems to be cost effective at £86.50 per dose (median incremental cost effectiveness ratio £17,000, interquartile range £11,700-£25,800). If two doses protect for more than 20 years, then the third dose will have to be priced substantially lower (median threshold price £31, interquartile range £28-£35) to be cost effective. Results are similar for a bivalent vaccine priced at £80.50 per dose and when the same scenarios are explored by parameterising a Canadian model (HPV-ADVISE) with economic data from the United Kingdom. Two dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules are likely to be the most cost effective option provided protection lasts for at least 20 years. As the precise duration of two dose schedules may not be known for decades, cohorts given two doses should be closely

  1. In-situ biogas upgrading process: modeling and simulations aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Giovanna; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Kovalovszki, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Biogas upgrading processes by in-situ hydrogen (H2) injection are still challenging and could benefit from a mathematical model to predict system performance. Therefore, a previous model on anaerobic digestion was updated and expanded to include the effect of H2 injection into the liquid phase of...

  2. Metrological aspects in estimating of radiation dose in patients of nuclear medicine; Aspectos metrologicos na estimativa da dose efetiva de pacientes em medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzzarin, Anelise

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the performance of routine measurements in nuclear medicine services, LNMRI/IRD has been conducting, since 1998, a comparison program of activity measurements of radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients in nuclear medicine. Correction factors are determined from the result of performance analysis in order to determine with better accuracy the activity to be administered to the patients. The present study shows how the correction factor is determined by the ratio between the measurement of the activity at the nuclear medicine center and the activity determined by the LNMRI, which is adopted as reference. It is essential that the dose calibrator be calibrated with standards traceable to national metrology laboratories, so that the activity administered to the patient is neither greater nor smaller than the appropriate value. The corrected values of the activities can be used to calculate with greater accuracy the effective doses received by the patients as well as the risk of cancer. Information related to radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities, type of exams and patient data of three Brazilian hospitals were collected for 1496 adults and 134 children submitted to diagnostic exams employing {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 131}I. Results showed up to a considerable difference between the administered activity and the corrected activity until 30% and 13% above the reference value, respectively, for the {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc was detected. The consequences of these differences were not very critical in this study since the activity measured in dose calibrator before administration was lower than the corrected activity, thus causing a lower effective dose in patients. However, this reduction in activity may result in problems in obtaining the image and consequently, failure diagnosis, delaying correct diagnosis. On the other hand, the overestimation would be worse, mainly in therapeutic applications, because an unnecessarily high absorbed

  3. Conceptual model for decision support in mining industry NORM - aspects of environmental radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Rocio Gloria dos

    2012-01-01

    Mining like many other industries can cause environmental impact. One of aspects that is in focus in many countries concerns to quantify the impact and establish requirements or improve the existing regulation about naturally occurring radioactive material - NORM. By a suitable management of the activities in these industries, there is an effort to minimize the waste production, minimize the environmental impacts and, consequently, the exposure of members of the public and workers. This study developed a conceptual model, a tool to assist in the decision making process for managers of mining and industrial facilities that deal with NORM. To develop this model, the Brazilian regulations were confronted with the regulations of countries where the NORM subject is important and with those that are being established by the principal institutions of radioprotection. The need of updating the Brazilian regulations was observed. Some recurring themes that are relevant to the management of NORM industries were surveyed, which resulted in the insertion of non-human biota risk assessment and the participation of stakeholders in the proposed model. The model was applied to a real case, the phosphoric acid and uranium plant of Santa Quiteria, in the Ceara state, with the aim of identifying the main critical points of the facility from the perspective of the environmental radiological impact and evaluating the adequacy of model, in addition to providing subsidies for its improvement. By the assessment of the process, it was found that the main source would be the phosphogypsum stack, which 226 Ra activity concentration might exceed the level established for its use in agriculture and cement industry. The impact assessment was carried out in three different scenarios: 1) the critical group located in the facility borders, 2) the critical group located on the stack, after the closure of the area and 3) workers. In all cases, the exercise pointed out the exceeding of the adopted

  4. ASPECTS OF MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND INTERPRETATION OF A MANUFACTURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela ALDEA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper developing we started from a model that allows a detailed decoding of causalrelationships and getting the laws that determine the evolution of the phenomenon.The model chosen for the study is a discrete event system applicable to optimize the transport systemused in pottery. In order to simulate the manufacturing process we chose Matlab package that contains pntoollibrary, by which can be realized modeling of analyzed graphs. Since the timings of manufacture are very highand the process simulation is conducted with difficulty, we divided the graph according to the transport system.

  5. Some Numerical Aspects on Crowd Motion - The Hughes Model

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-01-06

    Here, we study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [5] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an Eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori estimates for the solution. Second, we study radial solutions and identify a shock formation mechanism. Third, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. Finally, we propose a new numerical method and consider two numerical examples.

  6. Aspects of perturbative QCD in Monte Carlo shower models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    The perturbative QCD content of Monte Carlo models for high energy hadron-hadron scattering is examined. Particular attention is given to the recently developed backwards evolution formalism for initial state parton showers, and the merging of parton shower evolution with hard scattering cross sections. Shower estimates of K-factors are discussed, and a simple scheme is presented for incorporating 2 → QCD cross sections into shower model calculations without double counting. Additional issues in the development of hard scattering Monte Carlo models are summarized. 69 references, 20 figures

  7. Multiscale modeling of complex materials phenomenological, theoretical and computational aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Trovalusci, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this volume deal with materials science, theoretical mechanics and experimental and computational techniques at multiple scales, providing a sound base and a framework for many applications which are hitherto treated in a phenomenological sense. The basic principles are formulated of multiscale modeling strategies towards modern complex multiphase materials subjected to various types of mechanical, thermal loadings and environmental effects. The focus is on problems where mechanics is highly coupled with other concurrent physical phenomena. Attention is also focused on the historical origins of multiscale modeling and foundations of continuum mechanics currently adopted to model non-classical continua with substructure, for which internal length scales play a crucial role.

  8. Strategies and technical aspects of endobronchial high dose rate irradiation in the treatment of malignant airway occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Paolo; Ravo, Vincenzo

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: The combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDRBT) in a definitive approach to these patients is proposed. Moreover we try to determine the maximal acutely tolerable dose of HDRBT combined with EBRT and to search the optimal dose schedule using different fractionations. Material and Methods: From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 165 patients with external beam radiotherapy with concomitant HDR endobronchial brachytherapy. Patients selection criteria were: biopsy proved histology (non small cell cancers), Stage IIIa-IIIb-IV, KPS > 60, expectance of life> 3 months, presence of cough and/or dyspnea, haemoptysis, obstructive pneumonia. EBRT was performed using a 15 Mv linear accelerator and delivering 60 Gy to the tumor bed and 50 Gy for mediastinum with or without treating the supraclavicular fossae. In 38 patients (Group A) we delivered, with HDRBT, 10 Gy in 1 fraction with a dose that was calculated at 1 cm from the central axis of the endobronchial catheter. In 47 patients (Group B) HDRBT dose was of 7 Gy in 2 fractions always at 1 cm. In 80 patients (Group C) the dose was of 5 Gy in 3 fractions. In 20 patients of this group the dose was calculated at 1 cm and in 60 it was calculated at 0,5 cm from the central axis. Group A treatment was performed before starting EBRT. Group B received brachytherapy at the beginning and at the end of the EBRT treatment. Group C was treated every 15 fractions of EBRT (timing 0,15,30). Totally our group has performed 382 treatments. Results: Follow up is in the range of 5-36 months (with 151/165 evaluable patients). Mean survival from diagnosis of 10.3 months and mean survival from last HDRBT of 9.5 months. The symptomatic response rate is of 90% for dyspnea, 82 % for cough, 94% for emoptysis and of 90 % for obstructive pneumonia. We proved it at the 6 months bronchoscopy in (27(35)) patients evaluable of Group A, in(22(44)) evaluable of Group B and in(18(62)) evaluable

  9. The EFQM model on Danish public sector aspects of TQM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Madsen, Ole Nørgaard

    management systems at institutional level making use of the EFQM model. The results of this quality in classroom self-assessment project has been reported in Danish for the Ministry of Education. Secondly, the Ministry of Education has initiated another project with the aim of comparing quality approaches...... in education initiated in 1993 we have been involved in the Aarhus Technical College transformning the EFQM model into a tool for teachers´ self-assessment of quality in classroom. Looking upon education from a management point of view, an educational paradigm has been developed comparing learning as classroom...... as a guideline for implementing quality management at vocational colleges. This project is referring to the EFQM model as one of the approaches to be used. Thirdly, the EFQM Model is recommended by the Danish national government as the tool for assessing not only private companies business excellence, but public...

  10. Mathematical models for calculating radiation dose to the fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates of radiation dose from radionuclides inside the body are calculated on the basis of energy deposition in mathematical models representing the organs and tissues of the human body. Complex models may be used with radiation transport codes to calculate the fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed in a target tissue even at a distance from the source. Other models may be simple geometric shapes for which absorbed fractions of energy have already been calculated. Models of Reference Man, the 15-year-old (Reference Woman), the 10-year-old, the five-year-old, the one-year-old, and the newborn have been developed and used for calculating specific absorbed fractions (absorbed fractions of energy per unit mass) for several different photon energies and many different source-target combinations. The Reference woman model is adequate for calculating energy deposition in the uterus during the first few weeks of pregnancy. During the course of pregnancy, the embryo/fetus increases rapidly in size and thus requires several models for calculating absorbed fractions. In addition, the increases in size and changes in shape of the uterus and fetus result in the repositioning of the maternal organs and in different geometric relationships among the organs and the fetus. This is especially true of the excretory organs such as the urinary bladder and the various sections of the gastrointestinal tract. Several models have been developed for calculating absorbed fractions of energy in the fetus, including models of the uterus and fetus for each month of pregnancy and complete models of the pregnant woman at the end of each trimester. In this paper, the available models and the appropriate use of each will be discussed. (Author) 19 refs., 7 figs

  11. Global aspects of symmetries in sigma models with torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, G.; Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that non-trivial topological sectors can prevent the quantum mechanical implementation of the symmetries of the classical field equations of sigma models with torsion. The associated anomaly is computed, and it is shown that it depends on the homotopy class of the topological sector of the theory and the group action on the sigma model manifold that generates the symmetries of the classical field equations. (orig.)

  12. Thematic report: Macroeconomic models including specifically social and environmental aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kratena, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    WWWforEurope Deliverable No. 8, 30 pages A significant reduction of the global environmental consequences of European consumption and production activities are the main objective of the policy simulations carried out in this paper. For this purpose three different modelling approaches have been chosen. Two macroeconomic models following the philosophy of consistent stock-flow accounting for the main institutional sectors (households, firms, banks, central bank and government) are used for...

  13. A Thermoacoustic Model for High Aspect Ratio Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud S. Loeian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have developed a new thermoacoustic model for predicting the resonance frequency and quality factors of one-dimensional (1D nanoresonators. Considering a nanoresonator as a fix-free Bernoulli-Euler cantilever, an analytical model has been developed to show the influence of material and geometrical properties of 1D nanoresonators on their mechanical response without any damping. Diameter and elastic modulus have a direct relationship and length has an inverse relationship on the strain energy and stress at the clamp end of the nanoresonator. A thermoacoustic multiphysics COMSOL model has been elaborated to simulate the frequency response of vibrating 1D nanoresonators in air. The results are an excellent match with experimental data from independently published literature reports, and the results of this model are consistent with the analytical model. Considering the air and thermal damping in the thermoacoustic model, the quality factor of a nanowire has been estimated and the results show that zinc oxide (ZnO and silver-gallium (Ag2Ga nanoresonators are potential candidates as nanoresonators, nanoactuators, and for scanning probe microscopy applications.

  14. Soliton surfaces associated with sigma models: differential and algebraic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, P P; Grundland, A M; Post, S

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider both differential and algebraic properties of surfaces associated with sigma models. It is shown that surfaces defined by the generalized Weierstrass formula for immersion for solutions of the CP N-1 sigma model with finite action, defined in the Riemann sphere, are themselves solutions of the Euler–Lagrange equations for sigma models. On the other hand, we show that the Euler–Lagrange equations for surfaces immersed in the Lie algebra su(N), with conformal coordinates, that are extremals of the area functional, subject to a fixed polynomial identity, are exactly the Euler–Lagrange equations for sigma models. In addition to these differential constraints, the algebraic constraints, in the form of eigenvalues of the immersion functions, are systematically treated. The spectrum of the immersion functions, for different dimensions of the model, as well as its symmetry properties and its transformation under the action of the ladder operators are discussed. Another approach to the dynamics is given, i.e. description in terms of the unitary matrix which diagonalizes both the immersion functions and the projectors constituting the model. (paper)

  15. Thermodynamical aspects of modeling the mechanical response of granular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elata, D.

    1995-01-01

    In many applications in rock physics, the material is treated as a continuum. By supplementing the related conservation laws with constitutive equations such as stress-strain relations, a well-posed problem can be formulated and solved. The stress-strain relations may be based on a combination of experimental data and a phenomenological or micromechanical model. If the model is physically sound and its parameters have a physical meaning, it can serve to predict the stress response of the material to unmeasured deformations, predict the stress response of other materials, and perhaps predict other categories of the mechanical response such as failure, permeability, and conductivity. However, it is essential that the model be consistent with all conservation laws and consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. Specifically, some models of the mechanical response of granular materials proposed in literature, are based on intergranular contact force-displacement laws that violate the second law of thermodynamics by permitting energy generation at no cost. This diminishes the usefulness of these models as it invalidates their predictive capabilities. [This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  16. Phenomenological aspects of possible vacua of a neutrino flavor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Shimizu, Yusuke; Takagi, Kenta; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a supersymmetric model with discrete flavor symmetry {A}4× {Z}3. The additional scalar fields which contribute masses of leptons in the Yukawa terms are introduced in this model. We analyze their scalar potential and find that they have various vacuum structures. We show the relations among 24 different vacua and classify them into two types. We derive expressions of the lepton mixing angles, Dirac CP violating phase and Majorana phases for the two types. The model parameters which are allowed by the experimental data of the lepton mixing angles are different for each type. We also study the constraints on the model parameters which are related to Majorana phases. The different allowed regions of the model parameters for the two types are shown numerically for a given region of two combinations of the CP violating phases. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP17K05418 (T.M.). This work is also supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research [No. 16J05332 (Y.S.), Nos. 24540272, 26247038, 15H01037, 16H00871, and 16H02189 (H.U.)] from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. H.O. is also supported by Hiroshima Univ. Alumni Association

  17. The theoretical aspects of UrQMD & AMPT models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Abhilasha, E-mail: kashvini.abhi@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics, Suresh Gyan vihar University, Jaipur (India); Bhardwaj, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhir.hep@gmail.com [Assistant professor, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner (India)

    2016-05-06

    The field of high energy physics is very challenging in carrying out theories and experiments to unlock the secrets of heavy ion collisions and still not cracked and solved completely. There are many theoretical queries; some may be due to the inherent causes like the non-perturbative nature of QCD in the strong coupling limit, also due to the multi-particle production and evolution during the heavy ion collisions which increase the complexity of the phenomena. So for the purpose of understanding the phenomena, variety of theories and ideas are developed which are usually implied in the form of Monte-Carlo codes. The UrQMD model and the AMPT model are discussed here in detail. These methods are useful in modeling the nuclear collisions.

  18. Mathematical aspects of an exactly solvable inflationary model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintus, N.; Mignemi, S.

    2018-01-01

    The inflationary scenario is nowadays the most natural and simple way to solve the problems of the standard Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology. Generally, inflation is driven by models of gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field ϕ rolling on a suitable potential V (ϕ). We discuss a particular model presenting two scenarios: the vacuum universe and the matter-filled universe, in order to find exact general isotropic and homogeneous cosmological solutions displaying an inflationary behavior at early times and a power-law expansion at late times.

  19. Insights on non-perturbative aspects of TMDs from models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Avakian, A. Efremov, P. Schweitzer, O. Teryaev, F. Yuan, P. Zavada

    2009-12-01

    Transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions are a key ingredient in the description of spin and azimuthal asymmetries in deep-inelastic scattering processes. Recent results from non-perturbative calculations in effective approaches are reviewed, with focus on relations among different parton distribution functions in QCD and models.

  20. Some aspects of modelling CWIT refill test 1465 using CATHENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, P.; Thompson, W.; Galia, A.

    1995-01-01

    CATHENA is a multipurpose thermalhydraulic computer code which can be used for analysis of postulated LOCA scenarios for CANDU reactors. The CWIT refill test facility at Stern Laboratories, funded by the COG (CANDU Owners Group), has been used to investigate the flow and heat transfer behaviour as a function of channel power, system pressure, liquid subcooling, header injection flow rates, and channel configuration (Hanna and Mallory, 1989). The test No. 1465 was one of the refill experiments using the CWIT facility to investigate the quench and refill behaviour of the feeders, end fittings and channel during some postulated LOCAs (Buell and Kowalski, 1994). This test simulated a symmetric inlet/outlet header 50 mm break size with near-zero header-to-header pressure drop. A CATHENA representation of the CWIT facility was developed. The paper emphasizes the modelling of some non-pipe components in the system. CATHENA provides the user many choices for modelling these system components. Different code components were applied for modelling the header and end fitting, and the refill transients were compared. The use of a solid-to-solid contact model, giving zigzag heat conduction along the wall was investigated, to study the impact of axial heat conduction on a moving quench front. Suggestions are offered for future applications of CATHENA to similar problems. (author). 13 refs., 5 figs

  1. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-01-01

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids

  2. Modelling aspects of distributed processing in telecommunication networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasgard, A; Audestad, JA; Dye, S; Stougie, L; van der Vlerk, MH; Wallace, SW

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formally describe new optimization models for telecommunication networks with distributed processing. Modem distributed networks put more focus on the processing of information and less on the actual transportation of data than we are traditionally used to in

  3. An unsupervised aspect detection model for sentiment analysis of reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagheri, Ayoub; Saraee, M.; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    With the rapid growth of user-generated content on the internet, sentiment analysis of online reviews has become a hot research topic recently, but due to variety and wide range of products and services, the supervised and domain-specific models are often not practical. As the number of reviews

  4. Dosimetric Aspects of Personnel Skin Contamination by Radionuclides - Estimate of a Skin Dose, Monitoring and Interpretation of Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husak, V.; Kleinbauer, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: On the basis of a critical comparison of literary data, tables are compiled of beta and gamma dose rate in mSvh -1 (kBqcm -1 ) to the basal layer of the skin at 0.07 mm depth from contamination by 75 radionuclides unsealed sources; radioactive substances are assumed to reside on the skin surface. The residence time needed for the estimate of the skin dose is calculated assuming that a residual activity per unit area of any radionuclide on the skin, which could not be removed by the repeated careful decontamination, is supposed to be eliminated with the biological half-life of 116 h as a consequence of the natural sloughing off of the skin. Radionuclides are divided into five groups according to the dose estimate in mSv (kBqcm -2 ): ≥250 (e.g. 32 P, 89 Sr, 137 Cs/ 137m Ba), 100-250 (e.g. 90 Y, 131 I, 186 Re), 10-100 (e.g. 35 S, 67 Ga, 200 Tl), 1-10 (e.g. 18 F, 51 Cr, 99m Tc), ≤1 (e.g. 63 Ni, 144 Pr, 238 U). If it is possible, doses can be determined more precisely by measuring the effective half-life of the residual activity on the contaminated area. Our dose estimates are approximately valid on the condition that, after decontamination, residual activity of radionuclides persists predominantly in the superficial layers of epidermis. This and further uncertainties connected with the dose assessment are discussed. Our tables can help to determine easily rough values of doses to personnel in contamination incidents and to interpret them in relation to regulatory derived limits. This work was supported by State Office for Nuclear Safety in Prague. (author)

  5. New aspects of flavour model building in supersymmetric grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We derive predictions for Yukawa coupling ratios within Grand Unified Theories generated from operators with mass dimension four and five. These relations are a characteristic property of unified flavour models and can reduce the large number of free parameters related to the flavour sector of the Standard Model. The Yukawa couplings of the down-type quarks and charged leptons are affected within supersymmetric models by tan β-enhanced threshold corrections which can be sizeable if tan β is large. In this case their careful inclusion in the renormalisation group evolution is mandatory. We analyse these corrections and give simple analytic expressions and numerical estimates for them. The threshold corrections sensitively depend on the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters. Especially, they determine the overall sign of the corrections and therefore if the affected Yukawa couplings are enhanced or suppressed. In the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model many free parameters are introduced by supersymmetry breaking about which we make some plausible assumptions in our first simplified approach. In a second, more sophisticated approach we use three common breaking schemes in which all the soft breaking parameters at the electroweak scale can be calculated from only a handful of parameters. Within the second approach, we apply various phenomenological constraints on the supersymmetric parameters and find in this way new viable Yukawa coupling relations, for example y μ /y s =9/2 or 6 or y τ /y b =3/2 in SU(5). Furthermore, we study a special class of quark mass matrix textures for small tan β where θ u 13 =θ d 13 =0. We derive sum rules for the quark mixing parameters and find a simple relation between the two phases δ u 12 and δ d 12 and the right unitarity triangle angle α which suggests a simple phase structure for the quark mass matrices where one matrix element is purely imaginary and the remaining ones are purely real. To complement

  6. New aspects of flavour model building in supersymmetric grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2010-05-19

    We derive predictions for Yukawa coupling ratios within Grand Unified Theories generated from operators with mass dimension four and five. These relations are a characteristic property of unified flavour models and can reduce the large number of free parameters related to the flavour sector of the Standard Model. The Yukawa couplings of the down-type quarks and charged leptons are affected within supersymmetric models by tan {beta}-enhanced threshold corrections which can be sizeable if tan {beta} is large. In this case their careful inclusion in the renormalisation group evolution is mandatory. We analyse these corrections and give simple analytic expressions and numerical estimates for them. The threshold corrections sensitively depend on the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters. Especially, they determine the overall sign of the corrections and therefore if the affected Yukawa couplings are enhanced or suppressed. In the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model many free parameters are introduced by supersymmetry breaking about which we make some plausible assumptions in our first simplified approach. In a second, more sophisticated approach we use three common breaking schemes in which all the soft breaking parameters at the electroweak scale can be calculated from only a handful of parameters. Within the second approach, we apply various phenomenological constraints on the supersymmetric parameters and find in this way new viable Yukawa coupling relations, for example y{sub {mu}}/y{sub s}=9/2 or 6 or y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b}=3/2 in SU(5). Furthermore, we study a special class of quark mass matrix textures for small tan {beta} where {theta}{sup u}{sub 13}={theta}{sup d}{sub 13}=0. We derive sum rules for the quark mixing parameters and find a simple relation between the two phases {delta}{sup u}{sub 12} and {delta}{sup d}{sub 12} and the right unitarity triangle angle {alpha} which suggests a simple phase structure for the quark mass matrices where

  7. Multiscale modeling of lithium ion batteries: thermal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Latz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries has a huge impact on their lifetime and the initiation of degradation processes. The development of hot spots or large local overpotentials leading, e.g., to lithium metal deposition depends on material properties as well as on the nano- und microstructure of the electrodes. In recent years a theoretical structure emerges, which opens the possibility to establish a systematic modeling strategy from atomistic to continuum scale to capture and couple the relevant phenomena on each scale. We outline the building blocks for such a systematic approach and discuss in detail a rigorous approach for the continuum scale based on rational thermodynamics and homogenization theories. Our focus is on the development of a systematic thermodynamically consistent theory for thermal phenomena in batteries at the microstructure scale and at the cell scale. We discuss the importance of carefully defining the continuum fields for being able to compare seemingly different phenomenological theories and for obtaining rules to determine unknown parameters of the theory by experiments or lower-scale theories. The resulting continuum models for the microscopic and the cell scale are numerically solved in full 3D resolution. The complex very localized distributions of heat sources in a microstructure of a battery and the problems of mapping these localized sources on an averaged porous electrode model are discussed by comparing the detailed 3D microstructure-resolved simulations of the heat distribution with the result of the upscaled porous electrode model. It is shown, that not all heat sources that exist on the microstructure scale are represented in the averaged theory due to subtle cancellation effects of interface and bulk heat sources. Nevertheless, we find that in special cases the averaged thermal behavior can be captured very well by porous electrode theory.

  8. Distributional aspects of emissions in climate change integrated assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantore, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The recent failure of Copenhagen negotiations shows that concrete actions are needed to create the conditions for a consensus over global emission reduction policies. A wide coalition of countries in international climate change agreements could be facilitated by the perceived fairness of rich and poor countries of the abatement sharing at international level. In this paper I use two popular climate change integrated assessment models to investigate the path and decompose components and sources of future inequality in the emissions distribution. Results prove to be consistent with previous empirical studies and robust to model comparison and show that gaps in GDP across world regions will still play a crucial role in explaining different countries contributions to global warming. - Research highlights: → I implement a scenario analysis with two global climate change models. → I analyse inequality in the distribution of emissions. → I decompose emissions inequality components. → I find that GDP per capita is the main Kaya identity source of emissions inequality. → Current rich countries will mostly remain responsible for emissions inequality.

  9. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  10. Aspects of animal models for major neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefter Radu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We will review the main animal models for the major neuropsychiatric disorders, focusing on schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression, anxiety and autism. Although these mental disorders are specifically human pathologies and therefore impossible to perfectly replicate in animals, the use of experimental animals is based on the physiological and anatomical similarities between humans and animals such as the rat, and mouse, and on the fact that 99% of human and murine genomes are shared. Pathological conditions in animals can be assessed by manipulating the metabolism of neurotransmitters, through various behavioral tests, and by determining biochemical parameters that can serve as important markers of disorders.

  11. Local models of heterotic flux vacua: spacetime and worldsheet aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, D. [GRECO, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Carlevaro, L. [LAREMA, Universite d' Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-07-01

    We report on some recent progress in understanding heterotic flux compactifications, from a worldsheet perspective mainly. We consider local models consisting in torus fibration over warped Eguchi-Hanson space and non-Kaehler resolved conifold geometries. We analyze the supergravity solutions and define a double-scaling limit of the resolved singularities, defined such that the geometry is smooth and weakly coupled. We show that, remarkably, the heterotic solutions admit solvable worldsheet CFT descriptions in this limit. This allows in particular to understand the important role of worldsheet non-perturbative effects. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Methodological aspects of journaling a dynamic adjusting entry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Kašparovská

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper expands the discussion of the importance and function of adjusting entries for loan receivables. Discussion of the cyclical development of adjusting entries, their negative impact on the business cycle and potential solutions has intensified during the financial crisis. These discussions are still ongoing and continue to be relevant to members of the professional public, banking regulators and representatives of international accounting institutions. The objective of this paper is to evaluate a method of journaling dynamic adjusting entries under current accounting law. It also expresses the authors’ opinions on the potential for consistently implementing basic accounting principles in journaling adjusting entries for loan receivables under a dynamic model.

  13. Local models of heterotic flux vacua: spacetime and worldsheet aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, D.; Carlevaro, L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on some recent progress in understanding heterotic flux compactifications, from a worldsheet perspective mainly. We consider local models consisting in torus fibration over warped Eguchi-Hanson space and non-Kaehler resolved conifold geometries. We analyze the supergravity solutions and define a double-scaling limit of the resolved singularities, defined such that the geometry is smooth and weakly coupled. We show that, remarkably, the heterotic solutions admit solvable worldsheet CFT descriptions in this limit. This allows in particular to understand the important role of worldsheet non-perturbative effects. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Semiotic aspects of control and modeling relations in complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, C.

    1996-08-01

    A conceptual analysis of the semiotic nature of control is provided with the goal of elucidating its nature in complex systems. Control is identified as a canonical form of semiotic relation of a system to its environment. As a form of constraint between a system and its environment, its necessary and sufficient conditions are established, and the stabilities resulting from control are distinguished from other forms of stability. These result from the presence of semantic coding relations, and thus the class of control systems is hypothesized to be equivalent to that of semiotic systems. Control systems are contrasted with models, which, while they have the same measurement functions as control systems, do not necessarily require semantic relations because of the lack of the requirement of an interpreter. A hybrid construction of models in control systems is detailed. Towards the goal of considering the nature of control in complex systems, the possible relations among collections of control systems are considered. Powers arguments on conflict among control systems and the possible nature of control in social systems are reviewed, and reconsidered based on our observations about hierarchical control. Finally, we discuss the necessary semantic functions which must be present in complex systems for control in this sense to be present at all.

  15. Modeling socioeconomic and ecologic aspects of land-use change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, V.H.; Pedlowski, M.A.; O'Neill, R.V.; Southworth, F.

    1992-01-01

    Land use change is one of the major factors affecting global environmental conditions. Prevalent types of land-use change include replacing forests with agriculture, mines or ranches; forest degradation from collection of firewood; and forest logging. A global effect of wide-scale deforestation is an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, which may affect climate. Regional effects include loss of biodiversity and disruption of hydrologic regimes. Local effects include soil erosion, siltation and decreases in soil fertility, loss of extractive reserves, and disruption of indigenous people. Modeling land use change requires combining socioeconomic and ecological factors because socioeconomic forces frequently initiate land-use change and are affected by the subsequent ecological degradation. This paper describes a modeling system that integrates submodels of human colonization and impacts to estimate patterns and rates of deforestation under different immigration and land use scenarios. Immigration which follows road building or paving is a major factor in the rapid deforestation of previously inaccessible areas. Roads facilitate colonization, allow access for large machines, and provide transportation routes for mort of raw materials and produce

  16. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  17. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.; Aggeryd, I.

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  18. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.; Aggeryd, I. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  19. Common problematic aspects of coupling hydrological models with groundwater flow models on the river catchment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Barthel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Model coupling requires a thorough conceptualisation of the coupling strategy, including an exact definition of the individual model domains, the "transboundary" processes and the exchange parameters. It is shown here that in the case of coupling groundwater flow and hydrological models – in particular on the regional scale – it is very important to find a common definition and scale-appropriate process description of groundwater recharge and baseflow (or "groundwater runoff/discharge" in order to achieve a meaningful representation of the processes that link the unsaturated and saturated zones and the river network. As such, integration by means of coupling established disciplinary models is problematic given that in such models, processes are defined from a purpose-oriented, disciplinary perspective and are therefore not necessarily consistent with definitions of the same process in the model concepts of other disciplines. This article contains a general introduction to the requirements and challenges of model coupling in Integrated Water Resources Management including a definition of the most relevant technical terms, a short description of the commonly used approach of model coupling and finally a detailed consideration of the role of groundwater recharge and baseflow in coupling groundwater models with hydrological models. The conclusions summarize the most relevant problems rather than giving practical solutions. This paper aims to point out that working on a large scale in an integrated context requires rethinking traditional disciplinary workflows and encouraging communication between the different disciplines involved. It is worth noting that the aspects discussed here are mainly viewed from a groundwater perspective, which reflects the author's background.

  20. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-01-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced

  1. Discussions on the dose models for environmental impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongxing; Liu Senlin; Liu Xinhe

    1993-01-01

    A discussion was made about the relationship between the individual dose limits in the system of radiological protection and the doses estimated in the assessment of radiological impact on the environment. Based on this discussion and the discussions about the basic concepts of the methodology for environment impact assessment, a suggestion was set forth to utilize dose commitment or truncated dose commitment from one year of practice to represent the ultimate level of annual dose from a steadily continued source. The related formulae were presented in this paper

  2. Modelling and Formal Verification of Timing Aspects in Large PLC Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Tournier, J-C; Gonzalez Suarez, V M; Blech, J O

    2014-01-01

    One of the main obstacle that prevents model checking from being widely used in industrial control systems is the complexity of building formal models out of PLC programs, especially when timing aspects need to be integrated. This paper brings an answer to this obstacle by proposing a methodology to model and verify timing aspects of PLC programs. Two approaches are proposed to allow the users to balance the trade-off between the complexity of the model, i.e. its number of states, and the set of specifications possible to be verified. A tool supporting the methodology which allows to produce models for different model checkers directly from PLC programs has been developed. Verification of timing aspects for real-life PLC programs are presented in this paper using NuSMV.

