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Sample records for dose irradiated cells

  1. Dose verification by OSLDs in the irradiation of cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meca C, E. A.; Bourel, V.; Notcovich, C.; Duran, H.

    2015-10-01

    The determination of value of irradiation dose presents difficulties when targets are irradiated located in regions where electronic equilibrium of charged particle is not reached, as in the case of irradiation -in vitro- of cell lines monolayer-cultured, in culture dishes or flasks covered with culture medium. The present study aimed to implement a methodology for dose verification in irradiation of cells in culture media by optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry (OSLD). For the determination of the absorbed dose in terms of cell proliferation OSL dosimeters of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al 2 O 3 :C) were used, which were calibrated to the irradiation conditions of culture medium and at doses that ranged from 0.1 to 15 Gy obtained with a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Intercomparison measurements were performed with an ionization chamber of 6 cm 3 . Different geometries were evaluated by varying the thicknesses of solid water, air and cell culture medium. The results showed deviations below 2.2% when compared with the obtained doses of OSLDs and planning system used. Also deviations were observed below 3.4% by eccentric points of the irradiation plane, finding homogeneous dose distribution. Uncertainty in the readings was less than 2%. The proposed methodology contributes a contribution in the dose verification in this type of irradiations, eliminating from the calculation uncertainties, potential errors in settling irradiation or possible equipment failure with which is radiating. It also provides certainty about the survival curves to be plotted with the experimental data. (Author)

  2. Effects of low priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells caused by high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jingguang; Jin Xiaodong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Wenjian; Wang Jufang; Guo Chuanling; Gao Qingxiang

    2005-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells hepG2 were irradiated twice by 60 Co γ-rays with a priming dose of 5 cGy and a higher dose of 3 Gy performed 4h or 8h after the low dose irradiation. Effects of the priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose were examined with flow cytometry. Cells in G 2 /M phase accumulated temporarily after the 5 cGy irradiation, and proliferation of tumor cells was promoted significantly by the low dose irradiation. After the 3 Gy irradiation, G 2 phase arrest occurred, and S phase delayed temporally. In comparison with 3 kGy irradiation only, the priming dose delivered 4h prior to the high dose irradiation facilitated accumulation of hepG2 cells in G 2 /M phase, whereas the priming dose delivered 8h prior to the high dose irradiation helped the cells to overcome G 2 arrest. It was concluded that effects of the priming dose treatment on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose irradiation were dependent on time interval between the two irradiations. (authors)

  3. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  4. Effects of gemcitabine on cell survival and chromosome aberrations after pulsed low dose-rate irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro Kreder, Natasja; van Bree, Chris; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Haveman, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    The radiosensitizing potential of gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) was studied in combination with pulsed low dose-rate irradiation. The experiments were carried out with a human lung carcinoma cell line SW 1573. These were irradiated at pulsed low dose rate (p-LDR); the average dose

  5. Responses of cultured mammalian cells to prolonged low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Rongen, E. van; Welleweerd, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to verify the finding of others that prolonged irradiation caused sudden death of cells. Continuous irradiation (dose rate 0.09 Gy/h) was applied to the R-1, RUC-2, V79 and T-1g cells for up to 140 days. End points were: Population growth rate, plating efficiency and radiosensitivity. The population doubling times were increased and plating efficiencies decreased; cell survival after single doses at acute dose rate were lower than that of control cells. Part of the cell parameters returned to control values within three weeks after prolonged irradiation had been terminated. Sudden death after prolonged exposure was not observed. (orig.) [de

  6. Apoptosis supression of cultured mouse brain cells by low dose rate irradiation of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, S.; Nojima, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Suzuki, M.

    2003-01-01

    An environment of low dose rate radiation of heavy particles was achieved in an incubator by using off-centered scattered beam of accelerator (HIMAC). Cultured hole brain cells prepared from newborn mice of C3H, SCID and B6 were incubated in 10% FBS-DMEM medium for five days in the HIMAC incubator irradiating the low dose rate of heavy particles. The heavy particle irradiation was passively occurred while the HIMAC beam port was activated during the other experiments in the night period. The radiation doses inside and outside the incubator were continuously measured by LIULIN detectors. The accumulated dose during incubation varied 0.5-10mGy depend on the frequency of HIMAC operations. The apoptotic sensitivities of the brain cells were evaluated by fixing and Hoechst33342 staining after additional acute exposure of 200 KV X-ray within 4 Gy. A slight increase in apoptotic fraction without the acute irradiation was observed in cells inside the incubator compared to the laboratory control. The apoptosis induction was however suppressed when the additional X-ray irradiation was applied in a range of 0.25- 0.75Gy. This suggested that an adaptive response may be induced when heavy particle irradiation of the low dose rate was applied prior to the acute X-ray irradiation. This paper will discuss effects of the accumulated doses of the preceding irradiation of heavy particles and periods until the subsequent acute irradiation

  7. The biological effect of 125I seed continuous low dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Hong-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of 125I seed continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on colonic cell line CL187 in vitro. Methods The CL187 cell line was exposed to radiation of 60Coγ ray at high dose rate of 2 Gy/min and 125I seed at low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Radiation responses to different doses and dose rates were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Under 125I seed low dose rate irradiation, a total of 12 culture dishes were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group, and 2, 5, and 10 Gy irradiation groups. At 48 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by Annexin and Propidium iodide (PI staining. Cell cycle arrests were detected by PI staining. In order to investigate the influence of low dose rate irradiation on the MAPK signal transduction, the expression changes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Raf under continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDR and/or EGFR monoclonal antibodies were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Results The relative biological effect (RBE for 125I seeds compared with 60Co γ ray was 1.41. Apoptosis rates of CL187 cancer cells were 13.74% ± 1.63%, 32.58% ± 3.61%, and 46.27% ± 3.82% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 1.67% ± 0.19%. G2/M cell cycle arrests of CL187 cancer cells were 42.59% ± 3.21%, 59.84% ± 4.96%, and 34.61% ± 2.79% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 26.44% ± 2.53%. P 2/M cell cycle arrest. After low dose rate irradiation, EGFR and Raf expression increased, but when EGFR was blocked by a monoclonal antibody, EGFR and Raf expression did not change. Conclusion 125I seeds resulted in more effective inhibition than 60Co γ ray high dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells. Apoptosis following G2/M cell cycle arrest was the main mechanism of cell-killing effects under low dose rate irradiation. CLDR could

  8. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Gnanada S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Human cells were irradiated in G1 or G2 and evaluated for micronuclei and bridges. • Cells irradiated in G2 but not in G1 exhibit low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G2 do not fit a linear-no-threshold model. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G1 fit a linear-no-threshold model. - Abstract: The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3 Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0–400 cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20 cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

  9. Kinetics of colon adenocarcinoma cells in response to selected doses of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendzelovsky, R.; Kleban, J.; Mikes, J.; Sackova, V.; Solar, P.; Kulikova, L.; Koval, J.; Fedorocko, P.

    2006-01-01

    In our experiment we monitored changes of individual cytokinetical parameters in colon adenocarcinoma cells which were expressed to single total doses 1, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 Gy of gamma irradiation. We analysed cytokinetical parameters, like cellularity of adherent and floating cells, viability and cell cycle. Parameters were evaluated on 24 and 48 hour after irradiation. Dose dependent decrease of cellularity adherent cells and accumulation in G 2 phase of cell cycle was demonstrated, however almost no changes of viability and cellularity of float cells were achieved. (authors)

  10. Protection of lethally irradiated mice with allogeneic fetal liver cells: influence of irradiation dose on immunologic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulunay, O.; Good, R.A.; Yunis, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    After lethal irradiation long-lived, immunologically vigorous C3Hf mice were produced by treatment with syngeneic fetal liver cells or syngeneic newborn or adult spleen cells. Treatment of lethally irradiated mice with syngeneic or allogeneic newborn thymus cells or allogeneic newborn or adult spleen cells regularly led to fatal secondary disease or graft-versus-host reactions. Treatment of the lethally irradiated mice with fetal liver cells regularly yielded long-lived, immunologically vigorous chimeras. The introduction of the fetal liver cells into the irradiated mice appeared to be followed by development of immunological tolerance of the donor cells. The findings suggest that T-cells at an early stage of differentiation are more susceptible to tolerance induction than are T-lymphocytes at later stages of differentiation. These investigations turned up a perplexing paradox which suggests that high doses of irradiation may injure the thymic stroma, rendering it less capable of supporting certain T-cell populations in the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Alternatively, the higher and not the lower dose of irradiation may have eliminated a host cell not readily derived from fetal liver precursors which represents an important helper cell in certain cell-mediated immune functions, e.g., graft-versus-host reactions, but which is not important in others, e.g., allograft rejections. The higher dose of lethal irradiation did not permit development or maintenance of a population of spleen cells that could initiate graft-versus-host reactions but did permit the development of a population of donor cells capable of achieving vigorous allograft rejection

  11. Effect of radiation doses rate on SOS response induction in irradiated Escherichia coli Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuetara Lugo, Elizabeth B.; Fuentes Lorenzo, Jorge L.; Almeida Varela, Eliseo; Prieto Miranda, Enrique F.; Sanchez Lamar, Angel; Llagostera Casal, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the effect of radiation dose rate on the induction of SOS response in Escherichia coli cells. We measured the induction of sul A reporter gene in PQ-37 (SOS Chromotest) cells. Lead devises were built with different diameter and these were used for diminishing the dose rate of PX- -30M irradiator. Our results show that radiation doses rate significantly modifies the induction of SOS response. Induction factor increases proportionally to doses rate in Escherichia coli cells defective to nucleotide excision repair (uvrA), but not in wild type cells. We conclude that the dose rate affects the level of induction of SOS response

  12. Study of damage to red blood cells exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Deyi; Peng, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhe; Dong, Guofei; Zhang, Yiqin; Yu, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aims of this research were to study alterations in the ultrastructure of red blood cells, the changes in concentrations of plasma electrolytes and the killing effect of lymphocytes in samples of blood exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation. Materials and methods. Blood samples were treated with different doses of γ-ray irradiation and then preserved for different periods. Specimens were prepared for standard electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. At the same time, changes in the concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl− and pH values in the plasma as well as Fas and FasL expression of lymphocytes before and after irradiation were determined. Results. The proportions of reversibly and irreversibly transformed cells, for example, echinocytes, sphero-echinocytes, and degenerated forms, increased with increasing doses of irradiation and storage period, while the number of discocyte shaped red blood cells decreased. The change in K+ concentration was greater than that of Na+ or Cl− after irradiation and was dosage-dependent. Plasma pH was influenced by different doses of radiation and storage time. After exposure to 137Cs γ-irradiation, the expression of both Fas and FasL in lymphocytes differed significantly from that in the control group: the expression was positively correlated with irradiation dose (r=0.95, 0.96), but no significant difference in the Fas/FasL ratio was observed (P>0.05). Discussion. We conclude that the ultrastructure of red blood cells is not changed obviously by irradiation with some doses of γ-rays and various periods of storage. However, irradiation does have some dose-dependent and time-dependent adverse effects on the erythrocytes. PMID:22682338

  13. Investigation of the response of low-dose irradiated cells. Pt. 2. Radio-adaptive response of human embryonic cells is related to cell-to-cell communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keiichiro; Watanabe, Masami.

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the radio-adaptive response of normal cells to low-dose radiation, we irradiated human embryonic cells and HeLa cells with low-dose X-ray and examined the changes in sensitivity to subsequent high-dose X-irradiation. The results obtained were as follows; (1) When HE cells were irradiated by a high-dose of 200 cGy, the growth ratio of the living cells five days after the irradiation decreased to 37% of that of the cells which received no X-irradiation. When the cells received a preliminary irradiation of 10 to 20 cGy four hours before the irradiation of 200 cGy, the relative growth ratios increased significantly to 45-53%. (2) This preliminary irradiation effect was not observed in HeLa cells, being cancer cells. (3) When the HE cells suspended in a Ca 2+ iron-free medium or TPA added medium while receiving the preliminary irradiation of 13 cGy, the effect of the preliminary irradiation in increasing the relative growth ratio of living cells was not observed. (4) This indicates that normal cells shows an adaptive response to low-dose radiation and become more radioresistant. This phenomenon is considered to involve cell-to-cell communication maintained in normal cells and intracellular signal transduction in which Ca 2+ ion plays a role. (author)

  14. Influence of low dose irradiation on differentiation, maturation and T-cell activation of human dendritic cells

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    Jahns, Jutta [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Anderegg, Ulf; Saalbach, Anja [Department for Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Rosin, Britt; Patties, Ina; Glasow, Annegret [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Scholz, Markus [Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstr. 16-18, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido, E-mail: Guido.Hildebrandt@uni-rostock.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-05-10

    Ionizing irradiation could act directly on immune cells and may induce bystander effects mediated by soluble factors that are released by the irradiated cells. This is the first study analyzing both the direct effect of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on the maturation and cytokine release of human dendritic cells (DCs) and the functional consequences for co-cultured T-cells. We showed that irradiation of DC-precursors in vitro does not influence surface marker expression or cytokine profile of immature DCs nor of mature DCs after LPS treatment. There was no difference of single dose irradiation versus fractionated irradiation protocols on the behavior of the mature DCs. Further, the low dose irradiation did not change the capacity of the DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation. But the irradiation of the co-culture of DCs and T-cells revealed significantly lower proliferation of T-cells with higher doses. Summarizing the data from approx. 50 DC preparations there is no significant effect of low dose ionizing irradiation on the cytokine profile, surface marker expression and maturation of DCs in vitro although functional consequences cannot be excluded.

  15. Low Doses of Gamma-Irradiation Induce an Early Bystander Effect in Zebrafish Cells Which Is Sufficient to Radioprotect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term “bystander effect” is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01–0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors. PMID:24667817

  16. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO 2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different 137 Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662 keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. - Highlights: • A gamma irradiation facility for chronic exposures of cells was set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. • The dose rate uniformity and the percentage of primary 662 keV photons on the sample are greater than 92% and 80%, respectively. • The GEANT4 code was used to design the facility. • Good agreement between simulation and experimental dose rate measurements has been obtained. • The facility will allow to safely investigate different issues about low dose rate effects on cultured cells.

  17. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  18. Phosphoproteome Profiling of Human Skin Fibroplast Cells in Response to Low- and High-Dose Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Stenoien, David L.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Wang, Jeng-Han; Ding, Lianghao; Lipton, Mary S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Tang, Keqi; Fang, Ruihua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Chen, David J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-05-01

    The biological effect of low-dose radiation is currently not well understood. A hallmark of the response to radiation is the phosphorylation of proteins involved in DNA repair, DNA damage signaling, and cell cycle checkpoint control, which is important in prompt cellular response. The objective of the work presented here was to explore the phosphoproteome of normal human skin fibroblast (HSF) cells to reveal differences between low- and high-dose irradiation responses at the protein phosphorylation level. Several techniques —Trizol extract of proteins, methylation of the enzyme digest (peptides), enrichment of phosphopeptides with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), nanoflow reversed-phase HPLC (nano-LC)/electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry— were combined for analysis of the HSF cell phosphoproteome following low- and high-doses of irradiation. More than 95% of the peptides identified after IMAC enrichment were phosphopeptides. Among the 493 unique phosphopeptides, 232 were singly phosphorylated, 220 were doubly phosphorylated, and 41 were triply phosphorylated, indicating the overall effectiveness of the IMAC technique to enrich both singly and multiple phosphorylated peptides. Over 700 phosphorylation sites were assigned to a total of 346 proteins, many of which are known or proposed to be highly relevant to a plethora of fundamental biological processes. The profile for proteins identified from the low-dose (2cGy) irradiated HSF cells was shown to be different from the profile obtained for proteins irradiated at the high-dose (4 Gy). This type of fundamental information regarding radiation-response to cellular events at the molecular level provides a mechanistic basis for identifying relevant molecular markers that can be used in future to better evaluate human health risks at low doses of irradiation and to develop low dose radiation counter measurements.

  19. Interphase death of dividing cells. Kinetics of death of cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts after irradiation with various doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kublik, L.N.; Veksler, A.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    In studying the kinetics of interphase death (ID) of cultured Chinese hamster cells after irradiation with doses of 100 to 800 Gy the authors showed an increase in the ID rate with increasing radiation dose; the presence of serum in the medium both during and after irradiation prevents the cell death

  20. Single-dose and fractionated irradiation of four human lung cancer cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, O.; Lennartsson, L.; Nilsson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Four established human lung cancer cell lines were exposed to single-dose irradiation. The survival curves of 2 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) were characterized by a limited capacity for repair with small and moderate shoulders with extrapolation numbers (n) of 1.05 and 1.60 respectively. Two non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, one squamous cell (SQCLC) and one large cell (LCLC) had large shoulders with n-values of 73 and 15 respectively. The radiosensitivity when measured as D 0 did not, however, differ as much from cell line to cell line, with values from 1.22 to 1.65. The surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.24 and 0.42 respectively in the SCLC cell lines and 0.90 and 0.88 respectively in the NSCLC cell lines. Fractionated irradiation delivered according to 3 different schedules was also investigated. All the schedules delivered a total dose of 10 Gy in 5 days and were applied in 1, 2 and 5 Gy dose fractions respectively. Survival followed the pattern found after single-dose irradiation; it was lowest in the SCLC cell line with the lowest SF and highest in the two NSCLC cell lines. In the SCLC cell lines all schedules were approximately equally efficient. In the LCLC and in the SQCLC cell lines, the 5 Gy schedule killed more cells than the 1 and 2 Gy schedules. The results indicate that the size of the shoulder of the survival curve is essential when choosing the most tumoricidal fractionation schedule. (orig.)

  1. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  2. Fenofibrate dose not protect glioma cells from irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jae Lim; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Fenofibrate(FF) is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and used clinically as a hypolipidemic drug. FF has been reported to have a radioprotective effect of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus 1) and inhibit radiation-induced microglial pro-inflammatory response 2). However, if FF also protect tumor cells, it can not be used clinically during radiotherapy. Thus, we're interested in whether FF has an radioprotective effect of brain tumor cells or not Although the radiosensitive G0/G1 phase cells were increased, radiosensitization by FF was not observed in three human glioma cells. This may be due to counterbalance of radiosensitizing and radioprotecting proteins increased by FF. Taken together, FF neither radiosensitize nor radioprotect glioma cells, so it can be used to protect normal neural cells from radiation damage

  3. Edge restenosis: impact of low dose irradiation on cell proliferation and ICAM-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannekum Andreas

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low dose irradiation (LDI of uninjured segments is the consequence of the suggestion of many authors to extend the irradiation area in vascular brachytherapy to minimize the edge effect. Atherosclerosis is a general disease and the uninjured segment close to the intervention area is often atherosclerotic as well, consisting of neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC and quiescent monocytes (MC. The current study imitates this complex situation in vitro and investigates the effect of LDI on proliferation of SMC and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in MC. Methods Plaque tissue from advanced primary stenosing lesions of human coronary arteries (9 patients, age: 61 ± 7 years was extracted by local or extensive thrombendarterectomy. SMC were isolated and identified by positive reaction with smooth muscle α-actin. MC were isolated from buffy coat leukocytes using the MACS cell isolation kit. For identification of MC flow-cytometry analysis of FITC-conjugated CD68 and CD14 (FACScan was applied. SMC and MC were irradiated using megavoltage photon irradiation (CLINAC2300 C/D, VARIAN, USA of 6 mV at a focus-surface distance of 100 cm and a dose rate of 6 Gy min-1 with single doses of 1 Gy, 4 Gy, and 10 Gy. The effect on proliferation of SMC was analysed at day 10, 15, and 20. Secondly, total RNA of MC was isolated 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, and 4 h after irradiation and 5 μg of RNA was used in standard Northern blot analysis with ICAM-1 cDNA-probes. Results Both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were detected after irradiation of SMC with a dose of 1 Gy. At day 10 and 15 a significant antiproliferative effect was found; at day 20 after irradiation cell proliferation was significantly stimulated. Irradiation with 4 Gy and 10 Gy caused dose dependent inhibitory effects at day 10, 15, and 20. Expression of ICAM-1 in human MC was neihter inhibited nor stimulated by LDI. Conclusion Thus, the stimulatory effect of LDI on SMC

  4. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

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    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  5. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  6. Survival of tumor cells after proton irradiation with ultra-high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Susanne; Hable, Volker; Greubel, Christoph; Drexler, Guido A; Schmid, Thomas E; Belka, Claus; Dollinger, Günther; Friedl, Anna A

    2011-01-01

    Laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may in the future be used in radiation therapy. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed and ultra high dose rates of >10 9 Gy s -1 may be achieved. Here we compare the radiobiological effects of pulsed and continuous proton beams. The ion microbeam SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator was used to directly compare a pulsed and a continuous 20 MeV proton beam, which delivered a dose of 3 Gy to a HeLa cell monolayer within < 1 ns or 100 ms, respectively. Investigated endpoints were G2 phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and colony formation. At 10 h after pulsed irradiation, the fraction of G2 cells was significantly lower than after irradiation with the continuous beam, while all other endpoints including colony formation were not significantly different. We determined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for pulsed and continuous proton beams relative to x-irradiation as 0.91 ± 0.26 and 0.86 ± 0.33 (mean and SD), respectively. At the dose rates investigated here, which are expected to correspond to those in radiation therapy using laser-driven particles, the RBE of the pulsed and the (conventional) continuous irradiation mode do not differ significantly

  7. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  8. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun-Mi; Nguyen, Long Duy; Shim, Jaekyung; Song, Young-Han

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  10. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  11. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Chang

    Full Text Available One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE particles, such as oxygen (16O, carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE. Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB cells, and bone marrow (BM hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the

  12. Cisplatin and low dose rate irradiation in cisplatin resistant and sensitive human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Cheng, E. Ng; Raaphorst, G. Peter

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Human glioma cell lines resistant (U373MG CP ) and sensitive (U373MG) to cisplatin were used to evaluate the effect of cisplatin as a sensitizer to low dose rate irradiation (LDRI). Methods and Materials: A cisplatin resistant glioma cell line U373MG CP was developed by chronic exposure of parental U373MG cells to cisplatin. Plateau phase cells were treated with cisplatin, high dose rate (HDR) irradiation (1.12 Gy/min), LDRI (0.0088 Gy/min), or cisplatin concurrent with LDRI. Cell survival was determined by the colony forming assay. Results: Both cell lines showed increased resistance to radiation at LDR compared with HDR, with Dose Modifying Factors (DMF at 10% survival level) of 1.7 for U373MG and 2.5 for U373MG CP . The increased LDR sparing effect in the cisplatin resistant U373MG CP cells indicates increased repair proficiency. The resistant cell line showed a fourfold increase in resistance to cisplatin cytotoxicity at the 10% survival level compared with the parental U373MG cells. Cisplatin enhanced the response of both cell lines to LDRI. The DMFs were 1.2, 1.2, and 1.7, respectively, for the sensitive U373MG cell line given 1 μg/ml, and the resistant cell line given 3 or 6 μg/ml cisplatin treatments concurrent with LDRI. Conclusions: These data show that cisplatin can be an effective sensitizer to LDRI in both cisplatin resistant and sensitive glioma cell lines. However, in the resistant cell line, higher concentrations of cisplatin were necessary to achieve the same level of sensitization as in the sensitive cell line

  13. A comparison study on of tumor cell-killing effects between low-dose-rate β-irradiation of 32P and γ-irradiation of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiru; Tian Jiahe; Ding Weimin; Zhang Jinming; Chen Yingmao

    2004-01-01

    The paper is to elucidate radiobiological characteristics and radiobiological mechanism in killing tumor cells with low dose rate β-rays and high dose rate γ-rays. HeLa cells were exposed to low-rate β-irradiation of 32 P or high-dose-rate γ-irradiation of 60 Co. Cell response-patterns were compared between two the types of radiations in terms of their inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle blockage, evaluated by trypanblue excluded method and flow cytometry, respectively. Results show that there is a different way in growth inhibition effect on HeLa cells between low-dose-rate irradiation of 32 P and high-dose-rate irradiation of 60 Co γ. In exposure to 32 P, the inhibition of cell proliferation in HeLa cell was a prolong course, whereas and the effect was in a more serious and quick way in 60 Co irradiation. Cell cycle arrest in G 2 phase induced by 32 P was lower and more prolong than that induced by 60 Co. The inhibition effect on tumor cells between the two types of radiations is different. Impaired DNA repair system by continuous low-dose-rate radiation might contribute to the final radiation effect of 32 P

  14. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4 + T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4 + T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4 + T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation (IR) increases

  15. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  16. Concomitant low dose-rate irradiation and cisplatin treatment in ovarian carcinoma cell lines sensitive and resistant to cisplatin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Wang, G.; Stewart, D.; Ng, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Human ovarian carcinoma parental and cisplatin-resistant cells were evaluated for their radiation sensitivity to high and low dose-rate irradiation and for the effectiveness of cisplatin in radiosensitization. The cisplatin resistant variant A2780 cp showed increased radiation resistance for both low dose-rate (LDRI) and high dose-rate irradiation. For cisplatin treatment for 1 h before and after HDRI there was radiosensitization in only the cisplatin-resistant variant. Concomitant cisplatin treatment during LDRI resulted in radiosensitization in both cell lines with dose-modifying factors ranging from 1.6 to 5.8. In this case greater radiosensitization was achieved in the parental cell line. In both cell lines the dose-modifying factors were larger when the cisplatin was refreshed every 6 h instead of 12 h during LDRI. These data show that cisplatin may be a very effective radiosensitizer when given during LDRI which is used in brachytherapy. (author)

  17. Survival of spermatogonial stem cells in the rat after split dose irradiation during LH-RH analogue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroonenburgh, M.J.P.G. van; Daal, W.A.J. van; Beck, J.L.; Vemer, H.M.; Rolland, R.

    1987-01-01

    A rat model has been created in which a single injection of an LH-RH analogue depot preparation (Zoladex, ICI 118630) produced a temporary interruption of the pituitary-gonadal axis. This effect applied during irradiation was investigated as a possible mechanism to protect the testis from radiation damage. A local testicular irradiation dose of 6.0 Gy was given either as a single dose or as a fractionated (2 x 3.0 Gy) dose at different time intervals ranging from 8 to 72 h. Stem cell survival was measured 11 weeks after irradiation by means of the repopulation index and the number of haploid cells (spermatids) measured by flow cytometry. Serum gonadotrophins and testosterone concentrations were measured to evaluate hormonal recovery. No significant differences were observed between serum concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and the duration of the fractionation interval. Stem cell survival was higher following fractionated irradiation in comparison with the single dose. For the 8 h interval an increase in recovery ratio was found, amounting to a factor of 5 of the single dose value. The fluctuating pattern of the recovery curves indicated changes in radiosensitivity of stem cells. The combination of hormonal inhibition of spermatogenesis and fractionated irradiation led to a decrease in the absolute numbers of stem cells. However, the stem cell recovery curves were identical to those seen without hormonal inhibition. It was concluded that hormonal pretreatment with Zoladex during split dose irradiation had no protective effect on stem cell survival. 37 refs.; 4 figs

  18. G2 arrest and apoptosis of cultured Raji cells by continuous low dose rate beta irradiation therapy with 188Re-perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, S. J.; Kim, E. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, K. S.; Jeong, W. S.; Choi, C. W.; Yim, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Beta emitting radionuclide therapy gives exponentially decreasing radiation dose rate and results in cell death presumably by apoptosis. We observed changes in DNA content and apoptosis in relatively low dose rate beta irradiation. Raji cells were cultured and incubated with 188Re-perrhenate (3.7MBq, or 370MBq/ml) for 4 hours to give irradiation dose of 0.4, 4, or 40 Gy. After changing the culture media, cells were cultured for 2,4,8,16, and 24 hours. The cells were stained with Trypan blue, Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide (PI) to observe cell viability, cell membrane alternation by apoptosis and changes in DNA content respectively. Flowcytometry was done for Annexin-V and PI to quantitate apoptosis and necrosis in the irradiated cells. DAPI(4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) stain was also done to observe the damage in the nucleus. Cell viability decreased with an increasing radiation dose. Cells irradiated in 40 Gy showed early uptake of both Annexin-V and PI suggesting cell death by necrosis. Cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy showed delayed uptake of Annexin-V only, and later on PI uptake suggesting cell death mainly by apoptosis. The cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy showed G2 arrest in 16 hours after irradiation, but the cells irradiated in 40 Gy showed early DNA fragmentation within 2 hours after irradiation. In DAPI stain, early nucleus damage was observed in the cells irradiated in 40 Gy. On the other hand, slowly increasing apoptotic bodies were observed in the cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy. These results suggest that continuous low-dose irradiation induces G2 arrest and progressive apoptosis in cells while continuous high-dose irradiation induces rapid necrosis. Therefore, we expect therapeutic effect by continuous low-dose rate irradiation with beta emitting radiopharmaceuticals

  19. Inverse dose-rate-effects on the expressions of extra-cellular matrix-related genes in low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiated murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Kimio; Oghiso, Yoichi; Murano, Hayato

    2008-01-01

    Based on the results of previous microarray analyses of murine NIH3T3/PG13Luc cells irradiated with continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-ray or end-high-dose-rate-irradiations (end-HDR) at the end of the LDR-irradiation period, the inverse dose-rate-effects on gene expression levels were observed. To compare differences of the effects between LDR-irradiation and HDR-irradiation, HDR-irradiations at 2 different times, one (ini-HDR) at the same time at the start of LDR-irradiation and the other (end-HDR), were performed. The up-regulated genes were classified into two types, in which one was up-regulated in LDR-, ini-HDR-, and end-HDR irradiation such as Cdkn1a and Ccng1, which were reported as p53-dependent genes, and the other was up-regulated in LDR- and ini-HDR irradiations such as pro-collagen TypeIa2/Colla2, TenascinC/Tnc, and Fibulin5/Fbln5, which were reported as extra-cellular matrix-related (ECM) genes. The time dependent gene expression patterns in LDR-irradiation were also classified into two types, in which one was an early response such as in Cdkn1a and Ccng1 and the other was a delayed response such as the ECM genes which have no linearity to total dose. The protein expression pattern of Cdkn1a increased dose dependently in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations, but those of p53Ser15/18 and MDM2 in LDR-irradiations were different from end-HDR-irradiations. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of the ECM genes in embryonic fibroblasts from p53-deficient mice were not increased by LDR- and end-HDR-irradiation, so the delayed expressions of the ECM genes seem to be regulated by p53. Consequently, the inverse dose-rate-effects on the expression levels of the ECM genes in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations may be explained from different time responses by p53 status. (author)

  20. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  1. Determination of the dose rate to the center of the irradiation chamber of the Gamma cell 220 AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuazua G, M.P.

    1991-11-01

    To determine the dose rate at the center of the irradiation chamber of the Gamma cell 220 AECL, two different spectrophotometers for to measure the absorbency of the irradiated dosemeters were used. In the first one dosimetry, the absorbency of the irradiated Fricke solution was read in the Varian-UV-visible spectrophotometer Series 634 of the Applied Research Management. For the second dosimetry it was used the Shimadzu UV-visible spectrophotometer belonging to the Special Projects Department. The obtained results in this study are presented. (Author)

  2. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells promote colorectal cancer cell death under low-dose irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Schiergens, Tobias S; Wang, Pu-Xiongzhi; Ou, Bao-Chi; Al-Sayegh, Rami; Li, Ming-Lun; Lu, Ai-Guo; Yin, Shuai; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2018-02-06

    Radiotherapy remains one of the cornerstones to improve the outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Radiotherapy of the CRC not only help to destroy cancer cells but also remodel the tumour microenvironment by enhancing tumour-specific tropism of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) from the peripheral circulation. However, the role of local MSCs and recruited BM-MSC under radiation were not well defined. Indeed, the functions of BM-MSC without irradiation intervention remained controversial in tumour progression: BM-MSC was previously shown to modulate the immune function of major immune cells, resulting in an impaired immunological sensitivity and to induce an increased risk of tumour recurrence. In contrast, it could also secrete various cytokines and possess anticancer effect. Three co-cultivation modules, 3D culture modules, and cancer organoids were established. The induction of cytokines secretion in hBM-MSCs after irradiation was analysed by ELISA array and flow cytometry. AutoMac separator was used to separate hBM-MSC and CRC automatically. Cells from the co-cultured group and the control group were then irradiated by UV-C lamp and X-ray. Proliferation assay and viability assay were performed. In this study, we show that BM-MSCs can induce the EMT progression of CRC cells in vitro. When irradiated with low doses of ultraviolet radiation and X-rays, BM-MSCs show an anti-tumour effect by secreting certain cytokine (TNF-α, IFN-γ) that lead to the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis of CRC cells. This was further verified in a 3D culture model of a CRC cell in vitro. Furthermore, irradiation on the co-culture system induced the cleavage of caspase3, and attenuated the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in cancer cells. The signal pathways above might contribute to the cancer cell death. Taken together, we show that BM-MSC can potentially promote the

  3. Low dose irradiation of thyroid cells reveals a unique transcriptomic and epigenetic signature in RET/PTC-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil, E-mail: kabouela@sckcen.be [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Monsieurs, Pieter [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Anastasov, Natasa; Atkinson, Mike [Department of Radiation Sciences, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Derradji, Hanane [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Meyer, Tim [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bekaert, Sofie [Clinical Research Center, Faculty for Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiteit Gent, 185 De Pintelaan, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Criekinge, Wim [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2012-03-01

    The high doses of radiation received in the wake of the Chernobyl incident and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been linked to the increased appearance of thyroid cancer in the children living in the vicinity of the site. However, the data gathered on the effect of low doses of radiation on the thyroid remain limited. We have examined the genome wide transcriptional response of a culture of TPC-1 human cell line of papillary thyroid carcinoma origin with a RET/PTC1 translocation to various doses (0.0625, 0.5, and 4 Gy) of X-rays and compared it to response of thyroids with a RET/PTC3 translocation and against wild-type mouse thyroids irradiated with the same doses using Affymetrix microarrays. We have found considerable overlap at a high dose of 4 Gy in both RET/PTC-positive systems but no common genes at 62.5 mGy. In addition, the response of RET/PTC-positive system at all doses was distinct from the response of wild-type thyroids with both systems signaling down different pathways. Analysis of the response of microRNAs in TPC-1 cells revealed a radiation-responsive signature of microRNAs in addition to dose-responsive microRNAs. Our results point to the fact that a low dose of X-rays seems to have a significant proliferative effect on normal thyroids. This observation should be studied further as opposed to its effect on RET/PTC-positive thyroids which was subtle, anti-proliferative and system-dependent.