  3. The Impact of Personality on Training-Related Aspects of Motivation: Test of a Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Jens

    2007-01-01

    A model that proposed dispositional influences on training-related aspects of motivation was developed. More specifically, the model predicted influences of the Big Five personality variables on motivation to learn and transfer motivation, while controlling for general attitudes toward training. The model was tested empirically, drawing on a…

  4. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  5. Practical aspects and applications of the biological effective dose three-dimensional calculation for multi-phase radiotherapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin Ikaika

    The approximate BED (BEDA) is calculated for multi-phase cases due to current treatment planning systems (TPSs) being incapable of performing BED calculations. There has been no study on the mathematical accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to the true BED (BEDT), and how that might negatively impact patient care. The purpose of the first aim was to study the mathematical accuracy and precision in both hypothetical and clinical situations, while the next two aims were to create multi-phase BED optimization ideas for both multi-target liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases, and gynecological cases where patients are treated with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy along with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). MATLAB algorithms created for this work were used to mathematically analyze the accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to BEDT in both hypothetical and clinical situations on a 3D basis. The organs-at-risk (OARs) of ten head & neck and ten prostate cancer patients were studied for the clinical situations. The accuracy of BEDA was shown to vary between OARs as well as between patients. The percentage of patients with an overall BEDA percent error less than 1% were, 50% for the Optic Chiasm and Brainstem, 70% for the Left and Right Optic Nerves, as well as the Rectum and Bladder, and 80% for the Normal Brain and Spinal Cord. As seen for each OAR among different patients, there were always cases where the percent error was greater than 1%. This is a cause for concern since the goal of radiation therapy is to reduce the overall uncertainty of treatment, and calculating BEDA distributions increases the treatment uncertainty with percent errors greater than 1%. The revealed inaccuracy and imprecision of BEDA supports the argument to use BEDT. The multi-target liver study involved applying BEDT in order to reduce the number of dose limits to one rather than have one for each fractionation scheme in multi-target liver SBRT treatments. A BEDT limit

  6. Integration of aspect and slope in snowmelt runoff modeling in a mountain watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalamu Abudu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the performances of the traditional temperature-index snowmelt runoff model (SRM and an SRM model with a finer zonation based on aspect and slope (SRM + AS model in a data-scarce mountain watershed in the Urumqi River Basin, in Northwest China. The proposed SRM + AS model was used to estimate the melt rate with the degree-day factor (DDF through the division of watershed elevation zones based on aspect and slope. The simulation results of the SRM + AS model were compared with those of the traditional SRM model to identify the improvements of the SRM + AS model's performance with consideration of topographic features of the watershed. The results show that the performance of the SRM + AS model has improved slightly compared to that of the SRM model. The coefficients of determination increased from 0.73, 0.69, and 0.79 with the SRM model to 0.76, 0.76, and 0.81 with the SRM + AS model during the simulation and validation periods in 2005, 2006, and 2007, respectively. The proposed SRM + AS model that considers aspect and slope can improve the accuracy of snowmelt runoff simulation compared to the traditional SRM model in mountain watersheds in arid regions by proper parameterization, careful input data selection, and data preparation.

  7. Aspect of sucrose and its monomers from sugarcane juice submitted to different doses of cobalt-60 irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Roberta B.; Rela, Paulo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear da Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiobiologia e Ambiente; Souza, Juliana Ap.; Prezotto, Mariane P.; Baptista, Antonio S.; Aguiar, Claudio L., E-mail: claguiar@esalq.usp.br [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP, (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    The sugarcane is an important source of sucrose, which has been for years an essential source of energy, even for consumption as food or to produce liquid fuels. During the manufacturing process of crystal sugar, one of the main concerns is to avoid the inversion of sucrose to glucose and fructose, which could decrease the efficiency of crystal's production. The increase of sugar production and the growing interest of foreign market have encouraged the development of numerous investigative studying, searching for alternative technologies and a better efficiency of process of current clarifying, sulphitation, producing a whiter sugar in a process named 'sulfur free' with effectiveness production of crystal sucrose. In acid conditions or extended exposure to high temperatures, inversion reaction can occur, resulting in the formation of reducing sugars - i.e. mainly glucose and fructose - which affect the sucrose crystallization process. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of gamma irradiation (Co-60) on the rate of reducing sugars and also totals reducing sugars (i.e., sucrose, glucose and fructose) into sugarcane juice before and after treatment with different doses: 5, 10 and 20 kGy. Some parameters were evaluated, such as: Brix, pH, reducing sugar and total reducing sugar, and from the results it was observed that parameters such as Brix and pH did not have a significant variation between the control and irradiated samples, varying from 13.2 Brix (Control) to 13.0 Brix (20 kGy) and 5.26 (10KGy) to 5.36 (20 kGy), respectively. For the analysis of reducing sugar, the contents varying from 29 {+-}0.87 to 43{+-}1.43 mg.mL{sup -1} with the largest rise occurred in the sample irradiated at 20 kGy. For analysis of total reducing sugar, the results ranged from 12.02{+-}0.46% in control sample to 11.93{+-}0.21% in the sample which received the highest radiation dose, 20 kGy. Against these results, we could conclude that the impact of gamma radiation

  8. Aspect of sucrose and its monomers from sugarcane juice submitted to different doses of cobalt-60 irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Roberta B.; Rela, Paulo; Arthur, Valter; Souza, Juliana Ap.; Prezotto, Mariane P.; Baptista, Antonio S.; Aguiar, Claudio L.

    2011-01-01

    The sugarcane is an important source of sucrose, which has been for years an essential source of energy, even for consumption as food or to produce liquid fuels. During the manufacturing process of crystal sugar, one of the main concerns is to avoid the inversion of sucrose to glucose and fructose, which could decrease the efficiency of crystal's production. The increase of sugar production and the growing interest of foreign market have encouraged the development of numerous investigative studying, searching for alternative technologies and a better efficiency of process of current clarifying, sulphitation, producing a whiter sugar in a process named 'sulfur free' with effectiveness production of crystal sucrose. In acid conditions or extended exposure to high temperatures, inversion reaction can occur, resulting in the formation of reducing sugars - i.e. mainly glucose and fructose - which affect the sucrose crystallization process. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of gamma irradiation (Co-60) on the rate of reducing sugars and also totals reducing sugars (i.e., sucrose, glucose and fructose) into sugarcane juice before and after treatment with different doses: 5, 10 and 20 kGy. Some parameters were evaluated, such as: Brix, pH, reducing sugar and total reducing sugar, and from the results it was observed that parameters such as Brix and pH did not have a significant variation between the control and irradiated samples, varying from 13.2 Brix (Control) to 13.0 Brix (20 kGy) and 5.26 (10KGy) to 5.36 (20 kGy), respectively. For the analysis of reducing sugar, the contents varying from 29 ±0.87 to 43±1.43 mg.mL -1 with the largest rise occurred in the sample irradiated at 20 kGy. For analysis of total reducing sugar, the results ranged from 12.02±0.46% in control sample to 11.93±0.21% in the sample which received the highest radiation dose, 20 kGy. Against these results, we could conclude that the impact of gamma radiation emitted to dose rate of 3.88 KGy

  9. A strategy to optimize CT pediatric dose with a visual discrimination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Gudinchet, François; Alamo-Maestre, Leonor T.; Bochud, François O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2008-03-01

    Technological developments of computed tomography (CT) have led to a drastic increase of its clinical utilization, creating concerns about patient exposure. To better control dose to patients, we propose a methodology to find an objective compromise between dose and image quality by means of a visual discrimination model. A GE LightSpeed-Ultra scanner was used to perform the acquisitions. A QRM 3D low contrast resolution phantom (QRM - Germany) was scanned using CTDI vol values in the range of 1.7 to 103 mGy. Raw data obtained with the highest CTDI vol were afterwards processed to simulate dose reductions by white noise addition. Noise realism of the simulations was verified by comparing normalized noise power spectra aspect and amplitudes (NNPS) and standard deviation measurements. Patient images were acquired using the Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) proposed in Switzerland. Noise reduction was then simulated, as for the QRM phantom, to obtain five different CTDI vol levels, down to 3.0 mGy. Image quality of phantom images was assessed with the Sarnoff JNDmetrix visual discrimination model and compared to an assessment made by means of the ROC methodology, taken as a reference. For patient images a similar approach was taken but using as reference the Visual Grading Analysis (VGA) method. A relationship between Sarnoff JNDmetrix and ROC results was established for low contrast detection in phantom images, demonstrating that the Sarnoff JNDmetrix can be used for qualification of images with highly correlated noise. Patient image qualification showed a threshold of conspicuity loss only for children over 35 kg.

  10. Budget constraint and vaccine dosing: A mathematical modelling exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Standaert, Baudouin A.; Curran, Desmond; Postma, Maarten J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing the number of vaccine doses may potentially improve overall efficacy. Decision-makers need information about choosing the most efficient dose schedule to maximise the total health gain of a population when operating under a constrained budget. The objective of this study is to

  11. Direct electric current modifies important cellular aspects and ultrastructure features of Candida albicans yeasts: Influence of doses and polarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Dos Santos, Eldio Gonçalves; Capella, Francielle Neves Carvalho; Homsani, Fortune; de Pointis Marçal, Carina; Dos Santos Valle, Roberta; de Araújo Abi-Chacra, Érika; Braga-Silva, Lys Adriana; de Oliveira Sales, Marcelo Henrique; da Silva Neto, Inácio Domingos; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Holandino, Carla

    2017-02-01

    Available treatments against human fungal pathogens present high levels of resistance, motivating the development of new antifungal therapies. In this context, the present work aimed to analyze direct electric current (DC) antifungal action, using an in vitro apparatus equipped with platinum electrodes. Candida albicans yeast cells were submitted to three distinct conditions of DC treatment (anodic flow-AF; electroionic flow-EIF; and cathodic flow-CF), as well as different charges, ranging from 0.03 to 2.40 C. Our results indicated C. albicans presented distinct sensibility depending on the DC intensity and polarity applied. Both the colony-forming unit assay and the cytometry flow with propidium iodide indicated a drastic reduction on cellular viability after AF treatment with 0.15 C, while CF- and EIF-treated cells stayed alive when DC doses were increased up to 2.40 C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed important ultrastructural alterations in AF-treated yeasts, including cell structure disorganization, ruptures in plasmatic membrane, and cytoplasmic rarefaction. This work emphasizes the importance of physical parameters (polarity and doses) in cellular damage, and brings new evidence for using electrotherapy to treat C. albicans pathology process. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:95-108, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Wind Turbine and Wind Power Plant Modelling Aspects for Power System Stability Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Göksu, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    is not reasonable regarding the focus of the study. Therefore the power system operators should be aware of the modelling aspects of the wind power considering the related stability study and implement the required model in the appropriate power system toolbox. In this paper, the modelling aspects of wind turbines...... and wind power plants are reviewed for power system stability studies. Important remarks of the models are presented by means of simulations to emphasize the impact of these modelling details on the power system.......Large amount of wind power installations introduce modeling challenges for power system operators at both the planning and operational stages of power systems. Depending on the scope of the study, the modeling details of the wind turbine or the wind power plant are required to be different. A wind...

  13. Compatibility of the repairable-conditionally repairable, multi-target and linear-quadratic models in converting hypofractionated radiation doses to single doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Akagi, Takashi; Otsuka, Shinya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) model and the multi-target (MT) model to dose conversion in high-dose-per-fraction radiotherapy in comparison with the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. Cell survival data of V79 and EMT6 single cells receiving single doses of 2-12 Gy or 2 or 3 fractions of 4 or 5 Gy each, and that of V79 spheroids receiving single doses of 5-26 Gy or 2-5 fractions of 5-12 Gy, were analyzed. Single and fractionated doses to actually reduce cell survival to the same level were determined by a colony assay. Single doses used in the experiments and surviving fractions at the doses were substituted into equations of the RCR, MT and LQ models in the calculation software Mathematica, and each parameter coefficient was computed. Thereafter, using the coefficients and the three models, equivalent single doses for the hypofractionated doses were calculated. They were then compared with actually-determined equivalent single doses for the hypofractionated doses. The equivalent single doses calculated using the RCR, MT and LQ models tended to be lower than the actually determined equivalent single doses. The LQ model seemed to fit relatively well at doses of 5 Gy or less. At 6 Gy or higher doses, the RCR and MT models seemed to be more reliable than the LQ model. In hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, the LQ model should not be used, and conversion models incorporating the concept of the RCR or MT models, such as the generalized linear-quadratic models, appear to be more suitable.

  14. 4D Model on Assessing Psychomotor Aspect in Continental Food Processing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurafiati, P.; Ana, A.; Ratnasusanti, H.; Maulana, I.

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to develop and find out the response of observers for the assessment instrument of student’s psychomotor aspect on continental food processing practice. This research belongs to development research with 4P model that confined till the definition, design, and development stages. The data that gained during the research is analyzed descriptively. Research’s product is assessment instrument rubric form that consists of performance’s aspect which should be assessed and performance’s quality which stated in gradation score with 0-4 level and performance description that completed with picture illustration in every single score. Product was validate and responded based on material, construction, language, objectively, systematic, and practicability aspects. The result show that assessment instrument of student’s psychomotor aspect on continental food processing practice which developed gain very good response with percentage of 84,47%.

  15. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  16. Dose apportionment using statistical modeling of the effluent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are always operated under the guidelines stipulated by the regulatory body. These guidelines basically contain the technical specifications of the specific power plant and provide the knowledge of the discharge limit of the radioactive effluent into the environment through atmospheric and aquatic route. However, operational constraints sometimes may violate the technical specification due to which there may be a failure to satisfy the stipulated dose apportioned to that plant. In a site having multi facilities sum total of the dose apportioned to all the facilities should be constrained to 1 mSv/year to the members of the public. Dose apportionment scheme basically stipulates the limit of the gaseous and liquid effluent released into the environment. Existing methodology of dose apportionment is subjective in nature that may result the discharge limit of the effluent in atmospheric and aquatic route in an adhoc manner. Appropriate scientific basis for dose apportionment is always preferable rather than judicial basis from the point of harmonization of establishing the dose apportionment. This paper presents an attempt of establishing the discharge limit of the gaseous and liquid effluent first on the basis of the existing value of the release of the same. Existing release data for a few years (for example 10 years) for any nuclear power station have taken into consideration. Bootstrap, a resampling technique, has been adopted on this data sets to generate the population which subsequently provide the corresponding population distribution of the effluent release. Cumulative distribution of the population distribution obtained is constructed and using this cumulative distribution, 95th percentile (upper bound) of the discharge limit of the radioactive effluents is computed. Dose apportioned for a facility is evaluated using this estimated upper bound of the release limit. Paper describes the detail of the bootstrap method in evaluating the

  17. Controlled Optimal Design Program for the Logit Dose Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqiao Hu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of dose-response is an integral component of the drug development process. Parallel dose-response studies are conducted, customarily, in preclinical and phase 1, 2 clinical trials for this purpose. Practical constraints on dose range, dose levels and dose proportions are intrinsic issues in the design of dose response studies because of drug toxicity, efficacy, FDA regulations, protocol requirements, clinical trial logistics, and marketing issues. We provide a free on-line software package called Controlled Optimal Design 2.0 for generating controlled optimal designs that can incorporate prior information and multiple objectives, and meet multiple practical constraints at the same time. Researchers can either run the web-based design program or download its stand-alone version to construct the desired multiple-objective controlled Bayesian optimal designs. Because researchers often adopt ad-hoc design schemes such as the equal allocation rules without knowing how efficient such designs would be for the design problem, the program also evaluates the efficiency of user-supplied designs.

  18. GCR Environmental Models III: GCR Model Validation and Propagated Uncertainties in Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Xu, Xiaojing; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the last of three papers focused on quantifying the uncertainty associated with galactic cosmic rays (GCR) models used for space radiation shielding applications. In the first paper, it was found that GCR ions with Z>2 and boundary energy below 500 MeV/nucleon induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This is an important finding since GCR model development and validation have been heavily biased toward Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer measurements below 500 MeV/nucleon. Weights were also developed that quantify the relative contribution of defined GCR energy and charge groups to effective dose behind shielding. In the second paper, it was shown that these weights could be used to efficiently propagate GCR model uncertainties into effective dose behind shielding. In this work, uncertainties are quantified for a few commonly used GCR models. A validation metric is developed that accounts for measurements uncertainty, and the metric is coupled to the fast uncertainty propagation method. For this work, the Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) 2010 and 2011 and the Matthia GCR models are compared to an extensive measurement database. It is shown that BON2011 systematically overestimates heavy ion fluxes in the range 0.5-4 GeV/nucleon. The BON2010 and BON2011 also show moderate and large errors in reproducing past solar activity near the 2000 solar maximum and 2010 solar minimum. It is found that all three models induce relative errors in effective dose in the interval [-20%, 20%] at a 68% confidence level. The BON2010 and Matthia models are found to have similar overall uncertainty estimates and are preferred for space radiation shielding applications.

  19. Population-related genetic aspects of the low doses radiological risk and melanin influence on genetic radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, I.B.; Plotnikova, S.I.; Kostrova, L.N.; Subbot, S.T.; Maksymenia, I.P.; Dubovic, B.V.

    1997-01-01

    From the genetic point of view, radiation sensitivity is a quantitative character, and the distribution of individuals in the population with different radiation sensitivities is characterized by a binomial curve. Thus rise in irradiation dose first results in a very slow increase in the number of sensitive genotypes, and then in a sharp rise. Since quantitative characters are dependent on several polymeric genes, and their manifestation is strongly affected by external conditions, radiation sensitivity of the organism depends on many hereditary and environmental factors. One of them is the presence of melanin pigment in cells. In particular, we have shown that the introduction of exogenous melanin into the organisms of mice reduces (2-4 times) the frequency of mutations, induced not only by acute, but also by chronic irradiation. It was also established, that mutational load, accumulated in drosophila populations, irradiated within 125 generations, has been decreased under melanin influence almost to the control level. Antimutagenic action of melanin is also manifested on cultured human cells. So, it was shown by the example of melanin, that it is possible to increase the radiation resistance of individuals, and in the first place of the population highly sensitive fraction. (author)

  20. Using VCL as an Aspect-Oriented Approach to Requirements Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amálio, Nuno; Kelsen, Pierre; Ma, Qin; Glodt, Christian

    Software systems are becoming larger and more complex. By tackling the modularisation of crosscutting concerns, aspect orientation draws attention to modularity as a means to address the problems of scalability, complexity and evolution in software systems development. Aspect-oriented modelling (AOM) applies aspect-orientation to the construction of models. Most existing AOM approaches are designed without a formal semantics, and use multi-view partial descriptions of behaviour. This paper presents an AOM approach based on the Visual Contract Language (VCL): a visual language for abstract and precise modelling, designed with a formal semantics, and comprising a novel approach to visual behavioural modelling based on design by contract where behavioural descriptions are total. By applying VCL to a large case study of a car-crash crisis management system, the paper demonstrates how modularity of VCL's constructs, at different levels of granularity, help to tackle complexity. In particular, it shows how VCL's package construct and its associated composition mechanisms are key in supporting separation of concerns, coarse-grained problem decomposition and aspect-orientation. The case study's modelling solution has a clear and well-defined modular structure; the backbone of this structure is a collection of packages encapsulating local solutions to concerns.

  1. A Critical Overview of Models of Reading Comprehension with a Focus on Cognitive Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Shahnazari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reading is a cognitive activity involving skills, strategies, attentional resources, knowledge resources and their integration. The reader’s role is to decode the written symbols to allow for the recovery of information from long-term memory to construct a plausible interpretation of the writer’s message. Various number of reading models have been proposed by researchers among which some focus on motivational and emotional aspects of reading. Others highlight the cognitive aspects of reading. In this study, the models characterizing reading in terms of cognitive aspects are revieweded, and different viewpoints on the reading process are described. This may help EFL/ESL teachers to improve their understanding of the reading process, update their perspectives on teaching reading tasks which in turn might result in more efficient learning by not putting too much cognitively demanding reading tasks on EFL/ESL learners.

  2. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaraj Jayachandran

    Full Text Available 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT. Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach.

  3. Aerial gamma spectrometry of the uranium province of Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA, Brazil): go environmental aspects and distribution of the absorbed dose in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Esau Francisco Sena

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, it was analyzed the surface concentrations of the natural radioelements K, U and Th, as well as the absorbed dose rate in air caused by gamma radiation from the Lagoa Real uranium province, which is located at the center southern portion of Bahia State and comprises an area of approximately 4.600 Km 2 . Data from the airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey of the region (Sao Timoeo Project) carried out in 1979, was used in this study. Besides, recent data of U, Th and absorbed dose rates from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the uranium concentration plant (URA), operated in the region by the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB), were used with the aim of inter compare the sampling points in the same geo referenced area. Imaging geo processing software's give support to frame maps of surface concentrations and ternary maps, as well as allow the integration of these with other themes (e.g. hydrology, geology, pedology) favouring the interpretation of geo environmental process from the radioactive cartography. Considering the whole study area, it was obtained the following mean values: absorbed dose rate in air (61,08 nGy.h -1 ), Potassium (1,65 % K) , Uranium (3,02 ppm eU) and thorium (18,26 ppm eTh). The geological unities bounding the uranium anomalies were placed in the areas characterized by the highest values of radioelements and, as expected, the major dose levels. The use of ternary maps coupled with the geology and hydrology allowed distinguishing the relationship between the surface distribution of natural radioelements and the geo environmental aspects, including the influence of the catchment in their transport and migration. (author)

  4. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.

    2016-01-01

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 ''Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site''.

  5. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-31

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 “Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site”.

  6. A REVIEW: A MODEL of CULTURAL ASPECTS for SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihwan Ghazali,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Product design stages are important to consider critically in production. Generally, product design that shall be created by designer, should consider what the customer wants and needs. Nowadays issues, product design does not only consider the “wants and needs” of user, but also how the design can be created by embedding sustainability aspects in the product. Culture is also one of the important aspects which need to be considered in product design as culture affects the way users respond to the product. This paper aims to develop a new model for design development, in which the aspects of culture are incorporated into sustainable product design. By reviewing the existing literature, the authors attempt to identify the gaps of the existing papers, which illustrate how culture affects sustainable product design. Recent papers have only shown that culture influences product design, but they do not explore sustainability and the culture aspects in product design. Due to these gaps, it is therefore important to create a model which will assist designers to elicit sustainable product design based on cultural aspects. In summary, designers need to reflect on the “wants and needs” of users. The framework presented in this paper can be integrated into designers’ and companies’ decision-making during product design development.

  7. Some aspects to improve sound insulation prediction models for lightweight elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerretsen, E.

    2007-01-01

    The best approach to include lightweight building elements in prediction models for airborne and impact sound insulation between rooms, as in EN 12354, is not yet completely clear. Two aspects are at least of importance, i.e. to derive the sound reduction index R for lightweight elements for

  8. Active aeroelastic control aspects of an aircraft wing by using synthetic jet actuators : Modeling, simulations, experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnell, K.O.; Schober, S.; Stolk, M.; Marzocca, P.; De Breuker, R.; Abdalla, M.; Nicolini, E.; Gürdal, Z.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses modeling, simulations and experimental aspects of active aeroelastic control on aircraft wings by using Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs). SJAs, a particular class of zero-net mass-flux actuators, have shown very promising results in numerous aeronautical applications, such as

  9. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  10. Reconstruction of the external dose of evacuees from the contaminated areas based on simulation modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meckbach, R.; Chumak, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations are being performed for the reconstruction of individual external gamma doses of population evacuated during the Chernobyl accident from the city of Pripyat and other settlements of the 30-km zone. The models are based on sets of dose rate measurements performed during the accident, on individual behavior histories of more than 30000 evacuees obtained by questionnaire survey and on location factors determined for characteristic housing buildings. Location factors were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport for a typical housing block and village houses. Stochastic models for individual external dose reconstruction are described. Using Monte Carlo methods, frequency distributions representing the uncertainty of doses are calculated from an assessment of the uncertainty of the data. The determination of dose rate distributions in Pripyat is discussed. Exemplary results for individual external doses are presented

  11. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  12. Aspects and Class-based Security: A Survey of Interactions between Advice Weaving and the Java 2 Security Model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sewe, Andreas; Bockisch, Christoph; Mezini, Mira

    2008-01-01

    Various aspect-oriented languages, e.g., AspectJ, Aspect-Werkz, and JAsCo, have been proposed as extensions to one particular object-oriented base language, namely Java. But these extensions do not fully take the interactions with the Java 2 security model into account. In particular, the

  13. Modeling of tube current modulation methods in computed tomography dose calculations for adult and pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George; Gu, Jianwei

    2011-01-01

    The comparatively high dose and increasing frequency of computed tomography (CT) examinations have spurred the development of techniques for reducing radiation dose to imaging patients. Among these is the application of tube current modulation (TCM), which can be applied either longitudinally along the body or rotationally along the body, or both. Existing computational models for calculating dose from CT examinations do not include TCM techniques. Dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods have been previously prepared for constant-current rotational exposures at various positions along the body and for the principle exposure projections for several sets of computational phantoms, including adult male and female and pregnant patients. Dose calculations from CT scans with TCM are prepared by appropriately weighting the existing dose data. Longitudinal TCM doses can be obtained by weighting the dose at the z-axis scan position by the relative tube current at that position. Rotational TCM doses are weighted using the relative organ doses from the principle projections as a function of the current at the rotational angle. Significant dose reductions of 15% to 25% to fetal tissues are found from simulations of longitudinal TCM schemes to pregnant patients of different gestational ages. Weighting factors for each organ in rotational TCM schemes applied to adult male and female patients have also been found. As the application of TCM techniques becomes more prevalent, the need for including TCM in CT dose estimates will necessarily increase. (author)

  14. Use of the LQ model with large fraction sizes results in underestimation of isoeffect doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Tommy; Molkentine, Jessica; Transtrum, Mark K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Withers, Hubert Rodney; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the appropriateness of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe survival of jejunal crypt clonogens after split doses with variable (small 1–6 Gy, large 8–13 Gy) first dose, as a model of its appropriateness for both small and large fraction sizes. Methods: C3Hf/KamLaw mice were exposed to whole body irradiation using 300 kVp X-rays at a dose rate of 1.84 Gy/min, and the number of viable jejunal crypts was determined using the microcolony assay. 14 Gy total dose was split into unequal first and second fractions separated by 4 h. Data were analyzed using the LQ model, the lethal potentially lethal (LPL) model, and a repair-saturation (RS) model. Results: Cell kill was greater in the group receiving the larger fraction first, creating an asymmetry in the plot of survival vs size of first dose, as opposed to the prediction of the LQ model of a symmetric response. There was a significant difference in the estimated βs (higher β after larger first doses), but no significant difference in the αs, when large doses were given first vs small doses first. This difference results in underestimation (based on present data by approximately 8%) of isoeffect doses using LQ model parameters based on small fraction sizes. While the LPL model also predicted a symmetric response inconsistent with the data, the RS model results were consistent with the observed asymmetry. Conclusion: The LQ model underestimates doses for isoeffective crypt-cell survival with large fraction sizes (in the present setting, >9 Gy)

  15. Modelling second malignancy risks from low dose rate and high dose rate brachytherapy as monotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise; Mason, Joshua; Henry, Ann M; Hoskin, Peter; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Venselaar, Jack; Bownes, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the risks of radiation-induced rectal and bladder cancers following low dose rate (LDR) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localised prostate cancer and compare to external beam radiotherapy techniques. LDR and HDR brachytherapy monotherapy plans were generated for three prostate CT datasets. Second cancer risks were assessed using Schneider's concept of organ equivalent dose. LDR risks were assessed according to a mechanistic model and a bell-shaped model. HDR risks were assessed according to a bell-shaped model. Relative risks and excess absolute risks were estimated and compared to external beam techniques. Excess absolute risks of second rectal or bladder cancer were low for both LDR (irrespective of the model used for calculation) and HDR techniques. Average excess absolute risks of rectal cancer for LDR brachytherapy according to the mechanistic model were 0.71 per 10,000 person-years (PY) and 0.84 per 10,000 PY respectively, and according to the bell-shaped model, were 0.47 and 0.78 per 10,000 PY respectively. For HDR, the average excess absolute risks for second rectal and bladder cancers were 0.74 and 1.62 per 10,000 PY respectively. The absolute differences between techniques were very low and clinically irrelevant. Compared to external beam prostate radiotherapy techniques, LDR and HDR brachytherapy resulted in the lowest risks of second rectal and bladder cancer. This study shows both LDR and HDR brachytherapy monotherapy result in low estimated risks of radiation-induced rectal and bladder cancer. LDR resulted in lower bladder cancer risks than HDR, and lower or similar risks of rectal cancer. In absolute terms these differences between techniques were very small. Compared to external beam techniques, second rectal and bladder cancer risks were lowest for brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M; Thomson, R M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with(125)I, (103)Pd, or (131)Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20-30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%-10% and 13%-14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%-17% and 29%-34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model

  17. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with 125 I, 103 Pd, or 131 Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up

  18. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M., E-mail: rthomson@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 131}Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model

  19. Systematic in vitro nanotoxicity study on anodic alumina nanotubes with engineered aspect ratio: understanding nanotoxicity by a nanomaterial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Kaur, Gagandeep; Zysk, Aneta; Liapis, Vasilios; Hay, Shelley; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report a detailed and systematic approach for studying the in vitro nanotoxicity study of high aspect ratio (HAR) nanomaterials using anodic alumina nanotubes (AANTs) as a nanomaterial model. AANTs with bio-inert properties and tailored aspect ratios ranging from 7.8 to 63.3 were synthesized by an electrochemical pulse anodization process. Cytotoxicity studies were conducted with RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells and MDA-MB 231-TXSA human breast cancer cells through several toxicity parameters, including cell viability and morphology, pro-inflammatory response, mitochondrial depolarization, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), induction of autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The resulting toxicity patterns were cell-type dependent and strongly related with AANTs dose, length of time, and importantly the AR of AANTs. Long AANTs triggered enhanced cell death, morphological changes, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) release, LMP and ER stress than short AANTs. The toxic AR window of AANTs was determined to be 7.8, which is shorter than that of other previously reported HAR nanomaterials. This toxic AR window provides a promising opportunity to control the nanotoxicity of HAR nanomaterials for their advanced drug delivery application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The fitting parameters extraction of conversion model of the low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakerenkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) in bipolar devices consists of in base current degradation of NPN and PNP transistors increase as the dose rate is decreased. As a result of almost 20-year studying, the some physical models of effect are developed, being described in detail. Accelerated test methods, based on these models use in standards. The conversion model of the effect, that allows to describe the inverse S-shaped excess base current dependence versus dose rate, was proposed. This paper presents the problem of conversion model fitting parameters extraction.

  1. Referent 3D solid tumour model and absorbed dose calculations at cellular level in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaic, R.; Ilic, R.; Petrovic, B.; Dragovic, M.; Toskovic, F.

    2007-01-01

    An average absorbed dose of the tumour calculated by the MIRD formalism has not always a good correlation with the clinical response. The basic assumption of the MIRD schema is that a uniform spatial dose distribution is opposite to heterogeneity of intratumoral distribution of the administered radionuclide which can lead to a spatial nonuniformity of the absorbed dose. Therefore, in clinical practice, an absorbed dose of the tumour at the cellular level has to be calculated. The aim of this study is to define a referent 3D solid tumour model and using the direct Monte Carlo radiation transport method to calculate: a) absorbed fraction, b) spatial 3D absorbed dose distribution, c) absorbed dose and relative absorbed dose of cells or clusters of cells, and d) differential and accumulated dose volume histograms. A referent 3D solid tumour model is defined as a sphere which is randomly filled with cells and necrosis with defined radii and volumetric density. Radiolabelling of the tumour is defined by intracellular to extracellular radionuclide concentration and radio-labelled cell density. All these parameters are input data for software which generates a referent 3D solid tumour model. The modified FOTELP Monte Carlo code was used on this model for simulation study with beta emitters which were applied on the tumour. The absorbed fractions of Cu-67, I- 131, Re-188 and Y-90 were calculated for different tumour sphere masses and radii. Absorbed doses of cells and spatial distributions of the absorbed doses in the referent 3D solid tumour were calculated for radionuclides I-131 and Y-90. Dose scintigram or voxel presentation of absorbed dose distributions showed higher homogeneity for Y-90 than for I-131. A differential dose volume histogram, or spectrum, of the relative absorbed dose of cells, was much closer to the average absorbed dose of the tumour for Y-90 than I-131. An accumulated dose volume histogram showed that most tumour cells received a lower dose than

  2. An Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Model with Temperature and Nozzle Aspect Ratio Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    An empirical model for jet-surface interaction (JSI) noise produced by a round jet near a flat plate is described and the resulting model evaluated. The model covers unheated and hot jet conditions (1 less than or equal to jet total temperature ratio less than or equal to 2.7) in the subsonic range (0.5 less than or equal to M(sub a) less than or equal to 0.9), surface lengths 0.6 less than or equal to (axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)/nozzle exit diameter) less than or equal to 10, and surface standoff distances (0 less than or equal to (radial distance from jet lipline to surface (inches)/axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)) less than or equal to 1) using only second-order polynomials to provide predictable behavior. The JSI noise model is combined with an existing jet mixing noise model to produce exhaust noise predictions. Fit quality metrics and comparisons to between the predicted and experimental data indicate that the model is suitable for many system level studies. A first-order correction to the JSI source model that accounts for the effect of nozzle aspect ratio is also explored. This correction is based on changes to the potential core length and frequency scaling associated with rectangular nozzles up to 8:1 aspect ratio. However, more work is needed to refine these findings into a formal model.

  3. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  4. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose FR-om /sup 239/Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose FR-om the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  5. Development of MAAP5.0.3 Dose Model for Radiation Environment Effect Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mi Ro [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The equipment survivability assessment under the severe accident conditions should be performed. For the environmental conditions such as the pressure and temperature, they can be calculated using MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) code. However, since MAAP itself cannot calculate the radiation DOSE, MAAP5 DOSE model should be developed in order to calculate the DOSE rate during the severe accidents. In this study, we developed the MAAP5 DOSE model for spent fuel pool of OPR1000 type NPP and calculated the DOSE to assess the survivability of the facilities in spent fuel pool and fuel handling region. Until now, there are so many uncertainties in the analysis for radiation effect during the severe accident. However, in terms of the establishment of the severe accident management strategy, quantitative analysis in order to find the general trend for radiation increase during the severe accident is useful. For the radiation environmental effect analysis, the previous studies are mainly focused inside the containment. However, after the Fukushima accident, the severe accident phenomena in the SFP have been the great issues in the nuclear industry including Korea. So, in this study, the dose rate for spent fuel building when the severe accident happens in the SFP is calculated using MAAP5 DOSE. As expected, the dose rate is increased right after the spent fuel is partially uncovered. However, the amount of dose is less significant since the rate of temperature increase is much faster than the rate of dose increase.

  6. Estimating organ doses from tube current modulated CT examinations using a generalized linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostani, Maryam; McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Grace Hyun J; Cody, Dianna; Arbique, Gary; Greenberg, S Bruce; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2017-04-01

    Currently, available Computed Tomography dose metrics are mostly based on fixed tube current Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and/or physical measurements such as the size specific dose estimate (SSDE). In addition to not being able to account for Tube Current Modulation (TCM), these dose metrics do not represent actual patient dose. The purpose of this study was to generate and evaluate a dose estimation model based on the Generalized Linear Model (GLM), which extends the ability to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated examinations by incorporating regional descriptors of patient size, scanner output, and other scan-specific variables as needed. The collection of a total of 332 patient CT scans at four different institutions was approved by each institution's IRB and used to generate and test organ dose estimation models. The patient population consisted of pediatric and adult patients and included thoracic and abdomen/pelvis scans. The scans were performed on three different CT scanner systems. Manual segmentation of organs, depending on the examined anatomy, was performed on each patient's image series. In addition to the collected images, detailed TCM data were collected for all patients scanned on Siemens CT scanners, while for all GE and Toshiba patients, data representing z-axis-only TCM, extracted from the DICOM header of the images, were used for TCM simulations. A validated MC dosimetry package was used to perform detailed simulation of CT examinations on all 332 patient models to estimate dose to each segmented organ (lungs, breasts, liver, spleen, and kidneys), denoted as reference organ dose values. Approximately 60% of the data were used to train a dose estimation model, while the remaining 40% was used to evaluate performance. Two different methodologies were explored using GLM to generate a dose estimation model: (a) using the conventional exponential relationship between normalized organ dose and size with regional water equivalent diameter

  7. Metoprolol Dose Equivalence in Adult Men and Women Based on Gender Differences: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses and publications over the past 15 years have provided evidence showing there are considerable gender differences in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. Throughout this time, there have not been any research articles proposing a gender stratified dose-adjustment resulting in an equivalent total drug exposure. Metoprolol pharmacokinetic data was obtained from a previous publication. Data was modeled using nonlinear mixed effect modeling using the MONOLIX software package to quantify metoprolol concentration–time data. Gender-stratified dosing simulations were conducted to identify equivalent total drug exposure based on a 100 mg dose in adults. Based on the pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations, a 50 mg dose in adult women provides an approximately similar metoprolol drug exposure to a 100 mg dose in adult men.

  8. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance ...... in disease models such as autoimmune gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, we will consider some aspects of the therapeutic potential of Treg cells....

  9. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de, E-mail: scorrea@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Humberto de Oliveira, E-mail: hbetorj@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro IF/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: smagalhaes@nuclear.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2010-07-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  10. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Humberto de Oliveira; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga

    2010-01-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  11. Modeling late rectal toxicities based on a parameterized representation of the 3D dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2011-04-01

    Many models exist for predicting toxicities based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs) or dose-surface histograms (DSHs). This approach has several drawbacks as firstly the reduction of the dose distribution to a histogram results in the loss of spatial information and secondly the bins of the histograms are highly correlated with each other. Furthermore, some of the complex nonlinear models proposed in the past lack a direct physical interpretation and the ability to predict probabilities rather than binary outcomes. We propose a parameterized representation of the 3D distribution of the dose to the rectal wall which explicitly includes geometrical information in the form of the eccentricity of the dose distribution as well as its lateral and longitudinal extent. We use a nonlinear kernel-based probabilistic model to predict late rectal toxicity based on the parameterized dose distribution and assessed its predictive power using data from the MRC RT01 trial (ISCTRN 47772397). The endpoints under consideration were rectal bleeding, loose stools, and a global toxicity score. We extract simple rules identifying 3D dose patterns related to a specifically low risk of complication. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models based on parameterized representations of geometrical and volumetric measures resulted in areas under the curve (AUCs) of 0.66, 0.63 and 0.67 for predicting rectal bleeding, loose stools and global toxicity, respectively. In comparison, NTCP models based on standard DVHs performed worse and resulted in AUCs of 0.59 for all three endpoints. In conclusion, we have presented low-dimensional, interpretable and nonlinear NTCP models based on the parameterized representation of the dose to the rectal wall. These models had a higher predictive power than models based on standard DVHs and their low dimensionality allowed for the identification of 3D dose patterns related to a low risk of complication.

  12. Modeling late rectal toxicities based on a parameterized representation of the 3D dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike, E-mail: florian.buttner@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-07

    Many models exist for predicting toxicities based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs) or dose-surface histograms (DSHs). This approach has several drawbacks as firstly the reduction of the dose distribution to a histogram results in the loss of spatial information and secondly the bins of the histograms are highly correlated with each other. Furthermore, some of the complex nonlinear models proposed in the past lack a direct physical interpretation and the ability to predict probabilities rather than binary outcomes. We propose a parameterized representation of the 3D distribution of the dose to the rectal wall which explicitly includes geometrical information in the form of the eccentricity of the dose distribution as well as its lateral and longitudinal extent. We use a nonlinear kernel-based probabilistic model to predict late rectal toxicity based on the parameterized dose distribution and assessed its predictive power using data from the MRC RT01 trial (ISCTRN 47772397). The endpoints under consideration were rectal bleeding, loose stools, and a global toxicity score. We extract simple rules identifying 3D dose patterns related to a specifically low risk of complication. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models based on parameterized representations of geometrical and volumetric measures resulted in areas under the curve (AUCs) of 0.66, 0.63 and 0.67 for predicting rectal bleeding, loose stools and global toxicity, respectively. In comparison, NTCP models based on standard DVHs performed worse and resulted in AUCs of 0.59 for all three endpoints. In conclusion, we have presented low-dimensional, interpretable and nonlinear NTCP models based on the parameterized representation of the dose to the rectal wall. These models had a higher predictive power than models based on standard DVHs and their low dimensionality allowed for the identification of 3D dose patterns related to a low risk of complication.

  13. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  14. A simplified model for predicting skin dose received by patients from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to present a simplified model for predicting skin doses as function of three diagnostic X-ray parameters. The model used was a modification of an existing model by Edmonds. Results obtained based on our model show a reasonable agreement (1% or less) between our modified and the previously ...

  15. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  16. Low dose radiation risks for women surviving the a-bombs in Japan: generalized additive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropkin, Greg

    2016-11-24

    Analyses of cancer mortality and incidence in Japanese A-bomb survivors have been used to estimate radiation risks, which are generally higher for women. Relative Risk (RR) is usually modelled as a linear function of dose. Extrapolation from data including high doses predicts small risks at low doses. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) are flexible methods for modelling non-linear behaviour. GAMs are applied to cancer incidence in female low dose subcohorts, using anonymous public data for the 1958 - 1998 Life Span Study, to test for linearity, explore interactions, adjust for the skewed dose distribution, examine significance below 100 mGy, and estimate risks at 10 mGy. For all solid cancer incidence, RR estimated from 0 - 100 mGy and 0 - 20 mGy subcohorts is significantly raised. The response tapers above 150 mGy. At low doses, RR increases with age-at-exposure and decreases with time-since-exposure, the preferred covariate. Using the empirical cumulative distribution of dose improves model fit, and capacity to detect non-linear responses. RR is elevated over wide ranges of covariate values. Results are stable under simulation, or when removing exceptional data cells, or adjusting neutron RBE. Estimates of Excess RR at 10 mGy using the cumulative dose distribution are 10 - 45 times higher than extrapolations from a linear model fitted to the full cohort. Below 100 mGy, quasipoisson models find significant effects for all solid, squamous, uterus, corpus, and thyroid cancers, and for respiratory cancers when age-at-exposure > 35 yrs. Results for the thyroid are compatible with studies of children treated for tinea capitis, and Chernobyl survivors. Results for the uterus are compatible with studies of UK nuclear workers and the Techa River cohort. Non-linear models find large, significant cancer risks for Japanese women exposed to low dose radiation from the atomic bombings. The risks should be reflected in protection standards.

  17. SU-E-T-43: Analytical Model for Photon Peripheral Dose in Radiotherapy Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, B Sanchez; El far, R [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Santiago De Chile (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Lagares, J [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain); Mateo, JC [Hospital Duques del Infantado, Sevilla (Spain); Terron, JA [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The higher survival rate of radiotherapy patients entails a growing concern on second cancers associated to peripheral doses. Currently, dosimetry of out-of field doses is still under development. Our group has developed a methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs (1,2). We aimed to propose a model to estimate out-of-field photon doses in isocentric treatments from basic clinical data. Methods: The proposed function models the dose as the sum of leakage and scatter terms. The latter is modeled as a virtual source at the collimator, which suffers from attenuation in air and tissue, corrected by the inverse-square-law. The model was parameterized using experimental measurements with TLD700 chips placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom (6–18MV) irradiated with conformal and modulated techniques in Elekta, Siemens and Varian linacs. This model provides photon dose at a point as a function of clinical parameters as prescription dose/UM, PTV volume, distance to the field edge, height of the MLC leaves and distance from the the MLC to the isocenter. Model was tested against independent measurements (TLD100) for a VMAT treatment on a Elekta. Dose to organs is modeled from dose to points along the head-to-feet axis of the organ of a “standard man” escalated by patient height. Results: Our semi-empirical model depends on 3 given parameters (leakage parameter can be individualized). A novelty of our model, over other models (e.g., PERIDOSE), arises from its applicability to any technique (independently of the number of MU needed to deliver a dose). Differences between predictions and measurements were < 0.005mSv/UM. Conclusion: We have proposed a unique model which successfully account for photon peripheral organ dose. This model can be applied in the day-to-day clinic as it only needs a few basic parameters which are readily accessible.1. Radiother. Oncol. 107:234–243, 2013. 2. Phys. Med. Biol. 57:6167–6191, 2012.

  18. SU-E-T-43: Analytical Model for Photon Peripheral Dose in Radiotherapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, B Sanchez; El far, R; Romero-Exposito, M; Lagares, J; Mateo, JC; Terron, JA; Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The higher survival rate of radiotherapy patients entails a growing concern on second cancers associated to peripheral doses. Currently, dosimetry of out-of field doses is still under development. Our group has developed a methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs (1,2). We aimed to propose a model to estimate out-of-field photon doses in isocentric treatments from basic clinical data. Methods: The proposed function models the dose as the sum of leakage and scatter terms. The latter is modeled as a virtual source at the collimator, which suffers from attenuation in air and tissue, corrected by the inverse-square-law. The model was parameterized using experimental measurements with TLD700 chips placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom (6–18MV) irradiated with conformal and modulated techniques in Elekta, Siemens and Varian linacs. This model provides photon dose at a point as a function of clinical parameters as prescription dose/UM, PTV volume, distance to the field edge, height of the MLC leaves and distance from the the MLC to the isocenter. Model was tested against independent measurements (TLD100) for a VMAT treatment on a Elekta. Dose to organs is modeled from dose to points along the head-to-feet axis of the organ of a “standard man” escalated by patient height. Results: Our semi-empirical model depends on 3 given parameters (leakage parameter can be individualized). A novelty of our model, over other models (e.g., PERIDOSE), arises from its applicability to any technique (independently of the number of MU needed to deliver a dose). Differences between predictions and measurements were < 0.005mSv/UM. Conclusion: We have proposed a unique model which successfully account for photon peripheral organ dose. This model can be applied in the day-to-day clinic as it only needs a few basic parameters which are readily accessible.1. Radiother. Oncol. 107:234–243, 2013. 2. Phys. Med. Biol. 57:6167–6191, 2012

  19. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  20. Modeling for Dose Rate Calculation of the External Exposure to Gamma Emitters in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, K. A.; El-Mongy, S. A.; El-Tahawy, M. S.; Mohsen, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the model proposed and developed in Ph.D thesis of the first author of this work, the dose rate conversion factors (absorbed dose rate in air per specific activity of soil in nGy.hr - 1 per Bq.kg - 1) are calculated 1 m above the ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. This new and simple dose rate calculation software was used for calculation of the dose rate in air 1 m above the ground. Then the results were compared with those obtained by five different groups. Although the developed model is extremely simple, the obtained results of calculations, based on this model, show excellent agreement with those obtained by the above-mentioned models specially that one adopted by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  1. Extension of a generalized state-vector model of radiation carcinogenesis to consideration of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Hofmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models for radiation carcinogenesis typically employ transition rates that either are a function of the dose to specific cells or are purely empirical constructs unrelated to biophysical theory. These functions either ignore or do not explicitly model interactions between the fates of cells in a community. This paper extends a model of mitosis, cell transformation, promotion, and progression to cases in which interacting cellular communities are irradiated at specified dose rates. The model predicts that lower dose rates are less effective at producing cancer when irradiation is by X- or gamma rays but are generally more effective in instances of irradiation by alpha particles up to a dose rate in excess of 0.01 Gy/day. The resulting predictions are compared with existing experimental data. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  2. Model of the dose rate for a semi industrial irradiation plant. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangusi, Josefina

    2004-01-01

    The second stage of the model for the absorbed dose rate in air for the enclosure of a half-industrialist irradiation plant operating with cobalt-60 sources holden in plan geometry is presented. The sensibility of the model with the treatment of the support structure of the irradiator is analyzed and verified with experimental measurements with good accord. The model of the absorbed dose rate in air in the case of an interposed material between the radioactive sources and the point of interest includes in its calculation a set of secondary radioactive sources created by the Compton scattering of the primary radiation. The accord of the calculated absorbed dose rate and the experimental measured ones is good. The transit dose due to the irradiator moving until its dwell position is also modeled. The isodose curves for a set of irradiator parallel planes are also generated. (author) [es

  3. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Baumgartner, A.; Rechberger, F.; Seidel, C.; Stietka, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. - Highlights: • Dose models for indoor radiation exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials. • Strategies and methods in radionuclide metrology, activity measurement and dose modelling. • Selection of appropriate parameters in radiation protection standards for building materials. • Scientific-based limitations of indoor exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials

  4. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients' CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  5. A review of a priori regression models for warfarin maintenance dose prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Francis

    Full Text Available A number of a priori warfarin dosing algorithms, derived using linear regression methods, have been proposed. Although these dosing algorithms may have been validated using patients derived from the same centre, rarely have they been validated using a patient cohort recruited from another centre. In order to undertake external validation, two cohorts were utilised. One cohort formed by patients from a prospective trial and the second formed by patients in the control arm of the EU-PACT trial. Of these, 641 patients were identified as having attained stable dosing and formed the dataset used for validation. Predicted maintenance doses from six criterion fulfilling regression models were then compared to individual patient stable warfarin dose. Predictive ability was assessed with reference to several statistics including the R-square and mean absolute error. The six regression models explained different amounts of variability in the stable maintenance warfarin dose requirements of the patients in the two validation cohorts; adjusted R-squared values ranged from 24.2% to 68.6%. An overview of the summary statistics demonstrated that no one dosing algorithm could be considered optimal. The larger validation cohort from the prospective trial produced more consistent statistics across the six dosing algorithms. The study found that all the regression models performed worse in the validation cohort when compared to the derivation cohort. Further, there was little difference between regression models that contained pharmacogenetic coefficients and algorithms containing just non-pharmacogenetic coefficients. The inconsistency of results between the validation cohorts suggests that unaccounted population specific factors cause variability in dosing algorithm performance. Better methods for dosing that take into account inter- and intra-individual variability, at the initiation and maintenance phases of warfarin treatment, are needed.

  6. A review of a priori regression models for warfarin maintenance dose prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Ben; Lane, Steven; Pirmohamed, Munir; Jorgensen, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A number of a priori warfarin dosing algorithms, derived using linear regression methods, have been proposed. Although these dosing algorithms may have been validated using patients derived from the same centre, rarely have they been validated using a patient cohort recruited from another centre. In order to undertake external validation, two cohorts were utilised. One cohort formed by patients from a prospective trial and the second formed by patients in the control arm of the EU-PACT trial. Of these, 641 patients were identified as having attained stable dosing and formed the dataset used for validation. Predicted maintenance doses from six criterion fulfilling regression models were then compared to individual patient stable warfarin dose. Predictive ability was assessed with reference to several statistics including the R-square and mean absolute error. The six regression models explained different amounts of variability in the stable maintenance warfarin dose requirements of the patients in the two validation cohorts; adjusted R-squared values ranged from 24.2% to 68.6%. An overview of the summary statistics demonstrated that no one dosing algorithm could be considered optimal. The larger validation cohort from the prospective trial produced more consistent statistics across the six dosing algorithms. The study found that all the regression models performed worse in the validation cohort when compared to the derivation cohort. Further, there was little difference between regression models that contained pharmacogenetic coefficients and algorithms containing just non-pharmacogenetic coefficients. The inconsistency of results between the validation cohorts suggests that unaccounted population specific factors cause variability in dosing algorithm performance. Better methods for dosing that take into account inter- and intra-individual variability, at the initiation and maintenance phases of warfarin treatment, are needed.

  7. A marine compartment model for collective dose assessment of liquid radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.; Durance, J.A.; Jefferies, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    A compartment model is described which is currently used by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food to calculate collective radiation exposure due to liquid radioactive wastes discharged to sea from UK nuclear sites. Collective dose is a useful indicator of the radiological impact of a disposal practice and is one of the quantities needed to show compliance with the ICRP system of dose limitation. The model has been used for the purposes of the Sizewell Inquiry to predict the collective radiation exposure from reactor operation at Sizewell and, on the basis of current Sellafield experience, correlations between dose and discharge for disposals of fuel reprocessing wastes. (author)

  8. A comparison of newborn stylized and tomographic models for dose assessment in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, R J; Pazik, F D; Nipper, J C; Williams, J L; Bolch, W E

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of organ doses from diagnostic and interventional examinations is a key component to quantifying the radiation risks from medical exposures and for formulating corresponding dose-reduction strategies. Radiation transport models of human anatomy provide a convenient method for simulating radiological examinations. At present, two classes of models exist: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. In the present study, organ dose comparisons are made for projection radiographs of both a stylized and a tomographic model of the newborn patient. Sixteen separate radiographs were simulated for each model at x-ray technique factors typical of newborn examinations: chest, abdomen, thorax and head views in the AP, PA, left LAT and right LAT projection orientation. For AP and PA radiographs of the torso (chest, abdomen and thorax views), the effective dose assessed for the tomographic model exceeds that for the stylized model with per cent differences ranging from 19% (AP abdominal view) to 43% AP chest view. In contrast, the effective dose for the stylized model exceeds that for the tomographic model for all eight lateral views including those of the head, with per cent differences ranging from 9% (LLAT chest view) to 51% (RLAT thorax view). While organ positioning differences do exist between the models, a major factor contributing to differences in effective dose is the models' exterior trunk shape. In the tomographic model, a more elliptical shape is seen thus providing for less tissue shielding for internal organs in the AP and PA directions, with corresponding increased tissue shielding in the lateral directions. This observation is opposite of that seen in comparisons of stylized and tomographic models of the adult

  9. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan, E-mail: s.bartzsch@dkfz.de; Oelfke, Uwe [The Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Belmont, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG, United Kingdom and Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong 2522 (Australia); Bräuer-Krisch, Elke [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartínez-Rovira et al. [“Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 119–131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside

  10. Parameterizing Dose-Response Models to Estimate Relative Potency Functions Directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinse, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals’ dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology. PMID:22700543

  11. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  12. A note on vector flux models for radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews and extends modelling of anisotropic fluxes for radiation belt protons to provide closed-form equations for vector proton fluxes and proton flux anisotropy in terms of standard omnidirectional flux models. These equations provide a flexible alternative to the date-based vector flux models currently available. At higher energies, anisotropy of trapped proton flux in the upper atmosphere depends strongly on the variation of atmospheric density with altitude. Calculations of proton flux anisotropies using present models require specification of the average atmospheric density along trapped particle trajectories and its variation with mirror point altitude. For an isothermal atmosphere, calculations show that in a dipole magnetic field, the scale height of this trajectory-averaged density closely approximates the scale height of the atmosphere at the mirror point of the trapped particle. However, for the earth's magnetic field, the altitudes of mirror points vary for protons drifting in longitude. This results in a small increase in longitude-averaged scale heights compared to the atmospheric scale heights at minimum mirror point altitudes. The trajectory-averaged scale heights are increased by about 10-20% over scale heights from standard atmosphere models for protons mirroring at altitudes less than 500 km in the South Atlantic Anomaly Atmospheric losses of protons in the geomagnetic field minimum in the South Atlantic Anomaly control proton flux anisotropies of interest for radiation studies in low earth orbit. Standard atmosphere models provide corrections for diurnal, seasonal and solar activity-driven variations. Thus, determination of an ''equilibrium'' model of trapped proton fluxes of a given energy requires using a scale height that is time-averaged over the lifetime of the protons. The trajectory-averaged atmospheric densities calculated here lead to estimates for trapped proton lifetimes. These lifetimes provide appropriate time

  13. A generalized linear-quadratic model for radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Huang, Zhibin; Lo, Simon S; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2010-07-07

    Conventional radiation therapy for cancer usually consists of multiple treatments (called fractions) with low doses of radiation. These dose schemes are planned with the guidance of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, which has been the most prevalent model for designing dose schemes in radiation therapy. The high-dose fractions used in newer advanced radiosurgery, stereotactic radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy techniques, however, cannot be accurately calculated with the traditional LQ model. To address this problem, we developed a generalized LQ (gLQ) model that encompasses the entire range of possible dose delivery patterns and derived formulas for special radiotherapy schemes. We show that the gLQ model can naturally derive the traditional LQ model for low-dose and low-dose rate irradiation and the target model for high-dose irradiation as two special cases of gLQ. LQ and gLQ models were compared with published data obtained in vitro from Chinese hamster ovary cells across a wide dose range [0 to approximately 11.5 gray (Gy)] and from animals with dose fractions up to 13.5 Gy. The gLQ model provided consistent interpretation across the full dose range, whereas the LQ model generated parameters that depended on dose range, fitted only data with doses of 3.25 Gy or less, and failed to predict high-dose responses. Therefore, the gLQ model is useful for analyzing experimental radiation response data across wide dose ranges and translating common low-dose clinical experience into high-dose radiotherapy schemes for advanced radiation treatments.

  14. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Eley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  15. Cancer dose-response modeling of epidemiological data on worker exposures to aldrin and dieldrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, R L; Bretzlaff, R S; Valdez-Flores, C; Stevenson, D E; de Jong, G

    1999-12-01

    The paper applies classical statistical principles to yield new tools for risk assessment and makes new use of epidemiological data for human risk assessment. An extensive clinical and epidemiological study of workers engaged in the manufacturing and formulation of aldrin and dieldrin provides occupational hygiene and biological monitoring data on individual exposures over the years of employment and provides unusually accurate measures of individual lifetime average daily doses. In the cancer dose-response modeling, each worker is treated as a separate experimental unit with his own unique dose. Maximum likelihood estimates of added cancer risk are calculated for multistage, multistage-Weibull, and proportional hazards models. Distributional characterizations of added cancer risk are based on bootstrap and relative likelihood techniques. The cancer mortality data on these male workers suggest that low-dose exposures to aldrin and dieldrin do not significantly increase human cancer risk and may even decrease the human hazard rate for all types of cancer combined at low doses (e.g., 1 microgram/kg/day). The apparent hormetic effect in the best fitting dose-response models for this data set is statistically significant. The decrease in cancer risk at low doses of aldrin and dieldrin is in sharp contrast to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's upper bound on cancer potency based on mouse liver tumors. The EPA's upper bound implies that lifetime average daily doses of 0.0000625 and 0.00625 microgram/kg body weight/day would correspond to increased cancer risks of 0.000001 and 0.0001, respectively. However, the best estimate from the Pernis epidemiological data is that there is no increase in cancer risk in these workers at these doses or even at doses as large as 2 micrograms/kg/day.

  16. Improving ingestion dose modelling for the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems: A Nordic Initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Thørring, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    A Nordic work group under the NKS-B activity PARDNOR has revised the input parameters in the ECOSYS model that is incorporated for ingestion dose modelling in the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems. The new parameterisation takes into account recent measurement data, and targets the model...

  17. A model for predicting skin dose received by patients from an x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have done this by modifying a model for predicting skin dose derived by Edmonds for a triple-phase generator. Results for 100 patients based on the triple-phase generator output show a reasonable average agreement (»1%) between our present model and the Edmonds's model. Although our earlier estimated ...

  18. A system for environmental protection. Reference dose models for fauna and flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    Ideas have already been published on how the current problems relating to environmental protection could be explicitly addressed. One of the basic cornerstones of the proposed system is that of the use of reference dose models for fauna and flora, in a manner analogous to those used for the human species. The concept is that, for a number of both aquatic and terrestrial fauna and flora types, 'reference' dose models, and dose per unit (internal and external) exposure tables, could be compiled. These would then be used to draw broad conclusions on the likely effects for such organisms in relation to three broad environment end points of concern: life shortening; impairment of reproductive capacity; and scorable, cytogenetic damage. The level of complexity of the dose models needs to be commensurate with the morphological complexity of the modelled organism, its size, and the data bases which are either available or could be reasonably obtained. The most basic models considered are either solid ellipsoids or spheres, with fixed dimensions. Secondary models contain internal, but relatively simple geometric features representative of those key organs or tissues for which more precise estimates of dose are required. Their level of complexity is also a function of different internal and external sources of radiation, and expected differences in radiosensitivities. Tertiary models -of greater complexity- are only considered to be of value for higher vertebrates. The potential derivation and use of all three sets of models is briefly discussed. (author)

  19. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  20. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  1. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h•mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  2. Aspect Ratio of Receiver Node Geometry based Indoor WLAN Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Udaykumar; Bapat, Vishram N.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents validation of indoor wireless local area network (WLAN) propagation model for varying rectangular receiver node geometry. The rectangular client node configuration is a standard node arrangement in computer laboratories of academic institutes and research organizations. The model assists to install network nodes for the better signal coverage. The proposed model is backed by wide ranging real time received signal strength measurements at 2.4 GHz. The shadow fading component of signal propagation under realistic indoor environment is modelled with the dependency on varying aspect ratio of the client node geometry. The developed new model is useful in predicting indoor path loss for IEEE 802.11b/g WLAN. The new model provides better performance in comparison to well known International Telecommunication Union and free space propagation models. It is shown that the proposed model is simple and can be a useful tool for indoor WLAN node deployment planning and quick method for the best utilisation of the office space.

  3. Addressing model uncertainty in dose-response: The case of chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved in addressing model uncertainty in the analysis of dose-response relationships. A method for addressing model uncertainty is described and applied to characterize the uncertainty in estimates of the carcinogenic potency of chloroform. The approach, which is rooted in Bayesian concepts of subjective probability, uses probability trees and formally-elicited expert judgments to address model uncertainty. It is argued that a similar approach could be used to improve the characterization of model uncertainty in the dose-response relationships for health effects from ionizing radiation

  4. A model of CT dose profiles in Banach space; with applications to CT dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Victor J.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the scatter component of computed tomography dose profiles is modeled using the solution to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This scatter function is summed with a modeled primary function of approximate trapezoidal shape. The primary dose profile is modeled to include the analytic continuation of the Heaviside step function. A mathematical theory is developed in a Banach space. The modeled function is used to accurately fit data from a 256-slice GE Revolution scanner. A 60 cm long body phantom is assembled and used for data collection with both a pencil chamber and a Farmer-type chamber.

  5. Scaling model for high-aspect-ratio microballoon direct-drive implosions at short laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmann, D.; Juraszek, D.; Lane, S.M.; Campbell, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    A scaling model for hot spherical ablative implosions in direct-drive mode is presented. The model results have been compared with experiments from LLE, ILE, and LLNL. Reduction of the neutron yield due to illumination nonuniformities is taken into account by the assumption that the neutron emission is cut off when the gas shock wave reflected off the center meets the incoming pusher, i.e., at a time when the probability of shell breakup is greatly enhanced. The main advantage of this semiempirical scaling model is that it elucidates the principal features of these simple implosions and permits one to estimate very quickly the performance of a high-aspect-ratio direct-drive target illuminated by short-wavelength laser light. (Author)

  6. Environmental noise and noise modelling-some aspects in Malaysian development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Mohd Salman; Mohd Shafiek bin Hj Yaacob

    1994-01-01

    Environmental noise is of growing concern in Malaysia with the increasing awareness of the need for an environmental quality consistent with improved quality of life. While noise is one of the several elements in an Environmental Impact Assessment report, the degree of emphasis in the assessment is not as thorough as other aspects in the EIA study. The measurements, prediction (if at all any), and evaluation tended to be superficial. The paper presents a summary of correct noise descriptors and annoyance assessment parameters appropriate for the evaluation of environmental noise. The paper further highlights current inadequacies in the Environmental Quality Act for noise pollution, and annoyance assessment. Some examples of local noise pollution are presented. A discussion on environmental noise modelling is presented. Examples illustrating environmental noise modelling for a mining operation and a power station are given. It is the authors' recommendation that environmental noise modelling be made mandatory in all EIA studies such that a more definitive assessment could be realised

  7. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  8. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  9. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): Concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Limbergen, Erik van; Barillot, Isabelle; Brabandere, Marisol De; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm 3 ; optional 5 and 10 cm 3 . Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm 3 . Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD 2 )-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Poetter R, Van Limbergen E et al

  10. Computed tomography in multiple trauma patients. Technical aspects, work flow, and dose reduction; Polytrauma-Computertomographie. Technische Grundlagen, Workflow und Dosisreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellner, F.A. [AKH Linz - Kepler Universitaetsklinikum/JKU, Zentrales Radiologie Institut, Linz (Austria); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Krieger, J.; Floery, D. [AKH Linz - Kepler Universitaetsklinikum/JKU, Zentrales Radiologie Institut, Linz (Austria); Lechner, N. [AKH Linz - Kepler Universitaetsklinikum/JKU, Abteilung fuer Medizintechnik, Linz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Patients with severe, life-threatening trauma require a fast and accurate clinical and imaging diagnostic workup during the first phase of trauma management. Early whole-body computed tomography has clearly been proven to be the current standard of care of these patients. A similar imaging quality can be achieved in the multiple trauma setting compared with routine imaging especially using rapid, latest generation computed tomography (CT) scanners. This article encompasses a detailed view on the use of CT in patients with life-threatening trauma. A special focus is placed on radiological procedures in trauma units and on the methods for CT workup in routine cases and in challenging situations. Another focus discusses the potential of dose reduction of CT scans in multiple trauma as well as the examination of children with severe trauma. Various studies have demonstrated that early whole-body CT positively correlates with low morbidity and mortality and is clearly superior to the use of other imaging modalities. Optimal trauma unit management means a close cooperation between trauma surgeons, anesthesiologists and radiologists, whereby the radiologist is responsible for a rapid and accurate radiological workup and the rapid communication of imaging findings. However, even in the trauma setting, aspects of patient radiation doses should be kept in mind. (orig.) [German] Polytraumatisierte Patienten beduerfen im Rahmen der initialen Schockraumversorgung einer schnellen und exakten klinischen und bildgebenden Diagnostik. Fuer ein optimales Schockraummanagement ist heute die essenzielle Bedeutung einer zeitnah durchgefuehrten Ganzkoerper-CT unbestritten. Insbesondere durch schnelle CT-Scanner der letzten Generationen kann im Rahmen der Schockraum-CT eine aehnlich gute Bildqualitaet wie in der Routinediagnostik erzielt werden. Dieser Artikel beleuchtet den Einsatz der CT im Schockraum bei polytraumatisierten Patienten, wobei das Hauptaugenmerk auf Methoden des

  11. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen.