  4. Premature chromosome condensation following x irradiation of mammalian cells: expression time and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, T.D.; Carpenter, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells following exposure to 300-kVp x rays was first detected in the mitosis that followed the second postirradiation S phase. Thus, cells irradiated in G1 first expressed PCC at the second postirradiation mitosis while cells irradiated in G2 did not express PCC until the third postirradiation mitosis. Cells irradiated in the S phase expressed PCC at the second postirradiation mitosis with a frequency that was related to the position of the cells in the S phase at the time of exposure, cells in the first half of the S phase (at the time of exposure) showing a higher frequency than cells positioned in the second half. Thus, DNA replication during the first postirradiation S phase may be involved in the processing of lesions that eventually give rise to PCC. For cells in G1 at the time of exposure, the D/sub o/ for PCC expression at the second postirradiation mitosis was around 825 rad, indicating that PCC may play only a minor role in x-ray-induced cell killing. Autoradiographic analysis indicated approximately 50% of the PCC patches scored were replicating DNA at the time condensation was attempted. Daughter cells derived from such cells would suffer loss of genetic material

  5. Different doses of low-level laser irradiation modulate the in vitro response of osteoblast-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti Parenti, Serena; Checchi, Luigi; Fini, Milena; Tschon, Matilde

    2014-10-01

    Because osteoblasts play a key role in bone remodeling and the influence of low-level laser therapy on this process is not clear, Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells were irradiated by a gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser (915 nm) for 10, 48, 96, 193, and 482 s using doses 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 J/cm2, respectively. A control group was not irradiated. Morphology, viability, and cytotoxicity analyses were carried out after 1 hr, 1 day, and 3 days. Deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) content and release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated. Viability was modulated by laser irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 J/cm2 inducing a biostimulatory response and 20 to 50 J/cm2 determining a bioinhibitory and cytotoxic effect. Accordingly, DNA content was generally increased for the 10 J/cm2 dose and decreased for the 50 J/cm2 dose. A rapid and transitory trend toward increased RANKL/OPG ratio and a tendency toward a delayed increase in VEGF release for doses of 1 to 10 J/cm2 was found. Further investigations using the biostimulatory dose of 10 J/cm2 emerged from this study are needed to establish the ideal treatment regimens in the laboratory as well as in clinical practice.

  6. Time and dose dependent expression in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, S.; Ghosh, Anu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is to investigate time and dose dependent differential protein expression pattern of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after acute gamma irradiation. For this purpose, PBMCs extracted from eight healthy individuals were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays (0.3 Gy and 1 Gy) and compared with sham irradiated controls. Total proteins were extracted 1 and 4 hour post irradiation and analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis. A fold change of 1.5 in spot intensity was considered as 'biological significant'. Protein identification was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The MS/MS spectra were interrogated using Mascot 2.1 for searching against SWISS-PROT database. One-hour post irradiation, 18 proteins showed a significant difference between the sham (0 Gy) and 0.3 Gy irradiated group (6 proteins up-regulated and 12 proteins down-regulated) and 17 proteins between the sham (0 Gy) and 1 Gy irradiated group (9 proteins up-regulated and 8 down-regulated). Four hours after irradiation, 16 proteins were differentially expressed between the sham irradiated and 0.3 Gy treated group (5 proteins up-regulated and 11 proteins downregulated). Relatively high dose of 1 Gy showed modulation of 13 proteins (5 proteins upregulated and 8 proteins down regulated) after 4 hours. There were 15 proteins that were observed both at the early time point of 1-hour and the late time point of 4-hour. Important among these were, proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization like Actin, Plastin-2, Vinculin, PDZ and LIM domain protein, WD repeat containing protein and the chaperone proteins like HSP 90-alpha and Protein disulfide-isomerase A3. Proteins like thiol specific antioxidant peroxiredoxin-6 (indicating increased levels of ROS and oxidative stress) showed dose specific expression while proteins like Ras-related Rap-1b-like protein (involved in cell survival) were observed with both 0.3 Gy and 1 Gy. During the study, human peripheral blood

  7. Three-dimensional conformal radiation for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with involved-field irradiation may deliver considerable doses of incidental nodal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Kai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To quantify the incidental irradiation dose to esophageal lymph node stations when irradiating T1-4N0M0 thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC patients with a dose of 60 Gy/30f. Methods Thirty-nine patients with medically inoperable T1–4N0M0 thoracic ESCC were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation (3DCRT with involved-field radiation (IFI. The conformal clinical target volume (CTV was re-created using a 3-cm margin in the proximal and distal direction beyond the barium esophagogram, endoscopic examination and CT scan defined the gross tumor volume (GTV and a 0.5-cm margin in the lateral and anteroposterior directions of the CT scan-defined GTV. The PTV encompassed 1-cm proximal and distal margins and 0.5-cm radial margin based on the CTV. Nodal regions were delineated using the Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases (JSED guidelines and an EORTC-ROG expert opinion. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD and other dosimetric parameters were calculated for each nodal station. Nodal regions with a metastasis rate greater than 5% were considered a high-risk lymph node subgroup. Results Under a 60 Gy dosage, the median Dmean and EUD was greater than 40 Gy in most high-risk nodal regions except for regions of 104, 106tb-R in upper-thoracic ESCC and 101, 104-R, 105, 106rec-L, 2, 3&7 in middle-thoracic ESCC and 107, 3&7 in lower-thoracic ESCC. In the regions with an EUD less than 40Gy, most incidental irradiation doses were significantly associated with esophageal tumor length and location. Conclusions Lymph node stations near ESCC receive considerable incidental irradiation doses with involved-field irradiation that may contribute to the elimination of subclinical lesions.

  8. Recovery Profiles of T-Cell Subsets Following Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Improvement With Cinnamon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaodan [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); School of Medicine and Life Science, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan (China); Guo, Yuqi [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Wang, Lei [Second Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan (China); Zhang, Honghai [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Wang, Shaobo [Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, Li [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); An, Lei [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); School of Medicine and Life Science, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan (China); Zhou, Xianbin; Li, Xia [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Yao, Chengfang, E-mail: yaocf9941@163.com [Key Laboratory for Tumor Immunology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Immunology, Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Inefficient T-cell reconstitution from x-ray–induced immune damage reduces antitumor response. To understand the profile of T-cell reconstitution after irradiation will overcome the barrier of antitumor immunity. This study aimed to identify the recovery profile of T-cell subsets following x-ray irradiation and to highlight the role of cinnamon on efficient T-cell restoration postexposure in the antitumor response. Methods and Materials: CD3{sup +}, CD8{sup +}, and CD4{sup +} T cells and Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T (Treg) cells were evaluated at different time points after single low-dose total body irradiation (SLTBI) with or without cinnamon treatments. T-bet, GATA3, RORγt, and Foxp3 signaling specific for Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg were also analyzed by RT-PCR assay. The effects of cinnamon on efficient T-cell subset reconstitution was confirmed in a lung melanoma model in irradiated mice. Results: Reconstitution of CD4{sup +} T cells was delayed more than that of CD8{sup +} T cells in T-cell restoration after SLTBI. The production of IFNγ by Th1 or Tc1 cells was sharply decreased and was accompanied by reduced T-bet mRNA, even when total T-cell numbers had recovered; the frequencies of Th17 and Treg cells and their specific transcription factors (RORγt and Foxp3, respectively) were obviously increased. Irradiation-induced inefficient T-cell reconstitution impaired the antitumor capacities in the lung melanoma model. Pretreatment with cinnamon in irradiated mice accelerated the generation of Th1 and reduced the differentiation of Treg cells by activating T-bet and limiting transcriptions of Foxp3. Improvement resulting from cinnamon pretreatment on the efficient T-cell recovery profile from SLTBI promoted antitumor immunity in the lung melanoma model. Conclusions: T-cell reconstitution from SLTBI was characterized by impaired Th1 and elevated Th17 and Treg cells. Cinnamon effectively improved the imbalance of T-cell subsets by promoting the

  9. Recovery Profiles of T-Cell Subsets Following Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Improvement With Cinnamon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiaodan; Guo, Yuqi; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Wang, Shaobo; Wang, Li; An, Lei; Zhou, Xianbin; Li, Xia; Yao, Chengfang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Inefficient T-cell reconstitution from x-ray–induced immune damage reduces antitumor response. To understand the profile of T-cell reconstitution after irradiation will overcome the barrier of antitumor immunity. This study aimed to identify the recovery profile of T-cell subsets following x-ray irradiation and to highlight the role of cinnamon on efficient T-cell restoration postexposure in the antitumor response. Methods and Materials: CD3 + , CD8 + , and CD4 + T cells and Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T (Treg) cells were evaluated at different time points after single low-dose total body irradiation (SLTBI) with or without cinnamon treatments. T-bet, GATA3, RORγt, and Foxp3 signaling specific for Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg were also analyzed by RT-PCR assay. The effects of cinnamon on efficient T-cell subset reconstitution was confirmed in a lung melanoma model in irradiated mice. Results: Reconstitution of CD4 + T cells was delayed more than that of CD8 + T cells in T-cell restoration after SLTBI. The production of IFNγ by Th1 or Tc1 cells was sharply decreased and was accompanied by reduced T-bet mRNA, even when total T-cell numbers had recovered; the frequencies of Th17 and Treg cells and their specific transcription factors (RORγt and Foxp3, respectively) were obviously increased. Irradiation-induced inefficient T-cell reconstitution impaired the antitumor capacities in the lung melanoma model. Pretreatment with cinnamon in irradiated mice accelerated the generation of Th1 and reduced the differentiation of Treg cells by activating T-bet and limiting transcriptions of Foxp3. Improvement resulting from cinnamon pretreatment on the efficient T-cell recovery profile from SLTBI promoted antitumor immunity in the lung melanoma model. Conclusions: T-cell reconstitution from SLTBI was characterized by impaired Th1 and elevated Th17 and Treg cells. Cinnamon effectively improved the imbalance of T-cell subsets by promoting the proliferation of Th1 and

  10. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, E.

    1981-10-01

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis [fr

  11. Construction of dose-effect curves by irradiating peripheral blood mononuclear cells analyzed with the alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda, Lenin; Rosales Jaime; Leon, Kety; Espinoza, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of the alkaline comet assay to detect levels of DNA damage in human monocytes and lymphocytes under radiation was tested. For this purpose, four dose-effect curves by irradiation of cells isolated from blood samples of 4 young, health and non-smoker donors. A gamma ray source of 60 Co was used and doses of 0, 2.5, 5 and 7 Gy were delivered to blood cells. The results show good correlation (R2 = 0.973, SD = 0.009) between the radiation dose and DNA damage as measured by the parameter Tail Intensity (percentage of DNA in the tail of the 'comet'). Furthermore, we observe the variability in predicting DNA damage by Gy (7.59, SD = 1.5). Potential use of this technique in the biological dosimetry of ionizing radiations is being evaluated. (author)

  12. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  13. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  14. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  15. Dose response relationship of disturbed migration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum due to X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmanto, W.; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.; Murata, Yoshiharu [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1998-10-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.0, 2.25 or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation on gestation day 21. Pups were sacrificed 12 hr after exposure, and on postnatal day 5 (P5), P7 and P9. Their cerebella were observed immunohistochemically using anti-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) receptor antibody to identify Purkinje cells. These cells were disturbed to migrate and remained in the internal granular layer and white matter of the cerebellum. They had short dendrites, and some showed an abnormal direction of dendrites in rats exposed to 2.25 or 2.5 Gy. Alignment of Purkinje cells was also disturbed when examined either on P5, P7 or P9 especially by doses of 2.25 and 2.5 Gy. There was a relationship between X-ray doses and the number of cells piling up in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The dose-response relationship with the number of ectopic Purkinje cells was noted in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  16. Dose response relationship of disturbed migration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum due to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.; Murata, Yoshiharu

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.0, 2.25 or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation on gestation day 21. Pups were sacrificed 12 hr after exposure, and on postnatal day 5 (P5), P7 and P9. Their cerebella were observed immunohistochemically using anti-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) receptor antibody to identify Purkinje cells. These cells were disturbed to migrate and remained in the internal granular layer and white matter of the cerebellum. They had short dendrites, and some showed an abnormal direction of dendrites in rats exposed to 2.25 or 2.5 Gy. Alignment of Purkinje cells was also disturbed when examined either on P5, P7 or P9 especially by doses of 2.25 and 2.5 Gy. There was a relationship between X-ray doses and the number of cells piling up in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The dose-response relationship with the number of ectopic Purkinje cells was noted in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  17. Dose mapping role in gamma irradiation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; John Konsoh Sangau; Mazni Abd Latif

    2002-01-01

    In this studies, the role of dosimetry activity in gamma irradiator was discussed. Dose distribution in the irradiator, which is a main needs in irradiator or chamber commissioning. This distribution data were used to confirm the dosimetry parameters i.e. exposure time, maximum and minimum dose map/points, and dose distribution - in which were used as guidelines for optimum product irradiation. (Author)

  18. The influence of single and fractionated dose external beam irradiation on injury-induced arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Dorszewski, A.; Breithardt, G.; Willich, N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Restenosis after catheter-based revascularization has been demonstrated to be primarily caused by smooth muscle cell proliferation. This study examined the effects of external beam irradiation on neointimal proliferation after external injury to the central artery of the rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: 40 male New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. Crush lesions were performed on each ear under general anesthesia and bilateral auricular nerve blockade. A single dose of 12 Gy (n=10), 16 Gy (n=10), or 20 Gy (n=10) and a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy (n=10) gamma radiation was delivered to the left or right central artery of the ear 24 hours after injury; the contralateral central artery served as control. All rabbits were sacrificed after twenty-one days and the central arteries of the ear were fixed for morphometric measurements. Results: Mean (± SD) neointimal area was 0.062 ± 0.005 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.022 ± 0,005 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0,028 ± 0,006 mm 2 and 0.038 mm 2 ± 0,02 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,081 ± 0,009 mm 2 in the control group. Mean (±SD) luminal area was 0.049 ± 0.004 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.059 ± 0.002 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0.072 ± 0,006 mm 2 (20 Gy) and 0.048 mm 2 ± 0,018 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,043 ± 0,008 mm 2 in the control group. The difference in neointimal and luminal area between control and irradiated arteries was significant (p<0.05) only for the 16 and 20 Gy group compared to control. Conclusion: We conclude that in this model, external beam X-ray irradiation was successful in reducing neointimal proliferation after injury of the central artery of the rabbit ear. The optimal dose seems to be a single dose of 16 Gy - 20 Gy. Only a less prominent effect was noted for a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy. Whether this approach can be used successfully to inhibit restenosis in the clinical setting requires further investigation

  19. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. R.

    1974-01-01

    Cellular response and cell population kinetics were studied during lymphopoiesis in the thymus of the mouse under continuous gamma irradiation using autoradiographic techniques and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine. On the basis of tissue weights, it is concluded that the response of both the thymus and spleen to continuous low dose-rate irradiation is multiphasic. That is, alternating periods of steady state growth, followed by collapse, which in turn is followed by another period of homeostasis. Since there are two populations of lymphocytes - short lived and long-lived, it may be that different phases of steady state growth are mediated by different lymphocytes. The spleen is affected to a greater extent with shorter periods of steady-state growth than exhibited by the thymus.

  20. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  1. Dose verification by OSLDs in the irradiation of cell cultures; Verificacion de dosis mediante OSLDs, en la irradiacion de cultivos celulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meca C, E. A.; Bourel, V. [Ce. De. Te. Centro Especializado en Terapia Radiante, Viamonte 1861, C1056 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Notcovich, C.; Duran, H., E-mail: edarmeca@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnologia, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    The determination of value of irradiation dose presents difficulties when targets are irradiated located in regions where electronic equilibrium of charged particle is not reached, as in the case of irradiation -in vitro- of cell lines monolayer-cultured, in culture dishes or flasks covered with culture medium. The present study aimed to implement a methodology for dose verification in irradiation of cells in culture media by optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry (OSLD). For the determination of the absorbed dose in terms of cell proliferation OSL dosimeters of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) were used, which were calibrated to the irradiation conditions of culture medium and at doses that ranged from 0.1 to 15 Gy obtained with a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Intercomparison measurements were performed with an ionization chamber of 6 cm{sup 3}. Different geometries were evaluated by varying the thicknesses of solid water, air and cell culture medium. The results showed deviations below 2.2% when compared with the obtained doses of OSLDs and planning system used. Also deviations were observed below 3.4% by eccentric points of the irradiation plane, finding homogeneous dose distribution. Uncertainty in the readings was less than 2%. The proposed methodology contributes a contribution in the dose verification in this type of irradiations, eliminating from the calculation uncertainties, potential errors in settling irradiation or possible equipment failure with which is radiating. It also provides certainty about the survival curves to be plotted with the experimental data. (Author)

  2. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-12-19

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through

  3. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through

  4. Low dose ultraviolet B-irradiated Langerhans cells preferentially activate CD4+ cells of the T helper 2 subset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.C.; Cruz, P.D. Jr.; Bergstresser, P.R.; Tigelaar, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    UVB radiation distorts the Ag-presenting function of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC); this has been shown for the presentation of soluble Ag to primed T cells in vitro and for the initiation of delayed-type hypersensitivity in vivo, such as contact hypersensitivity (CH). Previous work has also demonstrated UVB-induced suppression of CH to be mediated ultimately by T cells. Two subsets of CD4+ Th cells, Th1 and Th2, have been identified, based on their cytokine production and functional activities. In particular, Th1 mediate delayed-type hypersensitivity, whereas Th2 do not. To investigate whether the perturbation of LC function induced by UVB radiation leads to a differential activation of these subsets of CD4+ cells, we examined the capacity of unirradiated and irradiated (200 J/m2) APC from adult BALB/c mice to present keyhole limpet hemocyanin to Ag-specific, H2d-restricted Th1 and Th2 cell lines. Four sources of APC were utilized: epidermal cells (EC), flow microfluorometry-purified Ia+ EC (LC), flow microfluorometry-purified Ia- EC, and splenic adherent cells (SAC). Unirradiated EC, LC, and SAC, but not Ia-EC, presented keyhole limpet hemocyanin to both Th1 and Th2. Irradiated EC and LC lost their ability to stimulate Th1, but retained fully their capacity to stimulate Th2. On the other hand, irradiated SAC were unable to induce proliferation of either Th1 or Th2. These findings indicate that suppression of CH mediated by UVB-irradiated LC may result from an alteration of the ratio and/or activity of Th1 and Th2 cells normally generated during the induction of such responses

  5. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  6. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Sirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the dose dependency of the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H-HeN female mice were irradiated by 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day) -1 , and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice were measured semi-quantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  7. Inactive Doses and Protein Concentration of Gamma Irradiated Yersinia Enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irawan Sugoro; Sandra Hermanto

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is one of bacteria which cause coliform mastitis in dairy cows. The bacteria could be inactivated by gamma irradiation as inactivated vaccine candidate. The experiment has been conducted to determine the inactive doses and the protein concentration of Yersinia enterocolitica Y3 which has been irradiated by gamma rays. The cells cultures were irradiated by gamma rays with doses of 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1.000 and 1.500 Gy (doses rate was 1089,59 Gy/hours). The inactive dose was determined by the drop test method and the protein concentration of cells were determined by Lowry method. The results showed that the inactive doses occurred on 800 – 1500 Gy. The different irradiation doses of cell cultures showed the effect of gamma irradiation on the protein concentration that was random and has a significant effect on the protein concentration. (author)

  8. Radio protective effects of calcium channel blockers (Deltiazem) on survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells irradiated with different doses of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alya, G.; Shamma, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2007-03-01

    Investigations of radioprotective effects of Deltiazem (as one of the commonly used calcium channel blockers, which is used in the treatment of acute and chronic angina and spasmo angina, in addition to the treatment of different types of essential hypertension) has been carried on Saccharomyces Cerevisiae cells. Cells cultures of the most famous yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (bakers yeast) were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. Results revealed that the necessary dose of gamma rays that leads to 10% of survived cellular population (D10 value) was about 256 Gy. This irradiation dose was used then in all irradiation experiments on culture of S. Cerevisiae cells in which different concentrations of Deltiazem (55, 110, 165 mg/Kg medium) were added before and after irradiation in order to study the radio protective effect of Deltiazem. Results showed that Deltiazem enhances survival percentage of irradiated S. Cerevisiae cultures in a concentration dependent manner. This study confirmed our previous works, which had demonstrated that Deltiazem protects lethally and supralethally irradiated rats, and enhances survival of pre-irradiated Deltiazem treated animals.(author)

  9. Concurrent high-dose thoracic irradiation plus daily low-dose cisplatin and vindesine in locally advanced unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Hada, Yosihiro; Nakamura, Kenji [National Hospital of Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer were treated to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of high-dose thoracic irradiation (RT) combined with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus vindesine. Twenty five evaluable patients were treated with continuous-course RT (70 Gy in 35 fractions of 2.0 Gy once daily) and concurrent daily intravenous cisplatin (6 mg/m{sup 2}) plus vindesine (3 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1 and day 8). Leukopenia (48%) was the most severe sign of toxicity, but there were no episodes of discontinuation of treatment. Two patients (8%) had a grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis, but there was no severe late radiation esophagitis. Ten patients experienced late radiation pneumonitis and 9 of those were grade 1 or 2. There was only one life-threatening toxicity (grade 5 pneumonitis). The objective response rate was 72%, and one patient achieved a radiographic complete response. The median survival duration for all patients was 14 months, and the 3- and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 27.2% and 27.2%, respectively. We concluded that the regimen of high-dose thoracic RT combined with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus vindesine was a well-tolerated regimen. The survival results were encouraging. (author)

  10. Tolerance and dose-volume relationship of intrathoracic stomach irradiation after esophagectomy for patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Xu-Wei; Fu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Jun-Chao; Xiang, Jia-Qing

    2015-10-13

    To identify the tolerance of radiation with a high prescribed dose and predictors for the development of intrathoracic stomach toxicity in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after esophagectomy followed by gastric conduit reconstruction. From 2011 to 2013, 105 patients after esophagectomy were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. The intrathoracic stomach was outlined with the calculation of a dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the initial intended treatment of 6020 cGy or 6300 cGy. The volume of the intrathoracic stomach receiving each dose was recorded at 10-Gy intervals between 10 and 40 Gy and at 5-Gy intervals between 40 and 60 Gy. The grade of toxicities was defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0. The mean and maximum doses of the intrathoracic stomach were 2449 ± 986 cGy and 6519 ± 406 cGy, respectively. Sixteen (15.2%) and three (2.9%) experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 and Grade 3 acute gastric toxicity. There were no Grade 4 toxicities. Fourteen patients (13.3%) exhibited late gastric complications possibly related to radiation. The volume percent of the intrathoracic stomach receiving at least 50 Gy (V50) was strongly associated with the degree of toxicity (p = 0.024, respectively). Multivariate analysis of patient and treatment-related factors revealed no other significant predictors of severe toxicities. The intrathoracic stomach is well tolerated with a high-dose irradiation for patients with esophageal SCC receiving radiotherapy after esophagectomy. A strong dose-volume relationship exists for the development of Grade 2 acute intrathoracic stomach toxicity in our study.

  11. Relationship between chromosomal aberration of bone marrow cells and dosage of irradiation after 46Sc internal pollution and external low dose X-irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guofu; Li Zhang; Wu Yin

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between chromosomal aberration of bone marrow cells and dosage in mice 24 h after 46 Sc internal pollution combined with external low dose whole body X-irradiation was quantiatively studied. The results showed that the relationship between chromosomal aberration and dosage was expressed in a linear regression equation. The chromosomal aberration rate was lower in the combined exposure than that of the sum of internal and external exposures, but higher than that of either the internal or external exposure singly. The relationship between chromosomal aberration and time was expressed in the following three phase exponential function: Y(t) = 2.9078 exp 0.27668t + 2.9371 exp -0.0778t + 2.3786 -0.01788t . By means of fit test, there was no significant difference between the determined and the theoretical values. The 90% theoretical values got from all the equations distributed over the determined values

  12. Ovarian function in survivors of childhood medulloblastoma: Impact of reduced dose craniospinal irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, Sadana; Dunkel, Ira J; Khakoo, Yasmin; Wolden, Suzanne; Allen, Jeffrey; Sklar, Charles A

    2015-02-01

    Data on ovarian function (OvF) in medulloblastoma (MB) survivors is limited, with most studies describing outcomes in survivors treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) doses >24 Gy ± standard chemotherapy. The objective of the current study is to report on OvF: (i) across a range of CSI doses; and (ii) following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (ASCR). Retrospective review of female MB survivors who were diagnosed in childhood and followed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were divided into three groups: (i) CSI ≤24 Gy +/- standard chemotherapy; (ii) CSI ≥35 Gy +/- standard chemotherapy; and (iii) high-dose chemotherapy with ASCR +/- CSI. Primary ovarian dysfunction (POD) occurred in 2/17 subjects in group 1, 3/9 subjects in group 2 and 5/5 subjects in group 3 (P < 0.01). Normalization of function was noted in four subjects with POD. Persistent POD requiring hormone replacement (POF) was observed in 1/17 subjects in group 1, 2/9 in group 2, and 3/5 in group 3 (P = 0.02). Neither age at treatment nor type of standard chemotherapy correlated with risk of POD or POF. Both POD and POF appear to occur in a small proportion of patients who are treated with contemporary doses of CSI +/- standard chemotherapy. However, ovarian dysfunction requiring hormone replacement therapy is common following high-dose chemotherapy associated with ASCR. These findings will assist clinicians in counseling patients regarding fertility preservation and risk of impaired ovarian function/future fertility. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:317-321. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Irradiation of blood, blood compounds and cell culture in equipment of radiotherapy of clinical usage. Study about volume and ideal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1996-01-01

    The irradiation of blood bags with the objective of minimizing the graft-versus-host disease in the proceedings of blood transfusion has been consolidated as an indispensable step in the advances of hematopoietic system diseases therapeutics. This practice performed in the great oncological treatment centers requires appropriate equipment (cell irradiators), that due to the high coast, is inaccessible to the majority of the services. The main objective of this work is the show the technique developed by the Radiological Physics Service of the Hospital A. C. Camargo Radiation Department, using the teletherapy equipment of clinical usage available at the Institution. The literature shows that a total dose of 2000 to 3500 c Gy must be administered to all target volume to get an ideal dose/volume relation that proportionates better therapeutic results, neutralizing the cells which are causative of post transfusion reactions of rejection, without prejudicing the other cells that are necessary to the maintenance and preservation of the transplanted person's hematopoietic system functions. With the technic developed for optimization of the irradiation. it is possible to conclude that the utilization of radiotherapy equipment of clinical usage for blood irradiation, substituting cells irradiators, is a good option, permitting safe transfusion of products irradiated with adequate dose. (author)

  14. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  15. Bone marrow cells homing to the thymus in mice after a leukemogenic split dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humblet, C.; Defresne, M.P.; Greimers, R.; Rongy, A.M.; Boniver, J.

    1987-01-01

    Fractionated whole body X-irradiation (4 x 1.75 Gy at weekly intervals) induces a high percentage of thymic lymphomas in C57Bl/Ka mice. These tumors develop after a long latency period during which the thymic lymphopoiesis is deeply altered. In the present work, we test wether those modifications are due to a lack of prothymocyte homing to preleukemic thymuses. Our results show that the preleukemic state of the thymus don't prevent the homing of normal marrow precursors grafted immediately after an irradiation of 4 Gy. Thus the alterations of thymic lymphopoiesis observed after a leukemogenic irradiation are not due to a modification in the thymus receptivity to thymocyte precursors [fr

  16. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  17. Autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose whole-body irradiation of dogs - influence of cell number and fractionation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenberger, U.

    1981-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome after a single dose of 1600 R (approx. 12-14 Gy in body midline) and after fractionated irradiation with 2400 R (approx. 18-20 Gy) was studied with regard to fractionation time and to the number of bone marrow cells infused. The acute radiation syndrome consisted of damage to the alimentary tract and of damage to the hemopoietic system. Damage of hemopoiesis was reversible in dogs which had been given a sufficient amount of hemopoietic cells. Furthermore changes in skin and in the mucous membranes occurred. Hemopoietic recovery following infusion of various amounts of bone marrow was investigated in dogs which were irradiated with 2400 R within 7 days. Repopulation of bone marrow as well as rise of leukocyte and platelet counts in the peripheral blood was taken as evidence of complete hemopoietic reconstitution. The results indicate that the acute radiation syndrom following 2400 R TBI and autologous BMT can be controlled by fractionation of this dose within 5 or 7 days. The acute gastrointestinal syndrome is aggravated by infusion of a lesser amount of hemopoietic cells. However, TBI with 2400 R does not require greater numbers of hemopoietic cells for restoration of hemopoiesis. Thus, the hemopoiesis supporting tissue can not be damage by this radiation dose to an essential degree. Longterm observations have not revealed serious late defects which could represent a contraindication to the treatment of malignent diseases with 2400 R of TBI. (orig./MG) [de

  18. The occurrence of apoptosis, abnormal mitoses, cells dying in mitosis and micronuclei in a human melanoma xenograft exposed to single dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkvoll, K.H.; Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo)

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell loss, the cell proliferation and the immediate growth response were investigated in a human melanoma xenograft given single dose irradiation with 7.5 Gy and 15.0 Gy, respectively. The frequencies of apoptotic cells, mitoses, abnormal mitoses, cells dying in mitosis and micronuclei, were scored in histological sections. In the untreated xenograft, the occurrence of micronuclei and abnormal mitoses indicated the presence of reproductively dead cells. Cell loss manifested itself through the appearance of apoptosis, cells dying in mitosis and necrosis. After irradiation, the cell proliferation was temporarily inhibited due to a radiation induced division delay. When proliferation resumed, there was a dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of abnormal mitoses and micronuclei and thus in the fraction of reproductively dead cells. The incidence of cell loss through apoptosis and cells dying in mitosis also increased. This cell loss probably reduced transiently the fraction of reproductively dead cells, and accounted for the reduced amount of tumour cells the first days after 15.0 Gy irradiation. The incidence of apoptotic cell loss and micronuclei decreased, and the incidence of normal mitoses increased when tumour growth resumed. (orig.) [de

  19. Nanoscale dose deposition in cell structures under X-ray irradiation treatment assisted with nanoparticles of a set of elements: an analytical approach to cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo B, W.; Barboza F, M.; Chernov, G.