  12. Application of the mathematical modelling and human phantoms for calculation of the organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Cechak, T.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing power of the computers hardware and new versions of the software for the radiation transport simulation and modelling of the complex experimental setups and geometrical arrangement enable to dramatically improve calculation of organ or target volume doses ( dose distributions) in the wide field of medical physics and radiation protection applications. Increase of computers memory and new software features makes it possible to use not only analytical (mathematical) phantoms but also allow constructing the voxel models of human or phantoms with voxels fine enough (e.g. 1·1·1 mm) to represent all required details. CT data can be used for the description of such voxel model geometry .Advanced scoring methods are available in the new software versions. Contribution gives the overview of such new possibilities in the modelling and doses calculations, discusses the simulation/approximation of the dosimetric quantities ( especially dose ) and calculated data interpretation. Some examples of application and demonstrations will be shown, compared and discussed. Present computational tools enables to calculate organ or target volumes doses with new quality of large voxel models/phantoms (including CT based patient specific model ), approximating the human body with high precision. Due to these features has more and more importance and use in the fields of medical and radiological physics, radiation protection, etc. (authors)

  13. Validation and uncertainty analysis of a pre-treatment 2D dose prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Jose A.; Wolfs, Cecile J. A.; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Independent verification of complex treatment delivery with megavolt photon beam radiotherapy (RT) has been effectively used to detect and prevent errors. This work presents the validation and uncertainty analysis of a model that predicts 2D portal dose images (PDIs) without a patient or phantom in the beam. The prediction model is based on an exponential point dose model with separable primary and secondary photon fluence components. The model includes a scatter kernel, off-axis ratio map, transmission values and penumbra kernels for beam-delimiting components. These parameters were derived through a model fitting procedure supplied with point dose and dose profile measurements of radiation fields. The model was validated against a treatment planning system (TPS; Eclipse) and radiochromic film measurements for complex clinical scenarios, including volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Confidence limits on fitted model parameters were calculated based on simulated measurements. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the parameter uncertainties on the model output. For the maximum uncertainty, the maximum deviating measurement sets were propagated through the fitting procedure and the model. The overall uncertainty was assessed using all simulated measurements. The validation of the prediction model against the TPS and the film showed a good agreement, with on average 90.8% and 90.5% of pixels passing a (2%,2 mm) global gamma analysis respectively, with a low dose threshold of 10%. The maximum and overall uncertainty of the model is dependent on the type of clinical plan used as input. The results can be used to study the robustness of the model. A model for predicting accurate 2D pre-treatment PDIs in complex RT scenarios can be used clinically and its uncertainties can be taken into account.

  14. A Topographically and anatomically unified phantom model for organ dose determination in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Rannikko, S.; Ermakov, I.; Masarskyi, L.; Saltukova, L.

    1989-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent is used as a risk-related factor for assessing radiation impact on patients. In order to assess the effective dose equivalent, data on organ doses in several organs are needed. For calculation of the collective effective dose equivalent, data on the sex and size distribution of the exposed population are also needed. A realistic phantom model based on the Alderson-Rando anatomical phantom has been developed for these purposes. The phantom model includes 22 organs and takes into account the deflections due to sex, height, weight and other anatomical features. Coordinates of the outer contours of inner organs are given in different slabs of the phantom. The images of cross sections of different slabs realistically depict the distribution of the organs in the phantom. Statistics about height and weight distribution as a function of the age of the Finnish population are also given. (orig.)

  15. Review of calculational models and computer codes for environmental dose assessment of radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Droppo, J.G.

    1976-06-01

    The development of technological bases for siting nuclear fuel cycle facilities requires calculational models and computer codes for the evaluation of risks and the assessment of environmental impact of radioactive effluents. A literature search and review of available computer programs revealed that no one program was capable of performing all of the great variety of calculations (i.e., external dose, internal dose, population dose, chronic release, accidental release, etc.). Available literature on existing computer programs has been reviewed and a description of each program reviewed is given

  16. Review of calculational models and computer codes for environmental dose assessment of radioactive releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Droppo, J.G.

    1976-06-01

    The development of technological bases for siting nuclear fuel cycle facilities requires calculational models and computer codes for the evaluation of risks and the assessment of environmental impact of radioactive effluents. A literature search and review of available computer programs revealed that no one program was capable of performing all of the great variety of calculations (i.e., external dose, internal dose, population dose, chronic release, accidental release, etc.). Available literature on existing computer programs has been reviewed and a description of each program reviewed is given.

  17. From the measurement to the dose, from model to practice in radiological and medical physics. Diploma of accreditation to supervise research; De la mesure a la dose, du modele a la pratique en physique radiologique et medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, D.

    2003-11-15

    After an introduction describing his course in research activities, the author presents and analyzes the current recommendations in the field of radioprotection, focusing more particularly on the standardization and regulation aspects of radioprotection within the frame of medical and radiological physics. He comments the passage from measurement to radiation dose in external dosimetry, by referring to works on passive and active dosimetry, and more particularly on mixed flow neutron dosimetry. Then, he gives an overview of simulation works based on Monte Carlo codes in radioprotection, radio-physics and dosimetry (examples are given dealing with detector response and with the modelling of radioactive sources). He proposes an assessment of the knowledge acquired during this 15 year period of researches in different laboratories, and draws perspectives for future works. Several published articles are also enclosed

  18. From Business Model to System Architecture Considering Goals, Aspects and Quality Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Guzmán

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available At present business models have been converted into strategic assets for enterprise organizations. They facilitate information management for decisions making, transactions between parties and optimized services. The goal of this work is to present an Architectural Design Process (DAOMAC integrating Goals, Aspects and Quality Standards techniques and practices, to obtain an Initial Architecture for the software system from the business model. The main contribution of this work is to consider explicitly non-functional requirements in the different abstraction levels involved in the process to obtain the initial architecture model, and guaranteeing their traceability: tasks originating non-functional goals in the business model where they are not explicitly considered, non-functional crosscutting goals in the goal model, crosscutting concerns treated as softgoals and operationalizations in the SIG (Softgoal Interdependency Graph model. The main artifact obtained is the initial architecture and its logical view can be appreciated in the DAOMAC application to the case study, an administrative service process of the Citizen Identification and Registration System. Another important contribution is the specification of non-functional requirements by the ISO/IEC 25010 standard to facilitate their traceability and the communication among work groups.

  19. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  20. Blast overpressure and fallout radiation dose models for casualty assessment and other purposes. Rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.R.

    1981-12-01

    The determination of blast overpressures and fallout radiation doses at points on a sufficiently fine grid, for any part or for the whole of the UK, and for any postulated attack, is an essential element in the systematic assessment of casualties, the estimation of numbers of homeless, and the evaluation of life-saving measures generally. Models are described which provide the required blast and dose values and which are intended to supersede existing models which were introduced in 1971. The factors which affect blast and, more particularly, dose values are discussed, and the way in which various factors are modelled is described. The models are incorporated into separate computer programs which are described, the outputs of which are stored on magnetic tape for subsequent use as required. (author)

  1. Effect of dose reduction on the detection of mammographic lesions: A mathematical observer model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert; Abbey, Craig; Delong, David

    2007-01-01

    The effect of reduction in dose levels normally used in mammographic screening procedures on the detection of breast lesions were analyzed. Four types of breast lesions were simulated and inserted into clinically-acquired digital mammograms. Dose reduction by 50% and 75% of the original clinically-relevant exposure levels were simulated by adding corresponding simulated noise into the original mammograms. The mammograms were converted into luminance values corresponding to those displayed on a clinical soft-copy display station and subsequently analyzed by Laguerre-Gauss and Gabor channelized Hotelling observer models for differences in detectability performance with reduction in radiation dose. Performance was measured under a signal known exactly but variable detection task paradigm in terms of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves. The results suggested that luminance mapping of digital mammograms affects performance of model observers. Reduction in dose levels by 50% lowered the detectability of masses with borderline statistical significance. Dose reduction did not have a statistically significant effect on detection of microcalcifications. The model results indicate that there is room for optimization of dose level in mammographic screening procedures

  2. Regression models in the determination of the absorbed dose with extrapolation chamber for ophthalmological applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Morales P, R.

    1992-06-01

    The absorbed dose for equivalent soft tissue is determined,it is imparted by ophthalmologic applicators, ( 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 1850 MBq) using an extrapolation chamber of variable electrodes; when estimating the slope of the extrapolation curve using a simple lineal regression model is observed that the dose values are underestimated from 17.7 percent up to a 20.4 percent in relation to the estimate of this dose by means of a regression model polynomial two grade, at the same time are observed an improvement in the standard error for the quadratic model until in 50%. Finally the global uncertainty of the dose is presented, taking into account the reproducibility of the experimental arrangement. As conclusion it can infers that in experimental arrangements where the source is to contact with the extrapolation chamber, it was recommended to substitute the lineal regression model by the quadratic regression model, in the determination of the slope of the extrapolation curve, for more exact and accurate measurements of the absorbed dose. (Author)

  3. Effect of Nordic ciets on ECOSYS model predictions of ingestion doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne S.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Andersson, Kasper Grann

    2010-01-01

    The ECOSYS model is used to estimate ingestion dose in the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems for nuclear emergency management. It is recommended that nation-specific values for several parameters are used in the model. However, this is generally overlooked when the systems are used in prac...

  4. Dose escalation for non-small cell lung cancer: Analysis and modelling of published literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, Mike; Ramos, Monica; Sardaro, Angela; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the published clinical data on non-small cell lung cancer treated with radical radiotherapy to confirm a dose-response relationship as a basis for further dose-escalation trials. Methods: Twenty-four published clinical trials were identified, 16 of which - with 29 different standard, hyper- and hypofractionated treatment schedules - were analysed. Prescription doses were converted to biologically-equivalent dose (BED), with a correction for repopulation. Disease-free survival data were corrected for the stage profile of each cohort to allow better comparison of results. We also analysed moderate (grade II and III) lung and oesophageal acute toxicity related to the corrected BED delivered to the tumour. Results: The clinical data analysed showed good agreement between the observed and modelled disease-free survival at 2 years when compared to the published models of Fenwick (correlation coefficient 0.525, p = 0.003) and Martel (correlation coefficient 0.492, p = 0.007), indicating a clear tumour dose-response. In the normally fractionated treatments (∼2 Gy per fraction), improved disease-free survival was generally observed in the shorter schedules (maximum around 6 weeks). However, the best outcomes were obtained for the hypofractionated schedules. No systematic relationship was seen between prescribed dose and lung or oesophageal acute toxicity, possibly due to dose selection depending on V 20 or MLD in some studies and the diversity of the patients analysed. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a dose-response relationship for NSCLC based on clinical data. The clinical data provide a rational basis for selection of dose escalation schedules to be tested in future randomised trials.

  5. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  6. Can the hair follicle become a model for studying selected aspects of human ocular immune privilege?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinori, Michael; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Paus, Ralf

    2011-06-23

    Immune privilege (IP) is important in maintaining ocular health. Understanding the mechanism underlying this dynamic state would assist in treating inflammatory eye diseases. Despite substantial progress in defining eye IP mechanisms, because of the scarcity of human ocular tissue for research purposes, most of what we know about ocular IP is based on rodent models (of unclear relevance to human eye immunology) and on cultured human eye-derived cells that cannot faithfully mirror the complex cell-tissue interactions that underlie normal human ocular IP in situ. Therefore, accessible, instructive, and clinically relevant human in vitro models are needed for exploring the general principles of why and how IP collapses under clinically relevant experimental conditions and how it can be protected or even restored therapeutically. Among the few human IP sites, the easily accessible and abundantly available hair follicle (HF) may offer one such surrogate model. There are excellent human HF organ culture systems for the study of HF IP in situ that instructively complement in vivo autoimmunity research in the human system. In this article, we delineate that the human eye and HF, despite their obvious differences, share key molecular and cellular mechanisms for maintaining IP. We argue that, therefore, human scalp HFs can provide an unconventional, but highly instructive, accessible, easily manipulated, and clinically relevant preclinical model for selected aspects of ocular IP. This essay is an attempt to encourage professional eye researchers to turn their attention, with appropriate caveats, to this candidate surrogate model for ocular IP in the human system.

  7. Studying the Aspects of Knowledge Creation in the LAB Studio Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari-Pekka Heikkinen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organisations of higher education are constantly changing. Universities, colleges, private schools and online universities refine their pedagogical methods and learning models in a competitive market. This article is a study on whether one such model helps students to gain new knowledge. A study of the LAB studio model (LSM, which is a pedagogical model developing connections between working-life based problems and the recognition and development of business-related prototypes and start-up companies, is presented. The LSM, theoretically grounded in a constructivist view of learning with a project-based education at its core, has the key goal of educating entrepreneurial competences in higher education. Based on the case study, comprisinga literature review of knowledge creation and a survey, the qualitative results analysis suggests that LSM offers a promising support for knowledge creation. The results lead to the conclusion that LSM provides support especially for the various modes of the SECI model, such as socialisation and internalisation, and seems to support organisational knowledge creation aspects as well.

  8. Modeling Aspects Of Activated Sludge Processes Part I: Process Modeling Of Activated Sludge Facilitation And Sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, H. I.; EI-Ahwany, A.H.; Ibrahim, G.

    2004-01-01

    Process modeling of activated sludge flocculation and sedimentation reviews consider the activated sludge floc characteristics such as: morphology viable and non-viable cell ratio density and water content, bio flocculation and its kinetics were studied considering the characteristics of bio flocculation and explaining theory of Divalent Cation Bridging which describes the major role of cations in bio flocculation. Activated sludge flocculation process modeling was studied considering mass transfer limitations from Clifft and Andrew, 1981, Benefild and Molz 1983 passing Henze 1987, until Tyagi 1996 and G. Ibrahim et aI. 2002. Models of aggregation and breakage of flocs were studied by Spicer and Pratsinis 1996,and Biggs 2002 Size distribution of floes influences mass transfer and biomass separation in the activated sludge process. Therefore, it is of primary importance to establish the role of specific process operation factors, such as sludge loading dynamic sludge age and dissolved oxygen, on this distribution with special emphasis on the formation of primary particles

  9. Fuzzy dynamic modelling and predictive control of a coagulation chemical dosing unit for water treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Oladipupo Bello; Yskandar Hamam; Karim Djouani

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy model predictive control (FMPC) strategy is proposed to regulate the output variables of a coagulation chemical dosing unit. A multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) process model in form of a linearised Takagi–Sugeno (T–S) fuzzy model is derived. The process model is obtained through subtractive clustering from the plant's data set. The MIMO model is described by a set of coupled multiple-input, single-output models (MISO). In the controller design, the T–S fuzzy model...

  10. Modelling and mitigating dose to firefighters from inhalation of radionuclides in wildland fire smoke.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viner, Brian J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC

    2015-06-12

    Firefighters responding to wildland fires where surface litter and vegetation contain radiological contamination will receive a radiological dose by inhaling resuspended radioactive material in the smoke. This may increase their lifetime risk of contracting certain types of cancer. Using published data, we modelled hypothetical radionuclide emissions, dispersion and dose for 70th and 97th percentile environmental conditions and for average and high fuel loads at the Savannah River Site. We predicted downwind concentration and potential dose to firefighters for radionuclides of interest (137Cs, 238Pu, 90Sr and 210Po). Predicted concentrations exceeded dose guidelines in the base case scenario emissions of 1.0 x 107Bq ha-1 for 238Pu at 70th percentile environmental conditions and average fuel load levels for both 4- and 14-h shifts. Under 97th percentile environmental conditions and high fuel loads, dose guidelines were exceeded for several reported cases for 90Sr, 238Pu and 210Po. The potential for exceeding dose guidelines was mitigated by including plume rise (>2ms-1) or moving a small distance from the fire owing to large concentration gradients near the edge of the fire. This approach can quickly estimate potential dose from airborne radionuclides in wildland fire and assist decision-making to reduce firefighter exposure.

  11. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  12. Development of a Monte Carlo multiple source model for inclusion in a dose calculation auditing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Fontenot, Jonas; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of agreement in their anthropomorphic phantom audits. There is reason to believe one source of error in this observed disagreement is the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms and heterogeneity corrections used. To audit this component of the radiotherapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on measurement of central axis depth dose data for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open field measurements consisting of depth dose data and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 30 × 30 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against measurements in IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck and lung phantoms. Validation results showed 97.9% and 96.8% of depth dose data passed a ±2% Van Dyk criterion for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Dose profile comparisons showed an average agreement using a ±2%/2 mm criterion of 98.0% and 99.0% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Phantom plan comparisons were evaluated using ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and averaged passing rates between Monte Carlo and measurements were 87.4% and 89.9% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Accurate multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray beams have been developed for inclusion in an independent dose calculation tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Digital Aquifer - Integrating modeling, technical, software and policy aspects to develop a groundwater management tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirupathi, S.; McKenna, S. A.; Fleming, K.; Wambua, M.; Waweru, P.; Ondula, E.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater management has traditionally been observed as a study for long term policy measures to ensure that the water resource is sustainable. IBM Research, in association with the World Bank, extended this traditional analysis to include realtime groundwater management by building a context-aware, water rights management and permitting system. As part of this effort, one of the primary objectives was to develop a groundwater flow model that can help the policy makers with a visual overview of the current groundwater distribution. In addition, the system helps the policy makers simulate a range of scenarios and check the sustainability of the groundwater resource in a given region. The system also enables a license provider to check the effect of the introduction of a new well on the existing wells in the domain as well as the groundwater resource in general. This process simplifies how an engineer will determine if a new well should be approved. Distance to the nearest well neighbors and the maximum decreases in water levels of nearby wells are continually assessed and presented as evidence for an engineer to make the final judgment on approving the permit. The system also facilitates updated insights on the amount of groundwater left in an area and provides advice on how water fees should be structured to balance conservation and economic development goals. In this talk, we will discuss the concept of Digital Aquifer, the challenges in integrating modeling, technical and software aspects to develop a management system that helps policy makers and license providers with a robust decision making tool. We will concentrate on the groundwater model developed using the analytic element method that plays a very important role in the decision making aspects. Finally, the efficiency of this system and methodology is shown through a case study in Laguna Province, Philippines, which was done in collaboration with the National Water Resource Board, Philippines and World

  14. Model of distribution of dose for intravascular brachytherapy; Modelo de distribucion de dosis para braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Signoretta, Catalina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dosimetria de Radioaciones Ionizantes; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Bergoc, Rosa [Univeridad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Guzman, Luis [Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    In this work we present the radiation dose distributions for a theoretical model with Monte Carlo simulation, which was based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a {sup 32} P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries. (author)

  15. Development of mathematical model for estimation of entrance surface dose in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgani, Yassir Mohammed Tahir

    2013-05-01

    Computer simulation is a convenient and frequently used tool in the study of x-ray mammography, for the design of novel detector systems, the evaluation of dose deposition, x-ray technique optimization, and other applications. An important component in the simulation process is the accurate computer generation of x-ray spectra. A computer model for the generation of x-ray spectra in the mammographic energy rang from 18 keV to 40 ke V has been developed by Boone et al. Due to the lack of QC and dose measurement tools, in addition to unavailability of medical physics, a mathematical tool was developed for estimation of patient exposure and entrance dose. The proposed model require no assumptions concerning the physics of x-ray production in an x-ray tube, but rather makes use of x-ray spectra recently measured experimentally by John M Boone (Department of Radiology, University of California). Using experimental dose measurements for specific tube voltage and tube current the generated x-ray spectra were calibrated. The spectrum calibration factors show a tube voltage dependency. From the calibrated x-ray spectrum, the exposure and entrance dose were estimated for different k Vp and m A. Results show good agreement between the measured and estimated values for tube voltage between 18 to 45 k Vp with a good correlation of nearly 1 and equal slope. The maximum estimated different between the measured and the simulated dose is approximately equal to 0.07%.(Author)

  16. Three-dimensional dose-response models of risk for radiation injury carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.

    1988-01-01

    The use of computer graphics in conjunction with three-dimensional models of dose-response relationships for chronic exposure to ionizing radiation dramaticly clarifies the separate and interactive roles of competing risks. The three dimensions are average dose rate, exposure time, and risk. As an example, the functionally injurious and carcinogenic responses after systemic uptake of Ra-226 by beagles, mice and people with consequent alpha particle irradiation of the bone are represented by three-dimensional dose-rate/time/response surfaces that demonstrate the contributions with the passage of time of the competing deleterious responses. These relationships are further evaluated by mathematical stripping with three-dimensional illustrations that graphically show the resultant separate contribution of each effect. Radiation bone injury predominates at high dose rates and bone cancer at intermediate dose rates. Low dose rates result in spontaneous deaths from natural aging, yielding a type of practical threshold for bone cancer induction. Risk assessment is benefited by the insights that become apparent with these three-dimensional models. The improved conceptualization afforded by them contributes to planning and evaluating epidemiological analyses and experimental studies

  17. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the background radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable

  18. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable.

  19. [People with venous ulcers: a study of the psychosocial aspects of the Roy Adaptation Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Isabelle Katherinne Fernandes; da Nóbrega, Walkíria Gomes; Costa, Isabel Karolyne Fernandes; Torres, Gilson de Vasconcelos; Lira, Ana Luiza Brandão de Carvalho; Tourinho, Francis Solange Vieira; Enders, Bertha Cruz

    2011-09-01

    A transversal descriptive quantitative study, conducted with 50 people with Venous Ulcer (VU) at an University Hospital, that aimed to ascertain the level of psychosocial adaptation of the Roy Model of people with VU. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee. The data were collected with a structured form. After organizing the data, composed of changes in the lives of people with VU, we classified it according to Roy's psychosocial aspects. We found that in the self-concept mode, 36% felt dissatisfied with physical appearance, and 18% had negative feelings; in the role-function mode: change in the working role (52.0%), housework (34.0%), marital (6.0%), leisure, pain, social, educational and transportation restrictions (82.0%); interdependence mode: support in treatment (82.0%), discrimination (58.0%). The identification of the psychosocial aspects directs nursing actions to consider the whole of the person receiving care in its relations with the environment, thus promoting a better level of adaptation.

  20. Reconstructing Organophosphorus Pesticide Doses Using the Reversed Dosimetry Approach in a Simple Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrated the development of a simple pharmacokinetic (SPK model aiming to estimate the absorbed chlorpyrifos doses using urinary biomarker data, 3,5,6-trichlorpyridinol as the model input. The effectiveness of the SPK model in the pesticide risk assessment was evaluated by comparing dose estimates using different urinary composite data. The dose estimates resulting from the first morning voids appeared to be lower than but not significantly different to those using before bedtime, lunch or dinner voids. We found similar trend for dose estimates using three different urinary composite data. However, the dose estimates using the SPK model for individual children were significantly higher than those from the conventional physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling using aggregate environmental measurements of chlorpyrifos as the model inputs. The use of urinary data in the SPK model intuitively provided a plausible alternative to the conventional PBPK model in reconstructing the absorbed chlorpyrifos dose.

  1. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect...... of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D-50,D-i, and the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma(50,i). Results: A highly...

  2. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: an evaluation of NTCP models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Marielle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; Schellekens, Suzanne A M W; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate models for normal-tissue-complication probability (NTCP) on describing the dose-volume effect in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord. Single-dose irradiation of four field lengths (4, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm) was evaluated by the endpoints paresis and white-matter necrosis. The resulting dose-response data were used to rank phenomenological and tissue architecture NTCP models. The 0.5-cm field length showed a steep increase in radiation tolerance. Statistical analysis of the model fits, which included evaluation of goodness of fit (GOF) and confidence intervals, resulted in the rejection of all the models considered. Excluding the smallest field length, the Schultheiss (D(50) = 21.5 Gy, k = 26.5), the relative seriality (D(50) = 21.4 Gy, s = 1.6, gamma(50) = 6.3), and the critical element (D(50,FSU) = 26.6 Gy, gamma(50,FSU) = 2.3, n = 1.3) model gave the best fit. A thorough statistical analysis resulted in a serial or critical-element behavior for the field lengths of 1.0 cm and greater. Including the 0.5-cm field length, the radiation response markedly diverged from serial properties, but none of the models applied acceptably described this dose-response relationship. This study suggests that the commonly assumed serial behavior of the spinal cord might be valid for daily use in external- beam irradiation.

  3. Fast Pencil Beam Dose Calculation for Proton Therapy Using a Double-Gaussian Beam Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams (PBs) are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real-time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a PB algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs) intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here, we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such PB algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parameterizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of PBs in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included while prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Furthermore, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parameterization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  4. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  5. Efficient calculation of local dose distributions for response modeling in proton and heavier ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Hahn, Ute; Kiderlen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex...... mixed particle fields over a wide range of fluences. Since the local dose distribution is the essential part of several approaches to model detector efficiency and cellular response it has potential use in ion-beam dosimetry, radiotherapy, and radiobiology....

  6. Evaluation of subject contrast and normalized average glandular dose by semi-analytical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomal, A.; Poletti, M.E.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, two semi-analytical models are described to evaluate the subject contrast of nodules and the normalized average glandular dose in mammography. Both models were used to study the influence of some parameters, such as breast characteristics (thickness and composition) and incident spectra (kVp and target-filter combination) on the subject contrast of a nodule and on the normalized average glandular dose. From the subject contrast results, detection limits of nodules were also determined. Our results are in good agreement with those reported by other authors, who had used Monte Carlo simulation, showing the robustness of our semi-analytical method.

  7. Radiotherapy. Treatment with high doses per fraction. Lineal-quadratic model of cellular survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valls, A.; Ballester, B.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last years, a significant number of papers have been published in the literature devoted to radiotherapy stating the inefficiency of traditional mathematical models in predicting the biological efficacy of treatment courses with high doses per fraction, and proposing a new model the so-called lineal-quadratic. In this paper the literature is reviewed and some practical examples are presented to illustrate the clinical application of the model. (Author). 15 refs

  8. Aspects of labor market flexicurity in the Mediterranean and Anglo-Saxon models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Ştefania CHENIC (CREŢU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the economic crisis and the challenges of globalization, the paper presents and analyses relevant aspects of labor market flexicurity, especially in the Mediterranean and Anglo- Saxon model. Thus, the labor market in Spain and the United Kingdom has been studied, highlighting the reason behind existing problems, compared to other EU countries, notably in the Euro area (Italy, Greece, Portugal, Germany. Labor market flexicurity highlights labor market flexibility while, at the same time, ensuring safe transition for employees from a job to another. In this context, it should be emphasized that integration in the Economic and Monetary Union involves fulfilling a major condition in order to cope within the Union, namely labor market flexibility.

  9. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  10. Biosphere Modeling for the Dose Assessment of a HLW Repository: Development of ACBIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2006-01-15

    For the purpose of evaluating a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, a biosphere assessment model and an implemented code, ACBIO, based on the BIOMASS methodology have been developed by utilizing AMBER, a general compartment modeling tool. To demonstrate its practicability and usability as well as to observe the sensitivity of the compartment scheme, the concentration, the activity in the compartments as well as the annual flux between the compartments at their peak values, were calculated and investigated. For each case when changing the structure of the compartments and GBIs as well as varying selected input Kd values, all of which seem very important among the others, the dose rate per nuclide release rate is calculated separately and analyzed. From the maximum dose rates, the flux to dose conversion factors for each nuclide were derived, which are used for converting the nuclide release rate appearing from the geosphere through various GBIs to dose rates (Sv/y) for an individual in a critical group. It has also been observed that the compartment scheme, the identification of a possible exposure group and the GBIs could all be highly sensitive to the final consequences in a biosphere modeling.

  11. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  12. Site-specific parameter values for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's food pathway dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Western South Carolina result in radionuclide releases to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiation doses to the off-site maximum individual and the off-site population within 80 km of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are currently generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose-model parameters for facilities without resources to develop site-specific values. A survey of land- and water-use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine site-specific values for water recreation, consumption, and agricultural parameters used in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 (1977) dosimetric models. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; recreational and commercial activities on the Savannah River; and meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates. This paper describes how parameter data were obtained at the Savannah River Site and the impacts of such data on off-site dose. Dose estimates using site-specific parameter values are compared to estimates using the NRC default values

  13. CT radiation dose and image quality optimization using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential radiation dose savings and resultant image quality effects with regard to optimization of commonly performed computed tomography (CT) studies derived from imaging a porcine (pig) model. Imaging protocols for 4 clinical CT suites were developed based on the lowest milliamperage and kilovoltage, the highest pitch that could be set from current imaging protocol parameters, or both. This occurred before significant changes in noise, contrast, and spatial resolution were measured objectively on images produced from a quality assurance CT phantom. The current and derived phantom protocols were then applied to scan a porcine model for head, abdomen, and chest CT studies. Further optimized protocols were developed based on the same methodology as in the phantom study. The optimization achieved with respect to radiation dose and image quality was evaluated following data collection of radiation dose recordings and image quality review. Relative visual grading analysis of image quality criteria adapted from the European guidelines on radiology quality criteria for CT were used for studies completed with both the phantom-based or porcine-derived imaging protocols. In 5 out of 16 experimental combinations, the current clinical protocol was maintained. In 2 instances, the phantom protocol reduced radiation dose by 19% to 38%. In the remaining 9 instances, the optimization based on the porcine model further reduced radiation dose by 17% to 38%. The porcine model closely reflects anatomical structures in humans, allowing the grading of anatomical criteria as part of image quality review without radiation risks to human subjects. This study demonstrates that using a porcine model to evaluate CT optimization resulted in more radiation dose reduction than when imaging protocols were tested solely on quality assurance phantoms.

  14. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, {sup 201}Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of {sup 82}Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: {sup 82}Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice.