    2016-10-01

    The goal of combining nanoparticles (Nps) with radiation therapy is to increase the differential effect between healthy and tumor tissues. Only some elements have been investigated to be used as radiosensitizers and no systematic experimental or theoretical comparisons between different materials have been developed. MacMahon, et al. (Nano scale, 2016, 8, 581) presents the first systematic computational study of the impact of elemental composition on nanoparticle radiation interaction for kilo voltage and megavoltage X-ray exposure, for a range of elements (Z = 14 - 80). In this study we present and analytical model to assess the cell survival modification responses of cell cultures under irradiation treatments with keV X-rays assisted with Nps of different materials as platinum, hafnium, gadolinium, gold, germanium, iodine and iron. This model starts from the data of radial dose deposition around a single 20 nm diameter Np irradiated with photons of an energy 20 keV higher than the element K-shell binding energy to the nano scale probability of dose distribution inside cell structures with embedded Nps (the assessment of the average dose and the average squared dose in cell structure). Also based on the Local Effect Model we estimate potential biological effects, as is the case of the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Nano scale dose deposition exhibits a complex dependence on atomic number, as a consequence of the variations in secondary Auger electron spectra, this is manifested in significant variations in RBE. Upon in vitro experiments RBE varies from 1 to 1.6. Values representative of a high radiosensitization were observed for lower energies, ones that are well reproduced by our analytical analysis for cell cultures with a homogeneous distribution of different material Nps. (Author)

  20. Nanoscale dose deposition in cell structures under X-ray irradiation treatment assisted with nanoparticles of a set of elements: an analytical approach to cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo B, W.; Barboza F, M. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Chernov, G., E-mail: g.chernovch@gmail.com [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Fisica, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The goal of combining nanoparticles (Nps) with radiation therapy is to increase the differential effect between healthy and tumor tissues. Only some elements have been investigated to be used as radiosensitizers and no systematic experimental or theoretical comparisons between different materials have been developed. MacMahon, et al. (Nano scale, 2016, 8, 581) presents the first systematic computational study of the impact of elemental composition on nanoparticle radiation interaction for kilo voltage and megavoltage X-ray exposure, for a range of elements (Z = 14 - 80). In this study we present and analytical model to assess the cell survival modification responses of cell cultures under irradiation treatments with keV X-rays assisted with Nps of different materials as platinum, hafnium, gadolinium, gold, germanium, iodine and iron. This model starts from the data of radial dose deposition around a single 20 nm diameter Np irradiated with photons of an energy 20 keV higher than the element K-shell binding energy to the nano scale probability of dose distribution inside cell structures with embedded Nps (the assessment of the average dose and the average squared dose in cell structure). Also based on the Local Effect Model we estimate potential biological effects, as is the case of the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Nano scale dose deposition exhibits a complex dependence on atomic number, as a consequence of the variations in secondary Auger electron spectra, this is manifested in significant variations in RBE. Upon in vitro experiments RBE varies from 1 to 1.6. Values representative of a high radiosensitization were observed for lower energies, ones that are well reproduced by our analytical analysis for cell cultures with a homogeneous distribution of different material Nps. (Author)

  1. In vitro investigations on the comparison of the effect of high-dose and low-dose irradiation by means of endothelium cells; In-vitro-Untersuchungen zum Vergleich der Wirkung hoch und niedrig dosierter Bestrahlung anhand von Endothelzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, Steffen

    2014-11-25

    The thesis was aimed to investigate the effect of low-dose irradiation of endothelium cells (H5V) using different in-vitro methods In order to characterize radiation induced modulation of inflammatory reactions. The results were compared with high.-dose irradiation experiments. For the simulation of inflammatory behavior the cells were stimulated by pro-inflammatory Zytokin TNF-alpha. The irradiation was performed with an X-ray device (200 kV) that is usually used for pain relieving therapy (single exposure and fractionated irradiation) in case of benign lesions was used and a linear accelerator (16 MeV). Further studies were performed covering the effect of serum in the medium on the growth, the clonogenic survival and the metabolic activity of the H5V cells.

  2. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  3. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.; Jia, R.F.; Yu, L.; Zhao, M.J.; Shao, C.L.; Cheng, W.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125 I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125 I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125 I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  4. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Effect of low dose UVB irradiation on the migratory properties and functional capacities of human skin dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richters, C. D.; Reits, E. A.; van Pelt, A. M.; Hoekstra, M. J.; van Baare, J.; Du Pont, J. S.; Kamperdijk, E. W.

    1996-01-01

    We recently described the 'spontaneous' migration of skin dendritic cells out of human split skin during culture. Since newly infiltrating cells from the circulation are excluded, this in vitro model is very suitable for studying the effect of UVB irradiation on the migratory properties, phenotype

  6. Immune cells in Chernobyl radiation workers exposed to low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazyka, D.; Chumak, A.; Byelyaeva, N.; Gulaya, N.; Margytich, V.; Thevenon, C.; Guichardant, M.; Lagarde, M.

    2002-01-01

    the aim of this work was to study immune response parameters in Chernobyl emergency and recovery operation radiation workers and nuclear industry workers exposed under professional limits. The monohydroxylated fatty acid content in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of radiation workers compared to unexposed control at the 12-th year after Chernobyl NPP accident was studied too

  7. Biological effects of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    For a long time, radiation, biological research concentrated on the diagnosis and the effect chains to be taken into consideration in the case of acute and chronic radiation effects due to intensive irradiation. Approximately at the beginning of the Thirties, the research results of the geneticist Mueller and the radiation-biologists Oliver and Timofeef-Ressovsky brought a fundamental change in the way of looking at things in radiation biology. From the results then obtained it can be deduced that even the smallest quantities of radiation can cause effects. Basically, two processes leading to different radiation reactions have to be recognized: 1) A change in the genetical code, especially by direct irradiation of the nucleus. The effects thus arising are called stochastic effects. 2) A change of the cell in total by inactivation of the cell division or by cell death. These are called non-stochastic effects. Here, a threshold dose is existent. In these cases, the degree of the effects depends on the quantity of the dose. Therefore, the stochastic effects are paid special attention when determining radiation effects with low doses. Here, the emphasis of the research was moved from the genetic effects to the generation of somatic effects, especially the generation of malign neoformations and the shortening of the life connected with them. In the generation of malign neoformations by ionising radiation, probably only the transformation of a single cell is necessary, however only then when ionising radiation is absorbed in the nucleus several times (multi-hit theory). This leads to the assumption that the induction of malignant neoformations possesses a linear quadratic function, at least in the region of medium doses. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  9. Greater sparing of stromal progenitor cells than of haemopoietic stem cells in γ-irradiated mouse marrow using low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.; Wang, S.B.; Testa, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Do value fibroblastoid colony-forming units in mouse bone-marrow increased from 1.7 Gy using γ-rays at 4.2 Gy/minute, to 2.6 Gy at 4.5 cGy/minute. In contrast, the sensitivity of bone-marrow stem cells was very little changed (Do approximately 0.9 Gy). At 7.5 Gy acute single dose, the dose sparing achieved for CFU-F using 4.5 cGy/minute was a factor of 1.4, inbetween the values reported for lung of 1.8 and for haemopoiesis of 1.2. Although the role of CFU-F in the haemopoietic environment has not been established, the content of CFU-F can predict the ability of irradiated marrow to sustain haemopoiesis in the long term. Hence the data imply that the haemopoiesis environment, as well as the dose-limiting lung, benefits from the use of low dose-rates for haemopoietic ablations in the treatment of leukaemia. No significant further sparing of CFU-F was achieved using a lower dose-rate of 1.4 cGy per minute

  10. The molecular cues for the biological effects of ionizing radiation dose and post-irradiation time on human breast cancer SKBR3 cell line: A Raman spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Naser; Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Gilany, Kambiz; Eynali, Samira; Ghaznavi, Habib; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main modalities of cancer treatment. The utility of Raman spectroscopy (RS) for detecting the distinct radiobiological responses in human cancer cells is currently under investigation. RS holds great promises to provide good opportunities for personalizing radiotherapy treatments. Here, we report the effects of the radiation dose and post-irradiation time on the molecular changes in the human breast cancer SKBR3 cells, using RS. The SKBR3 cells were irradiated by gamma radiation with different doses of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy. The Raman signals were acquired 24 and 48 h after the gamma radiation. The collected Raman spectra were analyzed by different statistical methods such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and genetic algorithm. A thorough analysis of the obtained Raman signals revealed that 2 Gy of gamma radiation induces remarkable molecular and structural changes in the SKBR3 cells. We found that the wavenumbers in the range of 1000-1400 cm -1 in Raman spectra are selective for discriminating between the effects of the different doses of irradiation. The results also revealed that longer post-irradiation time leads to the relaxation of the cells to their initial state. The molecular changes that occurred in the 2Gy samples were mostly reversible. On the other hand, the exposure to doses higher than 4Gy induced serious irreversible changes, mainly seen in 2700-2800 cm -1 in Raman spectra. The classification models developed in this study would help to predict the radiation-based molecular changes induced in the cancer cells by only using RS. Also, this designed framework may facilitate the process of biodosimetry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Irradiation of mammalian cells in the presence of diamide and low concentrations of oxygen at conventional and at ultrahigh dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, E.P.; Michaels, H.B.; Peterson, E.C.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The response of cultured CHO cells to ultrahigh-dose-radiation (approx.10 9 Gy/sec) has been previously studied extensively using the thin-layer cell-handling technique developed in this laboratory. When the cells are equilibrated with a low concentration of oxygen, e.g., 0.44% O 2 , a breaking survival curve, due to radiolytic depletion of the oxygen, is observed. Hypoxic cells irradiated in the presence of the nitroimidazoles (e.g., misonidazole) are sensitized at ultrahigh dose rates in a dose-modifying manner, similar to that observed at conventional dose rates. These radiosensitizer compounds, if present in cells equilibrated with a low concentration of oxygen, prevent the breaking behavior of the survival curve, an observation believed to be due to the sensitizer interfering with the oxygen depletion process, leaving oxygen free to sensitize. Such experiments have recently been extended to studies with diamide, which, unlike the other sensitizers tested, acts primarily as a shoulder-modifying rather than a dose-modifying agent in hypoxic mammalian cells. These data indicate that diamide is active as a sensitizer at ultrahigh dose rates in a manner similar to that observed at conventional dose rates, and does modify the shape of the breaking survival curve observed with low concentrations of oxygen

  12. Children after Chernobyl: immune cells adaptive changes and stable alterations under low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazyka, D.A.; Chumak, A.A.; Bebeshko, V.G.; Beliaeva, N.V.

    1997-01-01

    Early changes of immune parameters in children evacuated from 30-km zone were characterized by E-rossette forming cells decrease and E-receptor non-stability in theophylline assay, surface Ig changes. Immunological follow-up of children inhabitants of territories contaminated with radionuclides after Chernobyl accident revealed TCR/CD3, CD4 and MHC CD3+, CD4+, CD57+ subsets, RIL-2, TrT expression and calcium channel activity. PMNC percentage with cortical thymocyte phenotype (CD1+, CD4+8+) was elevated during the first years after the accident and seemed to be of a compensatory origin. Combination of heterogenic activation and suppression subset reactions and changes in fine subset (Th1/Th2) organization were suggested. Adaptive and compensatory reactions were supposed and delayed hypersensitivity reactions increase as well. (author)

  13. Bone cell viability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, M.; Kaelebo, P.; Tjellstroem, A.; Turesson, I.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Adult rabbits were irradiated to one proximal tibial metaphysis while the contralateral tibia served as a control. Each animal was thus its own control. Single doses of 15, 25 and 40 Gy 60 Co were used. The follow-up time was 11 to 22 weeks after irradiation. A histochemical method, recording diaphorase (NADH 2 and NADPH 2 ) activity in osteocytes, was employed. This method is regarded as superior to conventional histology. No evidence of osteocyte death was found even after 22 weeks following 40 Gy irradiation. This is interpreted as an indication that the osteocytes, which are end stage cells, are relatively radioresistant. (orig.)

  14. Dependence of the rate of DNA synthesis in x-irradiated HeLa S3 cells on dose and time after exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, L.J.; Jones, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    After irradiation of randomly dividing cultures of HeLa S3 cells with 220-kV x rays, the rate of DNA synthesis, measured by pulsed incorporation of labeled thymidine, falls nearly exponentially with time (t/sub 1/2/ approximately 1.3 hr), in a dose-independent fashion. The fall is less rapid than that observed after addition of inhibitors of protein synthesis. With doses up to 8 krad, the rate reaches a minimum and begins to increase after 1-3 hr, the minima occurring at lower values and at slightly later times with increasing dose. The increase appears to be roughly linear for about 6 hr, with the slope an inverse function of dose in the range 1-8 krad. About 7-9 hr after the completion of irradiation, the rate again falls, although no more than 10 percent of the cells die sooner than 14 hr after irradiation with 8 krad (and later with smaller doses). Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated delay in expression of the depression, described previously for doses up to 1 krad, occurs also at higher doses. During the period when the rate per culture rises, the rate in the individual cells, measured autoradiographically, appears to increase also, i.e., the rise presumably does not merely reflect populational shifts. The initial descending portion of the rate curve can be at least partially separated from the ascending portion by administering the total dose in suitably spaced fractions. If interpreted in terms of the model that attributes the initial depression in rate of synthesis to a temporary absence of replicon initiation, the results indicate that initiation is halted by an x-ray dose smaller than 1 krad; that it begins again after a dose-dependent delay amounting to about 0.7 hr after 1 krad and 1.5 hr after 7 krad; and that once begun, the rate of synthesis increases in a dose-dependent fashion. The second depression might derive from synchronization and/or from the imminence of cell death

  15. The nature of newly-synthesized DNA in irradiated lymphoid cells, measured by a technique sensitive to changes after low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, I.; Herbert, L.; Harris, G.; Cramp, W.A.; Hesslewood, I.P.; Parker, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have investigated the post-irradiation synthesis of DNA in a lymphoid cell line (LDV) obtained from normal human peripheral blood and maintained in culture. For doses up to Gy (1 kilorad) the repair of DNA damage in these cells was rapid and complete. However, when DNA strand elongation was assayed in apparently fully repaired cells the new DNA was grossly abnormal. Hydroxapathie chromatography was used to examine lesions in prelabelled DNA as well as strand elongation. Because of the sensitivity of this technique we have been able to show that the repair process is error prone. (orig.) [de

  16. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  17. Stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Helen

    1976-05-01

    The first section of the bibliography lists materials on the stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation, with particular reference to stimulation of germination and yield. The second section contains a small number of selected references on seed irradiation facilities. (author)

  18. Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Peng; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Wang Cuilan; Li Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro. Methods: The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro. The DCs were divided into 3 groups, group A: DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B: DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture, the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction), and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated. MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells. IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA. Results: After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays, the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t=2.79 and 3.71, P<0.05), but significantly increased in group B (t=3.60 and 3.11, P<0.05). The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t=2.89 and 2.91, P<0.05), but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t=2.91 and 2.82, P<0.05). Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t=4.44 and 6.93, P<0.05), but was increased in group B (t=3.51 and 4.12, P<0.05). Conclusions: The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose (<0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs, but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture. (authors)

  19. Dose mapping in category I irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Shinde, S.H.; Mhatre, S.G.V.

    2012-01-01

    Category I irradiators such as Gamma Chambers and Blood Irradiators are compact self shielded, dry source storage gamma irradiators offering irradiation volume of few hundred cubic centimeters. In the present work, dose distribution profiles along the central vertical plane of the irradiation volume of Gamma Chamber 900 and Blood Irradiator 2000 were measured using Fricke, FBX, and alanine dosimeters. Measured dose distribution profiles in Gamma Chamber 900 differed from the typical generic dose distribution pattern whereas that in Blood Irradiator 2000 was in agreement with the typical pattern. All reagents used were of analytical reagent grade and were used without further purification. Preparation and dose estimations of Fricke and FBX were carried out as recommended. Alanine pellets were directly placed in precleaned polystyrene container having dimensions 6.5 mm o.d., 32 mm height and 3 mm wall thickness. For these dosimeters, dose measurements were made using e-scan Bruker BioSpin alanine dedicated ESR spectrometer. Specially designed perspex jigs were used during irradiation in Gamma Chamber 900 and Blood Irradiator 2000. These jigs provided the reproducible geometry during irradiation, Absorbance measurements were made using a spectrophotometer calibrated as per the recommended procedure. In Gamma Chamber 900, there is a dose distribution variation of about 34% from top to the center, 18% from center to the bottom, and 15% from center to the periphery. Such a dose distribution profile is largely deviating from the typical profile wherein 15% variation is observed from center to the periphery on all sides. Further investigation showed that there was a nonalignment in the source and sample chamber. However, in Blood Irradiator 2000, there is a dose distribution variation of about 20% from top to the center, 15% from center to the bottom, and 12% from center to the periphery. This pattern is very much similar to the typical profile. Hence it is recommended

  20. Does the cell radioresistance acquired by low dose-rate gamma irradiation depend on genetic factors or physiological changes. Study carried out on inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettwiller, Pascale.

    1982-09-01

    Inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK were used to test the following hypothesis: the radioresistance acquired by these cells after irradiation at low dose rate (0.06 Gy/mn) is due to the selection or induction of radioresistant clones. Clone cultures were grown mainly from colonies exhibiting defects (high cell loss, slowed growth, pigment deficiency). Of thirty clones studied, three only of second and third separations possessed the radioresistance of their original population. On the basis of these results, backed up by a first experiment which shows the loss of cell radioresistance when continuous irradiation is stopped, the initial hypothesis may be dismissed and research directed towards changes relative to cell restoration processes by irradiation at low dose rates [fr

  1. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  2. The effect of glycolysis inhibitors on the recovery of CHO-K1 cells from split-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.; Dublin Inst. of Tech.

    1987-01-01

    The survival and recovery of CHO-K1 cells exposed to three inhibitors of different glycolytic enzymes was studied. All enzymes have previously been shown to reduce survival by acting on the survival curve shoulder. Split dose recovery, however, was increased when cells were treated with sodium iodoacetate or with sodium arsenate but decreased with sodium fluoride. The effect with the first two compounds was similar to that observed under similar conditions with glucose analogues, lactate, or oxamate and suggest that glycolytic energy metabolism is a factor in both survival and recovery of these cells from radiation. (orig.)

  3. Enhanced activity of deoxycytidine kinase after pulsed low dose rate and single dose gamma irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigmond, J.; Haveman, J.; Kreder, N. Castro; Loves, W. J.; van Bree, C.; Franken, N. A.; Peters, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    In both pulsed low dose rate (LDR) and single high dose radiation schedules, gemcitabine pretreatment sensitizes tumor cells to radiation. These radiosensitizing effects could be the result of decreased DNA repair. In this study, the effect of irradiation on the deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) needed for

  4. Reproductive death and population kinetics in survival fractions of in vitro hamster cells during 48 hours after X-irradiation with doses up to 800 Rds. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1976-01-01

    By means of a quantitative analysis, the time dependency of the number of dead cells and the resulting statement of cell numbers are compared with colony survival curves and with the distribution of colony sizes. The obtained periodical variation of reproductively killed cells is analyzed through population kinetics and is reduced to the number of those among the irradiated cells which show radiation-induced lethal reproductive damage. Therefrom, together with both sorts of interphase-dead cells, the dose dependency of the three lethal fractions results, taking into consideration the quantitative cellular statement. The formation of maxima of reproductively killed cells at the intervals of generation time until F 3 -generation is explained by an autosynchronization of partly lethally injured cell populations. From colony size distributions a linear dose dependency of the mean colony size group can be derived; this is discussed in connection with DNA double strand breaks regarded as a possible cause of reproductive lethal damages. The data obtained concerning the development of a cell population with radiation damages are evaluated by the construction of phylogenetic schedules for every 300 rd and 500 rd. By this means, the underlying population kinetics is being revised quantitatively. (orig.) [de

  5. Increased viability and resilience of haemolymph cells in blue mussels following pre-treatment with acute high-dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    In an initial experiment, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to a range of acute high doses of gamma radiation in the laboratory. Haemolymph was extracted and the haemocytes (blood cells) were scored for cell viability (% living cells) under a microscope, directly after irradiation (0.04, 0.4 or 4 Gy) and again after a subsequent treatment with hydrogen peroxide in vitro (final H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conc.: 0.2 μM). Cell viability in controls (0 Gy) was approximately 100% and no cell death was observable from radiation exposure alone. When treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} a decrease in cell viability was seen across all treatments, however this decrease in viability was reduced with increasing radiation pre-treatment (0 Gy = 53%; 0.04 Gy = 66%; 0.4 Gy = 75%; 4 Gy = 83%). To investigate the mechanism for this therapeutic effect observed, the experiment was repeated. Using mussels from a different location, the same, but more extensive method of irradiation (0[control], 0.04, 0.4 Gy, 5 or 40 Gy) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was used. Additional haemolymph sub-samples were taken for analysis of catalase concentration. In this second experiment, viability of cells from controls was only 62%, indicating the mussels were in a poorer condition than those of the previous experiment. The lowest level of radiation exposure (0.04 Gy) further decreased the viability (56%). However, at higher doses the viability was increased compared to control, which then gradually declined with increasing dose (0.4 Gy = 75%; 5 Gy = 72%; 40 Gy = 65%). Catalase analysis demonstrated a complimentary pattern of activity of the antioxidant in the haemolymph, directly correlating with radiation dose (0 Gy = 0.2 U; 0.04 Gy = 0.1 U; 0.4 Gy = 1.3 U; 5 Gy = 0.9 U; 40 Gy = 0.1 Gy). Treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased cell viability across all treatments, but no pattern between radiation treatments was discernable. The results indicate that an acute dose of radiation not only has negligible

  6. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  7. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  8. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  9. New method for the evaluation of the response of cultured cell lines to continuous low-dose-rate irradiation from encapsulated iridium-192 seeds with hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Kunishio, Katsuzo; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    A new method was designed to investigate and evaluate the biological effectiveness of hyperthermia combined with continuous low-dose-rate irradiation (CLDRI) from encapsulated iridium-192 seed sources on glioma cells in vitro using the MTT assay. The system consists of 10 iridium seeds contained in a catheter bent into a circle, which is placed on a culture plate containing the cells. The effects of CLDRI and CLDRI combined with hyperthermia on a cultured rat glioma call line (C-6) were studied. The number of surviving cells decreased as the total radiation dose increased. There was no significant difference in survival rates at dose rates of 0.1 Gy/hr and of 0.2 Gy/hr (p=0.2811). An additive effect was observed in the cells treated with hyperthermia at 41degC and 42degC, combined with CLDRI, and a synergistic effect between the two treatment modalities was observed at 43degC. This new device is less expensive, easily reproducible, and can also be performed easily enough to examine a large number of samples in a short time period for sensitivity testing. (author)

  10. Anomalous dose-response characteristics induced by caffeine in ultraviolet-irradiated V79-79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroy, C.B.; Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster cell line V79-79 exhibited an increase in survival with increasing UV fluence after a sharp decrease when exposed to 2.5 mM caffeine for 44 h after far-UV irradiation resulting in an anomalous maximum in the survival curve. No survival maximum was evident when either 0 or 1 mM caffeine is administered under the same conditions. The UV survival curve for 2.5 mM caffeine crossed the corresponding 1 mM curve and apparently became asymptotic to the 0 mM curve as UV fluence was increased. Chinese hamster cell lines V79-753B (related to V79-79 by derivation from the same parental line) and M3-1F3 (unrelated) exhibited only potentiation of post-UV lethality by the same concentration of caffeine and had no caffeine-induced anomalies in their survival curves. Xanthine, used alone or in combination with caffeine, only potentiated a slight amount of lethality and appeared not to be a major causative factor of the anomaly. (author)

  11. Establishing the irradiation dose for paper decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moise, Ioan Valentin; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin Daniel; Manea, Mihaela; Alexandru, Mioara; Trandafir, Laura; Zorila, Florina Lucica; Talasman, Catalina Mihaela; Manea, Daniela; Nisipeanu, Steluta; Haiducu, Maria; Balan, Zamfir

    2012-01-01

    Museums, libraries and archives are preserving documents that are slowly degrading due to the inherent ageing of the cellulose substrate or to the technological errors of the past (acid paper, iron gall ink). Beside this, large quantities of paper are rapidly damaged by biological attacks following natural disasters and improper storage conditions. The treatment of paper documents with ionizing radiation can be used for mass decontamination of cultural heritage items but conservators and restaurators are still reserved because of the radiation induced degradation. We conducted a study for establishing the dose needed for the effective treatment of paper documents, taking into account the biological burden and the irradiation effects on paper structure. We used physical testing specific to paper industry and less destructive analytical methods (thermal analysis). Our results show that an effective treatment can be performed with doses lower than 10 kGy. Old paper appears to be less affected by gamma radiation than recent paper but the sampling is highly affected by the non-uniform degree of the initial degradation status. The extent of testing for degradation and the magnitude of acceptable degradation should take into account the biological threat and the expected life time of the paper documents. - RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: ► For doses <15 kGy, the measurement uncertainty of mechanical properties is higher than the radiation induced degradation. ► The statistics of measuring induced degradation may be improved by testing both mechanical properties and thermal decomposition of paper. ►Because of the large variability of paper samples, testing to only one irradiation dose has no or reduced relevance. ►It was choused for the irradiation of paper items from archives and collections a dose range of 5–7 kGy.

  12. Kinetics of endogenous CFU-s in mice receiving divided-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Yori

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between dose and survival of endogenous CFUs in mice irradiated by a single dose of 167.2 rad was similar to that in mice receiving three daily doses of 55.7 rad each. In the latter dose range, the effect of dose fractionation was not evident. For five days after divided doses of irradiation, the CFUs increased with a calculated Td of 34.6 hours. For this period, the reduction of CFUs by HU treatment reached 86%. Eleven days after the divided doses of irradiation, the reactions of the CFUs kinetics were similar to the reactions in mice without the previously divided doses of irradiation. The recovery from injury caused by divided irradiation seems to occur within 11 days. The parameter p of CFUs was 0.54 and α was 0.46 for the A cell. One may conclude, therefore, that the kinetics of endogenous CFUs is similar to that of transplanted CFUs. (author)

  13. Sublethal dose of irradiation enhances invasion of malignant glioma cells through p53-MMP 2 pathway in U87MG mouse brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Jian; Park, In-Ho; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Wen, Min; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal neoplasm that frequently recurs locally after radiotherapy, and most of these recurrences originate from near the irradiated target field. In the present study, we identified the effects of radiation on glioma invasion and p53, TIMP-2, and MMP-2 expression through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The U87MG (wt p53) and U251 (mt p53) human malignant glioma cell lines were prepared, and the U2OS (wt 53) and Saos2 (del p53) osteosarcoma cell lines were used as p53 positive and negative controls. The four cell lines and p53 knock-downed U87MG cells received radiation (2–6 Gy) and were analyzed for expression of p53 and TIMP-2 by Western blot, and MMP-2 activity was detected by zymography. In addition, the effects of irradiation on directional invasion of malignant glioma were evaluated by implanting nude mice with bioluminescent u87-Fluc in vivo followed by MMP-2, p53, and TIMP-2 immunohisto-chemistry and in situ zymography. MMP-2 activity and p53 expression increased in proportional to the radiation dose in cell lines with wt p53, but not in the cell lines with del or mt p53. TIMP-2 expression did not increase in U87MG cells. MMP-2 activity decreased in p53 knock-downed U87MG cells but increased in the control group. Furthermore, radiation enhanced MMP-2 activity and increased tumor margin invasiveness in vivo. Tumor cells invaded by radiation overexpressed MMP-2 and p53 and revealed high gelatinolytic activity compared with those of non-radiated tumor cells. Radiation-induced upregulation of p53 modulated MMP-2 activity, and the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 may have an important role in glioblastoma invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. Bioluminescent “U87-Fluc”was useful for observing tumor formation without sacrifice after implanting tumor cells in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the radiotherapy involved field for malignant glioma needs to be reconsidered, and that future trials should investigate

  14. Cell Morphology Change by the Ultraviolet Ray Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Myung Joo; Matuo, Yoichirou; Akiyama, Yoko; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on morphology changes of cell has been studied based on the observation of the cell length. It was shown that UV-irradiated cell has different behavior in comparison with nonirradiated cell. From the histogram of cell-length distribution, it was confirmed that cell cycle of non irradiated cell was 28 hours, and that cell cycle of irradiated cell with dose of 20 Jm -2 was delayed (39 hours), while irradiated cell with 40 Jm -2 and 60 Jm -2 did not divide and kept growing continuously. It was supposed that in case of 20 Jm -2 of irradiation dose, the cell cycle was delayed because the checkpoint worked in order to repair DNA damage induced by generation of pyrimidine dimer, reactive oxygen species and so on. It was also supposed that in case of 40 Jm -2 and 60 Jm -2 of irradiation dose, overgrowth was induced because the checkpoint was not worked well. The morphology of overgrown cell was similar to that of normally senescent cell. Therefore, it was considered that cell senescence was accelerated by UV irradiation with irradiation doses of 40 Jm -2 and 60 Jm -2

  15. Cell Morphology Change by the Ultraviolet Ray Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Myung Joo; Matuo, Yoichirou; Akiyama, Yoko; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    The effect of low doses of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on morphology changes of cell has been studied based on the observation of the cell length. It was shown that UV-irradiated cell has different behavior in comparison with nonirradiated cell. From the histogram of cell-length distribution, it was confirmed that cell cycle of non irradiated cell was 28 hours, and that cell cycle of irradiated cell with dose of 20 Jm{sup -2} was delayed (39 hours), while irradiated cell with 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2} did not divide and kept growing continuously. It was supposed that in case of 20 Jm{sup -2} of irradiation dose, the cell cycle was delayed because the checkpoint worked in order to repair DNA damage induced by generation of pyrimidine dimer, reactive oxygen species and so on. It was also supposed that in case of 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2} of irradiation dose, overgrowth was induced because the checkpoint was not worked well. The morphology of overgrown cell was similar to that of normally senescent cell. Therefore, it was considered that cell senescence was accelerated by UV irradiation with irradiation doses of 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2}

  16. Transcriptome profiling of mice testes following low dose irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine C.; Tanaka, Masami; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is used routinely to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cells vary in radio-sensitivity and the aim of this study was to investigate cellular and molecular changes caused by low dose irradiation of mice testis and to identify transcripts from different cell types...... in the adult testis. METHODS: Transcriptome profiling was performed on total RNA from testes sampled at various time points (n = 17) after 1 Gy of irradiation. Transcripts displaying large overall expression changes during the time series, but small expression changes between neighbouring time points were...... selected for further analysis. These transcripts were separated into clusters and their cellular origin was determined. Immunohistochemistry and in silico quantification was further used to study cellular changes post-irradiation (pi). RESULTS: We identified a subset of transcripts (n = 988) where changes...

  17. New approach to the approximation of «dose – effect» dependence during the human somatic cells irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Chekhun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New data on cytogenetic approximation of the experimental cytogenetic dependence "dose - effect" based on the spline regression model that improves biological dosimetry of human radiological exposure were received. This is achieved by reducing the error of the determination of absorbed dose as compared to the traditional use of linear and linear-quadratic models and makes it possible to predict the effect of dose curves on plateau.

  18. The application of high dose food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyn, I. De [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa LTD, Building 2000, P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001, (South Africa)

    1997-12-31

    During the 1950`s to end 1970`s the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive `dried cooked` taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 25 to 45 kGy (depending on the product) at a temperature of between -20 and -40 Centigrade to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions. The product can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. (Author)

  19. The application of high dose food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyn, I. De

    1997-01-01

    During the 1950's to end 1970's the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive 'dried cooked' taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 25 to 45 kGy (depending on the product) at a temperature of between -20 and -40 Centigrade to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions. The product can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. (Author)

  20. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  1. Assessment of simulated high-dose partial-body irradiation by PCC-R assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ivonne; García, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I; Gregoire, Eric; González, Jorge E; Morales, Wilfredo; Martin, Cécile; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Voisin, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of the dose and the irradiated fraction of the body is important information in the primary medical response in case of a radiological accident. The PCC-R assay has been developed for high-dose estimations, but little attention has been given to its applicability for partial-body irradiations. In the present work we estimated the doses and the percentage of the irradiated fraction in simulated partial-body radiation exposures at high doses using the PCC-R assay. Peripheral whole blood of three healthy donors was exposed to doses from 0-20 Gy, with ⁶⁰Co gamma radiation. To simulate partial body irradiations, irradiated and non-irradiated blood was mixed to obtain proportions of irradiated blood from 10-90%. Lymphocyte cultures were treated with Colcemid and Calyculin-A before harvest. Conventional and triage scores were performed for each dose, proportion of irradiated blood and donor. The Papworth's u test was used to evaluate the PCC-R distribution per cell. A dose-response relationship was fitted according to the maximum likelihood method using the frequencies of PCC-R obtained from 100% irradiated blood. The dose to the partially irradiated blood was estimated using the Contaminated Poisson method. A new D₀ value of 10.9 Gy was calculated and used to estimate the initial fraction of irradiated cells. The results presented here indicate that by PCC-R it is possible to distinguish between simulated partial- and whole-body irradiations by the u-test, and to accurately estimate the dose from 10-20 Gy, and the initial fraction of irradiated cells in the interval from 10-90%.

  2. Alternatives to dose, quality factor and dose equivalent for low level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to the sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Normalizing to equal numbers of events produced by different radiations and applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) should define radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose evaluation, which are confounded when applied to low level irradiations. Examples using both calculation and experimental data are presented. 15 refs., 18 figs

  3. Determination of the dose rate to the center of the irradiation chamber of the Gamma cell 220 AECL; Determinacion de la razon de dosis al centro de la camara de irradiacion del Gammacell 220 AECL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuazua G, M.P

    1991-11-15

    To determine the dose rate at the center of the irradiation chamber of the Gamma cell 220 AECL, two different spectrophotometers for to measure the absorbency of the irradiated dosemeters were used. In the first one dosimetry, the absorbency of the irradiated Fricke solution was read in the Varian-UV-visible spectrophotometer Series 634 of the Applied Research Management. For the second dosimetry it was used the Shimadzu UV-visible spectrophotometer belonging to the Special Projects Department. The obtained results in this study are presented. (Author)

  4. Total Skin Electron Irradiation: Evaluation of Dose Uniformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Y.; Arican, Z.; Bar-Deroma, R.; Kuten, A.

    2002-01-01

    Total Skin Electron Beam Irradiation (TSEI) is one of the most sophisticated treatment techniques of modern radiation oncology practice. TSEI is used in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides (MF), and Kaposi sarcoma. The objective of TSEI is to uniformly deliver a specified dose over the entire skin surface down to a particular depth. However, considerable technical and dosimetric difficulties exist in achieving this goal due to patient and treatment machine factors. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements are usually performed to evaluate dose distribution throughout the body. This paper presents the in vivo dosimetric data of 67 treatments on 58 patients with MF, treated with TSEI

  5. Hematological changes after single large dose half-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.; Friedrich, S.; Jochem, I.; Eberhardt, H.J.; Koch, R.; Knorr, A.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of different peripheral blood parameters aimed at the study of side effects on the hematological cellular system following a 5 - 8 Gy single large dose half-body irradiation in 20 patients. Compared to the initial values the leukocytes between the 6. and 14., the thrombocytes between the 14. and 21. postirradiation day as well as the lymphocytes between 3 hours and 4 weeks postirradiation were significantly decreased without exhibiting complications such as hemorrhages or infections. The hemoglobin, hematocrit and reticulocyte values revealed but a slight decrease normalized within a 28 days postirradiation period. Transfusions were necessary when a tumor-caused anemia was present prior to irradiation. Changes in serum activity of aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase occured during the first hours after irradiation and were due to enzyme release from destroyed tumor cells

  6. Induction of lacI- mutations in Escherichia coli cells after single and split-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.; Ryznar, L.

    1992-01-01

    In the lacI system of Escherichia coli, X-ray mutagenesis follows a linear-quadratic curve with suppression; the survival curve is exponential. Dose fractionation leads to nearly complete repair of premutational lesions during an incubation interval of 3.5 h. Repair starts with a delay of 1.5-2 h, suggesting the involvement of an inducible repair/mutation fixation system. The dose-dependence of mutagenesis is described by a simple model assuming two hits being required. A probable explanation might be that the premutagenic lesions consist of two closely spaced lesions on the opposite strands of the DNA molecule. (author)

  7. Long-term results of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 non-small-cell lung cancer: Is low incidence of regional failure due to incidental nodal irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Hayman, James A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel; Fernando, Shaneli; Kong, F.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of high-dose conformal irradiation and examine incidental nodal irradiation and nodal failure in patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included patients with inoperable CT-staged T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated on our prospective dose-escalation trial. Patients were treated with radiation alone (total dose, 63-102.9 Gy in 2.1-Gy daily fractions) with a three-dimensional conformal technique without intentional nodal irradiation. Bilateral highest mediastinal and upper/lower paratracheal, prevascular and retrotracheal, sub- and para-aortic, subcarinal, paraesophageal, and ipsilateral hilar regions were delineated individually. Nodal failure and doses of incidental irradiation were studied. Results: The potential median follow-up was 104 months. For patients who completed protocol treatment, median survival was 31 months. The actuarial overall survival rate was 86%, 61%, 43%, and 21% and the cause-specific survival rate was 89%, 70%, 53%, and 35% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Weight loss (p = 0.008) and radiation dose in Gy (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with overall survival. In only 22% and 13% of patients examined did ipsilateral hilar and paratracheal (and subaortic for left-sided tumor) nodal regions receive a dose of ≥40 Gy, respectively. Less than 10% of all other nodal regions received a dose of ≥40 Gy. No patients failed initially at nodal sites. Conclusions: Radiation dose is positively associated with overall survival in patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 NSCLC, though long-term results remain poor. The nodal failure rate is low and does not seem to be due to high-dose incidental irradiation

  8. Cholesterol metabolism in blood cells of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselova, E.G.; Kulagina, T.P.; Potekhina, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism in blood erythrocytes and lymphocytes of irradiated rats has been investigated. It has been found that at all terms and doses of irradiation, a suppression of the synthesis of erythrocyte cholesterol is observed. The increase of cholesterol quantiy in erythrocytes upon total gamma irradiation in the 10 Gr dose possibly is the result of growth of cholesterol transfer from plasma into erythrocyte cells. The study of the cholesterol synthesis in suspension of lymphocytes elminated from peripheral blood of control and irradiated rats has shown that at irradiation doses of 4 and 10 Gr in an hour acivation of cholesterol synthesis in vitro takes places

  9. X-raying with low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malevich, E.E.; Kisel, E.M.; Shpita, I.D.; Lazovsky, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of the improvement of diagnostics quality and reduction of beam load on a patient in modern x-ray devices pulse x-raying is applied. It is based on the using of radiation pulses with various frequencies of intervals between them instead of continuous radiation. At pulse x-raying with the net control the principle of filling of an interval is used, when the information about the image, received with the last pulse, get into memory and is displayed before occurrence of other pulse. It creates impression of the continuous image even at low frequency of pulses. Due to the unique concept of the simultaneous (double) control, all of 3 parameters, which define the quality of the image (pressure(voltage), force of a current and length of a pulse), are adjusted automatically at each pulse, thus optimum adaptation to varied thickness of object during dynamic researches occurs. At x-raying pulse the presence of a free interval from x-ray radiation between two pulses results in the decrease of a radiation dose. Pulsing occurs some times per one second with equal intervals between pulses. Thus, the degree of decrease irradiation dose depends on duration of a pause between pulses. On the screen the image of last pulse before occurrence of the following is kept and repeats. The principle of x-raying pulse was realized in system Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy by the firm 'Philips Medi zin Systeme'. In the x-ray tube of this system inclusion and de energizing of radiation occurs directly on a source. Electron cloud is broken off by the special grid, which is located between the cathode and the anode and operates as a barrier. Thus the tube continues to be energized. In usual devices for pulses formation is used generator pulsation system, which at increase and attenuation of a x-ray pulse results in occurrence of the increasing and fading radiation which are not participating in the formation of the image, but creating beam load on the patient and the personnel. Thus

  10. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  11. Paint compositions for indicating irradiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Murata, K.

    1975-01-01

    Paint compositions for indicating irradiation dose are prepared from chlorine-combined polyester, 5 to 30 percent by weight of a reductive discoloring substance or a mixture of said substances, and/or 0.005 to 2.0 percent by weight of a reducing dyestuff or a mixture of said dyestuffs, in which said chlorine-combined polyester is obtained by a chlorinated dibasic acid or its anhydride as an acid component or a part of an acid component selected from a group consisting of 3-chlorophthalic acid, 4-chlorophthalic acid, dichlorinated phthalic acid, tetrachlorophthalic acid, 1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachlorobicyclo-(2,2,1)-5-heptene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, 4-chloro-4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid and the anhydrides corresponding to said acids. (auth)

  12. Prevention of MHC-alloimmunization by UV-B irradiation in a murine model: effects of UV dose and number of transfused cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grijzenhout, M.A.; Claas, F.H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal dose of UV-B radiation for prevention of in vivo alloimmunization (AI) against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens was investigated in a murine transfusion model. Two groups with five C57BL/6 mice (H-2 b ) each were transfused at weekly intervals with 1 x 10 5 or 1 x 10 6 DBA/2 (H-2 d ) leucocytes. Both suspensions induced anti-H-2 d antibodies in all mice after the second transfusion. The minimal UV-B dose required for abolition of alloreactivity in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) was 0.6 J/cm 2 . This dose completely prevented the onset of MHC-AI in all five mice transfused with six suspensions containing 1 x 10 5 leucocytes. In contrast, suspensions with 1 x 10 6 leucocytes and exposed to 0.6 J/cm 2 induced immunization in 4/5 mice. Further increase of the dose to 1.8 or 5.4 J/cm 2 did not prevent the onset of MHC-AI. We conclude that the number of leucocytes per transfusion determines the efficacy of UV irradiation for the prevention of MHC-AI. For UV irradiation of human platelet concentrates (PCs) we propose to reduce the number of leucocytes by centrifugation prior to UV exposure. UV-B irradiation of PCs with high numbers of leucocytes may not be effective for prevention of alloimmunization. (Author)

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  14. Suppressing effect of low-dose gamma-ray irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Tago, Fumitoshi; Masada, Ayako; Kojima, Shuji

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported attenuation of autoimmune disease by low-dose gamma-ray irradiation in MRL-lpr/lpr mice. Here, we studied the effect of low-dose gamma-ray irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Mice were immunized with type II collagen, and exposed to low-dose gamma-rays (0.5 Gy per week for 5 weeks). Paw swelling, redness, and bone degradation were suppressed by irradiation, which also delayed the onset of pathological change and reduced the severity of the arthritis. Production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and interleukin-6, which play important roles in the onset of CIA, was suppressed by the irradiation. The level of anti-type II collagen antibody, which is essential for the onset of CIA, was also lower in irradiated CIA mice. The population of plasma cells was increased in CIA mice, but irradiation blocked this increase. Since regulatory T cells are known to be involved in suppression of autoimmune disease, the population of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells was measured. Intriguingly, a significant increase of these regulatory T cells was found in irradiated CIA mice. Overall, our data suggest that low-dose gamma-ray irradiation could attenuate CIA through suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoantibody production, and induction of regulatory T cells. (author)

  15. Pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate blunted p53 response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Asakawa, I.; Tamamoto, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Yuki, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Tachibana, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied whether the p53-centered signal transduction pathway induced by acute radiation is interfered with chronic pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate in human cultured cells and whole body of mice. In squamous cell carcinoma cells, we found that a challenge irradiation with X-ray immediately after chronic irradiation resulted in lower levels of p53 than those observed after the challenge irradiation alone. In addition, the induction of p53-centered apoptosis and the accumulation of its related proteins after the challenge irradiation were strongly correlated with the above-mentioned phenomena. In mouse spleen, the induction of apoptosis and the accumulation of p53 and Bax were observed dose-dependently at 12 h after a challenge irradiation. In contrast, we found significant suppression of them induced by challenge irradiation at a high dose-rate when mice were pre-irradiated with chronic irradiation at a low dose-rate. These findings suggest that chronic pre-irradiation suppressed the p53 function through radiation-induced p53-dependent signal transduction processes. There are numerous papers about p53 functions in apoptosis, radiosensitivity, genomic instability and cancer incidence in cultured cells or animals. According to our data and other findings, since p53 can prevent carcinogenesis, pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate might enhance the predisposition to cancer. Therefore, it is possible that different maximal permissible dose equivalents for the public populations are appropriate. Furthermore, concerning health of human beings, studies of the adaptive responses to radiation are quite important, because the radiation response strongly depends on experience of prior exposure to radiation

  16. Chromosome instability and global gene expression patterns in proliferating human T-lymphocytes after low dose rate γ-irradiation, and genetic instability in cells from in vivo radiation-exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, Kerstin; Faelt, Susann; Wennborg, Anders; Lambert, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (Cl), and radiation induced Cl in particular, as well as in a wider sense, genomic instability, has been of great interest lately, as it provides an explanation for the occurrence of multiple mutations during transformation of a normal cell to a malignant tumor cell. To explore this phenomenon, we developed an in vitro system to study the long term, cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation in human T-lymphocytes. Irradiated or non-irradiated T-cells were grown for up to two months as monoclonal or bulk cell cultures in medium enriched with T-cell growth factors. Analysis of G-banded karyotypes at different time intervals demonstrated clonal aberrations in 65% of the clones derived from irradiated cells, and in only 5% of the clones from non-irradiated cells. Delayed occurrence of de novo aberrations, and a progressive development of subclones with karyotypic abnormalities of increasing complexity, was observed many cell generations after the radiation exposure. Moreover, cells exposed to γ-radiation at a low dose rate (LDR, 0.024 Gy h -1 ) for 5 days in G 0 -phase, e.g. a dose that gives the cells time to repair between subsequent hits, also demonstrated CI. Following a radiological accident in Estonia 1994, we studied the possible induction of CI in vivo. Both long term bulk cultures and single cell clones were established from one high and three low exposed persons, as well as control individuals from Estonia. Compared to our historical Swedish controls, we found CI to occur in both bulk cultures and clones, and the aberrations were more complex in the exposed individuals than in the controls, indicating that the aberrations were caused by the irradiation. However, due to the high frequency of CI in the Estonian controls, no conclusion with regard to chromosomal instability in vivo could be drawn from the study. In order to trace factors that induce and maintain the chromosomal instability, and clarify which steps are affected in the

  17. Absorbed dose distribution analyses in irradiation with adjacent fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudalbu, C.; Onuc, C.; Andrada, S.

    2002-01-01

    Because the special irradiation technique with adjacent fields is the most used in the case of medulloblastoma treatment, we consider very important to specify some general information about medulloblastoma. This malignant disease has a large incidence in children with age between 5-7 years. This tumor usually originates in the cerebellum and is referred to as primitive undifferentiated tumor. It may spread contiguously to the cerebellar peduncle, floor of the fourth ventricle, into the cervical spine. In addition, it may spread via the cerebrospinal fluid intracranially and/or to the spinal cord. For this purpose it is necessary to perform a treatment technique with cranial tangential fields combined with adjacent fields for the entire spinal cord to achieve a perfect coverage of the zones with malignant cells. The treatment in this case is an association between surgery-radio-chemotherapy, where the radiotherapy has a very important roll and a curative purpose. This is due to the fact that the migration of malignant cells in the body can't be controlled by surgery. Because of this special irradiation technique used in medulloblastoma treatment, we chase to describe in this paper this complex type of irradiation where the implications of the beams divergence in doses distribution are essentials

  18. Dose mapping inside a gamma irradiator measured with doped silica fibre dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, F.; Khandaker, M. U.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years doped silica fibre thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) have been demonstrated to have considerable potential for irradiation applications, benefitting from the available sensitivity, spatial resolution and dynamic dose range, with primary focus being on the needs of medical dosimetry. Present study concerns the dose distribution inside a cylindrically shaped gamma-ray irradiator cavity, with irradiator facilities such as the familiar 60Co versions being popularly used in industrial applications. Quality assurance of the radiation dose distribution inside the irradiation cell of such a device is of central importance in respect of the delivered dose to the irradiated material. Silica fibre TLD dose-rates obtained within a Gammacell-220 irradiator cavity show the existence of non-negligible dose distribution heterogeneity, by up to 20% and 26% in the radial and axial directions respectively, Monte Carlo simulations and available literature providing some support for present findings. In practice, it is evident that there is need to consider making corrections to nominal dose-rates in order to avoid the potential for under-dosing.

  19. Post-irradiation stability of polyvinyl chloride at sterilizing doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimian, F.; Katbab, A.A.; Nazokdast, H.

    1994-01-01

    Post-irradiation stability of plasticized PVC irradiated by 60 Co gamma ray at sterilizing doses has been studied. Effects of irradiation upon chemical structure, mechanical properties and rheological behaviour of samples contained different amounts of Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate as plasticizer have been investigated. Formation of conjugated double bonds, carbonyl and hydroxyl groups have been followed by UV and FTIR spectrometers up to 6 months after irradiation. FTIR spectra of irradiated samples showed no significant changes in carbonyl and hydroxyl groups even 6 months after irradiation. However, changes in UV-visible spectra was observed for the irradiated samples up to 6 months post-irradiation. This has been attributed to the formation of polyenes which leads to the discoloration of this polymer. Despite a certain degree of discoloration, it appears that the mechanical properties of PVC are not affected by irradiation at sterilizing doses. No change in the melt viscosity of the irradiated PVC samples with post-irradiation was observed, which is inconsistent with the IR results. (author)

  20. Experimental observation of lens damage after low doses of γ-ray irradiation to rabbit eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xicheng; Hu Chunzhi; Wang Huijun; Zeng Aiping

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and evaluate low dose γ-ray radiation induced lens damage. Methods: Both eyes of each rabbit were exposed to a single dose of 25 or 50 cGy γ-rays in two groups, respectively. Samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and slit lamp microscopy (SLM)after irradiation. Results: Three days after 25 and 50 cGy irradiation,the epithelial cells of lens equator al region showed marked swelling and many vacuoles formed in intercellular space and cytoplasm,and accompanied by increased multi-lamellar bodies. Five months after irradiation, SLM of both groups showed that the posterior sub-capsule cortex exhibited clusters of vacuoles; 11 months after 50 cGy irradiation,the posterior sub-capsule and deep cortex manifested marked cloudy opacities. Conclusion: Low doses of γ-ray (25 and 50 cGy) irradiation can markedly damage lens of rabbits

  1. Dose controlled low energy electron irradiator for biomolecular films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S V K; Tare, Satej T; Upalekar, Yogesh V; Tsering, Thupten

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a multi target, Low Energy Electron (LEE), precise dose controlled irradiator for biomolecular films. Up to seven samples can be irradiated one after another at any preset electron energy and dose under UHV conditions without venting the chamber. In addition, one more sample goes through all the steps except irradiation, which can be used as control for comparison with the irradiated samples. All the samples are protected against stray electron irradiation by biasing them at -20 V during the entire period, except during irradiation. Ethernet based communication electronics hardware, LEE beam control electronics and computer interface were developed in house. The user Graphical User Interface to control the irradiation and dose measurement was developed using National Instruments Lab Windows CVI. The working and reliability of the dose controlled irradiator has been fully tested over the electron energy range of 0.5 to 500 eV by studying LEE induced single strand breaks to ΦX174 RF1 dsDNA.

  2. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shamma, M A; Sharabi, N

    2002-01-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays.

  3. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  4. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  5. Relative biological effectiveness of 125I seeds for low-dose-rate irradiation of PANC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jidong; Wang Junjie; Zhuang Hongqing; Liao Anyan; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relative biological effectiveness(RBE) of National Model 6711 125 I seeds and the response patterns of PANC-1 exposed to 125 I seeds irradiation. Methods: PANC-1 cells in exponential growth were irradiated at initial dose rate of 2.59 cGy/h in vitro and exposed to 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. Meanwhile, the other part of cells were exposed to the same doses by 60 Co at dose rate of 2.21 Gy/min. After irradiation, the cells were stained by trypan blue to measure the cellular mortality rate and to compare the changes along with plating times of 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after 4 Gy. The colonies were counted to obtain the plating efficiencies by colony-forming assay and the cell surviving faction was calculated to plot cell survival curves, and RBE of 125 I seeds relative to 60 Co was determined. Results: The cell death rate for continuous low- dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds was greater than 60 Co at the same doses above or equal to 4 Gy. After 4 Gy irradiation, the cellular mortality rates were increased with times. The difference was significant between 125 I seeds and 60 Co. The survival fractions of 125 I were lower than those of 60 Co, and the RBE of 125 I relative to 60 Co was determined to be 1.45. Conclusion: The cell-killing effects for continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds are greater than acute high-dose-rate of 60 Co. (authors)

  6. Identification of irradiated foods prospects for post-irradiation estimate of irradiation dose in irradiated dry egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Raxem, B.; Mihaljievic, B.; Razem, D.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced chemical changes in foods are generally very small at the usual processing doses. Some exception is radiation degradation of lipids, which are the components most susceptible to oxidation. A possible use of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) as indicators of irradiation is described for whole egg and egg yolk powders. A sensitive and reproducible spectrophotometric method for LOOH measurement based on feric thiocyanate, as modified in our laboratory, was applied. This method enabled the determination of LOOH, including oleic acid hydroperoxides, which is usually not possible with some other frequently used methods. The lowest limit of 0.05 mmol LOOH/kg lipid could be measured. The measurements were performed in various batches of whole egg and egg yolk powders by the same producer, as well as in samples supplied by various producers. Baseline level in unirradiated egg powder 0.110 ± 0.067 mmol LOOH /kgL was established. The formation of LOOH with dose, as well as the influence of age, irradiation conditions, storage time and storage conditions on LOOH were investigated. The irradiation of whole egg and egg yolk powders in the presence of air revealed an initially slow increase of LOOH, caused by an inherent antioxidative capacity, followed by a fast linear increase after the inhibition dose (D o ). In all investigated samples D o of 2 kGy was determined. Hydroperoxides produced in irradiated materials decay with time. In whole egg and egg yolk powders, after an initially fast decay, the level of LOOH continued to decrease by the first-order decay. Nevertheless, after a six months storage it was still possible to unambiguously identify samples which had been irradiated with 2 kGy in the presence of air. Reirradiation of these samples revealed a significant reduction of D o to 1 kGy. In samples irradiated with 4 kGy and kept under the same conditions, the shortening of D o to 0.5 kGy was determined by reirradiation. This offers a possibility for the

  7. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  8. Dose mapping of the multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, E.G.; Lanuza, L.G.; Villamater, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    In radiation processing, reliable dosimetry constitutes a very important part of process control and quality assurance. Radiation dosimetry is the only acceptable method to guarantee that the irradiated product has undergone the correct radiation treatment. In preparation therefore, for the routine operation of the newly installed multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), dose mapping distribution studies were undertaken. Results of dose distribution in air as well as in dummy product are presented. The effects of product bulk density, product geometry and product to source distance on minimum absorbed dose and uniformity ratio have been determined. (Author)

  9. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  10. Cell survival of human tumor cells compared with normal fibroblasts following 60Co gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Henning, C.B.; Reynolds, S.D.; Holmblad, G.L.; Trier, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Three tumor cell lines, two of which were shown to be HeLa cells, were irradiated with 60 Co gamma irradiation, together with two cell cultures of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Cell survival was studied in three different experiments over a dose range of 2 to 14 gray. All the tumor cell lines showed a very wide shoulder in the dose response curves in contrast to the extremely narrow shoulder of the normal fibroblasts. In addition, the D/sub o/ values for the tumor cell lines were somewhat greater. These two characteristics of the dose response curves resulted in up to 2 orders of magnitude less sensitivity for cell inactivation of HeLa cells when compared with normal cells at high doses (10 gray). Because of these large differences, the extrapolation of results from the irradiation of HeLa cells concerning the mechanisms of normal cell killing should be interpreted with great caution

  11. Gamma irradiator dose mapping: a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Rogerio R.; Ribeiro, Mariana A.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Ferreira, Andrea V.; Meira-Belo, Luiz Claudio; Sousa, Romulo V.; Sebastiao, Rita de C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiator facilities can be used in a wide range of applications such as biological and chemical researches, food treatment and sterilization of medical devices and products. Dose mapping must be performed in these equipment in order to establish plant operational parameters, as dose uniformity, source utilization efficiency and maximum and minimum dose positions. The isodoses curves are generally measured using dosimeters distributed throughout the device, and this procedure often consume a large amount of dosimeters, irradiation time and manpower. However, a detailed curve doses identification of the irradiation facility can be performed using Monte Carlo simulation, which reduces significantly the monitoring with dosimeters. The present work evaluates the absorbed dose in the CDTN/CNEN Gammacell Irradiation Facility, using the Monte Carlo N-particles (MCNP) code. The Gammacell 220, serial number 39, was produced by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and was loaded with sources of 60 Co. Dose measurements using TLD and Fricke dosimeters were also performed to validate the calculations. The good agreement of the results shows that Monte Carlo simulations can be used as a predictive tool of irradiation planning for the CDTN/CNEN Gamma Cell Irradiator. (author)

  12. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2002-01-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  13. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  14. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr; Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G 0 -stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors’ blood irradiated in vitro to 0–40 Gy acute γ-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 ± 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 ± 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 ± 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2–4 Gy and 16.7 ± 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6–10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  15. The Optimum Irradiation Dose in Preservation of Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl.) As Anticancer Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendig Winarno; Ermin Katrin W; Wisnurahadi; Swasono R Tamat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to obtain the optimum irradiation dose, in order to preserve and protect the damage of anticancer compounds in mahkota dewa bark. The specimens of mahkota dewa bark were irradiated using 60 Co at the variation doses of 0; 5; 7,5 ; 10; 15; and 20 kGy, respectively at the dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The irradiated and control samples were macerated in n-hexane and ethyl acetate, respectively, then the ethyl acetate extract was then fractionated using chromatography column to obtain 8 fractions. The examination of irradiated and control samples of mahkota dewa bark against microbe contaminants showed that irradiation at doses ≥5 kGy could inhibit the growth of bacteria, mold and yeast and destroyed them. The cytotoxicity test of irradiated ethyl acetate extract of mahkota dewa bark against leukemia L1210 cell showed that irradiation at the dose up to 20 kGy can decreased cytotoxic activities performance, however these IC 50 values lower than 50 μg/ml, which is the cytotoxic activity threshold for extract. The cytotoxic activity test of fraction 6, the most active fraction in mahkota dewa bark, showed that irradiation at the dose up to 20 kGy can also decreased the cytotoxic activities performance, however these IC 50 values was lower than 20 μg/ml, which is the cytotoxic activity threshold for fraction. Analysis of 2,4’-dihydroxy-4 methoxy benzophenone-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in fraction 6 of irradiated samples showed that the concentration of this compound in irradiated samples significantly decreased, compared to the control sample. Decreasing the concentration of 2,4’-dihydroxy-4 methoxy benzophenone-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside was not comparable to the cytotoxic activity of ethyl acetate extract or fraction 6, therefore this compound can not be used as marker of irradiation effect on decreasing the cytotoxic activity of the mahkota dewa bark. Irradiation at doses of 5 up to 20 k

  16. Dose Profiles in ECAL Crystals for Various Irradiation Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Huhtinen, Mika

    1998-01-01

    Simulated dose profiles in various irradiation and beam test conditions are compared to the expected dose profiles in the ECAL crystals at LHC. Simple front or side irradiations with photons give too steep or too flat dose profiles, respectively. Thus, if dose maxima are fitted to agree, front irradiation underestimate the average dose whereas side irradiations tend to overestimate. Different profiles are difficult to compare reliably, but it seems likely that in both cases the discrepancy is about a factor of 2-3 but in different directions. For most purposes this is likely to be good enough, but should be taken into account in the interpretation of the test results. It is shown that using a customized lead mask between the source and the crystal can significantly improve the agreement between 60 Co side irradiations and the LHC predictions. A 400 MeV/c pion beam incident on a crystal matrix can also reproduce rather well the profiles expected in the barrel ECAL.

  17. TREX1 dictates the immune fate of irradiated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Formenti, Silvia C; Demaria, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The optimal radiation dose and fractionation to induce anti-tumor immunity remain elusive. We recently found that the exonuclease TREX1 abrogates the immunogenicity of irradiated cancer cells by degrading interferon-stimulatory cytosolic dsDNA. TREX1 upregulation by radiation dose per fraction beyond a threshold of 10-12 Gy results in poor synergy with immune checkpoint blockers.

  18. Protection of human cells against the effects of cadmium chloride by pretreatment with vitamins, interferon, and prior low-dose γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusainova, K.A.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Chekova, V.V.; Akhmatullina, N.B.; Zasukhina, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Within the increasing environmental pollution there is a need to discover means to protect humans from the mutagenic effects of chemical pollutants. Natural antimutagens such as interferon and vitamins have some protective properties. Interferons simulate a variety of repair pathways in human cells and reduce the numbers of mutations induced by physical and chemical mutagens. This study compares the protective properties of interferon and vitamins with the known protective effects of small doses of ionizing radiation

  19. Biological changes in experimental animals after irradiation with sublethal doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dae Seong; Park, Yong Dae; Jin, Chang Hyun; Byun, Myung Woo; Jeong, Il Yun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The objective of the present study was to investigate general clinical aspects such as weekly body weight and blood changes, and weekly food intake in gamma-irradiated C57BL/6j male mice fed AIN-76A purified rodent diet for 14 weeks. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy of gamma-rays (Gammacell 40 Exactor, {sup 137}Cs, MDS Nordion) at a dose rate of 1.8 {sub c}Gy per second. The mean body weight change of 6 Gy-irradiated mice significantly decreased when compared to that of the non-irradiated control mice. Moreover, high dose of radiation resulted in decreased levels of AST, ALT, but in increased levels of total cholersterol, triglyceride, HDL-C in mice.

  20. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  1. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  2. The postnatal progeny development of males whose sexual cells were irradiated during different stages of spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepekhin, N.P.; Palyga, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Distinct genetic radiosensitivity if germinal cells of males irradiated during different stages of spermatogenesis with doses of 0.25-5.0 Gy leads to reduction in vital newborn rats number in the first generation progeny and to elevated postnatal mortality rate. These postnatal ontogeny disorders depend on the irradiation dose and spermatogenesis stage for a moment irradiation. 11 refs.; 4 tabs

  3. The development of radiocaries after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willich, N.; Gundacker, K.; Rohloff, R.

    1988-01-01

    39 patients, who were irradiated with doses of 50 to 70 Gy for ENT-tumors over a period of 3.5 months to three years prior to the examination, showed a rapidly progressing caries of the teeth inside the target volume. The teeth outside the target volume developed a caries of less extent. Radiation induced xerostomia, effects of the irradiation of the soft tissues, nutrition habits and hygienics are discussed as causes for the damage of the teeth. (orig.) [de

  4. Effect of chromic γ-irradiation with small doses on candidiasis development in white rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchev, K.; Krushkov, Iv.

    1976-01-01

    Rats continuously exposed to 2 rads/day during eight months (cumulative dose of 400 rads) and nonirradiated rats were infected with a candida cells administered intravenously. All the irradiated animals died ten days after infection while only ten per cent of the control animals died for the same period of time. A morphological study has revealed candidiasis in the irradiated rats; changes, mainly in the kidneys, and formation of candidiasis granulomas have been detected in the control animals

  5. Gamma irradiation induced ultrastructural changes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demicheli, Marina C.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: marinademicheli@yahoo.com.br; antero@cdtn.br; Goes, Alfredo Miranda [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia]. E-mail: goes@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermally dimorphic fungus agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a deep-seated systemic infection of humans with high prevalence in Latin America. Up to the moment no vaccine has still been reported. Ionizing radiation can be used to attenuate pathogens for vaccine development and we have successfully attenuated yeast cells of P. brasiliensis by gamma irradiation. The aim of the present study was to examine at ultrastructural level the effects of gamma irradiation attenuation on the morphology of P. brasiliensis yeast cells. P. brasiliensis (strain Pb-18) cultures were irradiated with a dose of 6.5 kGy. The irradiated cells were examined by scanning and also transmission electron microscopy. When examined two hours after the irradiation by scanning electron microscopy the 6.5 kGy irradiated cells presented deep folds or were collapsed. These lesions were reversible since examined 48 hours after irradiation the yeast have recovered the usual morphology. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the irradiated cells plasma membrane and cell wall were intact and preserved. Remarkable changes were found in the nucleus that was frequently in a very electrodense form. A extensive DNA fragmentation was produced by the gamma irradiation treatment. (author)

  6. Survival curves for irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the probability of survival of biological cells which have been subjected to ionising radiation. The basic mathematical theories of cell survival as a function of radiation dose are developed. A brief comparison with observed survival curves is made. (author)

  7. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  8. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions....... Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine...