  15. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry; Effets sanitaires des faibles doses a faibles debits de dose: modelisation de la relation dose-reponse dans une cohorte de travailleurs du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-09-19

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  16. Single and 30 fraction tumor control doses correlate in xenografted tumor models: implications for predictive assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Dubois, Willum; Baumann, Michael; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    , the rank-order correlation coefficient between the single dose hypoxic versus fractionated dose TCD50s under hypoxic or aerobic conditions was 1.0. For all 5 tumors examined, a trend for rank correlation was observed between the single dose and the fractionated dose TCD50s performed under normal or clamp hypoxic conditions (r=0.7, p=0.16 in both cases). The linear correlation coefficients were 0.83, p=0.08 and 0.72, p=0.17, respectively. Failure to attain a rank correlation of 1.0 was due to one tumor exhibiting an insignificant fractionation effect. The rank correlation between the TCD50s for fractionated treatments under normal versus the extrapolated TCD50s under clamp hypoxic conditions was 1.00; the linear correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.01). Conclusions: In the tumor models examined, factors controlling the single fraction tumor control dose, also impact the response to fractionated treatments. These results suggest that laboratory estimates of intrinsic radiosensitivity and tumor clonogen number at the onset of treatment, will be of use in predicting radiocurability for fractionated treatments, as has been observed for single dose treatments

  17. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of research interest in developing fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods on graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. A good linear accelerator (linac) source model is critical for both accuracy and efficiency considerations. In principle, an analytical source model should be more preferred for GPU-based MC dose engines than a phase-space file-based model, in that data loading and CPU-GPU data transfer can be avoided. In this paper, we presented an analytical field-independent source model specifically developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations, associated with a GPU-friendly sampling scheme. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. Each PSR contained a group of particles that were of the same type, close in energy and reside in a narrow ring on the phase-space plane located just above the upper jaws. The model parameterized the probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. Models of one 2D Gaussian distribution or multiple Gaussian components were employed to represent the particle direction distributions of these PSRs. A method was developed to analyze a reference phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To efficiently use our model in MC dose calculations on GPU, we proposed a GPU-friendly sampling strategy, which ensured that the particles sampled and transported simultaneously are of the same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergences. To test the accuracy of our model, dose distributions of a set of open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those calculated using the reference phase-space files. For the high dose gradient regions, the average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm and the maximum DTA within 2 mm. For relatively low dose gradient regions, the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% and the maximum

  18. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-21

    Recently, there has been a lot of research interest in developing fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods on graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. A good linear accelerator (linac) source model is critical for both accuracy and efficiency considerations. In principle, an analytical source model should be more preferred for GPU-based MC dose engines than a phase-space file-based model, in that data loading and CPU-GPU data transfer can be avoided. In this paper, we presented an analytical field-independent source model specifically developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations, associated with a GPU-friendly sampling scheme. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. Each PSR contained a group of particles that were of the same type, close in energy and reside in a narrow ring on the phase-space plane located just above the upper jaws. The model parameterized the probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. Models of one 2D Gaussian distribution or multiple Gaussian components were employed to represent the particle direction distributions of these PSRs. A method was developed to analyze a reference phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To efficiently use our model in MC dose calculations on GPU, we proposed a GPU-friendly sampling strategy, which ensured that the particles sampled and transported simultaneously are of the same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergences. To test the accuracy of our model, dose distributions of a set of open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those calculated using the reference phase-space files. For the high dose gradient regions, the average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm and the maximum DTA within 2 mm. For relatively low dose gradient regions, the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% and the maximum

  19. Mathematical modeling identifies optimum lapatinib dosing schedules for the treatment of glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayna Stein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human primary glioblastomas (GBM often harbor mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Treatment of EGFR-mutant GBM cell lines with the EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib can effectively induce cell death in these models. However, EGFR inhibitors have shown little efficacy in the clinic, partly because of inappropriate dosing. Here, we developed a computational approach to model the in vitro cellular dynamics of the EGFR-mutant cell line SF268 in response to different lapatinib concentrations and dosing schedules. We then used this approach to identify an effective treatment strategy within the clinical toxicity limits of lapatinib, and developed a partial differential equation modeling approach to study the in vivo GBM treatment response by taking into account the heterogeneous and diffusive nature of the disease. Despite the inability of lapatinib to induce tumor regressions with a continuous daily schedule, our modeling approach consistently predicts that continuous dosing remains the best clinically feasible strategy for slowing down tumor growth and lowering overall tumor burden, compared to pulsatile schedules currently known to be tolerated, even when considering drug resistance, reduced lapatinib tumor concentrations due to the blood brain barrier, and the phenotypic switch from proliferative to migratory cell phenotypes that occurs in hypoxic microenvironments. Our mathematical modeling and statistical analysis platform provides a rational method for comparing treatment schedules in search for optimal dosing strategies for glioblastoma and other cancer types.

  20. Mesomechanical aspects of computational modeling for non-homogeneous materials joined by forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Prawoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal forming and joining industries are constantly evolving to adapt to new materials and alloys and to meet customers’ needs. However, the size of the companies in this segment is typically small. Therefore, the progress of the mesomechanical modeling on non-homogeneous materials is relatively slow. This article aims to contribute to the advancement of such computational idea. The industries and academics alike may benefit the mesomechanical aspects of computational modeling for materials joined by forming using the established theories known in the field of mechanics. It may be used as an introductory for the society of joining by forming. This article reviews the basic concept of the finite element method, the fundamental mechanics and highlights some common problems in joining by forming, namely contact problems, local variations and interfacial cracking. This article aims to disseminate the meso/micro-mechanics approach to the field of joining by forming, which currently is dominated by experimental works and macroscopic modeling. Using the simple approaches discussed in this article, researchers with little or no background in computational mechanics can implement the concepts.

  1. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  2. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, J. J.; Cagnon, C. H.; Cody, D. D.; Stevens, D. M.; McCollough, C. H.; Zankl, M.; Angel, E.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs-1 for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs-1) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs-1). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs-1, which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs-1) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs-1) and is higher relative to Golem (0

  3. SU-F-BRD-09: A Random Walk Model Algorithm for Proton Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a random walk model algorithm for calculating proton dose with balanced computation burden and accuracy. Methods: Random walk (RW) model is sometimes referred to as a density Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In MC proton dose calculation, the use of Gaussian angular distribution of protons due to multiple Coulomb scatter (MCS) is convenient, but in RW the use of Gaussian angular distribution requires an extremely large computation and memory. Thus, our RW model adopts spatial distribution from the angular one to accelerate the computation and to decrease the memory usage. From the physics and comparison with the MC simulations, we have determined and analytically expressed those critical variables affecting the dose accuracy in our RW model. Results: Besides those variables such as MCS, stopping power, energy spectrum after energy absorption etc., which have been extensively discussed in literature, the following variables were found to be critical in our RW model: (1) inverse squared law that can significantly reduce the computation burden and memory, (2) non-Gaussian spatial distribution after MCS, and (3) the mean direction of scatters at each voxel. In comparison to MC results, taken as reference, for a water phantom irradiated by mono-energetic proton beams from 75 MeV to 221.28 MeV, the gamma test pass rate was 100% for the 2%/2mm/10% criterion. For a highly heterogeneous phantom consisting of water embedded by a 10 cm cortical bone and a 10 cm lung in the Bragg peak region of the proton beam, the gamma test pass rate was greater than 98% for the 3%/3mm/10% criterion. Conclusion: We have determined key variables in our RW model for proton dose calculation. Compared with commercial pencil beam algorithms, our RW model much improves the dose accuracy in heterogeneous regions, and is about 10 times faster than MC simulations

  4. Modelling of the dose-rate variations with depth in the Martian regolith using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morthekai, P.; Jain, M.; Dartnell, L.; Murray, A.S.; Botter-Jensen, L.; Desorgher, L.

    2007-01-01

    The environmental radiation field at the Martian surface consists mainly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and charged particles ejected during the Solar Particle Events (SPE). Interactions between these radiation fluxes and the regolith result in a complex radiation field that varies both as a function of depth and time and can only be quantified using radiation transport models. We first describe here the main issues and constraints in deriving Martian dose rates. Preliminary results, obtained using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation tool kit, suggest the surface dose rate is ∼63 mGy a -1 during quiet periods in solar activity. The accuracy of the model predictions has been tested by comparison with published observations of cosmic ray dose-rate variation in the Earth's atmosphere

  5. An Economic Aspect of the AVOID Programme: Analysis Using the AIM/CGE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichi; Masui, Toshihiko

    2010-05-01

    This presentation purposes to show the results of the analysis that the AIM/CGE [Global] model contributed to Work Stream 1 of the AVOID programme. Three economic models participate in this WS to analyze the economic aspects of defined climate policies, and the AIM/CGE [Global] model is one of them. The reference scenario is SRES A1B and five policy scenarios (2016.R2.H, 2016.R4.L, 2016.R5.L, 2030.R2.H, and 2030.R5.L) are considered. The climate policies are expressed as emissions pathways of several gases such as greenhouse gases and aerosols. The AIM/CGE [Global] model is a recursive dynamic global CGE model with 21 industrial sectors and 24 world regions. These definitions are based on the GTAP6 database and it is used as the economic data of the base year. Some important characteristics of this model can be summarized as follows: power generation by various sources (from non-renewables to renewables) are considered; CCS technology is modeled; biomass energy (both traditional and purpose-grown) production and consumption are included; not only CO2 emissions but also other gases are considered; international markets are modeled for international trade of some fossil fuels; relationships between the costs and resource reserves of fossil fuels are modeled. The model is run with 10-year time steps until 2100. For the reference case, there are no constraints and the model is run based on the drivers (assumptions on GDP and population for A1B) and AEEI. The reference case does not have the same emissions pathways as the prescribed emissions for A1B in AVOID. For scenario cases, the model is run under emissions constraints. In particular, for each policy scenario, the constraint on each gas in each 10-year step is derived. The percentage reduction in emissions that occurs between the AVOID A1B scenario and the particular policy scenario, for each gas in each 10-year period is first calculated, and then these percentage reductions are applied to the AIM reference case

  6. Model-Based Evaluation of Higher Doses of Rifampin Using a Semimechanistic Model Incorporating Autoinduction and Saturation of Hepatic Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirehwa, Maxwell T; Rustomjee, Roxana; Mthiyane, Thuli; Onyebujoh, Philip; Smith, Peter; McIlleron, Helen; Denti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Rifampin is a key sterilizing drug in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It induces its own metabolism, but neither the onset nor the extent of autoinduction has been adequately described. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends a rifampin dose of 8 to 12 mg/kg of body weight, which is believed to be suboptimal, and higher doses may potentially improve treatment outcomes. However, a nonlinear increase in exposure may be observed because of saturation of hepatic extraction and hence this should be taken into consideration when a dose increase is implemented. Intensive pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 61 HIV-TB-coinfected patients in South Africa were collected at four visits, on days 1, 8, 15, and 29, after initiation of treatment. Data were analyzed by population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Rifampin PKs were best described by using a transit compartment absorption and a well-stirred liver model with saturation of hepatic extraction, including a first-pass effect. Autoinduction was characterized by using an exponential-maturation model: hepatic clearance almost doubled from the baseline to steady state, with a half-life of around 4.5 days. The model predicts that increases in the dose of rifampin result in more-than-linear drug exposure increases as measured by the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve. Simulations with doses of up to 35 mg/kg produced results closely in line with those of clinical trials. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Dose evaluation model for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Iyogi, Takashi; Inaba, Jiro; Chiang, Jing-Hsien; Suwa, Hiroji; Koide, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    A dose evaluation model was developed for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which is located in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, and now undergoing test operation. The dose evaluation model suitable for medium- and long-term dose assessments for both prolonged and short-term releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere was developed on the PC. The ARAC-2, a particle tracing type dispersion model coupled with 3-D wind field calculation by a mass conservative model, was adopted as the atmospheric dispersion model. The terrestrial transfer model included movement in soil and groundwater as well as an agricultural and livestock farming system. The available site-specific social and environmental characteristics were incorporated in the model. Growing of the crops was also introduced and radionuclides absorbed were calculated from weight increase from the start of deposition to harvest, and transfer factors. Most of the computer code system of the models was completed by 2005, and this paper reports the results of the development. (author)

  8. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose-Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose-response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose-response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose-response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation.

  9. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  10. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  11. Does scientific evidence support a change from the LNT model for low-dose radiation risk extrapolation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, Dietrich

    2009-11-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model has been widely used to establish international rules and standards in radiation protection. It is based on the notion that the physical energy deposition of ionizing radiation (IR) increases carcinogenic risk linearly with increasing dose (i.e., the carcinogenic effectiveness remains constant irrespective of dose) and, within a factor of two, also with dose-rate. However, recent findings have strongly put into question the LNT concept and its scientific validity, especially for very low doses and dose-rates. Low-dose effects are more difficult to ascertain than high-dose effects. Epidemiological studies usually lack sufficient statistical power to determine health risks from very low-dose exposures. In this situation, studies of the fundamental mechanisms involved help to understand and assess short- and long-term effects of low-dose IR and to evaluate low-dose radiation risks. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that low-dose and low dose-rate effects are generally lower than expected from high-dose exposures. DNA damage signaling, cell cycle checkpoint activation, DNA repair, gene and protein expression, apoptosis, and cell transformation differ qualitatively and quantitatively at high- and low-dose IR exposures, and most animal and epidemiological data support this conclusion. Thus, LNT appears to be scientifically invalid in the low-dose range.

  12. Dosing and switching strategies for paliperidone palmitate: based on population pharmacokinetic modelling and clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samtani, Mahesh N; Gopal, Srihari; Gassmann-Mayer, Cristiana; Alphs, Larry; Palumbo, Joseph M

    2011-10-01

    Paliperidone palmitate is a second-generation, long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic recently approved by the US FDA and European Medicines Agency for use in patients with schizophrenia. This article reviews the recommended dosing regimens for initiation and maintenance treatment with paliperidone palmitate in adult patients with schizophrenia. We also address issues of switching to paliperidone palmitate from other antipsychotics, managing missed doses and dosing in special patient populations. The dosing recommendations that were approved by the FDA and other regulatory agencies around the world are based on the results of population pharmacokinetic (PK) simulations and data from clinical trials that are presented in this review. A one-compartment disposition model with zero/first-order absorption best described the PK of paliperidone palmitate. Population PK models for extended-release paliperidone and long-acting risperidone were also developed and we report the results from these models. The PK profiles for 5000 patients were simulated after paliperidone palmitate injections. The population median and 90% prediction intervals of the simulated plasma concentration versus time profiles after multiple doses are graphically displayed in this review. Based on the data from model-based PK simulations, the approved recommended initiation regimen for paliperidone palmitate is 150 mg equivalent (mg eq.) paliperidone (paliperidone palmitate 234 mg) on day 1 followed by 100 mg eq. paliperidone (paliperidone palmitate 156 mg) on day 8, each administered into the deltoid muscle, using a 1-inch 23-gauge needle in those weighing paliperidone (paliperidone palmitate 39-234 mg; recommended dose of 75 mg eq. paliperidone [paliperidone palmitate 117 mg]) injected into the deltoid (needle size is weight adjusted) or gluteal (using a 1.5-inch 22-gauge needle) muscle. The day 8 dose may be administered ±2 days and monthly doses ±7 days, without a clinically

  13. Adaptive dose-finding studies: a review of model-guided phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasonos, Alexia; O'Quigley, John

    2014-08-10

    We provide a comprehensive review of adaptive phase I clinical trials in oncology that used a statistical model to guide dose escalation to identify the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). We describe the clinical setting, practical implications, and safety of such applications, with the aim of understanding how these designs work in practice. We identified 53 phase I trials published between January 2003 and September 2013 that used the continual reassessment method (CRM), CRM using escalation with overdose control, or time-to-event CRM for late-onset toxicities. Study characteristics, design parameters, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) definition, DLT rate, patient-dose allocation, overdose, underdose, sample size, and trial duration were abstracted from each study. In addition, we examined all studies in terms of safety, and we outlined the reasons why escalations occur and under what circumstances. On average, trials accrued 25 to 35 patients over a 2-year period and tested five dose levels. The average DLT rate was 18%, which is lower than in previous reports, whereas all levels above the MTD had an average DLT rate of 36%. On average, 39% of patients were treated at the MTD, and 74% were treated at either the MTD or an adjacent level (one level above or below). This review of completed phase I studies confirms the safety and generalizability of model-guided, adaptive dose-escalation designs, and it provides an approach for using, interpreting, and understanding such designs to guide dose escalation in phase I trials. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Development of models to predict dose of pesticides in professional turf applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley A; Sass-Kortsak, Andrea M; Corey, Paul N; Purdham, James T

    2002-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies designed to assess the chronic effects of pesticides are limited by inadequate measurements of exposures. Although cohort studies have been initiated to evaluate the effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and other pesticides in professional turf applicators, they may have limited power to detect significant health risks and may be subject to bias from exposure measurement error. In this study, the doses of 2,4-D, mecoprop [2-(4-chloro-2 methylphenoxy) propionic acid, MCPP] and dicamba (3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid) were evaluated in a group of 98 professional turf applicators from 20 companies across southwestern Ontario. During a 1-week period (Saturday to Thursday), the volume of pesticide (active ingredient) applied was only weakly related to the total dose of 2,4-D absorbed (R(2)=0.21). Two additional factors explained a large proportion of variation in dose: the type of spray nozzle used and the use of gloves while spraying. Individuals who used a fan-type nozzle had significantly higher doses than those who used a gun-type nozzle. Glove use was associated with significantly lower doses. Job satisfaction and current smoking influenced the dose but were not highly predictive. In the final multiple regression models predicting total absorbed dose of 2,4-D and mecoprop, approximately 63-68% of the variation was explained. The future application of these models for epidemiologic research will depend on the availability of information and records from employers, the feasibility of contacting study subjects and cost.

  15. Graphic display of radiobiological effects on dose response models and its application for clinical optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Yukimasa; Onogi, Yuzou; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Akanuma, Atsuo; Iio, Masahiro; Sakata, Kouichi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaneko, Katsutaro.

    1988-01-01

    Both physical dose distribution and radiobiological effect should be required for radiotherapy optimization, however, there is a tendency that they are handled separately and that the former is processed in the shape of dose distribution and the latter is estimated quantitatively as point values. Those two parameters are combined in the iso-TDF map, where various responses of organs are not considered. In this study, the iso-effect distribution and the dose distributions are compared to investigate optimization for radiation treatment. A computer program is developed to construct an image of iso-effect from both various response values of internal organs and a certain physical dose and to show the integral value of certain region of interest. NSD-TDF model and LQ model are adopted and presumptive cases of esophagus cancer and pituitary tumor are employed. The results show that the effect to normal tissues increases with one port a day technique compared with plural ports a day technique and the latter is most preferable in both cases. It will require a proper weighting function to establish a generalized parameter for both spatial and chronological optimization by integrating dose and biological effect. The volume effect in biological responses will be argued with three dimensional implementation of this program. (author)

  16. Mechanistic formulation of a lineal-quadratic-linear (LQL) model: split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Mariana; Carlone, Marco

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, several models were proposed that modify the standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model to make the predicted survival curve linear at high doses. Most of these models are purely phenomenological and can only be applied in the particular case of acute doses per fraction. The authors consider a mechanistic formulation of a linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model in the case of split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources. This model provides a comprehensive description of radiation response for arbitrary dose rate and fractionation with only one additional parameter. The authors use a compartmental formulation of the LQL model from the literature. They analytically solve the model's differential equations for the case of a split-dose experiment and for an exponentially decaying source. They compare the solutions of the survival fraction with the standard LQ equations and with the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model. In the case of the split-dose experiment, the LQL model predicts a recovery ratio as a function of dose per fraction that deviates from the square law of the standard LQ. The survival fraction as a function of time between fractions follows a similar exponential law as the LQ but adds a multiplicative factor to the LQ parameter beta. The LQL solution for the split-dose experiment is very close to the LPL prediction. For the decaying source, the differences between the LQL and the LQ solutions are negligible when the half-life of the source is much larger than the characteristic repair time, which is the clinically relevant case. The compartmental formulation of the LQL model can be used for arbitrary dose rates and provides a comprehensive description of dose response. When the survival fraction for acute doses is linear for high dose, a deviation of the square law formula of the recovery ratio for split doses is also predicted.

  17. Mechanistic formulation of a lineal-quadratic-linear (LQL) model: Split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Mariana; Carlone, Marco [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States) and Department of Radiation Therapy, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422 (United States); Princess Margaret Hospital and Peel Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In recent years, several models were proposed that modify the standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model to make the predicted survival curve linear at high doses. Most of these models are purely phenomenological and can only be applied in the particular case of acute doses per fraction. The authors consider a mechanistic formulation of a linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model in the case of split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources. This model provides a comprehensive description of radiation response for arbitrary dose rate and fractionation with only one additional parameter. Methods: The authors use a compartmental formulation of the LQL model from the literature. They analytically solve the model's differential equations for the case of a split-dose experiment and for an exponentially decaying source. They compare the solutions of the survival fraction with the standard LQ equations and with the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model. Results: In the case of the split-dose experiment, the LQL model predicts a recovery ratio as a function of dose per fraction that deviates from the square law of the standard LQ. The survival fraction as a function of time between fractions follows a similar exponential law as the LQ but adds a multiplicative factor to the LQ parameter {beta}. The LQL solution for the split-dose experiment is very close to the LPL prediction. For the decaying source, the differences between the LQL and the LQ solutions are negligible when the half-life of the source is much larger than the characteristic repair time, which is the clinically relevant case. Conclusions: The compartmental formulation of the LQL model can be used for arbitrary dose rates and provides a comprehensive description of dose response. When the survival fraction for acute doses is linear for high dose, a deviation of the square law formula of the recovery ratio for split doses is also predicted.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese I. Dose-Dependencies of Uptake and Elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Dorman, David C.; Covington, Tammie R.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homeostatic mechanisms controlling uptake, storage, and elimination of dietary manganese (Mn) afford protection against fluctuations in tissue manganese (Mn) levels. Homeostatic control of inhaled Mn is less well understood, but important in assessing likely risks of Mn inhalation. We have used two compartmental kinetic models to characterize the influence of Mn exposure level and route (oral, inhalation) on uptake, elimination and transport of Mn. The models were fitted to or used to interpret data from five whole body Mn elimination studies, from one dietary Mn balance study, and from two biliary elimination studies, one acute and one chronic. As dietary Mn concentrations increased from low-sufficiency (1.5 ppm) to sufficiency (20 ppm), control of Mn uptake shifts from the intestine (principally), to more proportional control by both intestinal tissues and the liver. Using a 2-compartment distribution model, the increased elimination of 54Mn tracer doses in response to increases in dietary (rats and mice) or inhaled Mn (rats) resulted from increases in Mn elimination rate constants rather than changes in intercompartmental transfer rate constants between a central compartment and deep compartment. The PK analysis also indicated differential control of absorption in single gavage oral dose studies versus continuous high oral doses in the feed. The gavage study indicated increased elimination rate constants and the chronic study had reduced rate constants for absorption. These dose-dependencies in uptake and elimination are necessary inputs for comprehensive PK models guiding human health risk assessments with Mn.

  19. Gender and dose dependent ovalbumin induced hypersensitivity responses in murine model of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    While federal regulations mandate the labeling of major food allergens, allowable food allergen thresholds have yet to be determined. Therefore the aim of this project was to identify the lowest egg allergen ovalbumin (OVA) dose causing hypersensitization using a validated murine model. Mice were or...

  20. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): reactor-accident assessment methods. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This document describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. IRDAM calculates whole body (5-cm depth) and infant thyroid doses at six fixed downwind distances between 500 and 20,000 meters. Radionuclides considered primarily consist of noble gases and radioiodines. In order to provide a rapid assessment capability consistent with the capacity of the Osborne-1 computer, certain simplifying approximations and assumptions are made. These are described, along with default values (assumptions used in the absence of specific input) in the text of this document. Two companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The user's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios.

  1. Fractional dosing of yellow fever vaccine to extend supply: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joseph T; Peak, Corey M; Leung, Gabriel M; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-12-10

    The ongoing yellow fever epidemic in Angola strains the global vaccine supply, prompting WHO to adopt dose sparing for its vaccination campaign in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, in July-August, 2016. Although a 5-fold fractional-dose vaccine is similar to standard-dose vaccine in safety and immunogenicity, efficacy is untested. There is an urgent need to ensure the robustness of fractional-dose vaccination by elucidation of the conditions under which dose fractionation would reduce transmission. We estimate the effective reproductive number for yellow fever in Angola using disease natural history and case report data. With simple mathematical models of yellow fever transmission, we calculate the infection attack rate (the proportion of population infected over the course of an epidemic) with various levels of transmissibility and 5-fold fractional-dose vaccine efficacy for two vaccination scenarios, ie, random vaccination in a hypothetical population that is completely susceptible, and the Kinshasa vaccination campaign in July-August, 2016, with different age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines. We estimate the effective reproductive number early in the Angola outbreak was between 5·2 and 7·1. If vaccine action is all-or-nothing (ie, a proportion of vaccine recipients receive complete protection [VE] and the remainder receive no protection), n-fold fractionation can greatly reduce infection attack rate as long as VE exceeds 1/n. This benefit threshold becomes more stringent if vaccine action is leaky (ie, the susceptibility of each vaccine recipient is reduced by a factor that is equal to the vaccine efficacy). The age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines chosen by WHO for the Kinshasa vaccination campaign (2 years) provides the largest reduction in infection attack rate if the efficacy of 5-fold fractional-dose vaccines exceeds 20%. Dose fractionation is an effective strategy for reduction of the infection attack rate that would be robust with a

  2. The Effects of Different Aspects of Tourism Services on Travelers' Quality of Life: Model Validation, Refinement, and Extension

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Janet Davis

    2000-01-01

    The Effects of Different Aspects of Tourism Services on Travelers' Quality of Life: Model Validation, Refinement, and Extension by Janet Davis Neal ABSTRACT Numerous satisfaction studies have been conducted in both tourism and marketing which have examined various aspects of travelers and/or consumers. Quality of life satisfaction studies look beyond the types of satisfaction experiences that endure for only a short time to those that "spill over" into individuals' life domains ...

  3. Neuroprotective effects of modafinil in a marmoset Parkinson model: behavioral and neurochemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Sanneke A M; Vanwersch, Raymond A P; Jongsma, Marjan J; van der Gugten, Jan; Olivier, Berend; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M

    2006-09-01

    The vigilance-enhancing agent modafinil has neuroprotective properties: it prevents striatal ischemic injury, nigrostriatal pathway deterioration after partial transsection and intoxication with 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. The present study determines the protective effects of modafinil in the marmoset 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Parkinson model on behavior and on monoamine levels. Twelve marmoset monkeys were treated with a total dose of 6 mg/kg 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Simultaneously, six animals received a daily oral dose of modafinil (100 mg/kg) and six animals received vehicle for 27 days. Behavior was observed daily and the locomotor activity, hand-eye coordination, small fast movements, anxiety-related behavior and startle response of the animals were tested twice a week for 3 weeks. Modafinil largely prevented the 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced change in observed behavior, locomotor activity, hand-eye coordination and small fast movements, whereas the vehicle could not prevent the devastating effects of 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Dopamine levels in the striatum of the vehicle+1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated animals were reduced to 5% of control levels, whereas the dopamine levels of the modafinil+1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated animals were reduced to 41% of control levels. The present data suggest that modafinil prevents decrease of movement-related behavior and dopamine levels after 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine intoxication and can be an efficaceous pharmacological intervention in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Specific Aspects Regarding Coupled Numerical Modeling of Inverter and Load Equipments in an Induction Heating Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu MICH-VANCEA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The most propitious projection of inductiveelectrothermic installation requires a deep study ofcoupled electrothermic and circuits problems; thereforethe present paper follows the same line. Research inspecific literature have emphasized that induction heatinghas a much higher efficiency if the supply of the charge(inductor – piece is done at frequencies other thatindustrial one. [1]. Due to material alter depending ontemperature and, implicitly, the variation of the electricalparameters of the heating installation it is necessary totackle the projection of these inductive electrothermicinstallation projected through coupled numericalmodeling of the inverter circuit and of the heatingthrough induction process. The paper presents thenumerical modeling of the continuous current –alternating current conversion bridge (inverter withelements of static switch – over, the type of commandsignal (PWM of elements of static switch of power, thenumerical modeling of the heating throughelectromagnetic induction process and aspects ofcorrelation regarding the functioning/ working of theinstallation depending on the parameters of the load. Theparameters get modified due to material alter dependingon temperature during the heating process.

  5. An experimental Toxoplasma gondii dose response challenge model to study therapeutic or vaccine efficacy in cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B W J Cornelissen

    Full Text Available High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10, and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application.

  6. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Dose reconstruction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Aragno, D.; Bailiff, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    The project Dose Reconstruction was conducted within the five work packages: - EPR with teeth, - Chromosome painting (FISH) in lymphocytes, - Luminescence methods, - Modelling, and - Evaluation. (orig.)

  7. Radiation doses from the transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark. A model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-05-01

    The radiation doses modelled for transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark, demonstrates that the risk associated with road and sea transport should not limit the future selection of a location of the repository. From a safety perspective both road and sea transport seem to be feasible modes of transport. Although the modelling in most cases is performed conservatively, the modelled doses suggest that both transport methods can be carried out well within the national dose limits. Additionally, the dose levels associated with the modelled accident scenarios are low and the scenarios are thus found to be acceptable taken the related probabilities into account. (LN)

  8. SOILD: A computer model for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.; Schafetz, S.; Mehta, P.

    1991-01-01

    The SOLID computer model was developed for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil. It is designed to assess external doses under various exposure scenarios that may be encountered in environmental restoration programs. The models four major functional features address (1) dose versus source depth in soil, (2) shielding of clean cover soil, (3) area of contamination, and (4) nonuniform distribution of sources. The model is also capable of adjusting doses when there are variations in soil densities for both source and cover soils. The model is supported by a data base of approximately 500 radionuclides. 4 refs

  9. Radiation doses from the transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark. A model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-05-15

    The radiation doses modelled for transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark, demonstrates that the risk associated with road and sea transport should not limit the future selection of a location of the repository. From a safety perspective both road and sea transport seem to be feasible modes of transport. Although the modelling in most cases is performed conservatively, the modelled doses suggest that both transport methods can be carried out well within the national dose limits. Additionally, the dose levels associated with the modelled accident scenarios are low and the scenarios are thus found to be acceptable taken the related probabilities into account. (LN)

  10. Comparison of the regulatory models assessing off-site radiological dose due to the routine releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E. H.; Han, M. H.; Choi, Y. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Methodologies of NEWTRIT model, NRC model and AIRDOS-EPA model, which are off-site dose assessment models for regulatory compliance from routine releases of tritium into the environment, were investigated. Using the domestic data, if available, the predictive results of the models were compared. Among them, recently developed NEWTRIT model considers only doses from organically bounded tritium (OBT) due to environmental releases of tritiated water (HTO). A total dose from all exposure pathways predicted from AIRDOS-EPA model was 1.03 and 2.46 times higher than that from NEWTRIT model and NRC model, respectively. From above result, readers should not have an understanding that a predictive dose from NRC model may be underestimated compared with a realistic dose. It is because of that both mathematical models and corresponding parameter values for regulatory compliance are based on the conservative assumptions. For a dose by food consumption predicted from NEWTRIT model, the contribution of OBT was nearly equivalent to that of HTO due to relatively high consumption of grains in Korean. Although a total dose predicted from NEWTRIT model is similar to that from AIRDOS-EPA model, NEWTRIT model may be have a meaning in the understanding of phenomena for the behavior of HTO released into the environment

  11. Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, A.

    1996-05-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies

  12. Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, A.

    1996-05-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies.

  13. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher–Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm −1 . It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm −1 . The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  14. Model of the absorbed dose on a small sphere into a gamma irradiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J.

    2009-01-01

    Several models of the absorbed dose calculated as the energy deposited by the secondary electrons on a small volume sphere are presented. The calculations use the Compton scattering of a uniform photon beam in water, the photon attenuation and the electron stopping power are included. The sphere total absorbed dose is due to the stopping of the electrons generated in three regions: into the sphere volume, ahead and behind the sphere volume. Calculations are performed for spheres of different radius and placed at various depth of the vacuum - water interface. (author)

  15. Target dose conversion modeling from pencil beam (PB) to Monte Carlo (MC) for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhen, Weining; Lin, Chi; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Wahl, Andrew; Lei, Yu; Zhou, Sumin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    A challenge preventing routine clinical implementation of Monte Carlo (MC)-based lung SBRT is the difficulty of reinterpreting historical outcome data calculated with inaccurate dose algorithms, because the target dose was found to decrease to varying degrees when recalculated with MC. The large variability was previously found to be affected by factors such as tumour size, location, and lung density, usually through sub-group comparisons. We hereby conducted a pilot study to systematically and quantitatively analyze these patient factors and explore accurate target dose conversion models, so that large-scale historical outcome data can be correlated with more accurate MC dose without recalculation. Twenty-one patients that underwent SBRT for early-stage lung cancer were replanned with 6MV 360° dynamic conformal arcs using pencil-beam (PB) and recalculated with MC. The percent D95 difference (PB-MC) was calculated for the PTV and GTV. Using single linear regression, this difference was correlated with the following quantitative patient indices: maximum tumour diameter (MaxD); PTV and GTV volumes; minimum distance from tumour to soft tissue (dmin); and mean density and standard deviation of the PTV, GTV, PTV margin, lung, and 2 mm, 15 mm, 50 mm shells outside the PTV. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to model multiple factors and improve dose conversion accuracy. Single linear regression with PTV D95 deficiency identified the strongest correlation on mean-density (location) indices, weaker on lung density, and the weakest on size indices, with the following R 2 values in decreasing orders: shell2mm (0.71), PTV (0.68), PTV margin (0.65), shell15mm (0.62), shell50mm (0.49), lung (0.40), dmin (0.22), GTV (0.19), MaxD (0.17), PTV volume (0.15), and GTV volume (0.08). A multiple linear regression model yielded the significance factor of 3.0E-7 using two independent features: mean density of shell2mm (P = 1.6E-7) and PTV volume

  16. A brief look at model-based dose calculation principles, practicalities, and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Ron S; Morrison, Hali; Cawston-Grant, Brie; Menon, Geetha V

    2017-02-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) have recently emerged as potential successors to the highly practical, but sometimes inaccurate TG-43 formalism for brachytherapy treatment planning. So named for their capacity to more accurately calculate dose deposition in a patient using information from medical images, these approaches to solve the linear Boltzmann radiation transport equation include point kernel superposition, the discrete ordinates method, and Monte Carlo simulation. In this overview, we describe three MBDCAs that are commercially available at the present time, and identify guidance from professional societies and the broader peer-reviewed literature intended to facilitate their safe and appropriate use. We also highlight several important considerations to keep in mind when introducing an MBDCA into clinical practice, and look briefly at early applications reported in the literature and selected from our own ongoing work. The enhanced dose calculation accuracy offered by a MBDCA comes at the additional cost of modelling the geometry and material composition of the patient in treatment position (as determined from imaging), and the treatment applicator (as characterized by the vendor). The adequacy of these inputs and of the radiation source model, which needs to be assessed for each treatment site, treatment technique, and radiation source type, determines the accuracy of the resultant dose calculations. Although new challenges associated with their familiarization, commissioning, clinical implementation, and quality assurance exist, MBDCAs clearly afford an opportunity to improve brachytherapy practice, particularly for low-energy sources.