  9. Electron beam irradiation facility for low to high dose irradiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petwal, V.C.; Wanmode, Yashwant; Verma, Vijay Pal; Bhisikar, Abhay; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Shrivastava, P.; Gupta, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam based irradiation facilities are becoming more and more popular over the conventional irradiator facilities due to many inherent advantages such as tunability of beam energy, availability of radiation both in electron mode and X-ray mode, wide range of the dose rate, control of radiation from a ON-OFF switch and other safety related merits. A prototype experimental facility based on electron accelerator has been set-up at RRCAT to meet the low-dose, medium dose and high-dose requirements for radiation processing of food, agricultural and medical products. The facility can be operated in the energy range from 7-10 MeV at variable power level from 0.05-3 kW to meet the dose rate requirement of 100 Gy to kGy. The facility is also equipped with a Bremsstrahlung converter optimized for X-ray irradiation at 7.5 MV. Availability of dose delivery in wide range with precision control and measurement has made the facility an excellent tool for researchers interested in electron/X-ray beam irradiation. A precision dosimetry lab based on alanine EPR and radiochromic film dosimetry system have been established to characterize the radiation field and precise dose measurements. Electron beam scattering technique has been developed to achieve low dose requirement for EB irradiation of various seeds such as groundnut, wheat, soybeans, moong beans, black gram etc. for mutation related studies. This paper describes various features of the facility together with the dosimetric measurements carried out for qualification of the facility and recent irradiation experiments carried out using this facility. (author)

  10. Identification and dose evaluation of irradiated beef containing bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangiacotti, M.; Alberti, A.; Fuochi, P.G.; Chiesa, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Food irradiation is a well-established technique to extend the food shelf life and to reduce the food-related health hazards caused by pathogenic micro-organisms. At present, radiation treatment is permitted for various categories of food and food ingredients in many countries. At the European level, irradiation of food is regulated by the European Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC. Community legislation states that any food or food ingredients, authorised in the European Union, must be labelled with the word 'irradiated' and that every year each Member State has to carry out checks at the product marketing stage to enforce correct labelling. The present work aimed at identifying irradiated beef meat by using a reliable and sensitive detection of DNA comets as screening biological method and performing an Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry as confirmatory qualitative standard. The influence of storage conditions and time after irradiation on DNA degradation was also investigated. Furthermore the application of ESR technique as a quantitative method was successfully applied to beef bones, using the approach of calibration curve. Results, although the limited statistics, proved for reliability of the dose reconstruction method and blind tests were carried out resulting in very satisfactory difference between actual treatment dose and reconstructed dose.

  11. Dose distribution in the irradiation with adjacent fields. Medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Cozar, Onuc; Stan, Andrada

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed the absorbed dose distribution for the irradiation with two adjacent fields in the case of medulloblastoma treatment and we optimized the irradiation technique by using three adjacent fields. As a purpose of this study we considered the secondary effects of the irradiation with two adjacent fields at the sensitive organs such as heart and lung. The objectives of this paper are: to achieve dose uniformity in the field junction region; to avoid the underdosage or overdosage in the junction area; the hot spot created due to the overlap of the beams in the depth has to be clinically acceptable; the dosage received by a sensitive structure such as the spinal cord must not exceed its tolerance dose. We should specify that this treatment technique was developed considering the following risk factors: the possibility of introducing very large dosage errors across the junction; the tumor recurrence if it is underdosed; severe complications if it is overdosed. The analysis of the irradiation technique was made from two points of view, geometric and dosimetric. The analysis from geometric and dosimetric points of view entails the conclusion that at the cord and lung level exists the risk of an important overdosage. This inconvenience was solved by moving one of the fields at the other side of the risk organs (if this procedure is possible) and by optimizing the irradiation technique by using three adjacent fields. (authors)

  12. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Jung, E-mail: forejs2@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won, E-mail: JUNWON@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyun, E-mail: gochunghee@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Woori, E-mail: asleo02@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Hoon, E-mail: wonhoon@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seoae, E-mail: seoae@cnkgenomics.com [C& K Genomics, Seoul National University Mt.4-2, Main Bldg. #514, SNU Research Park, NakSeoungDae, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jeong, E-mail: yunk9275@daum.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-760 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  13. Oxidative stress and low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerit, I.; Alaoui-Youssefi, A.; Cernjavski, L.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of this working group indicate a shift of the prooxidant - antioxidant balance to the prooxidant side for a large proportion of workers engaged in the clean-up of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986-87. Similar findings were obtained in children exposed to radiation after the explosion or still living within contaminated regions. Increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by phagocytes were correlated with an increase in lipid peroxiation products and a decrease in the enzymatic and non enzymatic antioxidant defenses of the organism. The calstogenic factor test, which detects the presence of lipid peroxidation products and cytokines due to their chromosome damaging effects, yielded positive results for 41% of 89 workers from Armenia and 52% of 200 workers from St. Petersburg. Clastogenic plasma activity was increased even in those workers, who had received radiation doses between 5 and 10 cGy only. The number of CF-positive workers increased in the subgroups with increasing radiation dose. In children, the data varied according to sites and suggested correlations with the radioactive contamination of the soil. Treatments with antioxidant vitamins, flavonoids and terpenes improved the health status of this high risk population. However, the type of antioxidant, the treatment schedule and the dosage have to be standardized in order to obtain comparable results. (author)

  14. Appearance of thymic nurse cells after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, A.H.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1983-01-01

    Since prothymocytes home from the bone marrow to the thymus, it was tested in the mouse whether prothymocytes could be recaptured from thymic nurse cells (TNC). Bone marrow cells were labelled with the red fluorescing anthracycline daunomycin and varying numbers (up to 25 x 10 6 nucleated bone marrow cells) were injected into lethally irradiated recipients. At several time intervals after transplantation (up to 24 hours), thymuses were removed and the TNCs were isolated. No specific red fluorescence was found within the TNCs. These experiments were repeated with supravital compounds at concentrations which have been shown not to affect viability, homing pattern and function. Again, no specific fluoresence was found in the TNC after transplantation of labelled bone marrow into irradiated mice. The relationship between the dose of total body gamma irradiation and the time after irradiation was investigated. Maximal numbers of TNCs were found at 6 hours after irradiation with 4 Gy. Eight to 12 hours after irradiation, the number of TNCs isolated decreased and had returned to preirradiation levels at 24 hours. The relation between TBI dose and the number of TNCs per thymus is shown. The number determined at 3 hours increased with the dose to reach a maximum at 4 Gy. The authors later studied the morphology of the TNCs isolated at 4 to 6 hours after irradiation. On electron microscopic examination, signs of degeneration and death of the enclosed thymocytes was detected. (Auth.)

  15. The effects of chronic low dose irradiation on drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.; Taskaev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of the chronic gamma-irradiation in the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability and on the life-span in the laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes in mobile genetic elements and defects in the DNA repair processes. It is shown that the radiation-induced alteration of the traits under study depends from genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains we have observed an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate and life-span. Also it was established that irradiation leads to the frequencies of the GD-sterility and mutability of the snw and h(w+) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. The obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation. (author)

  16. Genetic effects of low-dose irradiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnulin, V.G.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    Influence of chronic γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability in the laboratory strains of Drosophila Melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes by families of mobile genetic elements and of systems of hybrid disgenesis and also violations in reparation processes control mechanisms. It was shown that the rates of induction of recessive lethal mutations depended on genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate were observed. Also in was established that irradiation leads to the increase in frequencies of the gonads sterility and mutability of the sn w and h(w + ) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. Obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation [ru

  17. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaijapurkar, S.G.; Agarwal, Deepshikha; Chaudhuri, S.K.; Ram Senwar, Kana; Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied

  18. The investigation of fetal doses in mantle field irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacam, S. C; Gueralp, O. S; Oeksuez, D. C; Koca, A.; Cepni, I.; Cepni, K.; Bese, N.

    2009-01-01

    To determine clinically the fetal dose from irradiation of Hodgkin's disease during pregnancy and to quantify the components of fetal dose using phantom measurements. The fetal dose was measured with phantom measurements using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Phantom measurements were performed by simulating the treatment conditions on an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were placed on the phantom 41, 44, 46.5 and 49.5 cm from the centre of the treatment field. Two TLDs were placed on the surface of the phantom. The estimated total dose to all the TLDs ranged from 8.8 to 13.2 cGy for treatment with 60 Co and from 8.2 to 11.8 cGy for 4 MV photons. It was concluded that the doses in different sections were evaluated to investigate dose changes in different points and depths of fetal tissues in phantom. Precise planning and the use of supplemental fetal shielding may help reduce fetal exposure. (authors)

  19. Radiation-induced alterations of the proliferation dynamics of human skin fibroblasts after repeated irradiation in the subtherapeutic dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumann, J.; Santo-Hoeltje, L.; Loeffler, H.; Bamberg, M.; Rodemann, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of single and multiple irradiations on the differentiation and proliferation pattern of the stem cell system of human fibroblasts. The pattern of differentiation of fibroblast cultures was analyzed by morphological criteria using colony forming assays. Proliferation rates were assessed by cell counting and measuring the incorporation of BrdU. Ionizing radiation both in low and high dose ranges exerts differential effects on the cellular processes of differentiation and proliferation in human fibroblasts. Single irradiations of fibroblasts in the dose range of 1 to 8 Gy induced terminal differentiation into postmitotic fibrocytes at high percentage level. Irradiation of longterm cultures of fibroblasts with repeated doses of 0.2, 0.6 and 1.0 Gy revealed that only in cultures, which were irradiated repeatedly (x10) with 0.6 and 1.0 Gy a marked reduction of the proliferation capacity was apparent. Inhibition of proliferation by repeated irradiations with cumulative doses up to 10 Gy was not more pronounced as compared to single irradiations. 1. These results of radiation-induced changes in the proliferation and differentiation pattern of cells may be a basis for the understanding of the cellular processes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis and tissue aging. 2. Multiple irradiations with single doses up to 1 Gy and cumulative doses up to 10 Gy did not change the radiosensitivity of fibroblast cultures regarding effects on cell proliferation. (orig.) [de

  20. Method for dose calculation in intracavitary irradiation of endometrical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevrieva, I.F.; Ivashchenko, N.T.; Musapirova, N.A.; Fel'dman, S.Z.; Sajbekov, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method for dose calculation for the conditions of intracavitary gamma therapy of endometrial carcinoma using spherical and linear 60 Co sources was elaborated. Calculations of dose rates for different amount and orientation of spherical radiation sources and for different planes were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimet were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimetric study of dose fields was made using a phantom imitating the real conditions of irradiation. Discrepancies between experimental and calculated values are within the limits of the experiment accuracy

  1. Irradiation doses on thyroid gland during the postoperative irradiation for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, Mustafa; Ergen, Arzu; Unal, Aysegul; Bese, Nuran

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid gland is one of the radiosensitive endocrine organs in the body. It has been shown that direct irradiation of thyroid with total doses of 26 to 30 Gy can lead to functional abnormalities. In this study, irradiation doses on thyroid gland of the patients who received postoperative chest-wall/breast and regional nodal irradiation were assessed. Retrospective analyses of treatment plans from 122 breast cancer patients who were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) planning was performed. All patients received irradiation to supraclavicular/level III lymph nodes in addition to chest-wall/breast. A total dose of 46 Gy was delivered in 25 days to supraclavicular/level III lymph node region while a total dose of 50 Gy was delivered to whole breast/chest-wall. Thyroid gland was contoured on 2-5 mm thickness of computed tomography scans. Absolute thyroid volume, mean thyroid doses were calculated. The mean thyroid volume of all patients was 16.7 cc (min: 1.9 cc, max: 41.6 cc). The mean irradiation dose on was 22.5 Gy (0.32 Gy-46.5 Gy). The level of dose was higher than 26 Gy in 44% of the patients. In majority of the node-positive breast cancer patients treated with 3D CRT, the thyroid gland was exposed to considerable doses. On the other hand, for 44% of the patients are at risk for developing thyroid function abnormalities which should be considered during the routine follow-up.

  2. Adaptive response of the chicken embryo to low doses of x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, K.; Schleifer, S.

    1995-01-01

    Chicken embryos were x-irradiated in ovo with 5-30 cGy (=priming dose) at the 13th-15th day of development. After 3-48 h, brain- and liver-cell suspensions were x-irradiated in vitro with (challenge) doses of 4-32 Gy. Significantly less radiation damage was observed when the radiation response was measured by scheduled DNA synthesis, nucleoid sedimentation and viscosity of alkaline cell lysates 12-36 h after the priming exposure. In vivo, pre-irradiation with 10 cGy enhanced regeneration as evidenced by the DNA content of chicken embryo brain and liver 24 h following a challenge dose of 4 Gy. From nucleoid sedimentation analyses in brain and liver cells immediately after irradiation with 16 Gy and after a 30-min repair period in the presence of aphidicolin, dideoxythymidine and 3-aminobenzamide or in the absence of these DNA repair inhibitors, it is concluded that a reduction of the initial radiation damage is the dominant mechanism of the ''radio-adaptive'' response of the chicken embryo. Sedimentation of nucleoids from ethidium bromide (EB) (0.75-400 μg/ml)-treated cells suggests a higher tendency of ''radio-adapted'' cells to undergo positive DNA supercoiling in the presence of high EB concentrations. (orig.)

  3. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qi-Wen; Yu Xue-Feng; Cui Jiang-Wei; Guo Qi; Ren Di-Yuan; Cong Zhong-Chao; Zhou Hang

    2014-01-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  4. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Yu, Xue-Feng; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan; Cong, Zhong-Chao; Zhou, Hang

    2014-10-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device.

  5. Studies on chronic effects of lower dose level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.G.; Yun, Y.S.; Yun, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    This experiment is being carried out to elucidate the chronic effects of Co 60 (γ-ray) - low doses irradiation on JCR mice at 3rd week, 6th week, and 5th month after their birth. Experimental mice at 3rd week of age have been irradiated with Co 60 - 60mR weekly, Co 60 - 500mR weekly and Co 60 - 61R biweekly at the dose rate of 60mR per second for 23 weeks until now. Co 60 - 61R irradiated mice were subdivided into Co 60 - alone group and Co 60 combined with red ginseng extracts group. In their survivor's rate and their body weight etc., no significant differences between control groups and test groups in these experimental mice. Experimented mice at 6 weeks and 5 months of age are also being irradiated with Co 60 in the same doses as the above for 14 weeks and 8 weeks until present. In these experimental groups, there are also no significant differences between control groups and experimental groups in their survivor's rate and their body weight

  6. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    When a liquid solution in an optical cell is irradiated by an intense pulsed electron beam, it may be important in the chemical analysis of the solution to know the distribution of energy deposited throughout the cell. For the present work, absorbed dose distributions were measured by thin...... radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum with a maximum energy of ≈MeV. The measured three-dimensional dose distributions showed sharp gradients...... in dose at the largest penetration depths in the cell and at the extreme lateral edges of the cell interior near the optical windows. This method of measurement was convenient because of the high spatial resolution capability of the detector and the linearity and absence of dose-rate dependence of its...

  7. Orientation of streptococcus agalactiae irradiation dose for subclinical mastitis vaccine in dairy cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuasikal, B.J.; Estuningsih, S.; Pasaribu, F.H.; Wibawan, I.W.T.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment to determine the effect of gamma-ray irradiation in debilitating Streptococcus agalactiae as a cause of subclinical mastitis (inflammation of the udder) in cows has been conducted. S. agalactiae bacteria was isolated from subclinical mastitis found in dairy cows in the field was then observed for its cell growth. The bacteria which have reached mid-log phase of growth, were divided into 5 treatment groups, of which each was irradiated at dose level of 0; 25; 50; 75; and 100Gy. Irradiated bacteria subsequently were grown on Brain Heart Infusion agar (BHI), and each of its colonies was counted for LD50 determination. The obtained curves from irradiated treatment bacterial shown viability percentage by the linier equation of Y = 95.414 e -0,0371X ; R 2 = 0.9979, while Y = % viability and X = dose of irradiation. The calculation done in this experiment shows that irradiation dose of 17.4 Gy weaken the bacteria pathogenicity of S. agalactiae to the level of LD 50 . (author)

  8. Uterine malignant degeneration after low-dose endometrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, V.; Salmi, T.; Groenroos, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-dose intrauterine irradiation for benign diseases and its possible carcinogenic effect on the uterus was studied in 190 patients who were treated during the years 1952-1974. The indications for irradiation were premenopausal functional bleeding, leukemia, hemophilia, fibroids, endometriosis or other benign reason. Radiation was also performed on patients with severe neurologic diseases that contraindicated surgery and on some mentally retarded patients whose restlessness and epileptic seizures were aggravated premenstrually and during menstruation. The mean follow-up period was 15 years. Uterine bleeding recurred in 21 percent of the patients. No cases of uterine malignant degeneration were found. (author)

  9. High-dose irradiated food: Current progress, applications, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Chitho P.

    2018-03-01

    Food irradiation as an established and mature technology has gained more attention in the food industry for ensuring food safety and quality. Primarily used for phytosanitary applications, its use has been expanded for developing various food products for varied purposes (e.g. ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook foods, hospital diets, etc.). This paper summarized and analyzed the recent progress and application of high-dose irradiation and discussed its prospects in the field of food product development, its safety and quality.

  10. Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCID mice spleen after low dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Kondo, N.; Inaba, H.; Uotani, K.; Kiyohara, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.

    To assess the radioadaptive response of the whole body system in mice, we examined the temporal effect of low dose priming as an indicator of challenging irradiation-induced apoptosis through a p53 tumor suppressor protein- mediated signal transduction pathway. The p53 protein also plays an important role both in cell cycle control and DNA repair through cellular signal transduction. Using severe combined immunodeficiency mice defective in DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, we examined the role of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity in radioadaptation induced by low dose irradiation. Specific pathogen free 5-week-old female severe combined immunodeficiency mice and the parental mice (CB-17 Icr +/ + were irradiated with X-ray at 3.0 C3y at 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks after the conditioning irradiation at 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 or 0.60 Gy. The mice spleens were fixed for immunohistochemistry 12 h after the challenging irradiation. The p53-dependent apoptosis related Bax proteins on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method The apoptosis incidence in the sections was measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The frequency of Bax- and apoptosis-positive cells increased up to 12 h after the challenging irradiation in the spleen of both mice. However, these cells were not observed after a low dose irradiation at 0.15-0.60 Gy When pre-irradiation at 0.45 Gy 2 weeks before the challenging irradiation at 3.0 Gy was performed, Bax accumulation and apoptosis induced by challenging irradiation were depressed in the spleens of CB-17 Icr +/ + mice, but not in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These data suggest that DNA-dependent protein kinase might play a major role in radioadaptation induced by pre-irradiation with a low dose in mice spleen. We expect that the present findings will provide useful information in the health care of space crews.

  11. Specification of absorbed dose for reporting a therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of dose specification in external beam therapy with photons and electrons has been dealt with in ICRU Report 29 (1978). This problem arises from the fact that the absorbed dose distribution is usually not uniform in the target volume and that for the purpose of treatment reporting a nominal absorbed dose - which will be called target absorbed dose - has to be selected. When comparing the clinical results obtained between radiotherapy centres, the differences in the reported target absorbed doses which can be introduced by differences in the methods of dose specification often are much larger than the differences related to the dosimetric procedures themselves. This shows the importance of the problem. In this paper, some definitions of terms and concepts currently used in radiotherapy are first recalled: tumour volume, target volume, treatment volume, etc. These definitions have been proposed in ICRU Report 29 for photon and electron beams; they can be extended to any kind of irradiation. For external beam therapy with photons and electrons, the target absorbed dose is defined as the absorbed dose at selected point(s) (specification point(s)) having a meaningful relation to the target volume and/or the irradiation beams. Examples are discussed for typical cases. As far as interstitial and intracavitary therapy is concerned, the problem is more complex and no recommendations have so far been made by the ICRU Commission. A major difficulty arises from the sharp dose gradient as a function of the distance to the sources. The particular case of the treatment of cervix carcinoma is considered and some possible methods of specification are discussed: (1) the indication of the sources (in adequate units) and the duration of the application, (2) the absorbed doses at selected reference points (bladder, rectum, bony structures) and (3) the description of the tissue volume (height, width, thickness) encompassed by a given isodose surface (60Gy). (author)

  12. Untargeted viral mutagenesis is not found in X-irradiated monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.; Lee, W.; Bushar, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    The existence of untargeted viral mutagenesis in X-irradiated cells was investigated in a mammalian virus/cell system, where a low level of such viral mutagenesis can be demonstrated in UV-irradiated cells. In the positive control experiment UV-elicited mutagenesis was shown with cell exposures of 5, 10 and 15 J/m 2 and a delay of 24 h between cell irradiation and infection with unirradiated herpes simplex virus. Although X-ray doses of 1, 3 and 10 Gy elicit enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated virus, no untargeted mutagenesis for any X-ray dose at post-irradiation infection times of 0, 24 or 72 h was observed in this study. Thus untargeted mutagenesis of herpes simplex virus was not demonstrated in X-irradiated monkey cells, under conditions where X-ray-enhanced reactivation occurs and where untargeted mutagenesis in UV-irradiated cells occurs. (author)

  13. Effect of high-dose irradiation on quality characteristics of ready-to-eat chicken breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Haeng Lee, Kyung; Jung Lee, Hyun; Woon Lee, Ju; Uk Ahn, Dong; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-01-01

    High-dose (higher than 30 kGy) irradiation has been used to sterilize specific-purposed foods for safe and long-term storage. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on the quality characteristics of ready-to-eat chicken breast in comparison with those of the low-dose irradiation. Ready-to-eat chicken breast was manufactured, vacuum-packaged, and irradiated at 0, 5, and 40 kGy. The populations of total aerobic bacteria were 4.75 and 2.26 Log CFU/g in the samples irradiated at 0 and 5 kGy, respectively. However, no viable cells were detected in the samples irradiated at 40 kGy. On day 10, bacteria were not detected in the samples irradiated at 40 kGy but the number of bacteria in the samples irradiated at 5 kGy was increased. The pH at day 0 was higher in the samples irradiated at 40 kGy than those at 0 and 5 kGy. The 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values of the samples were not significantly different on day 0. However, on day 10, the TBARS value was significantly higher in the samples irradiated at 40 kGy than those at 0 and 5 kGy. There was no difference in the sensory scores of the samples, except for off-flavor, which was stronger in samples irradiated at 5 and 40 kGy than control. However, no difference in off-flavor between the irradiated ones was observed. After 10 days of storage, only the samples irradiated at 40 kGy showed higher off-flavor score. SPME-GC–MS analysis revealed that 5 kGy of irradiation produced 2-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanal, which were not present in the control, whereas 40 kGy of irradiation produced hexane, heptane, pentanal, dimethly disulfide, heptanal, and nonanal, which were not detected in the control or the samples irradiated at 5 kGy. However, the amount of compounds such as allyl sulfide and diallyl disulfide decreased significantly in the samples irradiated at 5 kGy and 40 kGy. - Highlights: ► Comparison of high (40 kGy) and low-dose irradiation (5 kGy) on

  14. Regeneration of Murine Hair Follicles is Inhibited by Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ishihara, Yoshie; Inoue, Sonoe

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether the effects of low-dose-rate gamma (γ) irradiation are identifiable in the regeneration of murine hair follicles, we irradiated whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the first telogen phase of the hair cycle with 137 Cs γ-rays. The mice were examined for effects on hair follicles, including number, morphology, and pigmentation in the second anagen phase. Effects of γ-radiation on melanocyte stem cells were also investigated by the indirect immunolabeling of tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2). Irradiated skin showed a decrease in hair follicle density and the induction of curved hair follicles along with the presence of white hairs and hypopigmented hair bulbs. There was a small, but not significant, change in the number of TRP2-positive melanocyte stem cells in the hair bulge region of the irradiated skin. These results suggest that low-dose rate γ-irradiation does not deplete melanocyte stem cells, but can damage stem cells and progenitors for both keratinocytes and melanocytes, thereby affecting the structure and pigmentation of regenerated hair follicles in the 2 nd anagen phase.

  15. Low-dose total body irradiation and G-CSF without hematopoietic stem cell support in the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), or AML in second or subsequent remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, Lawrence N.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Storen, Elizabeth; Marcus, Karen; Mauch, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who are not eligible for bone marrow transplantation, have a poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy alone. Total body irradiation (TBI) is an effective modality against AML when used in doses of 1000-1400 cGy with hematopoietic stem cell support. We undertook a phase I study of TBI with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support, without stem cell support in patients with AML either in relapse or second or subsequent remission. Methods and Materials: Patients with relapsed AML, or AML in second or subsequent remission were treated in a phase I study of TBI followed by G-CSF. The first dose level was 200 cGy. After the initial cohort of patients it was clear that patients with overt leukemia did not benefit from this treatment, and subsequent patients were required to be in remission at the time of TBI. Results: Eleven patients were treated, 4 in overt relapse, and 7 in remission. 200 cGy was used in all, and dose escalation was not possible due to prolonged thrombocytopenia in all patients but one. Neutrophil recovery was adequate in those patients who remained in remission after TBI. Patients with overt leukemia had transient reduction in blast counts, but rapid recurrence of their leukemia. Patients treated in remission had short remissions, with the exception of one patient who is in remission 32 months after treatment. Conclusion: There is some antileukemic effect of TBI even at 200 cGy, though this dose appears to be too low to help a significant number of patients. If TBI is to be escalated without stem cell support, then a thrombopoietic agent will need to be used

  16. Dose rate and irradiation time effects on the shape of Au nanomaterials under proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong-Joon; Song, Jae Hee

    2007-01-01

    A synthetic route is presented for the high yield production of Au nanomaterials via a simple proton beam irradiation process. We were able to prepare Au nanomaterials under a proton beam at low concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide at room temperature. It was observed that the size and shape of the prepared gold nanocrystals were easily controlled by the dose rate and irradiation time of the proton beam. When the dose rate of the proton beam was kept constant, a shape transition of Au crystals from particles to nanorods/nanowires and then again to particles was observed as the duration time was increased. When the total dose was kept constant by varying the dose rate and duration time of the proton beam, there was an apparent change in the feature size and shape of the Au nanomaterials produced under proton beam irradiation. Once the dose rate reached a proper value, very similar feature shapes of gold nanocrystals were produced, as long as the total dose was constant

  17. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorozu, Atsunori [National Tokyo Second Hospital (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p<0.05). Local control and survival rates were comparable with those of other modalities. The significant factor in local control was stage. For lesions more than 30 mm in diameter, local control was rather poor in the group given only brachytherapy compared with the group given combined therapy. After 30 Gy of external irradiation, local control was better at a brachytherapy dose >50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose <=50 Gy. Mucosal ulcer occurred frequently with increasing total dose and tumor volume. Bone necrosis increased significantly with increasing external irradiation dose. We suggest that external irradiation of 30 Gy followed by brachytherapy of 52 Gy is a better choice for T2 lesions >30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author).

  18. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pilot study of dose intensive weekly chemotherapy followed by cisplatin plus etoposide with concurrent thoracic irradiation for limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Takeshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Negoro, Shyunichi [and others

    2000-07-01

    It was reported from a previous randomized trial (NEJM 329: 1848, 1993) that a moderate increase in the initial dose of cyclophosphamide and cisplatin improves the survival of patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LDSCLC). Rapid administration of several active agents over a short treatment period, such as the CODE regimen, is a potentially useful strategy for increasing the initial dose intensity. Based on these findings, we conducted a pilot study of CODE (C: 25 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, weeks 1-4, O: 1 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, weeks 2, 4, D: 40 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, weeks 1, 3, E: 80 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-3, weeks 1, 3) chemotherapy for the first 4 weeks followed by PE therapy (P: 80 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, E: 100 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-3, for 3 cycles) with concurrent TRT (1.5 Gy bid x 30 fr., total 45 Gy) to treat LDSCLC. From June 1996 through September 1996, 23 patients (pts) were enrolled, among whom 22 were eligible. The patients' characteristics were as follows: median age 65; M/F, 15/7; PS, 0/1/2, 9/9/4; stage II/IIIA/IIIB, 3/8/11. The relative dose intensities in the CODE phase for patients who received this treatment were 107% for P and 156% for E, compared with standard PE therapy. No treatment-related death occurred in this series. Myelosuppression was the most frequent toxicity in both treatments. Grade 3 and 4 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in 73% and 86% of patients in the CODE phase, and in 83% and 91% in the PE phase, respectively. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 14% of the patients in the CODE phase and in 37% in the cisplatin-etoposide phase. Other non-hematological toxicities were mild. There was no severe esophagitis or pneumonitis following radiation therapy. CR was observed in 13 (59%) of the 22 patients, and 9 (41%) patients showed PR, giving an overall response rate of 100%. A median survival time has not yet been ascertained. Our preliminary results indicate that CODE therapy followed by PE therapy with concurrent TRT has very high

  20. Prediction of midline dose from entrance ad exit dose using OSLD measurements for total irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Chun, Min Soo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study aims to predict the midline dose based on the entrance and exit doses from optically stimulated luminescence detector (OSLD) measurements for total body irradiation (TBI). For TBI treatment, beam data sets were measured for 6 MV and 15 MV beams. To evaluate the tissue lateral effect of various thicknesses, the midline dose and peak dose were measured using a solid water phantom (SWP) and ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were measured using OSLDs. OSLDs were attached onto the central beam axis at the entrance and exit surfaces of the phantom. The predicted midline dose was evaluated as the sum of the entrance and exit doses by OSLD measurement. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was evaluated at various thicknesses. The ratio of the peak dose to the midline dose was 1.12 for a 30 cm thick SWP at both energies. When the patient thickness is greater than 30 cm, the 15 MV should be used to ensure dose homogeneity. The ratio of the entrance dose to the exit dose was less than 1.0 for thicknesses of less than 30 cm and 40 cm at 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. Therefore, the predicted midline dose can be underestimated for thinner body. At 15 MV, the ratios were approximately 1.06 for a thickness of 50 cm. In cases where adult patients are treated with the 15 MV photon beam, it is possible for the predicted midline dose to be overestimated for parts of the body with a thickness of 50 cm or greater. The predicted midline dose and OSLD-measured midline dose depend on the phantom thickness. For in-vivo dosimetry of TBI, the measurement dose should be corrected in order to accurately predict the midline dose.

  1. Immunological aspects of low doses gamma-irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovskij, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Low dose gamma-radiation effect on the nonspecific protection factors and immune reactions of agricultural birds (diurnal broiler chicks Broiler-6) was studied. Quantitative and qualitative composition of crest skin autoflora and oral cavity mucosa, level of essential antibodies in blood serum, activity of lysozyme, β-lysines, general bactericidal properties of blood serum were determined. It is shown that low dose irradiation promotes the enhancement of antimicrobial properties of skin and oral cavity mucosa, blood serum bactericidal properties due to the increase in lysozyme content as well as beta-lysines and normal antibodies. Radiation affect the formation of immune intensity and favourable result of infectious process

  2. Irradiation dose detection of irradiated milk powder using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, W W; Zhang, C; Liu, F; Gong, A P; He, Y

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the possibility of applying visible and near-infrared spectroscopy to the quantitative detection of irradiation dose of irradiated milk powder. A total of 150 samples were used: 100 for the calibration set and 50 for the validation set. The samples were irradiated at 5 different dose levels in the dose range 0 to 6.0 kGy. Six different pretreatment methods were compared. The prediction results of full spectra given by linear and nonlinear calibration methods suggested that Savitzky-Golay smoothing and first derivative were suitable pretreatment methods in this study. Regression coefficient analysis was applied to select effective wavelengths (EW). Less than 10 EW were selected and they were useful for portable detection instrument or sensor development. Partial least squares, extreme learning machine, and least squares support vector machine were used. The best prediction performance was achieved by the EW-extreme learning machine model with first-derivative spectra, and correlation coefficients=0.97 and root mean square error of prediction=0.844. This study provided a new approach for the fast detection of irradiation dose of milk powder. The results could be helpful for quality detection and safety monitoring of milk powder. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cranial irradiation in acute leukemia: dose estimate in the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, R.W.; Gillin, M.T.; Kun, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cranial irradiation for subclinical arachnoid infiltration is standard treatment in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. The incidental dose received by the ocular lens is of potential importance since these children evidence a significant long-term survival rate. Comparison of the lens dose using 6MV and 4MV photon beams and a cobalt unit is presented in terms of ion chamber measurements in a water phantom and thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements in a head phantom. TLD measurements on patients treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are examined and used to estimate the dose to the lens. It is demonstrated that the dose to the lens depends strongly on the choice of field margin and on the daily patient set-up. However, using parallel opposed beams in a clinically determined optimal set-up, the dose to the lens is approximately 20 to 30% of the midline central axis dose. By angling the treatment head to eliminate the geometrical divergence of the beam, it is possible to reduce the lens dose to approximately 15% of the midline dose

  4. Pathological consequences of chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Miller, A.C.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Fritz, T.E.

    2000-01-01

    The quantitative relationships between the chronic radiation exposure parameters of dose-rate and total dose in relation to associated health risks was examined in dogs. At a dose-rate of 75, 128, and 263 mGy/d the incidence of acute lymphohematopoietic suppression (aplastic anemia) and associated septic complications was 73%, 87%, and 100%, respectively, and it increased in dose-dependent manner. By contrast, at dose-rates below 75 mGy/d, late cancers contributed significantly to the death of relatively long-lived animals, whose mean survival time was 1800 days. Myeloproliferative disease (MPD), mainly myeloid leukemia, was the dominant pathology seen at the higher daily dose-rates (18.8-75 mGy/d). When daily exposure was carried out continuously, the incidence of MPD was quite high. It should be noted that the induction radiation-induced MPD in this study was highly significant, because spontaneous MPD is exceedingly rare in the dog. However, when the daily dose-rate was reduced further or exposure was discontinued, the incidence of MPD declined significantly. At these lower dose-rates, solid tumors contributed heavily to the life-shortening effects of chronic irradiation. The induction and progression of these survival-compromising, late forms of pathology appeared to be driven by the degree of hematopoietic suppression that occurred early during the exposure phase, and in turn by the capacity of hematopoietic system to repair itself, recover, and to accommodate under chronic radiation stress. (K.H.)

  5. Pathological consequences of chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.; Miller, A.C.; Ramakrishnan, N. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Fritz, T.E.

    2000-07-01

    The quantitative relationships between the chronic radiation exposure parameters of dose-rate and total dose in relation to associated health risks was examined in dogs. At a dose-rate of 75, 128, and 263 mGy/d the incidence of acute lymphohematopoietic suppression (aplastic anemia) and associated septic complications was 73%, 87%, and 100%, respectively, and it increased in dose-dependent manner. By contrast, at dose-rates below 75 mGy/d, late cancers contributed significantly to the death of relatively long-lived animals, whose mean survival time was 1800 days. Myeloproliferative disease (MPD), mainly myeloid leukemia, was the dominant pathology seen at the higher daily dose-rates (18.8-75 mGy/d). When daily exposure was carried out continuously, the incidence of MPD was quite high. It should be noted that the induction radiation-induced MPD in this study was highly significant, because spontaneous MPD is exceedingly rare in the dog. However, when the daily dose-rate was reduced further or exposure was discontinued, the incidence of MPD declined significantly. At these lower dose-rates, solid tumors contributed heavily to the life-shortening effects of chronic irradiation. The induction and progression of these survival-compromising, late forms of pathology appeared to be driven by the degree of hematopoietic suppression that occurred early during the exposure phase, and in turn by the capacity of hematopoietic system to repair itself, recover, and to accommodate under chronic radiation stress. (K.H.)

  6. The effects of X-irradiation on the chondrogensis of mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jong Ryeol

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that X-irradiation affects on maturing process of differentiated chondrocytes. Nevertheless, It has been remained elusively whether X-irradiation affects the process of differentiation of mesenchymal cells which differentiate into chondrocyte, fibroblast, or muscle cells. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation (with 1 to 10 Gy) on chondrogenesis using mesenchymal cells of chick limb bud. Our results show that X-irradiation dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis. This result suggests that immature chondroblast-like mesenchymal cells are sensitive to X-irradiation, Moreover, X-irradiation affects not only maturing process of chondrocytes, but also inhibits the chondrogenesis. Taken together, we demonstrate that the whole process of differentiation of mature chondrocytes from mesenchymal cells is affected by X-irradiation and undifferentiated cells were more affected by X-irradiation than mature cells

  7. Irradiation of human thymic stromal cells induces a diminution of T cell precursor proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, J.M.; Van der Meeren, A. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Coulombel, L. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1997-03-01

    Very little is known concerning the effects of ionizing radiation on the supportive function of the thymic microenvironment in the regeneration of a fully competent T lymphocyte population after irradiation. The data available suggest that irradiation of the thymus may have short-term effects on the thymus and long-term effects on peripheral blood T lymphocytes. We have recently developed an in vitro model of thymic stromal cell cultures (TSCC). These TSCC contained 30-50% thymic epithelial cells (TEC), 50-70% fibro-blastoid cells (TF), and 1-5% macrophages and dendritic cells. This model was used to study effects of ionizing radiation on human thymic microenvironment. TSCC were irradiated at a dose of 10 Grays (gamma rays, {sup 60}Co source, dose rate 1 Gy/mn) or sham-irradiated. Sorted autologous T cell precursors were seeded onto TSCC 24 hours after irradiation. Proliferation of T cell precursors was assessed by numerating non-adherent cells in the supernatant of TSCC twice a week. Results show that irradiation of TSCC induced a diminution in the number of T cell precursor harvested from the cultures either in the presence or in the absence of interleukin-7 (IL-7) and stem cell factor (SCF). This diminished number of cells harvested appeared as early as day 4, and remained constant during 21-day culture period. The results showed that the number of stromal cells after irradiation remained constant until day 21. We have generated supernatants (SN) from irradiated TSCC in order to test the presence of negative regulators or the decrease of activating factors. Results showed that SN from irradiated TSCC were able to induce a decrease in the number of harvested T cells. Overall, the results provides the first direct demonstration that irradiation of thymic microenvironment induced modifications in its supportive function for T cell precursor proliferation. (N.C.)

  8. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alexandre R.; Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F.; Silva, Francisco C.A. Da

    2015-01-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  9. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F., E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gabriel.alo@aceletron.com.br [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Aceletrica Comercio e Representacoes Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Francisco C.A. Da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  10. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae

  11. Irradiation in helical scanner: doses estimation, parameters choice; Irradiation en scanner helicoidal: estimation des doses, choix des parametres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Boyer, B.; Jouan, E.; Beauvais, H

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of helical scanners improves the diagnosis abilities and the service done to the patients. The rational use allows to give the patients a ratio benefit/risk far better than the almost medical examinations. It is particularly true for over sixty years old aged people, that have a null genetic risk and a practically null carcinogen risk; However, for young adults and children, it is necessary to banish any useless irradiation and limit exposure to the strict necessary for the diagnosis. It is necessary to develop a radiation protection culture, possible by the radiation doses index display and doses benchmarks knowledge. (N.C.)

  12. Effects of continuous low-dose prenatal irradiation on neuronal migration in mouse cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous exposure to γ-rays during corticogenesis on the migration of neuronal cells in developing cerebral cortex. Pregnant mice were injected with 0.5 mg of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on day 14 of gestation to label cells in the S phase. The mice were then exposed to 137 Cs γ-rays (dose rates of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.94 Gy/day) continuously for 3 days. Brains from 17-day-old embryos and from offspring at 3 and 8 weeks after birth were processed immunohistochemically to track the movements of BrdU-labeled cells. Comparative analyses of the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex revealed that the migration of neurons was delayed during the embryonic period in mice irradiated at 0.94 Gy/day, in 3-week-old mice, there was a significant difference in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex between the mice irradiated prenatally and control, and in 8-week-old mice, there were no differences in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells between control and animals irradiated with 0.1 and 0.3 Gy/day. In contrast, in the animals irradiated with 0.94 Gy/day, the significant difference in the distribution pattern of the labeled cells relative to control was maintained. These results suggest that the migration of neuronal cells in mouse cerebral cortex is disturbed by continuous prenatal irradiation at low-dose and some modificational process occurred during the postnatal period. (author)

  13. Effects of lethal dose of γ-irradiation on intestinal enzymes of the pigeons Columba livia intermedia Strickland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of γ-irradiation with lethal dose (1000 rads) on alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase have been studied in two different regions (duodenum and ileum) of small intestine of pigeons. The enzymes were studied at different intervals like 2, 4, 6 and 8 days after irradiation. The sp. activities of enzyme increased significantly both in duodenum and ileum. However, significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were observed at the 2nd and the 4th days post-irradiation respectively. The increase in enzyme activities may present de novo synthesis of these enzymes after lethal dose of irradiation. The histologic picture revealed that after the 4th day of irradiation, the number of goblet cells increased and after the 6th day crypt-villus system was destroyed completely as compared to sham-irradiated pigeons. (author)

  14. Accelerated repopulation of mouse tongue epithelium during fractionated irradiations or following single doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Kummermehr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa was established as an animal model to study repopulation after large single doses or during continuous irradiation. A top-up irradiation technique was used employing priming doses or fractionated treatment to the whole snout (300 kV X-rays) followed by local test doses (25 kV X-rays) to elicit denudation in a confined field of the inferior tongue surface. Clearcut quantal dose-response curves of ulcer incidence were obtained to all protocols; animal morbidity, i.e. body weight loss was minimal. Repopulation following priming doses of 10 and 13 Gy started with a delay of at least 3 days and then progressed rapidly to nearly restore original tissue tolerance by day 11. During continuous fractionation over 1 to 3 weeks with 5 fractions/week and doses per fraction of 2.5, 3 and 3.5 Gy, repopulation was small in week one but subsequently increased to fully compensate the weekly dose at all dose levels. Additional measurements of cell density during a 4 weeks course of 5 x 3 Gy or 5 x 4 Gy per week showed only moderate depletion to 67% of the control figures. The fact that rapid repopulation is achieved at relatively moderate damage levels should be taken into account when the timing of a treatment split is considered. (author). 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G, E-mail: georg.bauer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Abteilung Virologie, Institut fuer Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene, Universitaet Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  16. Effect of prolonged low-dose γ-irradiation upon male rat testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, E.F.; Chanturiya, A.V.; Popov, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Dose-dependent characteristics of rat testicular cytosol adrogen reception at varied terms after prolonged whole-body γ-irradiation (0.1, 0.25 and 0.4 Gy at dose rate of 5.83 x 10 -7 Gy/s) coupled with an electron microscopy morphological characteristics of Sertoli cells. Leydig's cells and other populations of testicular cells, were examined. Analysis of the data obtained suggests the existance of γ-sensor in brain of mammals, that involved on hypotalamic-pituitary-testicular levels in realisation of radiation stress supression of Sertoli cell functions at a relatively low (0.1-0.5 Gy) doses by means of hypotalamic releasing factors and, therefore pituitary gonadotropins hypersecretion. 15 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Shelf-stable food through high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placek, V.; Svobodova, V.; Bartonicek, B.; Rosmus, J.; Camra, M.

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation of food with high doses (radappertization) is a way, how to prepare shelf-stable ready-to-eat food. The radappertization process requires that the food be heated at first to an internal temperature of at least 75 deg. C to inactivate autolytic enzyme, which could cause the spoilage during storage without refrigeration. In order to prevent radiation induced changes in sensory properties (off flavors, odors, undesirable color change, etc.) the food was vacuum packed and irradiated in frozen state at -30 deg. C or less to a minimum dose of 35 kGy. Such products have characteristics of fresh food prepared for eating even if they are stored for long time under tropical conditions. The wholesomeness (safety for consumption) has been confirmed during 40 years of testing. Within the NRI Rez 10 kinds of shelf-stable meat products have been prepared. The meat was cooked, vacuum packed in SiO x -containing pouch, freezed in liquid nitrogen and irradiated with electron beam accelerator. The microbial, chemical, and organoleptic properties have been tested

  18. Excellent outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a conditioning regimen with medium-dose VP-16, cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Akio; Kondo, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sugita, Junichi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Kahata, Kaoru; Endo, Tomoyuki; Shiratori, Soichi; Ota, Shuichi; Obara, Masato; Wakasa, Kentaro; Takahata, Mutsumi; Takeda, Yukari; Tanaka, Junji; Hashino, Satoshi; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Koike, Takao; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2008-05-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of 37 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) conditioned with medium-dose VP-16 (VP, 30 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (CY, 120 mg/kg), and fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI, 12 Gy) (medium-dose VP/CY/TBI). The median age of the patients was 26 years. Thirteen patients underwent transplantation from HLA-matched related donors (MRD), 18 patients underwent transplantation from HLA-matched unrelated donors (MUD), and 6 patients underwent transplantation from HLA-mismatched donors (MMD). Thirty-two patients received bone marrow and 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cells. Ten patients were Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) and 35 patients were in complete remission (CR) at transplantation. All of the patients achieved engraftment, and grade 3 organ toxicity before engraftment occurred in 27 patients. Grade II-III acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) occurred in 15 and 18 patients, respectively. No patient developed grade IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) or died of GVHD. At median follow-up of 35.1 months, 32 patients were alive and all Ph(+) patients were alive. Three patients died of relapse and 2 died of transplant-related mortality (TRM). The actuarial 3-year overall survival (OS) rate, relapse rate, and TRM rate were 89.2%, 8.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Non-CR at transplantation, MRD, and no aGVHD were significant adverse prognostic factors for survival. Medium-dose VP/CY/TBI for adult ALL patients was associated with lower relapse rate and no increase in toxicity, resulting in better survival.

  19. The application of high dose food irradiation in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyn, Ingrid Nine de

    2000-01-01

    During the 1950s to the end of the 1970s the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf-stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive 'dried cooked' taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The Biogam group at the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa is currently producing shelf-stable irradiated meats on a commercial basis. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 45 kGy at a temperature of between -20 and -40 deg. C to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions and can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. Safari operators in remote parts of Africa, mountaineers, yachtsmen, canoeists and geological survey teams currently use shelf-stable irradiated meat products produced in South Africa. (author)

  20. Cell death induced by gamma irradiation of developing skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, M.; Blanco, R.; Rivera, R.; Cinos, C.; Ferrer, I.

    1995-01-01

    Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a single dose of 2 Gy gamma rays and killed from 6 h to 5 d later. Increased numbers of dying cells, characterised by their extreme chromatin condensation and often nuclear fragmentation were seen in skeletal muscle 6 h after irradiation. Dying cells decreased to nearly normal values 48 h later. In situ labelling of nuclear DNA fragmentation identified individual cells bearing fragmented DNA. The effects of gamma rays were suppressed following cycloheximide i.p. at a dose of 1 μg/g body weight given at the time of irradiation. Taken together, the present morphological and pharmacological results suggest that gamma ray induced cell death in skeletal muscle is apoptotic, and that the process is associated with protein synthesis. Finally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen-immunoreactive cells, which were abundant in control rats, decreased in number 48 h after irradiation. However, a marked increase significantly above normal age values was observed at the 5th day, thus suggesting that regeneration occurs following irradiation-induced cell death in developing muscle. (author)

  1. Influence of low dose ionizing radiation on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Hou Dianjun; Qiao Jianwei; Shang Ximei; Li Jieqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of low dose ionization on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells. Methods: TIL cells isolated from Lewis lung cancer tissues and LAK cells from spleen of tumor-bearing mouse were irradiated with different low doses of X-rays and were cultured after irradiation. Results: Low dose ionizing radiation improved the amplification volume of LAK/TIL cells, decreased the cell death ratio in amplification process, and increased the toxicity of LAK/TIL cells, Conclusions: Low dose ionizing radiation can result in amplification of biologically activated lymphocytes, and decreases the death ratio of the cells in amplification process

  2. Ad-endostatin treatment combined with low-dose irradiation in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Hui-Juan; Li, Yong-Xia; Li, Meng; Lu, Lian; Wan, Yang; Zhou, Bai-Ling; Liu, Yan; Pan, Ying; Wu, Xiao-Zhe; Fan, Ying-Zi; Yu, Chao-Heng; Wei, Yu-Quan; Shi, Hua-Shan

    2014-08-01

    Radiation therapy is a conventional strategy for treating advanced lung cancer yet is accompanied by serious side-effects. Its combination with other strategies, such as antiangiogenesis and gene therapy, has shown excellent prospects. As one of the potent endogenous vascular inhibitors, endostatin has been widely used in the antiangiogenic gene therapy of tumors. In the present study, LL/2 cells were infected with a recombinant adenovirus encoding endostatin (Ad-endostatin) to express endostatin. The results showed that LL/2 cells infected with the Ad-endostatin efficiently and longlastingly expressed endostatin. In order to further explore the role of Ad-endostatin combined with irradiation in the treatment of cancer, a murine lung cancer model was established and treated with Ad-endostatin combined with low-dose irradiation. The results showed that the combination treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, this significant antitumor activity was associated with lower levels of microvessel density and anoxia factors in the Ad-Endo combined with irradiation group, and with an increased apoptotic index of tumor cells. In addition, no serious side-effects were noted in the combination group. Based on our findings, Ad-endostatin combined with low-dose irradiation may be a rational alternative treatment for lung cancer and other solid tumors.

  3. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  4. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  5. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  6. Post irradiation dose determination of 800 MeV proton irradiated aluminum from LAMPF experiment 407

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1980-05-01

    Recorded here are the results of post irradiation radiochemistry analysis of 800 MeV proton irradiated ultra high purity aluminum. Standard gamma-ray counting equipment, including a Ge Li detector, a multichannel analyzer, and associated electronics, was employed to count the 22 Na activity in the activated aluminum. Since activation is proportional to proton fluence, relative dose levels can be determined. Also, use of a selected production cross section for 22 Na in aluminum and a calculated damage energy cross section, both for 800 MeV proton bombardment, allows determination of a calculated value for the number of displacements per atom (dpa) that the material received during an irradiation experiment at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). It is felt that simple and sufficiently accurate post irradiation dose determination can be made when either the subject material is ultra high purity aluminum or if this material is provided as a monitor with other subject materials, the simplicity being that the transmutation product, isotope 22 Na, is relatively abundant and has a long half-life

  7. Use of cadmium sulphide to measure integrated dose in short-time irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimnual, S.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was made to measure the dose from a short burst of X-rays in the order of 1 second or less by means of the cadmium sulphide photoconductive cell. If protected from light, the CdS cell has a very high resistance such that it does not discharge a capacitor appreciably. But during irradiation, the resistance decreases temporarily and an amount of charge will leak from the capacitor through the Ca S cell. The result to this experiment shows that the principle works very well but it is necessary to add another fixed high resistance of about 10 7 ohms into the circuit in order to get results independent of the dose-rate. The equipment used in this experiment can measure a dose as low as 6 m R

  8. Clastogenic effects in human lymphocytes exposed to low and high dose rate X-ray irradiation and vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacka, M; Rogolinski, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we investigated the ability of vitamin C to modulate clastogenic effects induced in cultured human lymphocytes by X-irradiation delivered at either high (1 Gy/min) or low dose rate (0.24 Gy/min). Biological effects of the irradiation were estimated by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay including the analysis of the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and apoptotic cells as well as calculation of nuclear division index (NDI). The numbers of micronucleated binucleate lymphocytes (MN-CBL) were 24.85 ± 2.67% and 32.56 ± 3.17% in cultures exposed to X-rays (2 Gy) delivered at low and high dose rates, respectively. Addition of vitamin C (1-20 μg/ml) to the medium of cultures irradiated with the low dose rate reduced the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes with multiple MN in a concentration-dependent manner. Lymphocytes exposed to the high dose rate radiation showed a U-shape response: low concentration of vitamin C significantly reduced the number of MN, whereas high concentration influenced the radiation-induced total number of micronucleated cells insignificantly, although it increased the number of cells with multiple MN. Addition of vitamin C significantly reduced the fraction of apoptotic cells, irrespective of the X-ray dose rate. These results indicate that radiation dose rate is an important exposure factor, not only in terms of biological cell response to irradiation, but also with respect to the modulating effects of antioxidants. (authors)

  9. Dose-response relationships for chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after whole- and partial-body irradiations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liniecki, J.; Bajerska, A.; Wyszynska, K.

    1983-01-01

    Dose-response relationships were established for yield of dicentrics and for a fraction of damaged metaphases in lymphocytes after γ-irradiation of rabbits' whole blood in vitro. These relationships were based on the scoring of cells only in their first post-stimulation division and they served as a reference system for comparison with results of 60 Co γ-irradiation in vivo, either of the whole or of predetermined parts of an animal's body. There was a statistically acceptable agreement between dose-response data established for dicentric yield after whole-body irradiation in vivo and the reference dose-response curve derived from exposure of rabbit's blood in vitro. For partial-body (1/2) irradiations there was a satisfactory agreement between the dose-response curves in vitro for dicentric yield and fraction of metaphases damaged on the one hand and the response in vivo when the latter was related to mean doses to circulating blood. However, there was a drastic disagreement with the dose responses in vitro when measured cytogenetic quantities were plotted versus mean doses to body mass. When the latter were substituted for by comparable doses to circulating blood the in vivo-in vitro agreement was acceptable after irradiation. (orig.)

  10. Effects of neonatal thymic exposure to high doses of X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, G.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1979-01-01

    The thymic region of neonatal Swiss mice was exposed to doses varying from 1000 R to 2000 R of X-irradiation. The animals did not show any signs of wasting syndrome up to 6 months after irradiation. At this time hyperplasia of the thymus with an associated lymphocytosis was evident in irradiated animals. Antibody production to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was not affected. However, at 12 months post-irradiation the animals showed signs of wasting disease with a progressive increase in their numbers at 18 and 24 months of age. The percentage incidence of animals with wasting disease was dose dependent. At this stage in the majority of the animals with the disease the thymus showed varying degrees of atrophy along with splenomegaly. There were no significant differences in the number of lymphocytes but the number of granulocytes showed a substantial increase. This was more evident in animals exposed to 2000 R to the thymic region. Though one observed a lowered ability to form antibodies to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with advancing age, the thymic irradiation did not affect the immune response to BSA even in animals manifesting wasting disease. An interesting observation has been the development of a severe loss of muscle power and tone in the hind limbs in a large majority of animals. (author)

  11. Neurodegeneration and adaptation in response to low-dose photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limoli, Charles L. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Neural stem and precursor cells (i.e. multipotent neural cells) are concentrated in the neurogenic regions of the brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, subventricular zones), and considerable evidence suggests that these cells are important in mediating the stress response of the CNS after damage from ionizing radiation. The capability of these cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate (i.e. to undergo neurogenesis) suggests they can participate in the repair and maintenance of CNS functions by replacing brain cells damaged or depleted due to irradiation. Importantly, we have shown that multipotent neural cells are markedly sensitive to irradiation and oxidative stress, insults that compromise neurogenesis and hasten the onset and progression of degenerative processes that are likely to have an adverse impact on cognition. Our past and current work has demonstrated that relatively low doses of radiation cause a persistent (weeks-months) oxidative stress in multipotent neural cells that can elicit a range of degenerative sequelae in the CNS. Therefore, our project is focused on determining the extent that endogenous and redox sensitive multipotent neural cells represent important radioresponsive targets for low dose radiation effects. We hypothesize that the activation of redox sensitive signaling can trigger radioadaptive changes in these cells that can be either harmful or beneficial to overall cognitive health.

  12. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation; Les recherches sur les effets des faibles doses d'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-02-15

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of

  13. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  14. Identification of irradiated meat using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and estimation of applied dose using re-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, S.P.; Thomas, Paul; Bongirwar, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    An in-house blind trail on bone-in meat chunks was carried out in which 35 coded samples were correctly identified. The samples were either left unirradiated or had been irradiated to dose of 1, 2.5 or 4 kGy. Using re-irradiation, the dose received by the samples were determined with either linear, quadratic or exponential equation. The quadratic or exponential equation gave more successful estimates of irradiation dose whereas linear fit equations tend to over estimate the dose. (author)

  15. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  16. Splenic irradiation for hairy cell leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Moundhri, A.; Graham, P.H. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1997-11-01

    Splenic irradiation in the management of hairy cell leukaemia is previously unreported. A case is presented here to illustrate that splenic irradiation may be a useful addition to systemic therapies. It achieved local splenic and blood picture response and remission similar to splenectomy without any significant toxicity. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  17. PROFOUND AND SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC EFFECTS OF CLINICALLY-RELEVANT LOW DOSE SCATTER IRRADIATION ON THE BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKovalchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Irradiated cells can signal damage and distress to both close and distant neighbors that have not been directly exposed to the radiation (naïve bystanders. While studies have shown that such bystander effects occur in the shielded brain of animals upon body irradiation, their mechanism remains unexplored. Observed effects may be caused by some blood-borne factors; however they may also be explained, at least in part, by very small direct doses received by the brain that result from scatter or leakage. In order to establish the roles of low doses of scatter irradiation in the brain response, we developed a new model for scatter irradiation analysis whereby one rat was irradiated directly at the liver and the second rat was placed adjacent to the first and received a scatter dose to its body and brain. This work focuses specifically on the response of the latter rat brain to the low scatter irradiation dose. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence that very low, clinically relevant doses of scatter irradiation alter gene expression, induce changes in dendritic morphology, and lead to behavioral deficits in exposed animals. The results showed that exposure to radiation doses as low as 0.115 cGy caused changes in gene expression and reduced spine density, dendritic complexity, and dendritic length in the prefrontal cortex tissues of females, but not males. In the hippocampus, radiation altered neuroanatomical organization in males, but not in females. Moreover, low dose radiation caused behavioral deficits in the exposed animals. This is the first study to show that low dose scatter irradiation influences the brain and behavior in a sex-specific way.

  18. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.; Nastasi, M.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Garner, F.A.; Bradt, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl 2 O 4 spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. Here, the crystal structures of MgAl 2 O 4 spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5·10 26 n/m 2 (E n > 0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highest dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by ∼ 20% while increasing by ∼ 8% on octahedral sites. Since the neutron scattering length for Mg is considerably larger than for Al, this results is consistent with site exchange between Mg 2+ ions on tetrahedral sites and Al 3+ ions on octahedral sites. Least-squares refinements also indicated that, in all irradiated samples, at least 35% of Mg 2+ and Al 3+ ions in the crystal experienced disordering replacements. This retained dpa on the cation sublattices is the largest retained damage ever measured in an irradiated spinel material

  19. Dose requirements for microbial decontamination of botanical materials by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razem, D.; Katusin-Razem, Branka

    2002-01-01

    Microbial contamination levels and corresponding resistivities to irradiation (expressed as dose required for the first 90% reduction, D first 9 0% r ed ) were analyzed in a number of various botanical materials. The following generalizations could be made: total aerobic plate count is the most informative measure of contamination; the probability of contamination depends on available surface of the material and processing history: flowers and leaves usually contain more contamination than fruits and seeds, while crude herbs contain more than extracts; liquid extracts are more contaminated than dry ones. At the same time, resistivity to irradiation increases approximately in the reverse order of contamination level on going from flowers and leaves, to fruits and seeds, to liquid and dry extracts. The two quantities, probability of contamination and D first 9 0% r ed being inversely related, the treatment dose needed to reduce initial contamination to tolerable level amounts to between 4 and 30 kGy under a typical scenario, and between 8 and 40 kGy under the worst-case scenario for the whole range of raw materials and botanical products

  20. Biophysical Monitoring and dose response characteristics of irradiated hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshemey, W.M; Selim, N.S.; Desouky, O.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims to move a step forward towards a deeper understanding of the scattering of x-ray, from lyophilized biological samples. Comparative study has been performed using LAXS and UV-visible spectrophotometry for monitoring the dose response characteristics of the hemoglobin molecule of irradiated blood. Blood samples were irradiated at doses ranging from 5 up to 100 Gy. Diluted hemoglobin solution was scanned in the UV- visible range (200-700 nm), and lyophilized hemoglobin was prepared for LAXS measurement. The radiation-induced changes in the hemoglobin structure have been evaluated. The LAXS profile of hemoglobin molecule is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks were found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The obtained results suggest that the 1 s t peak, recorded at 4.65 o , is sensitive to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the globin part, while the major peak, recorded at 10.5 o , appeared to be related to its primary and secondary structure

  1. Stock selection of high-dose-irradiation-resistant materials for filter press under high-dose irradiation operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro; Minami, Mamoru; Hara, Kouji; Yamashita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    In a volume reduction process for the decontamination of contained soil, the performance degradation of a filter press is expected owing to material deterioration under high-dose irradiation. Eleven-stock selection of candidate materials including polymers, fibers and rubbers for the filter press was conducted to achieve a high performance of volume reduction of contaminated soil and the following results were derived. Crude rubber and nylon were selected as prime candidates for packing, diaphragm and filter plate materials. Polyethylene was also selected as a prime candidate for the filter cloth material. (author)

  2. Electron microscopic study of the spilt irradiation effects on the rat parotid ductal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Rae

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of split irradiation on the salivary ductal cells, especially on the intercalated cells of the rat parotid glands. For this study, 24 Sprague-Dawley strain rats were irradiated on the head and neck region with two equal split doses of 9 Gy for a 4 hours interval by Co-60 teletherapy unit, Picker's mode l 4M 60. The conditions of irradiation were that field size, dose rate, SSD and depth were 12 X 5 cm, 222 cGy/min, 50 cm and 1 cm, respectively. The experimental animals were sacrificed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, hours and 1, 3, 7, days after the irradiation and the changes of the irradiated intercalated cells of the parotid glands were examined under light and electron microscope. The results were as follows: 1. By the split irradiation, the degenerative changes of intercalated cells of the parotid glands appeared at 3 hours after irradiation and the most severe cellular degeneration observed at 6 hours after irradiation. The repair processes began from 12 hours after irradiation and have matured progressively. 2. Under electron microscope, loss of nuclear membrane, microvilli and secretory granules, derangement of chromosomes, degeneration of cytoplasm, atrophy or reduction of intracytoplasmic organelles were observed in the intercalated ductal cells after split irradiation. 3. Under light microscope, derangement of ductal cells, widening of cytoplasms and nuclei, hyperchromatism and proliferation of ductal cells were observed in intercalated ducts after split irradiation.