  17. A model for the calculation of the radiation dose from natural radionuclides in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackers, J.G.

    1986-02-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the radiation dose incurred from natural radioactivity indoors and outdoors, expressed in effective dose equivalence/year. The model is applied on a three rooms dwelling characterized by interconnecting air flows and on a dwelling with crawlspace. In this model the distinct parameters are variable in order to allow the investigation of the relative influence. The calculated effective dose equivalent for an adult in the dwelling was calculated to be about 1.7 mSv/year, composed of 15% from cosmic radiation, 35% from terrestrial radioactivity, 20% from radioactivity in the body and 30% from natural radionuclides in building materials. The calculations show an enhancement of about a factor of two in radon concentration in air in a room which is ventilated by air from an adjacent room. It is also shown that the attachment rate of radon products to aerosols and the plate-out effect are relatively important parameters influencing the magnitude of the dose rate. (Auth.)

  18. The ecosystem models used for dose assessments in SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The estimation of doses to humans in the main scenarios considered in SR-Can is carried out by multiplying the radionuclide releases to the biosphere by Landscape Dose Factors (LDF), which provide estimates of doses incurred by unit releases of activity of a specific radionuclide to the landscape. The landscape models considered in deriving the LDFs consist of a set of interconnected ecosystem models of different types, including aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Aquatic ecosystems comprise the sea, lakes and rivers. The terrestrial ecosystems include agricultural lands, forests and mires. In this report dose conversion factor for each individual ecosystem are reported. Two release cases are considered in the report: a constant unit release rate during 10,000 years and a pulse release, i.e. a unit release during one year. For deriving the LDF values, at each considered time period an ecosystem model is assigned to each landscape object, according to the projected succession of ecosystems in the objects. The applied ecosystem models have been described elsewhere, but some modifications have been made which are described in this report. The main modifications applied to the models are to consider releases through bottom sediments and to consider upstream fluxes for the estimation of the fluxes of radionuclides between the different landscape objects. To facilitate calculations of the radionuclide concentrations in the ingested food, aggregated transfer factors are derived for each ecosystem type. These relate the radionuclide concentrations in the edible carbon production in different ecosystem types to the radionuclide concentrations in the main environmental substrates of the ecosystems, i.e. the water in aquatic ecosystems and the soil in the terrestrial ecosystems. The report provides a description of the methods applied for the derivation of aggregated transfer factors for each ecosystem type and for irrigation. These factors are applicable for situations of

  19. Aspects of hadronic B decays in and beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernazza, Leonardo

    2009-10-16

    In this thesis we address various issues of hadronic B decays, in the Standard Model and beyond. Concerning the first aspect, we focus on the problem of understanding better low energy strong interactions in these decays. We consider in particular B decays into a charmonium state and a light meson. We develop a complete treatment of low energy QCD interaction in the context of QCD factorization, treating the charmonia as nonrelativistic bound states. This allows us to demonstrate that, in the heavy-quark limit, a perturbative treatment of these decays is possible, even in case of decays into P-waves, which were found to be non-factorizing in previous studies. We achieve this, including in the analysis the bound state scales of charmonium, which in turn requires to consider charmonium production through colour-octet operators. Although there are very large uncertainties, we find reasonable parameter choices, where the main features of the data - large corrections to (naive) factorization and suppression of the {chi}{sub c2} and h{sub c} final states - are reproduced though the suppression of {chi}{sub c2} is not as strong as seen in the data. Our results also provide an example, where an endpoint divergence in hard spectator-scattering factorizes and is absorbed into colour-octet operator matrix elements. The second part of the thesis is devoted to a series of analyses of non-leptonic B decays in extensions of the Standard Model. The aim of these studies is twofold: on one hand we are interested in testing the sensitivity of these decays to new physics; on the other hand, we look for actual discrepancies between theory predictions and experimental results, trying to explain them in the context of a new physics model. Concerning the first aspect, we consider two well-motivated new physics scenarios, in which large deviations from the Standard Model are expected, i.e. the MSSM with large tan {beta}, and a supersymmetric GUT in which the large neutrino mixing angles

  20. Low-dose computed tomography to detect body-packing in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H., E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Niehues, S.M.; Schnapauff, D.; Grieser, C.; Rothe, J.H. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Waldmueller, D. [Bildungs- und Wissenschaftszentrum der Bundesfinanzverwaltung, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S.S. [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B.; Denecke, T. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To assess the possible extent of dose reduction for low-dose computed tomography (CT) in the detection of body-packing (ingested drug packets) as an alternative to plain radiographs in an animal model. Materials and methods: Twelve packets containing cocaine (purity >80%) were introduced into the intestine of an experimental animal (crossbred pig), which was then repeatedly examined by abdominal CT with stepwise dose reduction (tube voltage, 80 kV; tube current, 10-350 mA). Three blinded readers independently evaluated the CT datasets starting with the lowest tube current and noted the numbers of packets detected at the different tube currents used. In addition, 1 experienced reader determined the number of packets detectable on plain abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. Results: The threshold for correct identification of all 12 drug packets was 100 mA for reader 1 and 125 mA for readers 2 and 3. Above these thresholds all 3 readers consistently identified all 12 packets. The effective dose of a low-dose CT scan with 125 mA (including scout view) was 1.0 mSv, which was below that of 2 conventional abdominal radiographs (1.2 mSv). The reader interpreting the conventional radiographs identified a total of 9 drug packets and detected 8 packets by abdominal ultrasound. Conclusions: Extensive dose reduction makes low-dose CT a valuable alternative imaging modality for the examination of suspected body-packers and might replace conventional abdominal radiographs as the first-line imaging modality.

  1. Improvement in tumour control probability with active breathing control and dose escalation: A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, Mike; Tree, Alison; Brock, Juliet; McNair, Helen; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Panakis, Niki; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The prognosis from non-small cell lung cancer remains poor, even in those patients suitable for radical radiotherapy. The ability of radiotherapy to achieve local control is hampered by the sensitivity of normal structures to irradiation at the high tumour doses needed. This study aimed to look at the potential gain in tumour control probability from dose escalation facilitated by moderate deep inspiration breath-hold. Method: The data from 28 patients, recruited into two separate studies were used. These patients underwent planning with and without the use of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold with an active breathing control (ABC) device. Whilst maintaining the mean lung dose (MLD) at the level of the conventional plan, the ABC plan dose was theoretically escalated to a maximum of 84 Gy, constrained by usual normal tissue tolerances. Calculations were performed using data for both lungs and for the ipsilateral lung only. Resulting local progression-free survival at 30 months was calculated using a standard logistic model. Results: The prescription dose could be escalated from 64 Gy to a mean of 73.7 ± 6.5 Gy without margin reduction, which represents a statistically significant increase in tumour control probability from 0.15 ± 0.01 to 0.29 ± 0.11 (p < 0.0001). The results were not statistically different whether both lungs or just the ipsilateral lung was used for calculations. Conclusion: A near-doubling of tumour control probability is possible with modest dose escalation, which can be achieved with no extra increase in lung dose if deep inspiration breath-hold techniques are used.

  2. Practical aspects and uncertainty analysis of biological effective dose (BED) regarding its three-dimensional calculation in multiphase radiotherapy treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Bergamo, Angelo; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2014-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the radiation oncology community to use the biological effective dose (BED) rather than the physical dose (PD) in treatment plan evaluation and optimization due to its stronger correlation with radiobiological effects. Radiotherapy patients may receive treatments involving a single only phase or multiple phases (e.g., primary and boost). Since most treatment planning systems cannot calculate the analytical BED distribution in multiphase treatments, an approximate multiphase BED expression, which is based on the total physical dose distribution, has been used. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the mathematical properties of the approximate BED formulation, relative to the true BED. The mathematical properties of the approximate multiphase BED equation are analyzed and evaluated. In order to better understand the accuracy of the approximate multiphase BED equation, the true multiphase BED equation was derived and the mathematical differences between the true and approximate multiphase BED equations were determined. The magnitude of its inaccuracies under common clinical circumstances was also studied. All calculations were performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the three-dimensional dose matrices. Results showed that the approximate multiphase BED equation is accurate only when the dose-per-fractions (DPFs) in both the first and second phases are equal, which occur when the dose distribution does not significantly change between the phases. In the case of heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the inaccuracy of the approximate multiphase BED is greater. These characteristics are usually seen in the dose distributions being delivered to organs at risk rather than to targets. The finding of this study indicates that the true multiphase BED equation should be implemented in the treatment planning systems due to the inconsistent accuracy of

  3. Prospective study on the dose distribution to the acoustic structures during postoperative 3D conformal radiotherapy for parotid tumors. Dosimetric and audiometric aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze dose distribution in the hearing organ and to evaluate the dose effect on the hearing thresholds in patients treated with post-parotidectomy 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). A total of 17 patients received post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT (median dose: 63 Gy). The audiometric evaluation comprised pure tone audiometry and tympanometry performed before radiotherapy (RT) and 3, 6, and 24 months after RT. The ear structures were delineated on planning computer tomography scans. Mean and maximum doses were calculated and dose-volume histograms were plotted. Before RT, the median baseline audiometric thresholds were normal. At 3 months post-RT, 3 patients were diagnosed as having middle ear underpressure and/or effusion that resolved completely by 6 months. During 2-year follow-up, none of the ears showed perceptive hearing loss at speech frequencies. The mean doses at ipsilateral external auditory canal, mastoids cells, tympanic case, Eustachian tube, semicircular canals, and cochlea were 44.8 Gy, 39.0 Gy, 30.9 Gy, 33.0 Gy, 19.6 Gy, and 19.2 Gy, respectively. The doses to the contralateral ear were negligible, except for the Eustachian tube (up to 28.2 Gy). Post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT is associated with relatively low doses to the ear and the surrounding structures. Post-RT audiometry did not show any permanent (neither conductive nor perceptive) hearing impairment. Only in 3 patients were there signs of transient unilateral dysfunction of the Eustachian tube observed during the first few months after RT. Longer follow-up and larger patient series are warranted to confirm these preliminary findings. (orig.)

  4. The Impact of a One-Dose versus Two-Dose Oral Cholera Vaccine Regimen in Outbreak Settings: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Andrew S.; Luquero, Francisco J.; Ciglenecki, Iza; Grais, Rebecca F.; Sack, David A.; Lessler, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2013, a stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) was created for use in outbreak response, but vaccine availability remains severely limited. Innovative strategies are needed to maximize the health impact and minimize the logistical barriers to using available vaccine. Here we ask under what conditions the use of one dose rather than the internationally licensed two-dose protocol may do both. Methods and Findings Using mathematical models we determined the minimum relative single-dose efficacy (MRSE) at which single-dose reactive campaigns are expected to be as or more effective than two-dose campaigns with the same amount of vaccine. Average one- and two-dose OCV effectiveness was estimated from published literature and compared to the MRSE. Results were applied to recent outbreaks in Haiti, Zimbabwe, and Guinea using stochastic simulations to illustrate the potential impact of one- and two-dose campaigns. At the start of an epidemic, a single dose must be 35%–56% as efficacious as two doses to avert the same number of cases with a fixed amount of vaccine (i.e., MRSE between 35% and 56%). This threshold decreases as vaccination is delayed. Short-term OCV effectiveness is estimated to be 77% (95% CI 57%–88%) for two doses and 44% (95% CI −27% to 76%) for one dose. This results in a one-dose relative efficacy estimate of 57% (interquartile range 13%–88%), which is above conservative MRSE estimates. Using our best estimates of one- and two-dose efficacy, we projected that a single-dose reactive campaign could have prevented 70,584 (95% prediction interval [PI] 55,943–86,205) cases in Zimbabwe, 78,317 (95% PI 57,435–100,150) in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and 2,826 (95% PI 2,490–3,170) cases in Conakry, Guinea: 1.1 to 1.2 times as many as a two-dose campaign. While extensive sensitivity analyses were performed, our projections of cases averted in past epidemics are based on severely limited single-dose efficacy data and may not fully capture

  5. Aspects of modeling regarding the contribution of nitrogen to the formation of grape yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blidariu, Cosmin; Boldea, Marius; Sala, Florin

    2013-10-01

    The research focused on determining the influence of organic fertilization equivalent to 150, 200 and 250 kg ha-1 nitrogen, on the productivity indices that participate in the formation of the grape yield: grape berry weight, number of grape berries, rachis weight. Quality indices of grapes were also analyzed: structure index, berry index, as well as yield quality, through dry matter. The distribution analysis of the experimental data revealed that production increase dy/dx increases dramatically with the total fertilizer dose (x + x0), it being proportional to the saturation deficit (a-y), where a is the biologically maximum yield (asymptote). Constants a, b and x0 for each parameter were determined by confrontation with the experimental data, through the least square method, and they were used in modeling the contribution of nitrogen to the formation of grape yields. Although the equivalent quantity of nitrogen in the soil is 150 units, its use is different in the proposed model, depending on the parameter under study. When the focus is on grape berry weight, the enhancement of this parameter is at the level of 97 units, whereas the enhancement of dry matter is 300 units. Analysis of the experimental data revealed that productive parameters are in positive correlation with different intensity levels. Regression analysis, Stuart, A., 1987, facilitated prediction models for the productive characters under study, with high to very high degree of certainty ((Gb = f(Nb):r2 = 0.880;p<0.01;Gs = f(NrB):r2 = 0.852;p<0.01).

  6. Modeling dose-response relationships of the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardozo Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic for the treatment of overactive bladder, a syndrome of urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI, usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Our objective was to develop predictive models to describe the dose response of fesoterodine. Methods Data from subjects enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II and III trials were used for developing longitudinal dose-response models. Results The models predicted that clinically significant and near-maximum treatment effects would be seen within 3 to 4 weeks after treatment initiation. For a typical patient with 11 micturitions per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.2, -1.7, and -2.2 micturitions for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. For a typical patient with 2 UUI episodes per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.05, -1.26, and -1.43 UUI episodes for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Increase in mean voided volume was estimated at 9.7 mL for placebo, with an additional 14.2 mL and 28.4 mL for fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Conclusions A consistent dose response for fesoterodine was demonstrated for bladder diary endpoints in subjects with overactive bladder, a result that supports the greater efficacy seen with fesoterodine 8 mg in post hoc analyses of clinical trial data. The dose-response models can be used to predict outcomes for doses not studied or for patient subgroups underrepresented in clinical trials. Trial Registration The phase III trials used in this analysis have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723.

  7. Improving the Accuracy of a Heliocentric Potential (HCP Prediction Model for the Aviation Radiation Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junga Hwang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The space radiation dose over air routes including polar routes should be carefully considered, especially when space weather shows sudden disturbances such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs, flares, and accompanying solar energetic particle events. We recently established a heliocentric potential (HCP prediction model for real-time operation of the CARI-6 and CARI-6M programs. Specifically, the HCP value is used as a critical input value in the CARI-6/6M programs, which estimate the aviation route dose based on the effective dose rate. The CARI-6/6M approach is the most widely used technique, and the programs can be obtained from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA. However, HCP values are given at a one month delay on the FAA official webpage, which makes it difficult to obtain real-time information on the aviation route dose. In order to overcome this critical limitation regarding the time delay for space weather customers, we developed a HCP prediction model based on sunspot number variations (Hwang et al. 2015. In this paper, we focus on improvements to our HCP prediction model and update it with neutron monitoring data. We found that the most accurate method to derive the HCP value involves (1 real-time daily sunspot assessments, (2 predictions of the daily HCP by our prediction algorithm, and (3 calculations of the resultant daily effective dose rate. Additionally, we also derived the HCP prediction algorithm in this paper by using ground neutron counts. With the compensation stemming from the use of ground neutron count data, the newly developed HCP prediction model was improved.

  8. Fuzzy dynamic modelling and predictive control of a coagulation chemical dosing unit for water treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladipupo Bello

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fuzzy model predictive control (FMPC strategy is proposed to regulate the output variables of a coagulation chemical dosing unit. A multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO process model in form of a linearised Takagi–Sugeno (T–S fuzzy model is derived. The process model is obtained through subtractive clustering from the plant's data set. The MIMO model is described by a set of coupled multiple-input, single-output models (MISO. In the controller design, the T–S fuzzy model is applied in combination with the nonlinear model predictive control (MPC algorithm. The results show that the proposed controller has good set-point tracking when compared with nonlinear MPC and adequate disturbance rejection ability required for efficient coagulation control and process optimisation in water treatment operations.

  9. Hormesis: from marginalization to mainstream A case for hormesis as the default dose-response model in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper provides an account of how the hormetic dose response has emerged in recent years as a serious dose-response model in toxicology and risk assessment after decades of extreme marginalization. In addition to providing the toxicological basis of this dose-response revival, the paper reexamines the concept of a default dose model in toxicology and risk assessment and makes the argument that the hormetic model satisfies criteria (e.g., generalizability, frequency, application to risk assessment endpoints, false positive/negative potential, requirements for hazard assessment, reliability of estimating risks, capacity for validation of risk estimates, public health implications of risk estimates) for such a default model better than its chief competitors, the threshold and linear at low dose models. The selection of the hormetic model as the default model in risk assessment for noncarcinogens and specifically for carcinogens would have a profound impact on the practice of risk assessment and its societal implications

  10. THE ONE CINETIC MODEL DAMAGE OF CELL BY SMALL DOSES OF RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Gubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To explain the known differences in the dose and age dependences of radiogenic mortality from leukemia and solid tumors after single exposure, a model was developed, which is a modification of the Kellerer-Rossi theory of dual radiation action. The model assumes formation in a cell of both single and double primary damages due to radiation and other carcinogens, while the recovery rate of single damages (φ significantly exceeds that for double ones (ψ. Upon achieving a certain stage of the cell cycle (the critical age of cell – T, double damages become permanent and with probability of А can be inherited to daughter cells as “premalignant” defects. In contrast, in the Kellerer-Rossi theory, permanent damage is formed immediately after formation of the second damage at the next energy absorption event in the cell, i.e. ψ=0 .On the assumption that the premalignant defects only occur based on the double primary damages, i.e. φ>>ψ, the expressions for А were derived for the prompt radiation exposure and radiation exposure at a constant dose rate. They reproduce the effect increasing with decreasing of T, whereas the influence of T on the linear term of the dose expression in both cases is the same, but with decreasing of T the quadratic term increases faster for exposure at a constant dose rate than that for the prompt one. Thus, presence of the quadratic term in the dose expression for leukemia and its virtual complete absence for solid tumors may be due to lower T-value for hemopoietic stem cells. Predicted by the model dose rate influence on the quadratic term does not depend on the dose, so the reduction factor should be only applied to the quadratic term of the dose expression. This follows as well from the original version of the Kellerer-Rossi theory.

  11. A simple model to estimate radiation doses to aircrew during air flights in Brazil and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavalle Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando; Pérez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador; Lavalle Heilbron, Rafael Cabidolusso; Amaral, Mario Luth Gonçalves Henriques do

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the results obtained from the development of a simple model used to estimate cosmic radiation doses from crew members taking into consideration the variation of the dose rates with the altitude and the latitude, airplane cruise velocity and other important parameters such as, cruise height, takeoff time, landing time, takeoff angle, landing angle. The model was incorporated into a Brazilian computer program developed using the “mathematica” symbolic software. The data used to calculate the dose rates with altitude and latitude by the authors takes into consideration the mean solar activity from January 1958 to December 2008 (51 years). Twenty two data including international and national American flights were used to test the program and the results between them compared, showing good agreement. The program also gives excellent results for the doses expected for the crew members of three Brazilian national flights (between capitals cities in Brazil) when compared with the doses values measured for these flights using a radiation detector. According to the results the doses expected for the Brazilian crews of domestic flights can, in some cases, depending on the number of annual flights, overcome the limit of 1 mSv/year established by the Brazilian competent authority in Brazil (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission- CNEN) for public annual exposure. In the case of the simulated international flights the results shows a good agreement with the results found in literature especially when considered the different database series used by the authors and by the other references for the solar activity. (authors)

  12. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Schubert, Leah K [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Westerly, David C, E-mail: mwkissick@wisc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2010-05-21

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  13. A phantom model demonstration of tomotherapy dose painting delivery, including managed respiratory motion without motion management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Michael W; Mo Xiaohu; McCall, Keisha C; Mackie, Thomas R; Schubert, Leah K; Westerly, David C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a potential alternative scenario for accurate dose-painting (non-homogeneous planned dose) delivery at 1 cm beam width with helical tomotherapy (HT) in the presence of 1 cm, three-dimensional, intra-fraction respiratory motion, but without any active motion management. A model dose-painting experiment was planned and delivered to the average position (proper phase of a 4DCT scan) with three spherical PTV levels to approximate dose painting to compensate for hypothetical hypoxia in a model lung tumor. Realistic but regular motion was produced with the Washington University 4D Motion Phantom. A small spherical Virtual Water(TM) phantom was used to simulate a moving lung tumor inside of the LUNGMAN(TM) anthropomorphic chest phantom to simulate realistic heterogeneity uncertainties. A piece of 4 cm Gafchromic EBT(TM) film was inserted into the 6 cm diameter sphere. TomoTherapy, Inc., DQA(TM) software was used to verify the delivery performed on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II(TM) device. The dose uncertainty in the purposeful absence of motion management and in the absence of large, low frequency drifts (periods greater than the beam width divided by the couch velocity) or randomness in the breathing displacement yields very favorable results. Instead of interference effects, only small blurring is observed because of the averaging of many breathing cycles and beamlets and the avoidance of interference. Dose painting during respiration with helical tomotherapy is feasible in certain situations without motion management. A simple recommendation is to make respiration as regular as possible without low frequency drifting. The blurring is just small enough to suggest that it may be acceptable to deliver without motion management if the motion is equal to the beam width or smaller (at respiration frequencies) when registered to the average position.

  14. Use of high-dose nandrolone aggravates septic shock in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Lin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nandrolone, an anabolic-androgenic steroid, is widely misused by athletes who wish to rapidly increase muscle mass and performance. An increasing number of reports have indicated that nandrolone may affect and modulate the immune system. This study aimed to investigate the effects of nandrolone on septic shock-caused immune responses and the cellular mechanism of action using a sepsis murine model. Before septic shock induction, BALB/c mice were given a high dose of nandrolone or peanut oil only. After septic shock induction, mice were sacrificed at different time points. Their blood and tissue specimens were analyzed. It was found that the high-dose nandrolone group had significantly increased mortality compared with the control group (p<0.001. The serum malondialdehyde level was significantly increased in the high-dose group compared with the control group. Animals administered a high dose of nandrolone had significantly increased hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α or splenic interferon-γ at 0 and 6 hours. In lung tissue, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and IGFBP1 and IGFBP2 mRNA expression were increased in the high-dose nandrolone group at 6 hours. Nandrolone abuse may hasten the death of patients with septic shock and may aggravate septic shock in mice.

  15. Three-dimensional dose-response models of competing risks and natural life span

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional dose-rate/time/response surfaces for chronic exposure to carcinogens, toxicants, and ionizing radiation dramatically clarify the separate and interactive roles of competing risks. The three dimensions are average dose rate, exposure time, and risk. An illustration with computer graphics shows the contributions with the passage of time of the competing risks of death from radiation pneumonitis/fibrosis, lung cancer, and natural aging consequent to the inhalation of plutonium-239 dioxide by beagles. These relationships are further evaluated by mathematical stripping with three-dimensional illustrations that graphically show the resultant separate contribution of each fatal effect. Radiation pneumonitis predominates at high dose rates and lung cancer at intermediate dose rates. Low dose rates result in spontaneous deaths from natural aging, yielding a type of practical threshold for lung cancer induction. Risk assessment is benefited by the insights that become apparent with these three-dimensional models. The improved conceptualization afforded by them contributes to the planning and evaluation of epidemiological analyses and experimental studies involving chronic exposure to toxicants

  16. Study of distribution dose for chest radiography using the computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, B.C.; Menezes, C.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (MCE) to perform dose studies in situations of radiation exposure without the need for individuals to be exposed. MCEs are essentially composed of a simulator of the radioactive source, a Monte Carlo code, and a phantom of voxels representing the human anatomy. The objective of this work was to perform a study of the dose distribution in the thoracic region in radiographic exams using the MCE ALDERSON / EGSnrc. For that, virtual simulations were performed using Monte Carlo Method techniques to calculate the dose in the simulator of voxels representative of the thoracic region. The results show that most beam energy was deposited in the skeleton for all simulated radiological techniques, while smaller fractions were deposited in the lungs and soft tissue. For example, at 90 kV voltage, 14% of the energy was deposited in the bone medium, while lungs and soft tissue receive only 5 and 3%, respectively. It is concluded that the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE can be used for studies of the dose distribution on chest radiographs used in radiodiagnosis practice, thus optimizing dose absorbed in the patient in clinical exams

  17. Cumulative Training Dose's Effects on Interrelationships Between Common Training-Load Models During Basketball Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Fox, Jordan L; Borges, Nattai R; Dascombe, Ben J; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2017-02-01

    The influence of various factors on training-load (TL) responses in basketball has received limited attention. This study aimed to examine the temporal changes and influence of cumulative training dose on TL responses and interrelationships during basketball activity. Ten state-level Australian male junior basketball players completed 4 × 10-min standardized bouts of simulated basketball activity using a circuit-based protocol. Internal TL was quantified using the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE), summated heart-rate zones (SHRZ), Banister training impulse (TRIMP), and Lucia TRIMP models. External TL was assessed via measurement of mean sprint and circuit speeds. Temporal TL comparisons were performed between 10-min bouts, while Pearson correlation analyses were conducted across cumulative training doses (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, and 0-40 min). sRPE TL increased (P basketball activity. sRPE TL was only significantly related to Lucia TRIMP (r = .66-.69; P training doses (r = .84-.89; P basketball training doses lasting beyond 20 min. Thus, the interchangeability of commonly used internal and external TL approaches appears dose-dependent during basketball activity, with various psychophysiological mediators likely underpinning temporal changes.

  18. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  19. Cleanup techniques for Finnish urban environments and external doses from 137Cs - modelling and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moring, M.; Markkula, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    The external doses under various radioactive deposition conditions are assessed and the efficiencies of some simple decontamination techniques (grass cutting, vacuum sweeping, hosing of paved surfaces and roofs, and felling trees) are compared in the study. The present model has been constructed for the Finnish conditions and housing areas, using 137 Cs transfer data from the Nordic and Central European studies and models. The compartment model concerns behaviour and decontamination of 137 Cs in the urban environment under summer conditions. Doses to man have been calculated for wet (light rain) and dry deposition in four typical Finnish building areas: single-family wooden houses, brick terraced-houses, blocks of flats and urban office buildings. (26 refs.)

  20. Reduced Radiation Dose with Model-based Iterative Reconstruction versus Standard Dose with Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction in Abdominal CT for Diagnosis of Acute Renal Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontarensky, Mikael; Alfidja, Agaïcha; Perignon, Renan; Schoenig, Arnaud; Perrier, Christophe; Mulliez, Aurélien; Guy, Laurent; Boyer, Louis

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of reduced-dose abdominal computed tomographic (CT) imaging by using a new generation model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to diagnose acute renal colic compared with a standard-dose abdominal CT with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). This institutional review board-approved prospective study included 118 patients with symptoms of acute renal colic who underwent the following two successive CT examinations: standard-dose ASIR 50% and reduced-dose MBIR. Two radiologists independently reviewed both CT examinations for presence or absence of renal calculi, differential diagnoses, and associated abnormalities. The imaging findings, radiation dose estimates, and image quality of the two CT reconstruction methods were compared. Concordance was evaluated by κ coefficient, and descriptive statistics and t test were used for statistical analysis. Intraobserver correlation was 100% for the diagnosis of renal calculi (κ = 1). Renal calculus (τ = 98.7%; κ = 0.97) and obstructive upper urinary tract disease (τ = 98.16%; κ = 0.95) were detected, and differential or alternative diagnosis was performed (τ = 98.87% κ = 0.95). MBIR allowed a dose reduction of 84% versus standard-dose ASIR 50% (mean volume CT dose index, 1.7 mGy ± 0.8 [standard deviation] vs 10.9 mGy ± 4.6; mean size-specific dose estimate, 2.2 mGy ± 0.7 vs 13.7 mGy ± 3.9; P < .001) without a conspicuous deterioration in image quality (reduced-dose MBIR vs ASIR 50% mean scores, 3.83 ± 0.49 vs 3.92 ± 0.27, respectively; P = .32) or increase in noise (reduced-dose MBIR vs ASIR 50% mean, respectively, 18.36 HU ± 2.53 vs 17.40 HU ± 3.42). Its main drawback remains the long time required for reconstruction (mean, 40 minutes). A reduced-dose protocol with MBIR allowed a dose reduction of 84% without increasing noise and without an conspicuous deterioration in image quality in patients suspected of having renal colic.

  1. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. L Modele de Hubbard a Faible Densite et a Proximite du Demi-Remplissage quelques Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anne-Marie

    Ce travail, qui concerne quelques aspects du modele de Hubbard, se divise en deux volets. Dans une premiere partie, nous etudions une approximation simple basee sur l'idee de renormalisation de l'interaction par les effets a courte portee. Elle se justifie a basse densite et possede la propriete de satisfaire les relations de croisement fermioniques. Des comparaisons detaillees aux resultats de simulations Monte Carlo pour les fonctions de correlation de spin, de charge et de paire de diverses symetries, nous permettent d'identifier les effets essentiels dans ce regime d'interaction moderee, et de preciser les regions ou les effets non triviaux se manifestent. Cette approximation est egalement reliee a la theorie des liquides de Fermi, et nous permet d'interpreter les resultats a faible remplissage de bande, et sur petits reseaux, d'un point de vue liquide de Fermi faiblement correle. Dans une deuxieme partie, nous nous placerons a proximite du demi-remplissage de bande, pour uel une approche recemment developpee est particulierement adequate: elle predit conformement au theoreme de Mermin-Wagner, l'absence de transition magnetique a temperature finie en 2D. Cette theorie satisfait quelques exigences des relations de croisement. Nous nous interesserons a l'apparition et a la caracterisation d'une transition de phase antiferromagnetique par l'inclusion d'un faible effet tridimensionnel. Quelques comparaisons aux resultats experimentaux sur le compose de La_2CuO_4 sont discutees.

  3. Finite element analysis of high aspect ratio wind tunnel wing model: A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosly, N. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Procedure for designing the wind tunnel model of a high aspect ratio (HAR) wing containing geometric nonlinearities is described in this paper. The design process begins with identification of basic features of the HAR wing as well as its design constraints. This enables the design space to be narrowed down and consequently, brings ease of convergence towards the design solution. Parametric studies in terms of the spar thickness, the span length and the store diameter are performed using finite element analysis for both undeformed and deformed cases, which respectively demonstrate the linear and nonlinear conditions. Two main criteria are accounted for in the selection of the wing design: the static deflections due to gravitational loading should be within the allowable margin of the size of the wind tunnel test section and the flutter speed of the wing should be much below the maximum speed of the wind tunnel. The findings show that the wing experiences a stiffness hardening effect under the nonlinear static solution and the presence of the store enables significant reduction in linear flutter speed.

  4. Aspects of Piaget's cognitive developmental psychology and neurobiology of psychotic disorders - an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Stefan; Grant, Phillip; von Georgi, Richard; Huber, Martin T

    2008-09-01

    Psychological, neurobiological and neurodevelopmental approaches have frequently been used to provide pathogenic concepts on psychotic disorders. However, aspects of cognitive developmental psychology have hardly been considered in current models. Using a hypothesis-generating approach an integration of these concepts was conducted. According to Piaget (1896-1980), assimilation and accommodation as forms of maintenance and modification of cognitive schemata represent fundamental processes of the brain. In general, based on the perceived input stimuli, cognitive schemata are developed resulting in a conception of the world, the realistic validity and the actuality of which is still being controlled and modified by cognitive adjustment processes. In psychotic disorders, however, a disproportion of environmental demands and the ability to activate required neuronal adaptation processes occurs. We therefore hypothesize a failure of the adjustment of real and requested output patterns. As a consequence autonomous cognitive schemata are generated, which fail to adjust with reality resulting in psychotic symptomatology. Neurobiological, especially neuromodulatory and neuroplastic processes play a central role in these perceptive and cognitive processes. In conclusion, integration of cognitive developmental psychology into the existing pathogenic concepts of psychotic disorders leads to interesting insights into basic disease mechanisms and also guides future research in the cognitive neuroscience of such disorders.

  5. Thermophysiologic aspects of the three-process-model of sleepiness regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuchi, Kurt; Cajochen, Christian; Wirz-Justice, Anna

    2005-04-01

    The following overview reconsiders the three-process model of sleepiness regulation (homeostatic, circadian, and sleep inertia) from a thermophysiologic point of view. Our results gathered over the last decade indicate that the homeostatic aspect of sleepiness regulation (ie, buildup of sleepiness during wakefulness and its decay during sleep) is not related to the thermoregulatory system, whereas the two other processes of sleepiness regulation (ie, circadian and sleep inertia process) are clearly related to thermoregulation in humans. Distal skin temperature of hands and feet seems to be the crucial variable for the association between thermophysiology, sleepiness, and sleep. Increased distal skin temperature before a nocturnal sleep episode is a good predictor for short sleep-onset latency. The disappearance of sleep inertia after sleep or a nap episode shows very similar kinetics as distal vasoconstriction. Furthermore, relaxation-induced sleepiness (eg, after lying down, at lights-off, with thermal biofeedback training) also evokes an increase in distal skin temperatures. The reverse effect occurs at lights-on or a posture change from supine to standing, Therefore, in terms of thermophysiology, sleep inertia can be explained as the reverse of a relaxation process (ie, decrease in distal skin temperatures). Our results reinterpret the so-called "sleep-evoked" reduction of core body temperature as a consequence of relaxation-induced vasodilatation after lights-off. Sleep per se has no further thermoregulatory effect. Taken together, a thermophysiologic approach may provide a successful strategy to treat sleep-onset insomnia and alleviate sleep inertia.

  6. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  7. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  8. Treatment of Amblyopia Using Personalized Dosing Strategies: Statistical Modelling and Clinical Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michael P; Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2016-12-01

    To generate a statistical model for personalizing a patient's occlusion therapy regimen. Statistical modelling was undertaken on a combined data set of the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS) and the Randomized Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (ROTAS). This exercise permits the calculation of future patients' total effective dose (TED)-that predicted to achieve their best attainable visual acuity. Daily patching regimens (hours/day) can be calculated from the TED. Occlusion data for 149 study participants with amblyopia (anisometropic in 50, strabismic in 43, and mixed in 56) were analyzed. Median time to best observed visual acuity was 63 days (25% and 75% quartiles; 28 and 91 days). Median visual acuity in the amblyopic eye at start of occlusion was 0.40 logMAR (quartiles 0.22 and 0.68 logMAR) and at end of occlusion was 0.12 (quartiles 0.025 and 0.32 logMAR). Median lower and upper estimates of TED were 120 hours (quartiles 34 and 242 hours), and 176 hours (quartiles 84 and 316 hours). The data suggest a piecewise linear relationship (P = 0.008) between patching dose-rate (hours/day) and TED with a single breakpoint estimated at 2.16 (standard error 0.51) hours/day, suggesting doses below 2.16 hours/day are less effective. We introduce the concept of TED of occlusion. Predictors for TED are visual acuity deficit, amblyopia type, and age at start of occlusion therapy. Dose-rates prescribed within the model range from 2.5 to 12 hours/day and can be revised dynamically throughout treatment in response to recorded patient compliance: a personalized dosing strategy.

  9. The Security Aspect of Turkey-United States Relations: In Search For a New Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Svistunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security cooperation has always been an important aspect of the relations between Turkey and the USA. In Cold War era Turkish-American interaction within NATO played a crucial role in this cooperation. After that period the two countries began to search for a new model of their relations. Both Turkey and the USA started to use cooperation within NATO for the purpose of strengthening their global positions. At the same time the USA aspiration to use military bases in Turkey beyond NATO obligations frequently becomes a source of disagreement and crises in the relations of the two countries as it happened during the American intervention to Iraq in 2003. At present new challenges for regional security, especially in the Middle East, demands new forms of interaction between Turkey and the USA. The beginning of "the Arab spring" was met in Ankara and Washington with overlapping interest in changing conservative regimes and promoting "Turkish model". At the same time such questions as participation of Turkey in the fight against ISIL and the USA military cooperation with the Syrian Kurds, whom Ankara considers to be connected with the PKK terrorist organization, has brought serious contradictions between the two countries. The cause of these contradiction is the difference in the perception of threats in Turkey and in the Western countries. While the search for new forms of security cooperation meets with difficulties, NATO remains important for the relations between Turkey and the USA, despite traditionally high level of anti-NATO moods in the Turkish society.

  10. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  11. Ecological Dose Modeling of Aquatic and Riparian Receptors to Strontium-90 with an Emphasis on Radiosensitive Organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, Ted M.; Traub, Richard J.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2011-07-20

    The 100-NR-2 site is the location of elevated releases of strontium-90 to the Columbia River via contaminated groundwater. The resulting dose to aquatic and riparian receptors was evaluated in 2005 (DOE 2009) and compared to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose guidance values. We have conducted additional dose assessments for a broader spectrum of aquatic and riparian organisms using RESRAD Biota and specific exposure scenarios. Because strontium-90 accumulates in bone, we have also modeled the dose to the anterior kidney, a blood-forming and immune system organ that lies close to the spinal column of fish. The resulting dose is primarily attributable to the yttrium-90 progeny of strontium-90 and very little of the dose is associated with the beta emission from strontium-90. All dose modeling results were calculated with an assumption of secular equilibrium between strontium-90 and yttrum-90.

  12. Effect of variable consumption habits in the Nordic populations on ECOSYS model predictions of ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Sven P.; Andersson, Kasper G.; Hansen, Hanne S.; Thoerring, Haavard; Joensen, Hans P.; Isaksson, Mats; Kostiainen, Eila; Suolanen, Vesa; Sigurgeirsson, Magnus A.; Palsson, Sigurour E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The two European standard decision support systems, ARGOS and RODOS, have in recent years become increasingly integrated in the Nordic preparedness against nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. In the event of an emergency, decision making will rest heavily on the reliability of these tools. The ECOSYS model is the ingestion dose module in both decision support systems. This module is highly sensitive to variation in a number of input parameters, food production patterns, diets and environmental transfer data. With regard to for instance consumption habits, the ECOSYS default values, based on data from Southern Germany, have shown to be inadequate for Nordic conditions. We have thus collected recent data describing the human diets for four different age groups in each of the Nordic countries. Also the fractions of the consumed food items that have national origin and the animal feeding regimes in each of the Nordic countries have been examined. For a particular contamination scenario of atmospheric deposition of caesium-137, country specific data regarding consumption habits were used for dose calculations. Resulting 'country specific' doses were then compared among the participating countries and with the doses calculated using the default values of the parameters.The collected data for diets demonstrated that the average consumption of milk varied by a factor of 4-5 among the Nordic countries, and consumption of leafy vegetables varied by a factor of almost 4. Calculated ingestion doses based on country specific data for diets, with all other parameters being default values, varied by a factor of 1.8 among the countries. When also the import fractions were taken into account the calculated doses varied by a factor of 2. Due to the differences in the climate among the Nordic countries, and between these countries and Southern Germany, there were also very significant differences in the production regimes of some food items. In countries in

  13. Establishment of a new initial dose plan for vancomycin using the generalized linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourogi, Yasuyuki; Ogata, Kenji; Takamura, Norito; Tokunaga, Jin; Setoguchi, Nao; Kai, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Emi; Chiyotanda, Susumu

    2017-04-08

    When administering vancomycin hydrochloride (VCM), the initial dose is adjusted to ensure that the steady-state trough value (Css-trough) remains within the effective concentration range. However, the Css-trough (population mean method predicted value [PMMPV]) calculated using the population mean method (PMM) often deviate from the effective concentration range. In this study, we used the generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) for initial dose planning to create a model that accurately predicts Css-trough, and subsequently assessed its prediction accuracy. The study included 46 subjects whose trough values were measured after receiving VCM. We calculated the Css-trough (Bayesian estimate predicted value [BEPV]) from the Bayesian estimates of trough values. Using the patients' medical data, we created models that predict the BEPV and selected the model with minimum information criterion (GLMM best model). We then calculated the Css-trough (GLMMPV) from the GLMM best model and compared the BEPV correlation with GLMMPV and with PMMPV. The GLMM best model was {[0.977 + (males: 0.029 or females: -0.081)] × PMMPV + 0.101 × BUN/adjusted SCr - 12.899 × SCr adjusted amount}. The coefficients of determination for BEPV/GLMMPV and BEPV/PMMPV were 0.623 and 0.513, respectively. We demonstrated that the GLMM best model was more accurate in predicting the Css-trough than the PMM.

  14. A phenomenological biological dose model for proton therapy based on linear energy transfer spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørvik, Eivind; Thörnqvist, Sara; Stokkevåg, Camilla H; Dahle, Tordis J; Fjaera, Lars Fredrik; Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S

    2017-06-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons varies with the radiation quality, quantified by the linear energy transfer (LET). Most phenomenological models employ a linear dependency of the dose-averaged LET (LET d ) to calculate the biological dose. However, several experiments have indicated a possible non-linear trend. Our aim was to investigate if biological dose models including non-linear LET dependencies should be considered, by introducing a LET spectrum based dose model. The RBE-LET relationship was investigated by fitting of polynomials from 1st to 5th degree to a database of 85 data points from aerobic in vitro experiments. We included both unweighted and weighted regression, the latter taking into account experimental uncertainties. Statistical testing was performed to decide whether higher degree polynomials provided better fits to the data as compared to lower degrees. The newly developed models were compared to three published LET d based models for a simulated spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) scenario. The statistical analysis of the weighted regression analysis favored a non-linear RBE-LET relationship, with the quartic polynomial found to best represent the experimental data (P = 0.010). The results of the unweighted regression analysis were on the borderline of statistical significance for non-linear functions (P = 0.053), and with the current database a linear dependency could not be rejected. For the SOBP scenario, the weighted non-linear model estimated a similar mean RBE value (1.14) compared to the three established models (1.13-1.17). The unweighted model calculated a considerably higher RBE value (1.22). The analysis indicated that non-linear models could give a better representation of the RBE-LET relationship. However, this is not decisive, as inclusion of the experimental uncertainties in the regression analysis had a significant impact on the determination and ranking of the models. As differences between the models were

  15. Modelling of electron contamination in clinical photon beams for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Li, J S; Qin, L; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model electron contamination in clinical photon beams and to commission the source model using measured data for Monte Carlo treatment planning. In this work, a planar source is used to represent the contaminant electrons at a plane above the upper jaws. The source size depends on the dimensions of the field size at the isocentre. The energy spectra of the contaminant electrons are predetermined using Monte Carlo simulations for photon beams from different clinical accelerators. A 'random creep' method is employed to derive the weight of the electron contamination source by matching Monte Carlo calculated monoenergetic photon and electron percent depth-dose (PDD) curves with measured PDD curves. We have integrated this electron contamination source into a previously developed multiple source model and validated the model for photon beams from Siemens PRIMUS accelerators. The EGS4 based Monte Carlo user code BEAM and MCSIM were used for linac head simulation and dose calculation. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were compared with measured data. Our results showed good agreement (less than 2% or 2 mm) for 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams

  16. Modelling the dynamic dose response of an nMAG polymer gel dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceberg, Sofie; Ceberg, Crister; Lepage, Martin; Bäck, Sven Å J; Gustafsson, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Gel dosimetry measures the absorbed radiation dose with high spatial resolution in 3D. However, recently published data show that the response of metacrylic-based polymer gels depends on the segmented delivery pattern, which could potentially be a considerable disadvantage for measurements of modern dynamic radiotherapy techniques. The aim of this study is to design a dynamic compartment model for the response of a gel dosimeter, exposed to an arbitrary irradiation pattern (segmented delivery and intensity modulation), in order to evaluate the associated effects on absorbed dose measurements. The model is based on the separation of the protons affecting the magnetic resonance signal (i.e. the R2 value) into six compartments, described by a set of differential equations. The model is used to calculate R2 values for a number of different segmented delivery patterns between 0–4 Gy over 1–33 fractions. Very good agreement is found between calculated and measured R2 values, with an average difference of 0.3 ± 1.1% (1 SD). The model is also used to predict the behaviour of a gel dosimeter exposed to irradiation according to typical IMRT, VMAT and respiratory gating scenarios. The calculated R2 values are approximately independent of the segmented delivery, given that the same total dose is delivered during the same total time. It is concluded that this study helps to improve the theoretical understanding of the dependence of metacrylic-based polymer gel response to segmented radiation delivery. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of Different Dose-Response Models for High Hydrostatic Pressure Inactivation of Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzrul, Sencer

    2017-09-07

    Modeling of microbial inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) requires a plot of the log microbial count or survival ratio versus time data under a constant pressure and temperature. However, at low pressure and temperature values, very long holding times are needed to obtain measurable inactivation. Since the time has a significant effect on the cost of HHP processing it may be reasonable to fix the time at an appropriate value and quantify the inactivation with respect to pressure. Such a plot is called dose-response curve and it may be more beneficial than the traditional inactivation modeling since short holding times with different pressure values can be selected and used for the modeling of HHP inactivation. For this purpose, 49 dose-response curves (with at least 4 log 10 reduction and ≥5 data points including the atmospheric pressure value ( P = 0.1 MPa), and with holding time ≤10 min) for HHP inactivation of microorganisms obtained from published studies were fitted with four different models, namely the Discrete model, Shoulder model, Fermi equation, and Weibull model, and the pressure value needed for 5 log 10 ( P ₅) inactivation was calculated for all the models above. The Shoulder model and Fermi equation produced exactly the same parameter and P ₅ values, while the Discrete model produced similar or sometimes the exact same parameter values as the Fermi equation. The Weibull model produced the worst fit (had the lowest adjusted determination coefficient (R² adj ) and highest mean square error (MSE) values), while the Fermi equation had the best fit (the highest R² adj and lowest MSE values). Parameters of the models and also P ₅ values of each model can be useful for the further experimental design of HHP processing and also for the comparison of the pressure resistance of different microorganisms. Further experiments can be done to verify the P ₅ values at given conditions. The procedure given in this study can also be extended

  18. Sensitivity analysis of specific activity model parameters for environmental transport of 3H and dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, S.; Mishra, D.G.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tritium is one of the radionuclides likely to get released to the environment from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. Environmental models are extensively used to quantify the complex environmental transport processes of radionuclides and also to assess the impact to the environment. Model parameters exerting the significant influence on model results are identified through a sensitivity analysis (SA). SA is the study of how the variation (uncertainty) in the output of a mathematical model can be apportioned, qualitatively or quantitatively, to different sources of variation in the input parameters. This study was designed to identify the sensitive model parameters of specific activity model (TRS 1616, IAEA) for environmental transfer of 3 H following release to air and then to vegetation and animal products. Model includes parameters such as air to soil transfer factor (CRs), Tissue Free Water 3 H to Organically Bound 3 H ratio (Rp), Relative humidity (RH), WCP (fractional water content) and WEQp (water equivalent factor) any change in these parameters leads to change in 3 H level in vegetation and animal products consequently change in dose due to ingestion. All these parameters are function of climate and/or plant which change with time, space and species. Estimation of these parameters at every time is a time consuming and also required sophisticated instrumentation. Therefore it is necessary to identify the sensitive parameters and freeze the values of least sensitive parameters at constant values for more accurate estimation of 3 H dose in short time for routine assessment

  19. Importance and variability in processes relevant to environmental tritium ingestion dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.; Barry, P.

    1997-01-01

    The Aiken List was devised in 1990 to help decide which transport processes should be investigated experimentally so as to derive the greatest improvement in performance of environmental tritium assessment models. Each process was rated high, medium and low on each of two criteria. These were ''Importance'', which rated processes by how much each contributed to ingestion doses, and ''State of Modelling'', which rated the adequacy of the knowledge base on which models were built. Ratings, though unanimous, were, nevertheless, qualitative and subjective opinions. This paper describes how we have tried to quantify the ratings. To do this, we use, as measures of ''Importance'', sensitivities of predicted ingestion doses to changes in values of parameters in mathematical descriptions of individual processes. Measures of ''ModellinStatus'' were taken from a recently completed BIOMOVS study of HTO transport model performance and based either on by how much predicted transport by individual processes differed amongst participating modellers or by the variety of different ways that modellers chose to describe individual processes. The tritium transport model UFOTRI was used, and because environmental transport of HTO varies according to the weather at and after release time, sensitivities were measured in a sample of all conditions likely to arise in central Europe. (Author)

  20. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  1. Models for Total-Dose Radiation Effects in Non-Volatile Memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this work is to develop models to predict radiation effects in non- volatile memory: flash memory and ferroelectric RAM. In flash memory experiments have found that the internal high-voltage generators (charge pumps) are the most sensitive to radiation damage. Models are presented for radiation effects in charge pumps that demonstrate the experimental results. Floating gate models are developed for the memory cell in two types of flash memory devices by Intel and Samsung. These models utilize Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and hot electron injection to charge and erase the floating gate. Erase times are calculated from the models and compared with experimental results for different radiation doses. FRAM is less sensitive to radiation than flash memory, but measurements show that above 100 Krad FRAM suffers from a large increase in leakage current. A model for this effect is developed which compares closely with the measurements.

  2. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  3. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Marques, L.A.; Ruiz-Bueno, A.; Bailon, L.

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results

  4. High-dose ascorbate with low-dose amphotericin B attenuates severity of disease in a model of the reappearance of candidemia during sepsis in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somparn, Poorichaya; Bootprapan, Tanabodee; Tu, Hongbin; Tangtanatakul, Pattarin; Nuengjumnong, Ratchanok; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Eiam-ong, Somchai; Levine, Mark; Chinampon, Ariya; Srisawat, Nattachai

    2015-01-01

    Amphotericin B (Ampho B) is a fungicidal drug that causes cell wall injury. Pharmacological ascorbate induces the extracellular prooxidants, which might enter the Ampho B-induced cell wall porosity and act synergistically. We tested low-dose Ampho B with a short course of pharmacological ascorbate using a mouse model of sepsis preconditioned with an injection of Candida albicans 6 h prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In this model, candidemia reappeared as early as 6 h after CLP with a predictably high mortality rate. This characteristic mimics sepsis in the phase of immunosuppression in patients. Using the model, at 12- and 18-h post-CLP, we administered isotonic (pH neutralized) pharmacological ascorbate intravenously with low-dose Ampho B or sodium deoxycholate, vehicle-controlled, administered IP. The survival rate of low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate was 53%, compared with <11% for low-dose Ampho B or high-dose Ampho B alone. In addition, a beneficial effect was demonstrated in terms of kidney damage, liver injury, spleen histopathology, and serum markers at 24 h after CLP. Kidney injury was less severe in low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate combination therapy due to less severe sepsis. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced the effectiveness of phagocytosis against C. albicans in human phagocytic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the new mouse model simulates sepsis-induced immunosuppression and that the combination of pharmacological ascorbate with an antifungal drug is a potentially effective treatment that may reduce nephrotoxicity, and perhaps also increase fungicidal activity in patients with systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. PMID:25994956

  5. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  6. Radiation Dose Assessment Model for Marine Biota (K-BIOTA-DYN-M)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a dynamic compartment model based on the food chain of marine biota, which can be used with easily obtainable ecological parameters, is presented to predict the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota as a result of a nuclear. The model was applied to investigate a long-term effect of the Fukushima accident on the marine biota by using {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations of seawater measured for up to about 2.5years after the accident in the port of FDNPS, which was known to be the most severely contaminated. A dynamic compartment model was presented to assess the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota, and was tested through the prediction of the activity concentration and dose rate of the marine biota using the seawater activities of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs measured after the accident at two locations in the port of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), as a result the Fukushima nuclear accident that occurred on March 11, 2011. The prediction results showed the radiological effect on the population of the marine biota as a consequence of the accident was insignificant. This result is also valid for biota in a less contaminated offshore because the present assessment was made for the most highly contaminated area such as marine ecosystem in the port of FDNPS. Conclusively, the present dynamic model can be usefully applied to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of the marine biota as the consequence of a nuclear accident.

  7. Software verification, model validation, and hydrogeologic modelling aspects in nuclear waste disposal system simulations. A paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    This work reviewed the current concept of nuclear waste disposal in stable, terrestrial geologic media with a system of natural and man-made multi-barriers. Various aspects of this concept and supporting research were examined with the emphasis on the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Several of the crucial issues and challenges facing the current concept were discussed. These include: The difficulties inherent in a concept that centres around lithologic studies; the unsatisfactory state of software quality assurance in the present computer simulation programs; and the lack of a standardized, comprehensive, and systematic procedure to carry out a rigorous process of model validation and assessment of simulation studies. An outline of such an approach was presented and some of the principles, tools and techniques for software verification were introduced and described. A case study involving an evaluation of the Canadian performance assessment computer program is presented. A new paradigm to nuclear waste disposal was advocated to address the challenges facing the existing concept. The RRC (Regional Recharge Concept) was introduced and its many advantages were described and shown through a modelling exercise. (orig./HP)

  8. Semi-empirical model for the generation of dose distributions produced by a scanning electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, R.; Gignac, C.E.; Agostinelli, A.G.; Rothberg, S.; Schulz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    There are linear accelerators (Sagittaire and Saturne accelerators produced by Compagnie Generale de Radiologie (CGR/MeV) Corporation) which produce broad, flat electron fields by magnetically scanning the relatively narrow electron beam as it emerges from the accelerator vacuum system. A semi-empirical model, which mimics the scanning action of this type of accelerator, was developed for the generation of dose distributions in homogeneous media. The model employs the dose distributions of the scanning electron beams. These were measured with photographic film in a polystyrene phantom by turning off the magnetic scanning system. The mean deviation calculated from measured dose distributions is about 0.2%; a few points have deviations as large as 2 to 4% inside of the 50% isodose curve, but less than 8% outside of the 50% isodose curve. The model has been used to generate the electron beam library required by a modified version of a commercially-available computerized treatment-planning system. (The RAD-8 treatment planning system was purchased from the Digital Equipment Corporation. It is currently available from Electronic Music Industries

  9. Ratios between effective doses for tomographic and mathematician models due to internal exposure of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Santos, A.M.; Loureiro, E.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new and sophisticated Monte Carlo codes and tomographic human phantoms or voxels motivated the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to revise the traditional models of exposure, which have been used to calculate effective dose coefficients for organs and tissues based on mathematician phantoms known as MIRD5. This paper shows the results of calculations using tomographic phantoms MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel), recently developed by the authors as well as with the phantoms ADAM and EVA, of specific genres, type MIRD5, coupled to the EGS4 Monte Carlo and MCNP4C codes, for internal exposure with photons of energies between 10 keV and 4 MeV to several organs sources. Effective Doses for both models, tomographic and mathematician, will be compared separately as a function of the Monte Carlo code replacement, of compositions of human tissues and the anatomy reproduced through tomographs. The results indicate that for photon internal exposure, the use of models of exposure based in voxel, increases the values of effective doses up to 70% for some organs sources considered in this study, when compared with the corresponding results obtained with phantoms of MIRD-5 type

  10. Thermodynamic aspects of solubility and partitioning processes of some sulfonamides in the solvents modeling biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlovich, German L.; Ryzhakov, Alex M.; Strakhova, Nadezda N.; Kazachenko, Vladimir P.; Schaper, Klaus-Jürgen; Raevsky, Oleg A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility processes of some sulfonamide isomers in water and 1-octanol were investigated. • Transfer processes from water to 1-octanol were evaluated by analysis of enthalpic and entropic terms. • Impact of various substituents in phenyl rings on solubility and transfer processes was studied. -- Abstract: The thermodynamic aspects of solubility processes of sulfonamides (SAs) with the general structures 4-NH 2 –C 6 H 4 –SO 2 NH–C 6 H 2 (R 1 )(R 2 )-R 3 (R 1 = 2-CH 3 , 2-Cl; R 2 = 4-CH 3 , 4-Cl; R 3 =5-H, 5-Cl), 4-NH 2 -2-Cl–C 6 H 3 –SO 2 NH–C 6 H 3 (R 1 )-R 2 (R 1 = 2-H, 2-Cl; R 2 = 4-H, 4-Cl) and 4-NH 2 -2-CH 3 –C 6 H 3 –SO 2 NH–C 6 H 3 (R 1 )-R 2 (R 1 = 2-H, 2-Cl, 2-NO 2 ; R 2 = 4-H, 4-Cl) in water and 1-octanol (as phases modeling various drug delivery pathways) were studied using the isothermal saturation method. For the sulfonamides with various substituents in phenyl rings the processes of transfer from water to 1-octanol were studied by a diagram method combined with analysis of enthalpic and entropic terms. Distinguishing between enthalpy and entropy, as is possible through the present approach, leads to the insight that the contribution of these terms is different for different molecules (entropy- or enthalpy-determined). Thus, in contrast to the interpretation of only the Gibbs energy of transfer (extensively used for pharmaceuticals in the form of the partition coefficient, logP), the analysis of thermodynamic functions of the transfer process provides additional mechanistic information. This may be important for further evaluation of the physiological distribution of drug molecules and may provide a better understanding of biopharmaceutical properties of drugs

  11. Experimental validation of a kV source model and dose computation method for CBCT imaging in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2016-07-08

    We present an experimental validation of a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray source characterization model in an anthropomorphic phantom to estimate patient-specific absorbed dose from kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging procedures and compare these doses to nominal weighted CT-dose index (CTDIw) dose estimates. We simulated the default Varian on-board imager 1.4 (OBI) default CBCT imaging protocols (i.e., standard-dose head, low-dose thorax, pelvis, and pelvis spotlight) using our previously developed and easy to implement X-ray point-source model and source characterization approach. We used this characterized source model to compute absorbed dose in homogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms using our previously validated in-house kV dose computation software (kVDoseCalc). We compared these computed absorbed doses to doses derived from ionization chamber measurements acquired at several points in a homogeneous cylindrical phantom and from thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) placed in the anthropomorphic phantom. In the homogeneous cylindrical phantom, computed values of absorbed dose relative to the center of the phantom agreed with measured values within ≤2% of local dose, except in regions of high-dose gradient where the distance to agreement (DTA) was 2 mm. The computed absorbed dose in the anthropomorphic phantom generally agreed with TLD measurements, with an average percent dose difference ranging from 2.4% ± 6.0% to 5.7% ± 10.3%, depending on the characterized CBCT imaging protocol. The low-dose thorax and the standard dose scans showed the best and worst agreement, respectively. Our results also broadly agree with published values, which are approximately twice as high as the nominal CTDIw would suggest. The results demonstrate that our previously developed method for modeling and characterizing a kV X-ray source could be used to accurately assess patient-specific absorbed dose from kV CBCT procedures within reasonable accuracy, and serve as further

  12. The modelled benefits of individualizing radiotherapy patients' dose using cellular radiosensitivity assays with inherent variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, R.I.; Hendry, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To model the increases in local tumour control that may be achieved, without increasing normal tissue complications, by prescribing a patient's dose based on cellular radiosensitivity measured using an assay possessing inherent variability.Method: Patient populations with varying radiosensitivity were simulated, based on measured distributions among cancer patients of the surviving fraction of their fibroblasts given a dose of 2 Gy in vitro (SF 2 ). The dose-response curve for complications in the population was assessed using a formula relating SF 2 to normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), by summing the data for the individuals. This curve was similar to clinically-derived dose-response curves. The effect of individualizing the patients' doses was explored, based on individual radiosensitivities measured by SF 2 , so that every patient had the same low (5%) value of NTCP.Results: It was found that a significant gain (up to around 30%) in tumour control probability (TCP) was predicted for the population when the doses were individualized using a predictive assay result strongly correlated with NTCP. A greater gain in TCP was predicted when each of the individuals were assumed to have a higher sensitivity and the distribution of radiosensitivity in the population was widened to compensate. The gain in TCP was less (around 20%) when considering less-sensitive patients and a narrower distribution of radiosensitivities. The effect of assay variability and other factors that could affect the predictive power of the assay was simulated. Assay variability and an imperfect correlation between in vitro cell survival and tissue complications, rapidly increased the NTCP for the population when treated with individualized doses. However the individualized doses could be reduced so that NTCP declined to an acceptable level, but in this case the TCP for the population also declined. For example, when the assay variability was half the true variability in SF

  13. Analytical probabilistic modeling of RBE-weighted dose for ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, H. P.; Hennig, P.; Wahl, N.; Bangert, M.

    2017-12-01

    Particle therapy is especially prone to uncertainties. This issue is usually addressed with uncertainty quantification and minimization techniques based on scenario sampling. For proton therapy, however, it was recently shown that it is also possible to use closed-form computations based on analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) for this purpose. APM yields unique features compared to sampling-based approaches, motivating further research in this context. This paper demonstrates the application of APM for intensity-modulated carbon ion therapy to quantify the influence of setup and range uncertainties on the RBE-weighted dose. In particular, we derive analytical forms for the nonlinear computations of the expectation value and variance of the RBE-weighted dose by propagating linearly correlated Gaussian input uncertainties through a pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Both exact and approximation formulas are presented for the expectation value and variance of the RBE-weighted dose and are subsequently studied in-depth for a one-dimensional carbon ion spread-out Bragg peak. With V and B being the number of voxels and pencil beams, respectively, the proposed approximations induce only a marginal loss of accuracy while lowering the computational complexity from order O(V × B^2) to O(V × B) for the expectation value and from O(V × B^4) to O(V × B^2) for the variance of the RBE-weighted dose. Moreover, we evaluated the approximated calculation of the expectation value and standard deviation of the RBE-weighted dose in combination with a probabilistic effect-based optimization on three patient cases considering carbon ions as radiation modality against sampled references. The resulting global γ-pass rates (2 mm,2%) are > 99.15% for the expectation value and > 94.95% for the standard deviation of the RBE-weighted dose, respectively. We applied the derived analytical model to carbon ion treatment planning, although the concept is in general applicable to other

  14. GPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation using a finite size pencil beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Men, Chunhua; Pan, Hubert; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is an attractive concept that promises the ability to deliver an optimal treatment in response to the inter-fraction variability in patient anatomy. However, it has yet to be realized due to technical limitations. Fast dose deposit coefficient calculation is a critical component of the online planning process that is required for plan optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Computer graphics processing units (GPUs) are well suited to provide the requisite fast performance for the data-parallel nature of dose calculation. In this work, we develop a dose calculation engine based on a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm and a GPU parallel computing framework. The developed framework can accommodate any FSPB model. We test our implementation in the case of a water phantom and the case of a prostate cancer patient with varying beamlet and voxel sizes. All testing scenarios achieved speedup ranging from 200 to 400 times when using a NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card in comparison with a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU. The computational time for calculating dose deposition coefficients for a nine-field prostate IMRT plan with this new framework is less than 1 s. This indicates that the GPU-based FSPB algorithm is well suited for online re-planning for adaptive radiotherapy.