  3. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. The two strategies of plants to cope with chronic low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodzinsky, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The adaptive responses of plants to an increase in radioactivity of environment were established in radiobiological researches carried out in the Zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. It has been shown that there are two types of adaptive strategies to the environment contaminated with radionuclides, namely ontogenetic and phylogenetic strategies. The ontogenetic adaptive strategy is attained by induction of DNA reparation. Increasing of the genetic variability in irradiated population performs the phylogenetic adaptive strategy. The mechanism of this strategy is associated with induction of genetic instability. Rise in the frequency of genetic recombination as well as heterozygosity is at the time essential components of phylogenetic adaptation. Ontogenetic and phylogenetic adaptation strategies are an important feature in coping of plants to the elevated chronic irradiation. Most likely plant cells as a stress signal into adaptive responses perceive the low doses of irradiation. (author)

  5. Optimization of total body irradiation: the match between (maximal) leukemic cell kill and (minimal) late effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, M.L. van

    2007-01-01

    Optimization of total body irradiation: the match between (maximal) leukemic cell kill and (minimal) late effects: In this thesis, cataract formation and renal dysfunction as late effects of high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the conditioning before hematological stem cell

  6. Dose-response relationship for elective neck irradiation of head and neck cancer - facts and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwinski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Withers, H.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assign dose-response relationship for subclinical neck metastases of squamous cell head and neck cancer based on extensive survey of 24 data sets collected from the literature. Neck relapse rates (NRR) without and after elective (ENI) or preoperative irradiation were estimated for each site and stage of primary tumor and the reduction in neck relapse rate was calculated. An average NRR without ENI was 22% (12-35% ) and only 2.5% (0-1 0%) after the ENI with total dose of 46- 50 Gy which gives high reduction rate in the risk of neck recurrences being on the average 89% and 42% (0-46%) after preoperative irradiation using 22-30 Gy. Dose response curve for elective and preoperative irradiation have shown that 50 Gy in 2 Gy fraction reduces the incidence of neck relapses in the NO patients by more than 90% and only by less than 50% after total doses lower than 30 Gy. No correlation between the risk of neck metastases without ENI and the reduction in neck relapses after ENI was found. (authors)

  7. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Jeynes, J.C.G.; Merchant, M.J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Center, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Guildford Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: •Recently completed nanobeam at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre was used. •3.8-MeV single and broad proton beams irradiated Chinese hamster cells. •Cell survival curves were measured and compared with 300-kV X-ray irradiation. •Single ion irradiation had a lower survival part at ultra-low dose. •It implies hypersensitivity, bystander effect and cell cycle phase of cell death. -- Abstract: As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  8. Simulation of limiting dilution technique in determination of immunocompetent cells frequency in irradiated cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini Filho, R.J.; Barlette, V.E.; Goes, E.G.; Covas, D.T.; Orellana, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limiting dilution techniques (LDA) dose-response data have been used to detect immunocompetent T-Cells in microcultures. In this work, LDA frequencies estimates was obtained using χ2 minimization for irradiated cells in a range of 500 to 1,500 cGy. (author)

  9. Evaluation of low doses of gamma irradiation in the formation of mineralization nodules in osteoblasts culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Targino, Bárbara; Pinto, Thais Lazarine; Silva, Evily Fernandes; Somessari, E.S.R.; Bellini, Maria Helena; Affonso, Regina [Instituto De Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Osteoblasts are specialized fibroblasts that secrete and mineralize the bone matrix. The mineralized extracellular matrix is mainly composed of type I collagen, osteocalcin, and the inorganic mineral hydroxylapatite1. The use of radiation as therapy in some cancers causes great bone loss. However, low dose radiation may have the opposite effect. Low dose X-irradiation on osteoblastic culture had effects on proliferation and differentiation with increase of mineralization nodules2. However, there is little information on the potential therapeutic efficacy of low-dose gamma-irradiation in the formation of mineralization nodules. Objective: To evaluate the effects of irradiation with 60Co γ-rays in low doses in the formation of mineralization nodules in culture of osteoblasts. Methods: MC3T3-E1 cells were bought by the Banco de Células do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (MC3T3-E1 Subclone 14). The cells were cultured in α-MEM medium consisting of 10% FBS and without β-glycerophosphate and L-ascorbic acid (GIBCO, Custom Product, Catalog No. A1049001) (Zhao Y, Guan H, Liu S et al. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 2005, 28(8):1371-1376). Plating efficiency assays: cells were plated at a density of 100 cell/plate into 60 mm Petri dishes. After 14 days the places were stained with violet crystal and the colonies were counted. -glycerophosphate and 50 mg/ml ascorbic acid, and analyzed on days 7, 14 and 21. Osteoblast culture irradiation assay: cells were plated at a density of 1 x 105 cells/plate on 60 mm dishes and the next day were irradiated by 60Co source with 0 (as the control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Gy using the GammaCell 220 - Irradiation Unit of Canadian-Atomic Energy Commission Ltd. (CTR-IPEN). On day 21 of culture, undifferentiated (without ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate), differentiating cells (0 Gy) and irradiated cells at different doses, the medium was removed, cells were washed with phosphate buffer saline, fixed with 70% ethyl alcohol and

  10. Evaluation of low doses of gamma irradiation in the formation of mineralization nodules in osteoblasts culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targino, Bárbara; Pinto, Thais Lazarine; Silva, Evily Fernandes; Somessari, E.S.R.; Bellini, Maria Helena; Affonso, Regina

    2017-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Osteoblasts are specialized fibroblasts that secrete and mineralize the bone matrix. The mineralized extracellular matrix is mainly composed of type I collagen, osteocalcin, and the inorganic mineral hydroxylapatite1. The use of radiation as therapy in some cancers causes great bone loss. However, low dose radiation may have the opposite effect. Low dose X-irradiation on osteoblastic culture had effects on proliferation and differentiation with increase of mineralization nodules2. However, there is little information on the potential therapeutic efficacy of low-dose gamma-irradiation in the formation of mineralization nodules. Objective: To evaluate the effects of irradiation with 60Co γ-rays in low doses in the formation of mineralization nodules in culture of osteoblasts. Methods: MC3T3-E1 cells were bought by the Banco de Células do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (MC3T3-E1 Subclone 14). The cells were cultured in α-MEM medium consisting of 10% FBS and without β-glycerophosphate and L-ascorbic acid (GIBCO, Custom Product, Catalog No. A1049001) (Zhao Y, Guan H, Liu S et al. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 2005, 28(8):1371-1376). Plating efficiency assays: cells were plated at a density of 100 cell/plate into 60 mm Petri dishes. After 14 days the places were stained with violet crystal and the colonies were counted. -glycerophosphate and 50 mg/ml ascorbic acid, and analyzed on days 7, 14 and 21. Osteoblast culture irradiation assay: cells were plated at a density of 1 x 105 cells/plate on 60 mm dishes and the next day were irradiated by 60Co source with 0 (as the control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Gy using the GammaCell 220 - Irradiation Unit of Canadian-Atomic Energy Commission Ltd. (CTR-IPEN). On day 21 of culture, undifferentiated (without ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate), differentiating cells (0 Gy) and irradiated cells at different doses, the medium was removed, cells were washed with phosphate buffer saline, fixed with 70% ethyl alcohol and

  11. Evaluation of cell proliferative activity after irradiation using immunohistochemical approach and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Takashi (Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    To evaluate a proliferative activity of post-irradiated malignant cells, we studied the kinetics of HeLa cells using immunohistochemical approach and flow cytometry. HeLa cells were stained with two proliferation-associated monoclonal antibodies, Ki-67 and anti-DNA polymerase {alpha} antibody. Nucleoli of non-irradiated cells were granularly stained with Ki-67. After irradiation, only the center of nuclei was diffusely stained with Ki-67. One hundred forty-four hours after low-dose irradiation, the staining patterns became the same as the control. On the other hand, after high-dose irradiation, the center of nuclei was weakly stained. DNA polymerase {alpha} was diffusely labelled with nuclei of the control. It was located around the border of nuclei of low-dose irradiated cells like a ring. But after high-dose irradiation, it was granularly distributed in the periphery of nuclei. FITC conjugated Ki-67/PI two parameter analysis was done by a single laser flow cytometer. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, DNA-histograms showed the accumulation to G{sub 2}/M phase and the increase of DNA content of G{sub 2}/M cells, as exposure dose was increased. Two parameter analysis showed the increase of FITC uptake of G{sub 2}/M phase as dose increased. These changes of flow cytometry were remarkably observed after 24 hours' incubation. It was shown that the difference of Ki-67 antigen and DNA polymerase {alpha} appearance depended on the irradiation dose. These findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining with Ki-67 or anti-DNA polymerase {alpha} antibody and flow cytometry using Ki-67 are available to evaluate cell damages after irradiation. (author).

  12. Patterns of proliferation and differentiation of irradiated haemopoietic stem cells cultured on normal 'stromal' cell colonies in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were designed to elucidate whether or not the irradiated bone marrow cells receive any stimulation for the self-replication and differentiation from normal 'stromal' cell colonies in the bone marrow cell culture in vitro. When irradiated or unirradiated bone marrow cells were overlaid on the normal adherent cell colonies, the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells was supported, the degree of the stimulation depending on the starting cellular concentration. There was, however, no significant changes in the concentration of either CFUs or CFUc regardless of the dose of irradiation on the bone marrow cells overlaid. This was a great contrast to the dose-dependent decrease of CFUs or CFUc within the culture in which both the stem cells and stromal cells were simultaneously irradiated. These results suggest that the balance of self-replication and differentiation of the haemopoietic stem cells is affected only when haemopoietic microenvironment is perturbed. (author)

  13. Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B.

    2013-09-17

    This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

  14. Microbeam evolution: From single cell irradiation to preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Fukunaga, Hisanori

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This review follows the development of microbeam technology from the early days of single cell irradiations, to investigations of specific cellular mechanisms and to the development of new treatment modalities in vivo. A number of microbeam applications are discussed with a focus...... on preclinical modalities and translation towards clinical application. Conclusions: The development of radiation microbeams has been a valuable tool for the exploration of fundamental radiobiological response mechanisms. The strength of micro-irradiation techniques lies in their ability to deliver precise doses...

  15. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  16. Relationship of dose rate and total dose to responses of continuously irradiated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Norris, W.P.; Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Young-adult beagles were exposed continuously (22 hours/day) to 60 Co gamma rays in a specially constructed facility. The exposure rates were 5, 19, 17 or 35 R/day, and the exposures were terminated at 600, 1400, 2000 or 4000 R. A total of 354 dogs were irradiated; 221 are still alive as long-term survivors, some after more than 2000 days. The data on survival of these dogs, coupled with data from similar preliminary experiments, allow an estimate of the LD 50 for gamma-ray exposures given at a number of exposure rates. They also allow comparison of the relativeimportance of dose rate and total dose, and the interaction of these two variables, in the early and late effects after protracted irradiation. The LD 50 for the beagle increases from 344 R (258 rads) delivered at 15 R/minute to approximately 4000 R (approximately 3000 rads) at 10 R/day. Over this entire range, the LD 50 is dependent upon haematopoietic damage. At 5 R/day and less, no definitive LD 50 can be determined; there is nearly normal continued haematopoietic function, survival is prolonged, and the dogs manifest varied individual responses in the organ systems. Although the experiment is not complete, interim data allow serveral important conclusions. Terminated exposures, while not as effective as irradiation continued until death, can produce myelogenous leukaemia at the same exposure rate, 10 R/day. More importantly, at the same total accumulated dose, lower exposure rates appear more damaging than higher rates on the basis of the rate and degree of haematological recovery that occurs after termination of irradiation. Thus, the rate of haematologic depression, the nadir of the depression and the rate of recovery are dependent upon exposure rate; the latter is inversely related and the first two are directly related to exposure rate. ( author)

  17. Cytogenetic investigations of persons exposed to professional chronic low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, V.; Mitev, L.; Petrunov, P.; Vesselinova, L.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of long term influence of low-doses occupational irradiation is connected with the real assessment of their consequences. The current cytogenetic investigations were done on persons working under occupational chronic external partial irradiation. Accumulated doses of external irradiation are surveyed. Data give ground for suggestion about the relationship between accumulated dose and chromosomal aberrations. The additional damage factors (diagnostic investigations, chemical substances, tobacco addict) have done the more significant influence upon aberrations appearance increasing

  18. Development of microstructure and irradiation hardening of Zircaloy during low dose neutron irradiation at nominally 358 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Smith, R. W.; Leonard, K. J.; Byun, T. S.; Snead, L. L.

    2011-11-01

    Wrought Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were neutron irradiated at nominally 358 °C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron fluences between 5.8 × 10 22 and 2.9 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV). The irradiation hardening and change in microstructure were characterized following irradiation using tensile testing and examinations of microstructure using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). Small increments of dose (0.0058, 0.11, 0.55, 1.08, and 2.93 × 10 25 n/m 2) were used in the range where the saturation of irradiation hardening is typically observed so that the role of microstructure evolution and loop formation on irradiation hardening could be correlated. An incubation dose between 5.8 × 10 23 and 1.1 × 10 24 n/m 2 was needed for loop nucleation to occur that resulted in irradiation hardening. Increases in yield strength were consistent with previous results in this temperature regime, and as expected less irradiation hardening and lower loop number density values than those generally reported in literature for irradiations at 260-326 °C were observed. Unlike previous lower temperature data, there is evidence in this study that the irradiation hardening can decrease with dose over certain ranges of fluence. Irradiation induced voids were observed in very low numbers in the Zircaloy-2 materials at the highest fluence.

  19. Differential effects of fractionated X irradiation on mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Y.; Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J. A.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The response of spermatogonial stem cells to fractionated X irradiation was studied in the various stages of the spermatogenic cycle of the CBA mouse. Fractionated doses of 2 + 2, 1 + 3, and 3 + 1 Gy with a 24-h interval between the doses were compared with a single dose of 4 Gy. The numbers of

  20. Low dose ionizing radiation treated lymphoblastoid cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiated cell lines exposed to 1-10 Gy 2 Lymphoblastoid cell lines (GM15510 and GM15036) irradiated 1 2.5 5 7.5 10 Gy RNA is isolated and labeled using a T7...

  1. Inactivation of HTB63 human melanoma cells by irradiation with protons and gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic-Fira, Aleksandra; Petrovic, Ivan; Todorovic, Danijela; Koricanac, Lela; Vujèic, Miroslava; Demajo, Miroslav; Sabini, Gabriella; Cirrone, Pablo; Cuttone, Giacomo

    2004-12-01

    The effects of single irradiation with gamma rays and protons on HTB63 human melanoma cell growth were compared. The exponentially growing cells were irradiated with gamma rays or protons using doses ranging from 2-20 Gy. At 48 h of post-irradiation incubation under standard conditions, cell survival and induction of apoptotic cell death were examined. The best effect of the single irradiation with gamma rays was the reduction of cell growth by up to 26% (p=0.048, irradiation vs. control), obtained using the dose of 16 Gy. The same doses of proton irradiation, having energy at the target of 22.6 MeV, significantly inhibited melanoma cell growth. Doses of 12 and 16 Gy of protons provoked growth inhibition of 48.9% (p=0.003, irradiation vs. control) and 51.2% (p=0.012, irradiation vs. control) respectively. Irradiation with 12 and 16 Gy protons, compared to the effects of the same doses of gamma rays, significantly reduced melanoma cell growth (p=0.015 and p=0.028, protons vs. gamma rays, respectively). Estimated RBEs for growth inhibition of HTB63 cells ranged from 1.02 to 1.45. The electrophoretical analyses of DNA samples and flow cytometric evaluation have shown a low percentage of apoptotic cells after both types of irradiation. The better inhibitory effect achieved by protons in contrast to gamma rays, can be explained considering specific physical properties of protons, especially taking into account the highly localized energy deposition (high LET).

  2. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  3. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  4. Influence of Ouabain on cell inactivation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheye-Dua, F.A.; Boehm, L.

    1996-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that irradiation affects the function of the Na + -K + -ATPase. Here we examine the influence of the inhibitor ouabain on the cytotoxicity or irradiation. Material and Methods: Cell colony assay, cell survival, 86 Rb-uptake, flow cytometry. Results: In V79, HeLa and A549 cell ouabain alone causes a significant growth reduction at medium concentrations of 10 -4 M, 10 -6 M and 10 -7 M, respectively. When cells were exposed to the drug for 1 h and subsequently irradiated, the SF2 values decreased from 0.55 to 0.41, from 0.42 to 0.18 and from 0.57 to 0.35 in V79, HeLa and A549 cells, respectively. These effects were manifest at drug concentrations of 10 -3 M, 10 -6 M and 10 -7 M respectively, where Na + -K + -ATPase activity as mesured by 86 Rb-uptake was reduced to 40 to 60% of the control value. Addition of the drug after irradiation and when the G2/M cell cycle block was firmly established, markedly delayed the recovery of cells for well over 6 h and G1 levels remained at 50% of the control values. Conclusion: It is concluded that ouabain is strongly dose modifying in the human cell lines HeLa and A549 at concentrations which correlate with the inhibition of the Na + -K + -ATPase. Ouabain also inhibits the recovery of cells blocked in the cell cycle by irradiation. (orig.) [de

  5. Inhibitory mechanism of low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays against tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhiro Ohsima; Mitsutoshi Tukimoto; Shuji Kojima

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A lot of beneficial effects of low-dose irradiation are well known. Of them, an inhibitory effect of the radiation on lung metastasis is reported so far. It has been reported that low-dose whole-body irradiation with gamma rays enhanced cytotoxic immune response as one of the mechanisms. In our laboratory, it has been confirmed an enhancement of natural killer activity in mice irradiated with whole-body 0.5Gy gamma-rays. Metastasis is accomplished by multistep process, involving basement membrane destruction, local invasion, intravasation, survival in the bloodstream, extravasation into distant organs, and proliferation at the target site. Besides, a lot of growth factors and proteases are involved in these steps. As to mechanism of inhibition of tumor metastasis induced by low-dose whole-body irradiation, studies from the standpoint of tumor invasion have not been reported. Here, inhibitory effect of 0.5Gy whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on tumor metastasis and its mechanism were examined in pulmonary metastasis model mice injected with B16 melanoma cells. Consequently, 0.5Gy whole-body gamma ray irradiation significantly suppressed colony formation in the lungs. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase- 2 (MMP- 2), a proteinase related to metastasis, in lung tissues was suppressed by the radiation. Alteration of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) after the gamma-ray irradiation was examined. Expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA in the lungs were significantly increased. In order to clarify the inhibitory effect obtained in the in vivo metastatic lung cancer model mice, we studied effects of gamma-rays on cell proliferation, alterations of mRNA and proteins related to tumor metastasis in cultured B16 melanoma cells. Proliferation of B16 melanoma cells was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. MMP-2 mRNA expression was not altered in any doses of gamma-rays. Thought expression of the protein was slightly

  6. Intracavitary irradiation of prostatic carcinoma by a high dose-rate afterloading technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odelberg-Johnson, O.; Underskog, I.; Johansson, J.E.; Bernshaw, D.; Sorbe, B.; Persson, J.E. (Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Urology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics)

    1991-01-01

    A high dose-rate ({sup 60}Co) afterloading technique was evaluated in a series of 73 patients with prostatic carcinoma stages I-IV. The intraurethral irradiation was combined with external pelvic radiotherapy. A minimum total dose of 78 Gy was delivered to the target volume. In a subgroup of patients extramustine (Estracyt) was given as adjuvant chemohormonal therapy during irradiation. The median follow-up for the whole group was 63 months. The crude 5-year survival rate was 60% and the corrected survival rate 90%. Survival was related to the tumor grade. Local pelvic recurrences were recorded in 17.8%. 'Viable cells' in posttherapy aspiration biopsy were not associated with tumor recurrences or survival. Four patients (5%) had grade 3 late radiation reactions with urethral structure or bladder fibrosis. Urinary tract infections and prior transurethral resections were not associated with a higher frequency of reactions. Concurrent estramustine therapy seemed to increase the frequency of both acute and chronic radiation reactions. Local control, recurrence, and survival were not affected by chemohormonal therapy. The use of tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound as aids to computerized dosimetry may improve local dose distribution and reduce the irradiated volume. (orig.).

  7. Involvement of immune system in enhanced tumor rejection in mice by chronic low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    In the previous study, I found that low dose-rate radiation, under certain irradiation conditions, enhanced the rejective response against tumor cells in irradiated C57BL/6N mice. To elucidate the involvement of immune system, I studied the rejective response against taking tumor cells in C57BL/6 mice and scid mice. The C57BL/6N mice have normal immune system, but the scid mice lack a functional immune system. The rejective response was analyzed by applying methods of TD50 assay. TD50 is the abbreviation for tumor dose 50 and indicates the number of cells required for successful transplantation to 50% of injected sites in the recipient animals. I transplanted the tumor cells prepared from a Methylcholanthrene-induced tumor (fibrosarcoma) in mice. The increase in the TD50 value suggests an enhancement of the rejective response against taking tumor cells. The TD50 in non-irradiated scid mice was smaller than that of non-irradiated C57BL/6N mice and the values were 7.6 x 10 2 and 1.01 x 10 4 , respectively. Furthermore, the TD50 value in C57BL/6N mice irradiated with 250 mGy increased to 3.5 x 10 4 . On the other hand, that in scid mice irradiated with the same total dose remained at low level and did riot change. These results suggest that the increase in TD50 value in mice by irradiation with 250 mGy needs normal immune system. The immune system is stimulated by transplantated tumor cells and induced the enhancement of the rejective response against taking tumor cells. (author)

  8. Studies on the radiation sensitivity of food microorganism by high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Han Joon; Lee, Eun Jung; Yu, Hyun Hee; Lee, Jae Ho

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the radio resistance of pathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) and Escherichia coli O157) in irradiating environments. Their radiation conditions of pathogenic microorganisms varied with pH(3-10), salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition. In addition, the effect of γ-irradiation on the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms inoculated into food (saengsik, sliced ham, chopped beef) was investigated. The radiation dose ranged from 0 to 3 kGy. The γ--irradiated B.cereus(γ--BC) St.aureus(γ--SA), MRSA(γ--MRSA) and E.coli O157(γ--EC) were then cultured and the viable cell count on plate count agar and D10-values(dose required to inactivate 90% of a microbial population) were calculated. The number of pathogenic microorganisms at pH(3-10) and salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition decreased by 1 log CFU/ml after irradiation. The D 10 -value of γ--SA in the optimum condition was 0.152 kGy, and these of γ--MRSA and γ--EC were 0.346 and 0.240 kGy, respectively. The initial cell counts of pathogenic microorganisms in culture broth were slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration. However, radiation resistance of pathogenic microorganisms was increased at frozen state. Moreover, D 10 -values of these is test strains in saengsik, sliced ham and chopped beef were 0.597, 0.226 , 0.398 and 0.416 kGy, respectively. These results provide the basic information for the in activation of pathogenic microorganisms in foods by irradiation

  9. Studies on the radiation sensitivity of food microorganism by high dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Han Joon; Lee, Eun Jung; Yu, Hyun Hee; Lee, Jae Ho [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We investigated the radio resistance of pathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) and Escherichia coli O157) in irradiating environments. Their radiation conditions of pathogenic microorganisms varied with pH(3-10), salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition. In addition, the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms inoculated into food (saengsik, sliced ham, chopped beef) was investigated. The radiation dose ranged from 0 to 3 kGy. The {gamma}--irradiated B.cereus({gamma}--BC) St.aureus({gamma}--SA), MRSA({gamma}--MRSA) and E.coli O157({gamma}--EC) were then cultured and the viable cell count on plate count agar and D10-values(dose required to inactivate 90% of a microbial population) were calculated. The number of pathogenic microorganisms at pH(3-10) and salt concentration(1-15%), temperature(-20, 4 and 25 .deg. C) and atmospheric condition decreased by 1 log CFU/ml after irradiation. The D{sub 10}-value of {gamma}--SA in the optimum condition was 0.152 kGy, and these of {gamma}--MRSA and {gamma}--EC were 0.346 and 0.240 kGy, respectively. The initial cell counts of pathogenic microorganisms in culture broth were slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration. However, radiation resistance of pathogenic microorganisms was increased at frozen state. Moreover, D{sub 10}-values of these is test strains in saengsik, sliced ham and chopped beef were 0.597, 0.226 , 0.398 and 0.416 kGy, respectively. These results provide the basic information for the in activation of pathogenic microorganisms in foods by irradiation

  10. Changes in the ultrastructure of rectum cancer cells after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaretskaya, A.I.; Lushnikov, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Data on electron microscopy of the tumoral tissue of 10 patients with rectum cancer after preoperative irradiation in a total focal dose of 2O00 rad are presented. Visually cells with a certain degree of damage of the organoids prevailed in the newgrowths. No relationship between the extent of the tumour differentiation, time of investigation and the nature of radiation changes on the tumoral cells was established. Under the effect of irradiation the cell nucleus size increases and chromatin becomes condensed near the nuclear membrane. Mitocehondria swell and vacuolize. Endoplasmatic reticulum and Golgi complex widen and vacuolize. It is suggested that at the level of ultrastructures there occures the formation of the routes of the development of events: survival of the cell or its destruction by an interphasal or reproductive type

  11. The effects of pervanadate given at different times on the proliferation of irradiated NFS-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuan; Yuan Xiaoling; Zhao Zhenhu; Shan Yajun; Chen Jiapei; Cong Yuwen

    2004-01-01

    To comprehend the feasibility of the inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase pervanadate using for therapy of radiation injury and inquire into the effects of tyrosine phosphatases on the radiation injury of hematopoietic cells, the effects of different times of administration on NFS-60 cells irradiated with different doses were observed. It was found that pervanadate could specifically enhance the proliferation of irradiated cells, such effects became obvious with the dose of irradiation increased and displayed time effects. For 3 Gy irradiated NFS-60 cells, good results were achieved when pervanadate was administrated 24h after irradiation, there were no difference between before and 30 mins after irradiation, but for 5 Gy irradiated cells, the best time administration is 24 and 48h after irradiation. Effects of pervanadate administrated before irradiation was better than that administrated 30 min after irradiation. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatase might involve in the course of radiation injury of hematopoietic cells. It is hoped that enhancing receptor signal transduction by PTP inhibitors will become a new way of therapy of acute radiation disease

  12. Anti-tumor effect of total body irradiation of low doses on WHT/Ht mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Miyako; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1987-01-01

    The effect of low dose (0.05 - 1.0 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) on non-tumor bearing and tumor bearing mice were investigated. Mice received TBI of 0.1 Gy during 6 - 12 hours before tumor cell inoculation demonstrated to need larger number of tumor cells (approximately 2.5 times) for 50 per cent tumor incidence, compared to recipient mice not to receive TBI. On the other hand, in tumor bearing mice given 0.1 Gy of TBI only tumor cell killing effect was not detected, however enhancement of tumor cell killing effect and prolonged growth delay were observed when tumor bearing mice were treated with 0.1 Gy of TBI in combined with local irradiation on tumors, especially cell killing effect was remarkable in dose range over 6 Gy of local exposure. The mechanism of the effect of 0.1 Gy TBI is considered to be host mediated reactions from the other our experimental results. (author)

  13. Chromosome aberrations and micronucleus in continuously irradiated mice for a low dose rate of 137Cs γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Jun; Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Sato, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    Delayed chromosomal instability is developed by radiation after several cell divisions in cultured rodent and human cells. The genetic instability might be related to cancer development and it has been mainly found in cultured rodent and human cells irradiated at high dose rate. It has not been well studied whether the genetic instability is induced by prolonged irradiation with low dose rate in vivo or not. Mice irradiated with 20 mGy/day for 5-8 Gy were analyzed by FISH to estimate the chromosome aberration rate and micronucleus incidence in spleen and bone marrow cells. Spleen cells in mice exposed to 8 Gy have higher incidence of monosomy and trisomy than non-exposed mice. The number of cells with 2-4 micronuclei in 10,000 scored spleen cells is also higher in 5-8 Gy exposed mice. These numerical chromosome aberrations are not induced directly by radiation exposure. These results indicate that prolonged 137 Cs γ ray-irradiation with low dose rates of 20 mGy/day induces delayed chromosome instability in mice. (author)

  14. Biological effects in lymphocytes irradiated with 99mTc: determination of the curve dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Romero Marcilio Barros Matias de

    2002-08-01

    Biological dosimetry estimates the absorbed dose taking into account changes in biological parameters. The most used biological indicator of an exposition to ionizing radiation is the quantification of chromosomal aberrations of lymphocytes from irradiated individuals. The curves of dose versus induced biological effects, obtained through bionalyses, are used in used in retrospective evaluations of the dose, mainly in the case of accidents. In this research, a simple model for electrons and photons transports was idealized to simulate the irradiation of lymphocytes with 99m Tc, representing a system used for irradiation of blood cells. The objective of the work was to establish a curve of dose versus frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of human blood. For the irradiation of blood samples micro spheres of human serum of albumin (HSAM) market with 99m Tc were used, allowing the irradiation of blood with different administered activities of 99m Tc, making possible the study the cytogenetical effects as a function of such activities. The conditions of irradiation in vivo using HSAM spheres marked with 99m Tc were simulated with MCNP 4C (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code to obtain the dose-response curve. Soft tissue composition was employed to simulate blood tissue and the analyses of the curve of dose versus biological effect showed a linear quadratic response of the unstable chromosomal aberrations. As a result, the response of dose versus chromosomal aberrations of blood irradiation with 99m Tc was best fitted by the curve Y=(8,99 ±2,06) x 1- -4 + (1,24 ±0,62) x 10 -2 D + (5,67 ± 0,64) x 10 -2 D 2 . (author)

  15. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  16. On the mechanism of action of low dose irradiation on plants and its utilization in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, W.; Degner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Essential systematic aspects of morphogenesis, especially of organogenesis of plants with respect to their possible influence by low doses of ionizing radiations are analyzed. Literature results on the effects of a gamma and X-irradiation, respectively, on plants and their organs are discussed. It is tried to combine characteristic effects of irradiation on cell cultures and meristems with the previously discussed effects at higher organization levels. Central conclusion is that with an effect of low ionizing radiation doses the time course of cell division and differentiation processes in the plant organism is changed. Initial decrease in the mitotic rate are overcompensated, the intensification of all differentiation processes leads to an accelerated organogenesis. Accompanying growth effects preponderantly have transient character under optimum conditions. Under sub- and supraoptimum conditions longer existing differences in growth and yield develop. The earlier organ maturation favours the accumulation of substances. Finally, rules for the choice of cultures and cultivation conditions for which essential effects can be expected by gamma irradiation as well as references to the experimental check and further investigation of this effect are given. (author)

  17. Absence of single critical dose for the amorphization of quartz under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Backholm, M.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.; Wang, T. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we first simulated the amorphization of crystalline quartz under 50 keV 23 Na ion irradiation with classical molecular dynamics (MD). We then used binary collision approximation algorithms to simulate the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions (RBS-C) from these irradiated MD cells, and compared the RBS-C spectra with experiments. The simulated RBS-C results show an agreement with experiments in the evolution of amorphization as a function of dose, showing what appears to be (by this measure) full amorphization at about 2.2 eVṡatom-1 . We also applied other analysis methods, such as angular structure factor, Wigner–Seitz, coordination analysis and topological analysis, to analyze the structural evolution of the irradiated MD cells. The results show that the atomic-level structure of the sample keeps evolving after the RBS signal has saturated, until the dose of about 5 eVṡatom-1 . The continued evolution of the SiO2 structure makes the definition of what is, on the atomic level, an amorphized quartz ambiguous.

  18. Effect of low dose irradiation on expression of membrane molecules of T lymphocytes in cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Yang Guang; Jia Tingzhen

    2001-01-01

    The membrane molecules expression of T lymphocytes of cord blood after low dose irradiation (LDI) was investigated. Freshly isolated lymphocytes from cord blood were irradiated with 62 mGy γ-ray. At different time (4 h, 12 h, 24 h) after irradiation the changes of TCR + , CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells were examined by flow cytometry with direct immunofluorescence, respectively. The experimental results showed that the proportion of CD3 + , TCR + /CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells increased significantly after LDI, with the most obvious enhancement noted in the 24 h experimental group. The ratio of CD4 to CD8 showed no significant changes. It is suggested that expedition of the maturation, activation and signal transduction of T lymphocytes from cord blood can be induced by irradiation of 62 mGy γ-ray. So the reconstruction of immune functions after cord blood transplantation can be accelerated, enhancing the graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and preventing the tumor from relapsing

  19. Relationship of dose rate and total dose to responses of continuously irradiated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Norris, W.P.; Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Young-adult beagles were exposed continuously (22 hours/day) to 60 Co γ rays in a specially constructed facility. The exposure rates were either 5, 10, 17, or 35 R/day, and the exposures were terminated at either 600, 1400, 2000, or 4000 R. A total of 354 dogs were irradiated; 221 are still alive as long-term survivors, some after more than 2000 days. The data on survival of these dogs, coupled with data from similar preliminary experiments, allow an estimate of the LD 50 for γ-ray exposures given at a number of exposure rates. They also allow comparison of the relative importance of dose rate and total dose, and the interaction of these two variables, in the early and late effects after protracted irradiation. The LD 50 for the beagle increases from 258 rad delivered at 15 R/minute to approximately 3000 rad at 10 R/day. Over this entire range, the LD 50 is dependent upon hematopoietic damage. At 5 R/day and less, no meaningful LD 50 can be determined; there is nearly normal continued hematopoietic function, survival is prolonged, and the dogs manifest varied individual responses in other organ systems. Although the experiment is not complete, interim data allow several important conclusions. Terminated exposures, while not as effective as radiation continued until death, can produce myelogenous leukemia at the same exposure rate, 10 R/day. More importantly, at the same total accumulated dose, lower exposure rates are more damaging than higher rates on the basis of the rate and degree of hematological recovery that occurs after termination of irradiation. Thus, the rate of hematologic depression, the nadir of the depression, and the rate of recovery are dependent upon exposure rate; the latter is inversely related and the former two are directly related to exposure rate

  20. Molecular characterization of non-thymic lymphomas in mice exposed to continuous low-dose-rate g-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabatake, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, I.; Tanaka-Braga III, I.; Sunaga, Y.; Ichinoche, K.; Sato, F.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the effects of continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on life span and neoplasm incidence, SPE B6C3 F1 mice were irradiated with 137Cs-ray at dose-rates of 20, 1 and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000, 40 and 20 mGy, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day were significantly shorter than that of the non-irradiated group. No significant difference in the cause of death and mortality rates was found between the groups. However, non-thymic lymphomas, the most common lethal neoplasm, showed a tendency to develop at an earlier age in mice irradiated with 20 mGy/day, regardless of sex. to obtain clues on the molecular mechanisms underlying the earlier development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group, detailed molecular characterizations of non-thymic lymphomas with respect to B-cell or T-cell origin was done by detecting rearrangements in immunoglobulin heavy gene and in T-cell receptor b-and g chain genes by Southem hybridization method. to determine whether the early development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group is associated wi the any recurrent chromosomal imbalance such as deletions and amplifications, the genome-wide scanning is also currently in progress by both LOH and array CGH methods. Present data obtained by LOH method show that deletions in parts of chromosomes 11 and 12 were more frequent than in chromosomes 2, 4 and 14 in both the non-irradiated control and 20 mGy/day irradiated groups. this work is supported by grants from Aomori Prefecture, Japan. (Author)

  1. Molecular characterization of non-thymic lymphomas in mice exposed to continuous low-dose-rate g-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabatake, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, I.; Tanaka-Braga III, I.; Sunaga, Y.; Ichinoche, K.; Sato, F.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effects of continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on life span and neoplasm incidence, SPE B6C3 F1 mice were irradiated with 137Cs-ray at dose-rates of 20, 1 and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000, 40 and 20 mGy, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day were significantly shorter than that of the non-irradiated group. No significant difference in the cause of death and mortality rates was found between the groups. However, non-thymic lymphomas, the most common lethal neoplasm, showed a tendency to develop at an earlier age in mice irradiated with 20 mGy/day, regardless of sex. to obtain clues on the molecular mechanisms underlying the earlier development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group, detailed molecular characterizations of non-thymic lymphomas with respect to B-cell or T-cell origin was done by detecting rearrangements in immunoglobulin heavy gene and in T-cell receptor b-and g chain genes by Southem hybridization method. to determine whether the early development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group is associated wi the any recurrent chromosomal imbalance such as deletions and amplifications, the genome-wide scanning is also currently in progress by both LOH and array CGH methods. Present data obtained by LOH method show that deletions in parts of chromosomes 11 and 12 were more frequent than in chromosomes 2, 4 and 14 in both the non-irradiated control and 20 mGy/day irradiated groups. this work is supported by grants from Aomori Prefecture, Japan. (Author)

  2. Recovery of the proliferative and functional integrity of mouse bone marrow in long-term cultures established after whole-body irradiation at different doses and dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierkens, J.G.; Hendry, J.H.; Testa, N.G. (Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (England))

    1991-02-01

    Injury inflicted upon the bone marrow stroma following whole-body irradiation and its repair over a 1-year period has been assessed in murine long-term bone marrow cultures established at increasing time intervals after irradiation. Different doses at different dose rates (10 Gy at 0.05 cGy/min, 4.5 Gy and 10 Gy at 1.6 cGy/min, and 4 x 4.5 Gy (3 weeks between doses) at 60 cGy/min) were chosen so as to maximize differences in effect in the stroma. The cellularity of the adherent layer in long-term cultures established 1 month after irradiation was reduced by 40%-90% depending on the dose and dose rate. Simultaneous with the poor ability of the marrow to form adherent layers, the cumulative spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) production over a 7-week period was reduced to 0% and 30% of control cultures, respectively. The slow recovery of the adherent layer was paralleled by an increase in the numbers of CFU-S and GM-CFC in the supernatant. Cultures established from repeatedly irradiated mice performed poorly over the entire 1-year period. Whereas the regeneration of the stroma was near complete 1 year after irradiation, the CFU-S and GM-CFC levels reached only between 50% and 80% of control cultures, respectively. Also, the concentration of CFU-S and GM-CFC in the supernatant remained persistently lower in cultures established from irradiated mice as compared to control cultures. The levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, which have been implicated in the establishment of the functional integrity of the microenvironment, were not reduced in the adherent layers at any time after irradiation. These results indicate that the regeneration of the stroma is accompanied by an incomplete recovery of active hemopoiesis in vitro.