  15. Dose estimation at radioiodine treatment using FAX/EGS4 computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Filho, F.J.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Santos, M.; Lima, F.R.A.; Vieira, J.W.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2005-01-01

    The radioiodine is a technique for treatment of thyroid cancer. In this technique, the patients are submitted to the incorporation of the radioactive substance sodium iodide (Na 131 I), which reacts with physiologically metastasis, thyroid tissue remains of and other organs and tissues of the human body. The locations of these reactions are known as areas of highest concentration, hypercaptured areas, hyperconcentrator areas, 'hot areas' or organ-sources and are viewed through images of nuclear medicine scan known as pre-dose (front and rear). In this study, the scanning images of pre-dose were adjusted to the dimensions of FAX voxel phantom, and the hot areas correspond to internal sources of the proposed model. Algorithms were developed to generate particles (photons and electrons) in these regions of the FAX. To estimate the coefficients of conversions between equivalent dose and accumulated activity in major radiosensitive organs, FAX and algorithms source were coupled to the Monte Carlo EGS4 code (Electron Gamma Shower, version 4). With these factors is possible to estimate the equivalent doses in the radiosensitive organs and tissues of patients as long as is know the activity administered and the half-life of organic sources

  16. In vitro modeling of skin dose and monitoring of DCA following therapeutic intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is the largest organ of the body accounting for approximately 16% of the total bodyweight. Skin is readily exposed to ionizing radiation during either accidental or intentional exposure such as radiotherapy or other medical procedures because it constitutes the interface between environment and internal organs. Estimation of accurate entrance skin dose and maximum absorbed dose (MAD) is crucial to prevent serious skin injuries. Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome (CRS) is defined by a number of pathological changes manifested in the skin and severity of these changes depend on Liner Energy Transfer (LET), dose, dose-rate, geometry of exposure and volume of body part exposed. In most of the radiological accident scenarios, reconstructive dosimetry in the skin has been performed using physical (thermoluminescence and optical stimulated luminescence), biological (cytogenetics) and computational methods/models to manage radiation exposed victims.Results of the cytogenetic testing performed at the CBL on a few patients will be discussed to illustrate the potential use of DCA and other cytogenetic techniques such as micronuclei and multicolor FISH in monitoring the health of radiotherapy patients

  17. A scalable and deformable stylized model of the adult human eye for radiation dose assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Basha, Daniel; Furuta, Takuya; Iyer, Siva S R; Bolch, Wesley E

    2018-03-23

    With recent changes in the recommended annual limit on eye lens exposures to ionizing radiation, there is considerable interest in predictive computational dosimetry models of the human eye and its various ocular structures including the crystalline lens, ciliary body, cornea, retina, optic nerve, and central retinal artery. Computational eye models to date have been constructed as stylized models, high-resolution voxel models, and polygon mesh models. Their common feature, however, is that they are typically constructed of nominal size and of a roughly spherical shape associated with the emmetropic eye. In this study, we present a geometric eye model that is both scalable (allowing for changes in eye size) and deformable (allowing for changes in eye shape), and that is suitable for use in radiation transport studies of ocular exposures and radiation treatments of eye disease. The model allows continuous and variable changes in eye size (axial lengths from 20 to 26 mm) and eye shape (diopters from -12 to +6). As an explanatory example of its use, five models (emmetropic eyes of small, average, and large size, as well as average size eyes of -12D and +6D) were constructed and subjected to normally incident beams of monoenergetic electrons and photons, with resultant energy-dependent dose coefficients presented for both anterior and posterior eye structures. Electron dose coefficients were found to vary with changes to both eye size and shape for the posterior eye structures, while their values for the eye crystalline lens were found to be sensitive to changes in only eye size. No dependence upon eye size or eye shape was found for photon dose coefficients at energies below 2 MeV. Future applications of the model can include more extensive tabulations of dose coefficients to all ocular structures (not only the lens) as a function of eye size and shape, as well as the assessment of x-ray therapies for ocular disease for patients with non-emmetropic eyes. © 2018

  18. Simulation studies of optimum energies for DXA: dependence on tissue type, patient size and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, G. J.; Henderson, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a well established technique for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). However, in recent years DXA is increasingly being used to measure body composition in terms of fat and fat-free mass. DXA scanners must also determine the soft tissue baseline value from soft-tissue-only regions adjacent to bone. The aim of this work is to determine, using computer simulations, the optimum x- ray energies for a number of dose models, different tissues, i.e. bone mineral, average soft tissue, lean soft tissue and fat; and a range of anatomical sites and patient sizes. Three models for patient dose were evaluated total beam energy, entrance exposure and absorbed dose calculated by Monte Carlo modelling. A range of tissue compositions and thicknesses were chosen to cover typical patient variations for the three sites femoral neck, PA spine and lateral spine. In this work, the optimisation of the energies is based on (1) the uncertainty that arises from the quantum statistical nature of the number of x-rays recorded by the detector, and (2) the radiation dose received by the patient. This study has deliberately not considered other parameters such as detector response, electronic noise, x-ray tube heat load etc, because these are technology dependent parameters, not ones that are inherent to the measuring technique. Optimisation of the energies is achieved by minimisation of the product of variance of density measurement and dose which is independent of the absolute intensities of the x-ray beams. The results obtained indicate that if solving for bone density, then E-low in the range 34 to 42 keV, E-high in the range 100 to 200 keV and incident intensity ratio (low energy/high energy) in the range 3 to 10 is a reasonable compromise for the normal range of patient sizes. The choice of energies is complicated by the fact that the DXA unit must also solve for fat and lean soft tissue in soft- tissue-only regions adjacent to the bone. In this

  19. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Voriconazole To Develop an Alternative Dosing Regimen in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Silke; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Müller, Carsten; Farowski, Fedja; Bader, Peter; Ullmann-Moskovits, Judith; Cornely, Oliver A; Groll, Andreas H; Hempel, Georg

    2018-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic variability of voriconazole (VCZ) in immunocompromised children is high, and adequate exposure, particularly in the first days of therapy, is uncertain. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to explore VCZ exposure in plasma after alternative dosing regimens. Concentration data were obtained from a pediatric phase II study. Nonlinear mixed effects modeling was used to develop the model. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to test an array of three-times-daily (TID) intravenous dosing regimens in children 2 to 12 years of age. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption, nonlinear Michaelis-Menten elimination, and allometric scaling best described the data (maximal kinetic velocity for nonlinear Michaelis-Menten clearance [ V max ] = 51.5 mg/h/70 kg, central volume of distribution [ V 1 ] = 228 liters/70 kg, intercompartmental clearance [ Q ] = 21.9 liters/h/70 kg, peripheral volume of distribution [ V 2 ] = 1,430 liters/70 kg, bioavailability [ F ] = 59.4%, K m = fixed value of 1.15 mg/liter, absorption rate constant = fixed value of 1.19 h -1 ). Interindividual variabilities for V max , V 1 , Q , and F were 63.6%, 45.4%, 67%, and 1.34% on a logit scale, respectively, and residual variability was 37.8% (proportional error) and 0.0049 mg/liter (additive error). Monte Carlo simulations of a regimen of 9 mg/kg of body weight TID simulated for 24, 48, and 72 h followed by 8 mg/kg two times daily (BID) resulted in improved early target attainment relative to that with the currently recommended BID dosing regimen but no increased rate of accumulation thereafter. Pharmacokinetic modeling suggests that intravenous TID dosing at 9 mg/kg per dose for up to 3 days may result in a substantially higher percentage of children 2 to 12 years of age with adequate exposure to VCZ early during treatment. Before implementation of this regimen in patients, however, validation of exposure, safety, and tolerability in a carefully designed

  20. Clinical evaluation of the partition model for estimating radiation doses from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.; Lau, W.Y.; Leung, T.W.T.; Chan, M.; Johnson, P.J.; Li, A.K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation doses to the tumour and non-tumorous liver compartments from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer, as estimated by a partition model, have been verified by correlation with the actual doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The validity of the doses to the lungs, the tumour and non-tumours liver compartment as estimated by the partition model was further evaluated in clinical settings. On the basis of the observation that one of three patients who received more than 30 Gy from a single treatment and one of two patients who received more than 50 Gy from multiple treatments developed radiation pneumonitis, it was deduced that an estimated lung dose 30 Gy as estimated by the partition model and were predicted to develop radiation pneumonitis, did so despite the use of partial hepatic embolization to reduce the degree of lung shunting. Furthermore, a higher radiological response rate and prolonged survival were found in the group of patients who received higher tumour doses, as estimated by the partition model, than in the group with lower estimated tumour doses. Thus the radiation doses estimated by the partition model can be used to predict (a) complication rate, (b) response rate and (c) duration of survival in the same manner as the actual radiation doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The partition model has made selective internal radiation therapy using 90 Y microspheres safe and repeatable without laparotomy. (orig.)

  1. Theoretical modelling of experimental diagnostic procedures employed during pre-dose dosimetry of quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Chen, R.; Kitis, G.

    2006-01-01

    The pre-dose technique in thermoluminescence (TL) is used for dating archaeological ceramics and for accident dosimetry. During routine applications of this technique, the sensitisation of the quartz samples is measured as a function of the annealing temperature, yielding the so-called thermal activation characteristic (TAC). The measurement of multiple TACs and the study of the effect of UV-radiation on the TL sensitivity of quartz are important analytical and diagnostic tools. In this paper, it is shown that a modified Zimmerman model for quartz can successfully model the experimental steps undertaken during a measurement of multiple TACs. (authors)

  2. Low Radiation Dose and Low Cell Dose Increase the Risk of Graft Rejection in a Canine Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sandra; Steder, Anne; Glass, Änne; Killian, Doreen; Wittmann, Susanne; Machka, Christoph; Werner, Juliane; Schäfer, Stephanie; Roolf, Catrin; Junghanss, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The canine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) model has become accepted in recent decades as a good preclinical model for the development of new transplantation strategies. Information on factors associated with outcome after allogeneic HSCT are a prerequisite for designing new risk-adapted transplantation protocols. Here we report a retrospective analysis aimed at identifying risk factors for allograft rejection in the canine HSCT model. A total of 75 dog leukocyte antigen-identical sibling HSCTs were performed since 2003 on 10 different protocols. Conditioning consisted of total body irradiation at 1.0 Gy (n = 20), 2.0 Gy (n = 40), or 4.5 Gy (n = 15). Bone marrow was infused either intravenously (n = 54) or intraosseously (n = 21). Cyclosporin A alone or different combinations of cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, and everolimus were used for immunosuppression. A median cell dose of 3.5 (range, 1.0 to 11.8) total nucleated cells (TNCs)/kg was infused. Cox analyses were used to assess the influence of age, weight, radiation dose, donor/recipient sex, type of immunosuppression, and cell dose (TNCs, CD34(+) cells) on allograft rejection. Initial engraftment occurred in all dogs. Forty-two dogs (56%) experienced graft rejection at median of 11 weeks (range, 6 to 56 weeks) after HSCT. Univariate analyses revealed radiation dose, type of immunosuppression, TNC dose, recipient weight, and recipient age as factors influencing long-term engraftment. In multivariate analysis, low radiation dose (P rejection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell chimerism ≥30% (P = .008) and granulocyte chimerism ≥70% (P = .023) at 4 weeks after HSCT were independent predictors of stable engraftment. In summary, these data indicate that even in low-dose total body irradiation-based regimens, the irradiation dose is important for engraftment. The level of blood chimerism at 4 weeks post-HSCT was predictive of long-term engraftment in the canine HSCT

  3. A novel model-based approach for dose determination of glycopyrronium bromide in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arievich Helen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycopyrronium bromide (NVA237 is an inhaled long-acting muscarinic antagonist in development for treatment of COPD. This study compared the efficacy and safety of once-daily (OD and twice-daily (BID glycopyrronium bromide regimens, using a novel model-based approach, in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. Methods Double-blind, randomized, dose-finding trial with an eight-treatment, two-period, balanced incomplete block design. Patients (smoking history ≥10 pack-years, post-bronchodilator FEV1 ≥30% and 1/FVC 1 at Day 28. Results 385 patients (mean age 61.2 years; mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 53% predicted were randomized; 88.6% completed. All OD and BID dosing regimens produced dose-dependent bronchodilation; at Day 28, increases in mean trough FEV1 versus placebo were statistically significant for all regimens, ranging from 51 mL (glycopyrronium bromide 12.5 μg OD to 160 mL (glycopyrronium bromide 50 μg BID. Pharmacodynamic steady-state was reached by Day 7. There was a small separation (≤37 mL between BID and OD dose–response curves for mean trough FEV1 at steady-state in favour of BID dosing. Over 24 hours, separation between OD and BID regimens was even smaller (FEV1 AUC0-24h maximum difference for equivalent daily dose regimens: 8 mL. Dose–response results for FEV1 at 12 hours, FEV1 AUC0-12h and FEV1 AUC0-4h at steady-state showed OD regimens provided greater improvement over placebo than BID regimens for total daily doses of 25 μg, 50 μg and 100 μg, while the reverse was true for OD versus BID regimens from 12–24 hours. The 12.5 μg BID dose produced a marginally higher improvement in trough FEV1 versus placebo than 50 μg OD, however, the response at 12 hours over placebo was suboptimal (74 mL. Glycopyrronium bromide was safe and well tolerated at all doses. Conclusions Glycopyrronium bromide 50 μg OD provides significant bronchodilation over a 24 hour period

  4. Dose-responses from multi-model inference for the non-cancer disease mortality of atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllnberger, H; Kaiser, J C; Jacob, P; Walsh, L

    2012-05-01

    The non-cancer mortality data for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular diseases from Report 13 on the atomic bomb survivors published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were analysed to investigate the dose-response for the influence of radiation on these detrimental health effects. Various parametric and categorical models (such as linear-no-threshold (LNT) and a number of threshold and step models) were analysed with a statistical selection protocol that rated the model description of the data. Instead of applying the usual approach of identifying one preferred model for each data set, a set of plausible models was applied, and a sub-set of non-nested models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. Subsequently, this sub-set of non-nested models was used to perform multi-model inference (MMI), an innovative method of mathematically combining different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. This procedure thereby produces more reliable risk estimates based on a more comprehensive appraisal of model uncertainties. For CVD, MMI yielded a weak dose-response (with a risk estimate of about one-third of the LNT model) below a step at 0.6 Gy and a stronger dose-response at higher doses. The calculated risk estimates are consistent with zero risk below this threshold-dose. For mortalities related to cardiovascular diseases, an LNT-type dose-response was found with risk estimates consistent with zero risk below 2.2 Gy based on 90% confidence intervals. The MMI approach described here resolves a dilemma in practical radiation protection when one is forced to select between models with profoundly different dose-responses for risk estimates.

  5. Dose-responses from multi-model inference for the non-cancer disease mortality of atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoellnberger, H.; Kaiser, J.C.; Jacob, P. [Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Department of Radiation Sciences, Neuherberg (Germany); Walsh, L. [BfS-Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The non-cancer mortality data for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular diseases from Report 13 on the atomic bomb survivors published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were analysed to investigate the dose-response for the influence of radiation on these detrimental health effects. Various parametric and categorical models (such as linear-no-threshold (LNT) and a number of threshold and step models) were analysed with a statistical selection protocol that rated the model description of the data. Instead of applying the usual approach of identifying one preferred model for each data set, a set of plausible models was applied, and a sub-set of non-nested models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. Subsequently, this sub-set of non-nested models was used to perform multi-model inference (MMI), an innovative method of mathematically combining different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. This procedure thereby produces more reliable risk estimates based on a more comprehensive appraisal of model uncertainties. For CVD, MMI yielded a weak dose-response (with a risk estimate of about one-third of the LNT model) below a step at 0.6 Gy and a stronger dose-response at higher doses. The calculated risk estimates are consistent with zero risk below this threshold-dose. For mortalities related to cardiovascular diseases, an LNT-type dose-response was found with risk estimates consistent with zero risk below 2.2 Gy based on 90% confidence intervals. The MMI approach described here resolves a dilemma in practical radiation protection when one is forced to select between models with profoundly different dose-responses for risk estimates. (orig.)

  6. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy

  7. Submillisievert Radiation Dose Coronary CT Angiography: Clinical Impact of the Knowledge-Based Iterative Model Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyama, Yuji; Nakaura, Takeshi; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Sakaino, Naritsugu; Tokuyasu, Shinichi; Osakabe, Hirokazu; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the noise and image quality of images reconstructed with a knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (knowledge-based IMR) in ultra-low dose cardiac computed tomography (CT). We performed submillisievert radiation dose coronary CT angiography on 43 patients. We also performed a phantom study to evaluate the influence of object size with the automatic exposure control phantom. We reconstructed clinical and phantom studies with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (hybrid IR), and knowledge-based IMR. We measured effective dose of patients and compared CT number, image noise, and contrast noise ratio in ascending aorta of each reconstruction technique. We compared the relationship between image noise and body mass index for the clinical study, and object size for phantom study. The mean effective dose was 0.98 ± 0.25 mSv. The image noise of knowledge-based IMR images was significantly lower than those of FBP and hybrid IR images (knowledge-based IMR: 19.4 ± 2.8; FBP: 126.7 ± 35.0; hybrid IR: 48.8 ± 12.8, respectively) (P knowledge-based IMR images was significantly higher than those of FBP and hybrid IR images (knowledge-based IMR: 29.1 ± 5.4; FBP: 4.6 ± 1.3; hybrid IR: 13.1 ± 3.5, respectively) (P knowledge-based IMR (r = 0.27, P knowledge-based IMR offers significant noise reduction and improvement in image quality in submillisievert radiation dose cardiac CT. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling and simulation in dose determination for biodefense products approved under the FDA animal rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Kimberly L; Krudys, K; Seo, S K; Florian, J

    2017-04-01

    Development of effective medical countermeasures for biodefense is vital to United States biopreparedness and response in the age of terrorism, both foreign and domestic. A traditional drug development pathway toward approval is not possible for most biodefense-related indications, creating the need for alternative development pathways such as the FDA's Animal Rule. Under this unique regulatory mechanism, FDA-approval is based on adequate and well-controlled animal studies when it is neither ethical nor feasible to conduct human efficacy studies. Translation of animal efficacy findings to humans is accomplished by use of modeling and simulation techniques. Pharmacokinetic and exposure-response modeling allow effective dosing regimens in humans to be identified, which are expected to produce similar benefit to that observed in animal models of disease. In this review, the role of modeling and simulation in determining the human dose for biodefense products developed under the Food and Drug Administration's Animal Rule regulatory pathway is discussed, and case studies illustrating the utility of modeling and simulation in this area of development are presented.

  9. General extrapolation model for an important chemical dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1984-12-01

    In order to extrapolate material accelerated aging data, methodologies must be developed based on sufficient understanding of the processes leading to material degradation. One of the most important mechanisms leading to chemical dose-rate effects in polymers involves the breakdown of intermediate hydroperoxide species. A general model for this mechanism is derived based on the underlying chemical steps. The results lead to a general formalism for understanding dose rate and sequential aging effects when hydroperoxide breakdown is important. We apply the model to combined radiation/temperature aging data for a PVC material and show that this data is consistent with the model and that model extrapolations are in excellent agreement with 12-year real-time aging results from an actual nuclear plant. This model and other techniques discussed in this report can aid in the selection of appropriate accelerated aging methods and can also be used to compare and select materials for use in safety-related components. This will result in increased assurance that equipment qualification procedures are adequate

  10. Assessment of health aspects in some X-ray examination types from gonad dose measurements on phantoms with or without shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermendzhiev, Kh.; Velikov, V.; Katerinov, E.

    1975-01-01

    X-ray mass screening examinations have been found to lead, particularly in countries with a welldeveloped medical service, to substantial population exposure, namely in the range of 20 to 150 mrad per year versus 100 mrad per year from natural radiation background. A substantial share of this exposure stems from gonad doses delivered to patients in the course of various types of diagnostic X-ray procedures. The magnitude of doses absorbed by the gonads depends to a large extent on shielding devices used to protect the patient during the examination, on the nature of the examination - whether gonads lie directly under the beam - and a number of other factors. For the present study, four phantoms corresponding to a selection of ages (2, 7, 14, and 25 years of age) were prepared. Dosimetric measurements were performed on a ''Hoffmann SR 700 D'' X-ray apparatus, with simulation of various types of diagnostic procedures: roentgenoscopic examinations or films, with or without shielding, with or without use of image converters. The data obtained indicated that the X-ray procedure types investigated may be grouped, in descending order or associated radiation exposures, as follows: roentgenoscopy of GI tract in children or women, roentgenography of lumbar vertebrae, pelvic organs, kidneys, thighs. There are cases where shielding is unfeasible (roentgenoscopy of GI tract in children or women, pelvic organ and kidney examination in women). In other cases, gonad shielding is of low efficiency: roentgenoscopy of lumbar vertebrae, skull or chest films in men. With use of image converters, a gonad-dose reduction by a factor of 2 to 9 is achieved. In terms of gonad dose level to the patient, X-ray procedure types may be distributed into three main groups: (1) low level (skull or chest films, etc.); (2) intermediate level (lung roentgenoscopy, thigh film, etc.); (3) high level, with gonads lying in the primary-beam field (GI tract roentgenoscopy, pelvic film, etc.). (author)

  11. Application of a Monte Carlo linac model in routine verifications of dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Rosales, H. M.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Lara Mas, E.; Popescu, T.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of some parameters of interest in Radiotherapy Medical Physics based on an experimentally validated Monte Carlo model of an Elekta Precise lineal accelerator, was performed for 6 and 15 Mv photon beams. The simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code. As reference for simulations, the optimal beam parameters values (energy and FWHM) previously obtained were used. Deposited dose calculations in water phantoms were done, on typical complex geometries commonly are used in acceptance and quality control tests, such as irregular and asymmetric fields. Parameters such as MLC scatter, maximum opening or closing position, and the separation between them were analyzed from calculations in water. Similarly simulations were performed on phantoms obtained from CT studies of real patients, making comparisons of the dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc and the dose distribution obtained from the computerized treatment planning systems (TPS) used in routine clinical plans. All the results showed a great agreement with measurements, finding all of them within tolerance limits. These results allowed the possibility of using the developed model as a robust verification tool for validating calculations in very complex situation, where the accuracy of the available TPS could be questionable. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of environmental UV doses by empirical WL4UV model and multichannel radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piervitali, Emanuela; Benedetti, Elena; Damiani, Alessandro; Rafanelli, Claudio; Di Menno, Ivo; Casu, Giovanni; Malaspina, Fabio; Anav, Andrea; Di Menno, Massimo

    2005-08-01

    Solar UV radiation interacts both with atmospheric constituents, producing photochemical reactions, and with the biosphere, inducing changes or protection responses. Important for humans are the skin and eye diseases that result from UV exposure, in particular from social or recreational exposure. This leads to an evaluation of risks and to an assessment of suitable prevention strategies. Therefore, the correct evaluation of the available environmental dose is important; in fact, only a fraction of UV radiation will be absorbed by individuals depending on their outdoor activity. The more dense the UV solar network is, the more the doses will be correct. This paper shows the results of research carried out in Vigna di Valle (Rome, Italy) during spring 2004. The available environmental doses are evaluated by the WL4UV empirical model, developed by the authors, utilizing the solar UV spectral irradiance measured by a GUV 511C multichannel radiometer. The spectra of a wide range Brewer spectrophotometer (286.5 - 363.0 nm) have been assumed as reference. As an evaluation of the model in cloudy situations, an analysis in San Diego, Calif., USA, with a SUV 100 spectroradiometer is also shown.

  13. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazareth, O.W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Energy, Upton, New York (USA))

    1991-01-10

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. It was found that protons in the energy range from 50 to 200 MeV are the largest contributor to the radiation dose to a human inside an Al structure 1 cm thick. Other studies have predicted a dose-equivalent of several Sv (several hundred rem) to each crew member during the voyage. LD{sub 50} is the amount of radiation required to produce death in 50% of the organisms within 30 days. Since LD{sub 50} is 4.5 Sv (450 rem) for people, several Sv is a relatively high value.

  14. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Receptor Internalization with CRTH2 Antagonists to Optimize Dose Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Strasser, Daniel S; Gehin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Groenen, Peter M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-07-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper-2 cells (CRTH2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a key mediator in inflammatory disorders. Two selective and potent CRTH2 antagonists currently in clinical development, ACT-453859 and setipiprant, were compared with respect to their (predicted) clinical efficacy. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to characterize how plasma concentrations (PK) of ACT-453859, its active metabolite ACT-463036 and setipiprant related to their effect on blocking PGD2-induced internalization of CRTH2 on eosinophils (PD). Simulations were used to identify doses and dosing regimens leading to 90 % of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough. A combined concentration of ACT-453859 and its metabolite ACT-463036, with weights proportional to potency (based on an eosinophil shape change assay), enabled good characterization of the PD effect. The modelling and simulation results facilitated decision making by suggesting an ACT-453859 dose of 400 mg once daily (or 100 mg twice daily) for clinically relevant CRTH2 antagonism. Pharmacometric quantification demonstrated that CRTH2 internalization is a useful new biomarker to study CRTH2 antagonism. Ninety percent of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough is suggested as a quantitative PD target in clinical studies.

  15. Sludge reduction by ozone: Insights and modeling of the dose-response effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Silva-Hernández, B C; Hooijmans, C M; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Esparza-Soto, M; Lucero-Chávez, M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2018-01-15

    Applying ozone to the return flow in an activated sludge (AS) process is a way for reducing the residual solids production. To be able to extend the activated sludge models to the ozone-AS process, adequate prediction of the tri-atoms effects on the particulate COD fractions is needed. In this study, the biomass inactivation, COD mineralization, and solids dissolution were quantified in batch tests and dose-response models were developed as a function of the reacted ozone doses (ROD). Three kinds of model-sludge were used. S1 was a lab-cultivated synthetic sludge with two components (heterotrophs X H and X P ). S2 was a digestate of S1 almost made by the endogenous residues, X P . S3 was from a municipal activated sludge plant. The specific ozone uptake rate (SO 3 UR, mgO 3 /gCOD.h) was determined as a tool for characterizing the reactivity of the sludges. SO 3 UR increased with the X H fraction and decreased with more X P . Biomass inactivation was exponential (e -β.ROD ) as a function of the ROD doses. The percentage of solids reduction was predictable through a linear model (C Miner  + Y sol ROD), with a fixed part due to mineralization (C Miner ) and a variable part from the solubilization process. The parameters of the models, i.e. the inactivation and the dissolution yields (β, 0.008-0.029 (mgO 3 /mgCOD ini ) -1 vs Y sol , 0.5-2.8 mg COD sol /mgO 3 ) varied in magnitude, depending on the intensity of the scavenging reactions and potentially the compactness of the flocs for each sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  17. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  18. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  19. Model to project dose-to-man from buried solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    To plan for the postoperational surveillance and control of the Savannah River Plant solid waste burial site, a model is being developed to simulate movement of radionuclides from buried solid waste through the environment to man. Results from the study of the model will be used to validate current operating limits for burial and to establish criteria for future surveillance and control. A preliminary model has been formulated to estimate the rate and extent of 90 Sr movement through a set of aquatic (ground water, creeks, and river) and terrestrial (vegetation, animals, and dust) pathways. Estimates based on pessimistic assumptions show that drinking water from the shallow ground water table in the burial region is the critical pathway for dose-to-man. Current and planned experimental programs to refine model parameters will be presented

  20. Phenomenological, symmetrical, field-theoretical aspects and mathematical considerations of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodjaev, L.Sh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We review the conceptual foundation of Yang-Mills gauge field theories. On these gauge theories the Standard Model (SM) are constructed. The fundamental postulates and their immediate consequence of the SM are formulated. The SM is a Yang-Mills type gauge field theory basically dictated by the Generalized Gauge Principle (GGP). According to this principle all fundamental forces of nature such as strong, electroweak, gravitational are mediated by an exchange of the Yang-Mills gauge fields corresponding gauge group. The SM is constructed by extension of the global non-Abelian SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) symmetry to the local SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) symmetry under which the Lagrangian of the SM invariant. This full symmetry has to be broken by Higgs mechanism down to the Electroweak gauge symmetry. The concept of fundamental particles does not exist. To Look for not Fundamental Particles but Fundamental symmetries. By searching of more general theory it is natural to search first of all Global symmetries and then to learn consequences connected with the localization of the global symmetries like wise of SM. The SM is renormalizable and therefor potentially consist at all energy scales. The SM in principle can describe the properties of the Universe beginning at 10 -43 sec. after BIG BANG. A SM of the BIG BANG Particle physics provides one of the few windows of the high energy world beyond SM which is consistent with SM and Cosmology. All the fundamental particles of the SM such as quarks, leptons and weak intermediate vector-gauge Bosons except one Higgs boson H 0 have been discovered and there masses and spins have been determined. The SM is stunning. Until now, no cracks have been found. There is no experiment that contradicts the SM. Moreover there is nothing observed beyond the SM. The SM works better and better. We proposed to construct colour singular nuclear forces theory based on Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). As well Theological aspects of the BIG BANG

  1. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  2. Computer generation of cobalt-60 single beam dose distribution using an analytical beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, S.

    1981-01-01

    A beam dose calculation model based on evaluation of tissue air ratios (TAR) and scatter air ratios (SAR) for cobalt-60 beams of rectangular cross section has been developed. Off-central axis fall-off of primary radiation intensity is derived by an empirical formulation involving an arctangent function with the slope of the geometrical penumbra acting as an essential constant. Central axis TAR and SAR values are assessed by semi-empirical polynomial expressions employing the two sides of the rectangular field as the bariables. The model utilises a minimum number of parametric constants and is useful for computer generation of isodose curves. The model is capable of accounting for situations where wedge filters or split field shielding blocks, are encountered. Further it could be widely applied with minor modifications to several makes of the currently available cobalt-60 units. The paper explains the model and shows examples of the results obtained in comparison with the corresponding experimentally determined dose distributions. (orig.) [de

  3. Using adaptive model predictive control to customize maintenance therapy chemotherapeutic dosing for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Sarah L; Sherer, Eric; Hannemann, Robert E; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Vik, Terry; Rundell, Ann E

    2010-06-07

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common childhood cancer in which nearly one-quarter of patients experience a disease relapse. However, it has been shown that individualizing therapy for childhood ALL patients by adjusting doses based on the blood concentration of active drug metabolite could significantly improve treatment outcome. An adaptive model predictive control (MPC) strategy is presented in which maintenance therapy for childhood ALL is personalized using routine patient measurements of red blood cell mean corpuscular volume as a surrogate for the active drug metabolite concentration. A clinically relevant mathematical model is developed and used to describe the patient response to the chemotherapeutic drug 6-mercaptopurine, with some model parameters being patient-specific. During the course of treatment, the patient-specific parameters are adaptively identified using recurrent complete blood count measurements, which sufficiently constrain the patient parameter uncertainty to support customized adjustments of the drug dose. While this work represents only a first step toward a quantitative tool for clinical use, the simulated treatment results indicate that the proposed mathematical model and adaptive MPC approach could serve as valuable resources to the oncologist toward creating a personalized treatment strategy that is both safe and effective. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic low dose risperidone and clozapine alleviate positive but not negative symptoms in the rat neonatal ventral hippocampal lesion model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueter, Lynne E; Ballard, Michael E; Gallagher, Kelly B; Basso, Ana Maria; Curzon, Peter; Kohlhaas, Kathy L

    2004-11-01

    The rat neonatal ventral hippocampal (VH) ibotenic lesion model has been proposed as a developmental model of schizophrenia, based on evidence that it encompasses aspects of the disorder including psychomotor agitation (hyperactivity), deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI), and deficits in social interaction (SI), measures presumed to reflect positive symptoms, sensory gating deficits and negative symptoms, respectively. However, validation of the model as a predictive pharmacological screening tool has been minimal. Determine the effects of a chronic 3-week low dose treatment of clozapine or risperidone on locomotor hyperactivity, PPI and SI in lesioned and control rats. Both clozapine, 2.5 mg/kg per day IP and risperidone, 0.1 mg/kg per day IP, reversed lesion-induced locomotor hyperactivity; however, the compounds also decreased locomotor activity in the non-lesioned controls. Clozapine 2.5 mg/kg per day and risperidone 0.1 mg/kg per day significantly attenuated lesion-induced PPI deficits. Neither compound induced a significant attenuation of lesion-induced SI deficits. In order to see if SI deficits required a higher dose of an antipsychotic, the dose of clozapine was increased to 4 mg/kg per day; however this dose induced such marked decreases in the activity and startle responses in the control rats, i.e. up to 74% decrease, that the effects on the lesioned rats could not be adequately interpreted. These data add further support to the neonatal VH lesion model as a predictive pharmacological screening assay for identifying compounds effective in the treatment of positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, the usefulness of the model in detecting compounds effective in treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is still in question.

  5. Overland flow under rainfall : some aspects related to modelling and conditioning factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, de J.L.M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This study concerns the theory and some practical aspects of overland flow under rainfall. Of the conditioning factors and processes which govern the generation of overland flow, the following were studied: depression storage, infiltration, morphology and wind. Special attention was paid to

  6. Analysis of some key aspects of soil/foundation interaction-Finite elements modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hamidi

    2018-01-01

    The third aspect studied was the interference between two strip footings installed on saturated clay. It was shown within a threshold distance between these foundations, an important modification of the foundation behaviour may occur. Finally, the numerical results were fitted and interpreted which allowed suggesting simple practical formulae for shallow foundations design.

  7. STATISTICAL ESTIMATION ECOLOGICAL COMPONENT IN THE MODEL OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: HISTORICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zatulyviter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies historical aspect in the selection of the environmental component of sustainable economic development. Theories and concepts that combine economy and environment with limited resources have been considered. The basic idea of forming views about environmental factors in economic theory has been described.

  8. Temporal aspects of user experience : Models and methods beyond a single use situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kujala, S.; Minge, M.; Pohlmeyer, A.E.; Vogel, M.

    2012-01-01

    User Experience (UX) is an ongoing process and should not be limited to a single use situation. However, this is unfortunately often the case in HCI research. The goal of this workshop is t