  3. VARIATIONS IN RADIATION SENSITIVITY AND REPAIR AMONG DIFFERENT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL SUBSETS FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED-IRRADIATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; BOUDEWIJN, A; VANOS, R; THAMES, HD; PLOEMACHER, RE

    1995-01-01

    The radiation dose-survival of various hematopoietic cell subsets in murine bone marrow (BM) was determined in the cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay under conditions of single-, split-, and multiple-dose irradiation. A greater recovery in cell survival with decreasing dose per fraction, or

  4. Effects of irradiation source and dose level on quality characteristics of processed meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Choi, Yun-Sang; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2017-01-01

    The effect of irradiation source (gamma-ray, electron-beam, and X-ray) and dose levels on the physicochemical, organoleptic and microbial properties of cooked beef patties and pork sausages was studied, during 10 days of storage at 30±1 °C. The processed meat products were irradiated at 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 kGy by three different irradiation sources. The pH of cooked beef patties and pork sausages was unaffected by irradiation sources or their doses. The redness of beef patties linearly decreased with increasing dose level (Pchanges in overall acceptability were observed for pork sausages regardless of irradiation source (P>0.05), while gamma-ray irradiated beef patties showed significantly decreased overall acceptability in a dose-dependent manner (Poxidation of samples was accelerated by irradiation depending on irradiation sources and dose levels during storage at 30 °C. E-beam reduced total aerobic bacteria of beef patties more effectively, while gamma-ray considerably decreased microbes in pork sausages as irradiation dose increased. The results of this study indicate that quality attributes of meat products, in particular color, lipid oxidation, and microbial properties are significantly influenced by the irradiation sources.

  5. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs

  6. Determination of the adecuated dose for different irradiation geometries of blood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, E.; Hernandez Gonzalez, C.

    1994-01-01

    Nowadays the most economic and effective method to overcome the human postransfusional graft versus host disease whose death rate is 90-100%, is the irradiation treatment of blood products. Therefore it is very important to know the real absorbed dose in this products during the irradiation process. In this paper the dosimetric calibration of the MPX-gamma-25M irradiator for blood products irradiation process in six different geometries making use of Fricke dosimeter is carried out. It allows to provide the suitable gamma irradiation dose to each product insuring the effect without damaging the product to be provided to immunosuppressed patients

  7. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  8. Effects of split-dose irradiation of the rabbit's eye - a histopathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabenbauer, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six rabbits were included in a study investigating into the effects of split-dose 300 KV X-irradiation on the cornea, ciliary body, nictitating membrane and lacrimal gland. In each animal, soly the right the eye was irradiated using total doses of 21 Gy, 30 Gy, 36 Gy and 45 Gy that were administered according to a fixed schedule in fractions of 3 Gy five times per week. After latency periods of six weeks, three months and six months the animals receiving 21 Gy, 30 Gy and 36 Gy showed no changes of the bulbi, eye lids and lacrimal glands that could be ascertained by histopathological evaluation. In the animals exposed to the 45 Gy dose, changes of the cornea and conjunctiva caused by radiation injuries to the lacrimal glands and conjunctival goblet cells started to appear after a minimum period of 3 months. This dose level was also the threshold for the occurrence of corneal damage or even ulceration as a result of secondary reduction or qualitative change of lacrimal secretions. (ECB) [de

  9. Immunotherapy with BCG cell wall plus irradiated tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukuro, Tomoyuki (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    Two different fibrosarcomas (MCB-I, MCB-II) were induced by methylcholcholanthrene in syngeneic Balb/C mice were used. The tumor cells irradiated with 5,000 to 30,000 rads did not growth in mice on 30 days after inoculation. The viable tumor cells were challenged intradermally to mice on 7 days after inoculation of the tumor cells irradiated with 5,000 to 30,000 rads. The challenged tumor cells were all rejected at 30 days after inoculation. Mice were challenged with 5 x 10/sup 5/ viable tumor cells on 7 days after inoculation of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 8/ irradiated tumor cells. Mice pretreated with 10/sup 5/ or 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells rejected the tumor cells completely. The viable tumor cells were challenged to mice on 7 days after inoculation of BCG-CW emulsion plus 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells. 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mu g of BCG-CW emulsion were mixed in 10/sup 6/ irradiated tumor cells. Optimal dosage of BCG-CW emulsion was 50 or 100 mu g. BCG-CW emulsion plus irradiated tumor cells were injected subcutaneously to the mice after tumor cells inoculation. Three injections of the vaccine significantly suppressed the tumor outgrowth, but not one or two injections in no-treated mice. However, in the mice pretreated with BCG-CW emulsion, the tumor growth was significantly suppressed by one or two injections of the vaccine. Especially, the three injections of the vaccine significantly suppressed the tumor growth and the 25% of the mice were completely cured. The effect of the vaccine was almost the same grade by contralateral or ipsilateral treatment. The irradiated MCB-II tumor cells plus BCG-CW emulsion were not effective to the MCB-1 tumor bearing mice, suggesting the anti-tumor effect of this vaccine was immunologically specific.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on whole-cell glucose isomerase. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, S.; Gebicka, L.

    1984-06-01

    Several properties of Actinoplanes missouriensis and Streptomyces olivaceus glucose isomerase have been studied after irradiation of the enzyme of the dose of 10 kGy in dry state. The temperature at which the Actinoplanes missouriensis cells show the highest activity decreased by at least five centigrades. Other investigated enzymatic properties have been found to show no significant differences after irradiation.

  11. Problems following hippocampal irradiation in interventional radiologists - doses and potential effect:a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumak, V.; Morgun, A.; Bakhanova, O.; Loganovs'kij, K.; Loganovs'ka, T.; Marazziti, D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating radiation exposure of hippocampus in interventional medical professionals irradiated in the operating room, and to compare doses in the hippocampus with the effective dose (protection quantity), as well as with the doses measured by individual dosimeter, in order to estimate probability of reaching levels of radiation induced cognitive and other neuropsychiatric alterations during their working career, through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results showed that cranial irradiation was very heterogeneous and depended on the projection: doses of left and right hippocampi may be different up to a factor of 2.5; under certain conditions, the dose of the left hippocampus may be twice the effective dose, estimated by conventional double dosimetry algorithm. The professional span doses of the irradiated hippocampus may overcome the threshold able to provoke possible cognitive and emotional-behavioral impairment. Therefore, in-depth studies of the effects of brain irradiation in occupationally exposed interventional medical personnel appear urgently needed and crucial

  12. Change of cell cycle arrest of tumor cell lines after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yi; Liu Wenli; Zhou Jianfeng; Gao Qinglei; Wu Jianhong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the cell cycle arrest changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of normal persons and several kinds of tumor cell lines after 60 Co γ-irradiation. Methods: PBMNCs of normal persons, HL-60, K562, SiHA and 113 tumor cell lines were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays at the absorbed doses of 6, 10,15 Gy. Cell cycles changes were checked 6, 12, 24, 48 and 60 h after the irradiation. Results: A stasis state was observed in normal person PBMNCs, 95 percents of which were in G 1 phase, and they still remained stasis after the irradiation. Except the 113 cell line manifesting G 1 phase arrest, all other tumor cell lines showed G 2 /M phase arrest after irradiation. The radiation sensitivity of HL-60 was higher than that of SiHA cell line. Conclusion: Different cell lines have different cell cycle arrest reaction to radiation and their radiation sensitivity are also different

  13. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, Claudia; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kotzerke, Joerg; Buchmann, Inga; Reske, Sven N.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-x L , a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  14. Effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on storage properties in light salted Pseudosciaena crocea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoyan; Yang Xianshi; Li Xueying; Guo Quanyou

    2012-01-01

    To explore the preservation effect of γ irradiation on light salted Pseudosciaena crocea, the influence of 1 kGy low-dose γ irradiation on sensory quality, microbiological and chemical quality including TVC, TVB-N and TBARS contents of light salted P. crocea stored at 25 ℃ was discussed. The results showed that the number of total viable counts significantly decreased after irradiation, during the whole storage, the bacteria numbers of light salted P. crocea treated with irradiation were still less than the control. The concentrations of TVB-N was significantly reduced after irradiation, whereas lipid oxidation was less accelerated. The shelf life could be remarkably prolonged after low-dose γ irradiation. While the shelf life of control group were 9 and 11 days, the shelf life of irradiated light salted P. crocea were extended to 16 and 20 days, respectively. The results can provide technical references for commercial application of seafood irradiation. (authors)

  15. In vitro gamma irradiation Medical Center of leukemic cells in mice, rats, and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, L.; Dreyfuss, Y.; Ehrenreich, T.; Feldman, D.; Limbert, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro gamma irradiation of virus-induced (Gross) mouse leukemia cells at doses of 350 to 1600 rads (1 rad = 0.01 gray) had no effect on their ability to induce leukemia, usually within 2 weeks, after transplantation into syngeneic mice. However, when cells irradiated at doses of 2000-20,000 rads were transplanted, they induced leukemia after a latency period exceeding 2.5 months, similar to the results observed in mice inoculated with filtered mouse leukemia extracts. Similar results were also obtained after irradiation of leukemic cells derived from rats in which leukemia had been induced by rat-adapted mouse leukemia virus. Apparently, gamma irradiation at a dose of, or exceeding, 2000 rads, inhibits the ability of mouse and rat leukemic cells to induce leukemia after transplantation into syngeneic hosts; however, it does not inactivate the virus carried by such cells nor prevent it from inducing leukemia. [In previous experiments, doses of more than 4,500,000 rads were needed to inactivate the passage A (Gross) leukemia virus carried in either mouse or rat leukemic cells.] In vitro gamma irradiation of L2C guinea pig leukemic cells at doses of 750 to 2500 rads had no apparent effect on their ability to induce leukemia after transplantation into strain 2 guinea pigs. However, irradiation at doses of 3250 to 20,000 rads inactivated their ability to do so. The morphology of mouse, rat, and guinea pig leukemic cells and the virus particles present in such cells was not affected by irradiation at doses of 20,000 rads

  16. High-dose irradiation: wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization, in association with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency to consider the implications of food irradiated to doses higher than those recommended in 1980 by the Joint Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food. Irradiation ensures the hygienic quality of food and extends shelf-life. The public perception of the safety of food irradiation has generally precluded its widespread use. However, current applications of food irradiation to doses over 10 kGy have been in the development of high-quality shelf-stable convenience foods for specific target groups such as immunosuppressed individuals and those under medical care, astronauts and outdoor enthusiasts. The Study Group reviewed data relating to the toxicological, nutritional, radiation chemical and physical aspects of food irradiated to doses above 10 kGy from a wide range and number of studies carried out over the last forty years. This report presents a comprehensive summary, along with references, of the effectiveness and safety of the irradiation process. It concludes that foods treated with doses greater than 10 kGy can be considered safe and nutritionally adequate when produced under established Good Manufacturing Practice.

  17. High-dose irradiation: Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a joint FAO/IAEA/WHO study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization, in association with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency, to consider the implications of food irradiated to doses higher than those recommended in 1980 by the Joint Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food. Irradiation ensures the hygienic quality of food and extends shelf-life. The public perception of the safety of food irradiation has generally precluded its widespread use. However, current applications of food irradiation to doses over 10 kGy have been in the development of high-quality shelf-stable convenience foods for specific target groups such as immunosuppressed individuals and those under medical care, astronauts and outdoor enthusiasts. The Study Group reviewed data relating to the toxicological, nutritional, radiation chemical and physical aspects of food irradiated to doses above 10kGy from a wide range and number of studies carried out over the last forty years. This report presents a comprehensive summary, along with references, of the effectiveness and safety of the irradiation process. It concludes that foods treated with doses greater than 10kGy can be considered safe and nutritionally adequate when produced under established Good Manufacturing Practice

  18. Radioeffects on the advanced breast cancer treated preoperatively by a single large dose irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikuriya, Shuichi; Konoeda, Koichi; Mikami, Akihiko

    1981-01-01

    A single irradiation with a large electron dose was applied on 26 cases of advanced breast cancer in National Medical Center Hospital. Pertinent voltage from 6 to 20 MeV betatron electron was selected in accordance with tumor sizes. In eight patients, 30 Gy were given at once and other patients were irradiated with fractionated dose from 10 to 20 Gy, two or three times within 2 or 3 weeks (total 28 - 38 Gy). The radioresponse in primary and metastatic lesions was macroscopically, histopathologically and immunologically examined. Direct effects of preoperative irradiation of the primary lesions in 18 out of 24 cases (75%) were relatively remarkable by histopathological examinations. Remarkable cellular infiltrations into tumor nests of primary lesions were observed in 14 out of 24 cases (58%). Abscopal effects on metastatic lymph nodes were observed macroscopically in 7 of 20 cases (35%) and microscopic abscopal effects were seen in 10 of 20 cases (50%). In 6 cases among these ten cases macroscopic abscopal effects were associated with microscopic ones. In tests for cellular immunity, blastoid formation rates of lymphocytes induced by PHA in vitro, lymphocytes and absolute numbers of T-cells in peripheral blood slightly decreased after the irradiation. However, in four kinds of skin tests, enhancements of the response were confirmed. The crude survival rate for 3 years of Stage III cases revealed 83.3% and relative survival rate of these cases was 85.5%. A single large electron dose for the treatment of advanced breast cancer may inhibit the depression of immunoreaction in hosts. (J.P.N.)

  19. Statistical analysis of dose heterogeneity in circulating blood: Implications for sequential methods of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Janelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Improvements in delivery techniques for total body irradiation (TBI) using Tomotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy have been proven feasible. Despite the promise of improved dose conformality, the application of these ''sequential'' techniques has been hampered by concerns over dose heterogeneity to circulating blood. The present study was conducted to provide quantitative evidence regarding the potential clinical impact of this heterogeneity. Methods: Blood perfusion was modeled analytically as possessing linear, sinusoidal motion in the craniocaudal dimension. The average perfusion period for human circulation was estimated to be approximately 78 s. Sequential treatment delivery was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped dose cloud with a 10 cm length that traversed a 183 cm patient length at a uniform speed. Total dose to circulating blood voxels was calculated via numerical integration and normalized to 2 Gy per fraction. Dose statistics and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were calculated for relevant treatment times, radiobiological parameters, blood perfusion rates, and fractionation schemes. The model was then refined to account for random dispersion superimposed onto the underlying periodic blood flow. Finally, a fully stochastic model was developed using binomial and trinomial probability distributions. These models allowed for the analysis of nonlinear sequential treatment modalities and treatment designs that incorporate deliberate organ sparing. Results: The dose received by individual blood voxels exhibited asymmetric behavior that depended on the coherence among the blood velocity, circulation phase, and the spatiotemporal characteristics of the irradiation beam. Heterogeneity increased with the perfusion period and decreased with the treatment time. Notwithstanding, heterogeneity was less than ±10% for perfusion periods less than 150 s. The EUD was compromised for radiosensitive cells, long perfusion periods, and short treatment times

  20. Statistical analysis of dose heterogeneity in circulating blood: implications for sequential methods of total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Janelle A

    2010-11-01

    Improvements in delivery techniques for total body irradiation (TBI) using Tomotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy have been proven feasible. Despite the promise of improved dose conformality, the application of these "sequential" techniques has been hampered by concerns over dose heterogeneity to circulating blood. The present study was conducted to provide quantitative evidence regarding the potential clinical impact of this heterogeneity. Blood perfusion was modeled analytically as possessing linear, sinusoidal motion in the craniocaudal dimension. The average perfusion period for human circulation was estimated to be approximately 78 s. Sequential treatment delivery was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped dose cloud with a 10 cm length that traversed a 183 cm patient length at a uniform speed. Total dose to circulating blood voxels was calculated via numerical integration and normalized to 2 Gy per fraction. Dose statistics and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were calculated for relevant treatment times, radiobiological parameters, blood perfusion rates, and fractionation schemes. The model was then refined to account for random dispersion superimposed onto the underlying periodic blood flow. Finally, a fully stochastic model was developed using binomial and trinomial probability distributions. These models allowed for the analysis of nonlinear sequential treatment modalities and treatment designs that incorporate deliberate organ sparing. The dose received by individual blood voxels exhibited asymmetric behavior that depended on the coherence among the blood velocity, circulation phase, and the spatiotemporal characteristics of the irradiation beam. Heterogeneity increased with the perfusion period and decreased with the treatment time. Notwithstanding, heterogeneity was less than +/- 10% for perfusion periods less than 150 s. The EUD was compromised for radiosensitive cells, long perfusion periods, and short treatment times. However, the EUD was

  1. Effect of kasoline on male rats reproductive system in control and after irradiation in low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, E.F.; Vereshchako, G.G.; Khodosovskaya, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    It was studied morphofunctional status of reproductive system and several haematological parameters of male rats after administration of kasoline without any another treatment or before following irradiation in low dose (1 Gy). Kasoline is biological active substance obtained from castoreum. In intact animals this medical drug heightened relative weight of testis, epidydimisis, prostate gland and seminal vesicles; number of mature sex cells, extracted from epidydimisis and DNA contents in testiculare tissue. Kasoline possesses specific radioprotective properties that resulted in restoration of leukocytes number in blood, in grown number of spermatozoids, extracted from epidydimisis, and considerable increase of DNA value in the testis tissue. Obtained effects were more prominent at 30 and 90 days after irradiation. (authors)

  2. Correcting Effect of Therapeutic Doses of Optical Radiation on Hematological Parameters of Blood Irradiated In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the effect of therapeutic doses of optical radiation on the hematological parameters of blood irradiated in vivo: hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and the number of erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of patients during courses of extracorporeal, overvein, and intravenous blood irradiation and after treatment. The reversible changes during the procedures were found to differ from the changes obtained after treatment completion. At the end of the treatment course, the hematological parameters had changed in different directions and became higher, the same, or lower than the initial parameters depending on the initial parameters and photoinduced changes in blood oxygenation. A compensatory effect was found for photohemotherapy on oxygen-dependent processes altering the oxygen inflow into cells as well as the generation of active oxygen species and their inhibition by antioxidant systems.

  3. Effect of low dose irradiation of pork loins on the microflora, sensory characteristics and fat stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, M.L.; Kraft, A.A.; Olson, D.G.; Walker, H.W.; Rust, R.E.; James, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of low dose (100 krad) irradiation on microflora, sensory characteristics, and development of oxidative rancidity of vacuum packaged pork loins was investigated after irradiation and during low temperature (4 0 C) storage up to 21 days. Irradiation reduced numbers of mesophiles, psychrotrophs, anaerobic bacteria (P<0.01), and staphylococci (P<0.05), with the effect on mesophiles and psychrotrophic spoilage organisms the greatest. Effect of irradiation on sensory characteristics of pork loin was minimal with no detectable differences between irradiated and nonirradiated pork after 14 days of storage. Irradiation of pork did not affect cooking loss or thiobarbituric acid values

  4. Detection of the effects of low dose ionising irradiation on epidermal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, S.P.; Black, D.R.; Gaskell, S.A.; Marks, R. (Welsh National School of Medicine, Cardiff (UK)); Sathyanarayana, J.R.; Paterson, I. (Velindre Hospital, Whitchurch, Cardiff (UK))

    1985-01-01

    A non-invasive technique for the detection of small doses of X irradiation to the skin would be important for improvements in radiation protection. In this investigation we have studied the effects of doses of X rays of less than 2.0 Gy (sub-erythemal) on human skin in order to select such a technique. Our results indicate that a dose of X rays between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy was sufficient to depress significantly epidermal cell production in the basal layer. Accompanying this change in epidermal cell production after 1.0 Gy exposure, there was a reduction in the rate of desquamation of corneocytes. In the stratum granulosum, changes in ''non-specific esterase'' activity (a marker of lysosomal enzyme release) were also observed. Thus at three stages of the keratinisation process, functional alterations had occurred within three days of exposure to an X ray dose of 1.0 Gy. For this reason it seems likely that the various changes were at least partially independent of each other and that the stratum corneum may serve as a biological dosimeter for the detection of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation.

  5. Evaluation of cell regeneration of bone marrow after fractionated irradiation of mouse in toto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisin, H.; Evercoren, A. van; Anckaert, M.A.; Coster, B.M. de

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the recovery for mice bone marrow cells after fractionated irradiation of the whole body. The additional dose (Dr) to obtain a given biological effect if the irradiation is split in two equal subfractions (2 Di) separated by a short interval of time (i) is 40 rad per day when the interval of time between the two irradiations is lenghtened of one day [fr

  6. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1976-01-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups. (auth.)

  7. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  8. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  9. Gamma-irradiation and neutron effect on DNA-membrane complexes of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidus, I.L.; Nazarov, V.M.; Ehrtsgreber, G.

    1984-01-01

    The first results of radiobiological investigations in the biophysical channel of the JINR reactor IBR-2 are presented. Sedimentation behaviour of DNA-membrane complexes has been studied at irradiation of the Chinese hamster cells (VT9-4) in a wide dose range of 137 Cs γ-irradiation and neutrons. An earlier assumption of the authors on the role of DNA double-strand breaks in changing the relative sedimentation velocity of complexes at irradiation of cells with doses over 50 Gy has been confirmed

  10. Improvement of AdCMV-GFP gene transfection efficiency induced by heavy-ion beam irradiation on murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Xin; Min Fengling; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Li Xiaoda; Wang Yanling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong; Qiu Rong; Hao Jifang; Zhou Guangming; Gao Qingxiang

    2007-01-01

    The effect of 12 C 6+ beam irradiation on AdCMV-GFP (a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein) gene transfection efficiency for murine melanoma cell B16 has been investigated. B16 cells infected with AdCMV-GFP were irradiated by different doses of 12 C 6+ beam. The transfection efficiency was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM). Results show that 12 C 6+ beam irradiation can improve transfection efficiency of AdCMV-GFP on murine melanoma cell B16 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the transfection efficiency in pre-tranfection plus irradiation group is higher than that in pre-irradiation plus transfection group at the same dose irradiation dose. (authors)

  11. Solvent and irradiation doses effects on the ion exchange capacity of sulfonated styrene grafted PVDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Henrique P.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2011-01-01

    Polymers exhibiting ion exchange capacity are studied for many years due to their application in several fields, such as membranes for proton exchange fuel cells, filtration membranes, heavy ions recovery and artificial muscles and sensors. Radiation induced grafting followed by sulfonation is a well-known way to obtain ion exchange polymers. Fluorinated polymers are frequently used as polymeric matrix for grafting due to their excellent physicochemical properties. Radiation induced grafting of styrene into poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) by simultaneous method in 1:1 styrene/toluene or styrene/N,N-dimethylformamide solutions was studied. Irradiations were performed under nitrogen atmosphere, room temperature and at doses of 5, 10 and 20 kGy with dose rate of 5 kGy.h -1 from a 60 Co gamma source. After washing, grafted materials were sulfonated in 10% chlorosulfonic acid/1,2-dichloroethane solutions for 4 h at room temperature. Characterization shows that increasing irradiation dose corresponds to increases in the grafting yield (GY %) gravimetrically calculated and these different solvents shows different grafting behaviors. Toluene allows no more than 3 % of grafting while DMF allows up to 55 % of grafting in the same condition. Grafting in toluene solution occurs on the surface and in DMF solution it occurs in the bulk, as confirmed by SEM. Both irradiation doses and solvent used have direct effects in the ion exchange capacities (calculated after titrations). FT-IR spectra exhibit new peaks after grafting and after sulfonation, attributed to grafted monomer and sulfonic groups attached to the styrene. DSC shows differences in thermal behavior of the polymer before and after each step. (author)

  12. Solvent and irradiation doses effects on the ion exchange capacity of sulfonated styrene grafted PVDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Henrique P.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Polymers exhibiting ion exchange capacity are studied for many years due to their application in several fields, such as membranes for proton exchange fuel cells, filtration membranes, heavy ions recovery and artificial muscles and sensors. Radiation induced grafting followed by sulfonation is a well-known way to obtain ion exchange polymers. Fluorinated polymers are frequently used as polymeric matrix for grafting due to their excellent physicochemical properties. Radiation induced grafting of styrene into poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) by simultaneous method in 1:1 styrene/toluene or styrene/N,N-dimethylformamide solutions was studied. Irradiations were performed under nitrogen atmosphere, room temperature and at doses of 5, 10 and 20 kGy with dose rate of 5 kGy.h{sup -1} from a {sup 60}Co gamma source. After washing, grafted materials were sulfonated in 10% chlorosulfonic acid/1,2-dichloroethane solutions for 4 h at room temperature. Characterization shows that increasing irradiation dose corresponds to increases in the grafting yield (GY %) gravimetrically calculated and these different solvents shows different grafting behaviors. Toluene allows no more than 3 % of grafting while DMF allows up to 55 % of grafting in the same condition. Grafting in toluene solution occurs on the surface and in DMF solution it occurs in the bulk, as confirmed by SEM. Both irradiation doses and solvent used have direct effects in the ion exchange capacities (calculated after titrations). FT-IR spectra exhibit new peaks after grafting and after sulfonation, attributed to grafted monomer and sulfonic groups attached to the styrene. DSC shows differences in thermal behavior of the polymer before and after each step. (author)

  13. Dosimetry of irradiation models. The 96-well clonogenic assay for testing radiosensitivity of cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulmala, J.; Rantanen, V.; Turku Univ.; Pekkola-Heino, K.; Turku Univ.; Tuominen, J.; Grenman, R.; Turku Univ.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation experiments with cells in single cell suspension in test tubes and on 96-well plates were carried out and compared. The cells originated from cell lines established from carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and from endometrical carcinoma. Two irradiation models were constructed. Both models allowed the absorbed doses to the cells to be administered with a high accuracy in both experimental settings (better than 5.0%). These irradiation models were compared on cancer cell lines with dissimilar inherent radiation sensitivity and histologic type (UM-SCC-1 resistant, UM-SCC-14A sensitive, and UT-EC-2B highly sensitive); various radiation doses were used. The fractions of surviving cells as a function of radiation dose were compared: there was no significant difference between cells irradiated in test tubes and cells irradiated in 96-well plates. Thus, if the absorbed doses in cells suspended in a tube and in a plate were the same, the survival was similar regardless of the type of irradiation model. (orig.)

  14. Case report: high dose irradiation for recurrent carcinoma of the cervix following radical hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abayomi, O.K.

    1987-07-01

    A patient with recurrent carcinoma, after radical hysterectomy for Stage 1B carcinoma of the cervix, is presented to illustrate a technique for excluding the small bowel from high dose irradiation. With a barium meal and follow through examination, and fluoroscopy using the simulator, the ideal treatment position for the boost to high dose was determined. Consequently the patient received high dose irradiation with minimal complications and has survived for 42 months after treatment. Since a significant proportion of patients with recurrent carcinoma of the cervix have disease limited to the pelvis, many are potentially curable with high dose irradiation. Small bowel tolerance is a major dose limiting factor: the use of special techniques that limit the volume of small bowel receiving a high dose may enable these patients to have curative irradiation with minimal morbidity.

  15. Pigment abnormalities in irradiated hair follicles: effects of low doses, dose rate, and LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fu-Du; Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are reported concerning the effect of dose-rate and LET on the induction of pigment abnormalities in mice. The distribution of abnormalities among individual follicles at low doses was also measured. The radiations were 137 Cs γ-rays delivered at 5 Gy/min, 60 Co γ-rays at 0.0005 Gy/min, and collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons at 0.005, 0.015, or 0.15 Gy/min. Results indicated that pigment clumping responds to dose-rate and LET, and that the assay could be used to resolve acute γ-ray doses of 0.3 Gy or more. Zigzag hair follicles had a lower threshold dose than the less numerous but larger guard hair follicles. The RBE value for neutrons was 2.3. From 0 to 1.25 Gy γ-rays or at 0.30 Gy neutrons, the distribution of clumps per follicle was approximately Poisson. At doses of γ-rays greater than 1.25 Gy, the distribution diverged from a Poisson, with more highly-affected follicles and fewer lightly-affected follicles observed than would be expected. Follicles lacking pigment cells or containing 'albino' pigment cells could not apparently be induced by radiation to exhibit pigment clumping. (U.K.)

  16. Investigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of low dose neutron irradiated HT-9 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, A.; Alsabbagh, A.H.; Murty, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutron irradiation has been carried out on HT-9 steel. • Microstructure of the irradiated HT-9 steel has been investigated using XRD. • There is an increase in dislocation density in the irradiated sample. • Tensile tests have been carried out to determine the changes in mechanical properties due to irradiation. • Yield stress and strain rate sensitivity increased due to irradiation. - Abstract: HT-9 steel samples have been irradiated with fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) to a low dose (1.2 × 10 −3 dpa). Microstructure of the unirradiated and irradiated samples has been characterized by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis using different model-based approaches. The domain size and density of dislocations of the irradiated steel have been estimated. Different types of tensile tests have been carried out at room temperature to assess the changes in mechanical properties of HT-9 steel due to neutron irradiation

  17. Individual and collective doses associated with the transport of irradiated magnox fuel within the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, H.F.; Mairs, J.H.

    1978-12-01

    A method is described of evaluating the individual and collective doses arising during the transport of irradiated fuel from a system of nuclear power stations to a central reprocessing plant. The doses associated with irradiated Magnox fuel movements in the UK are estimated and compared with those resulting from other phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the individual and collective doses implied by the accidental activity release limits contained within the 1973 IAEA Tranport Regulations are discussed. (author)

  18. Dose rate distribution of the GammaBeam: 127 irradiator using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gual, Maritza Rodriguez; Batista, Adriana de Souza Medeiros; Pereira, Claubia; Faria, Luiz O. de; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2013-01-01

    The GammaBeam - 127 Irradiator is widely used for biological, chemical and medical applications of the gamma irradiation technology using Cobalt 60 radioactive at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The source has maximum activity of 60.000Ci, which is composed by 16 double encapsulated radioactive pencils placed in a rack. The facility is classified by the IAEA as Category II (dry storage facility). The aim of this work is to present a modelling developed to evaluate the dose rates at the irradiation room and the dose distribution at the irradiated products. In addition, the simulations could be used as a predictive tool of dose evaluation in the irradiation facility helping benchmark experiments in new similar facilities. The MCNPX simulated results were compared and validated with radiometric measurements using Fricke and TLDs dosimeters along several positions inside the irradiation room. (author)

  19. Estimation of the fetal dose by dose measurement during an irradiation of a parotid tumor; Estimation de la dose foetale par mesure de dose lors d'une irradiation d'une tumeur de la parotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Graff-Cailleaud, P.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, CRAN CNRS UMR-7039, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-11-15

    The irradiation of a five months pregnant patient has been made for a right parotid attack. In conformation with the legislative texts relative to radiation protection ( publication 84 of the ICRP) an estimation of the dose received for the fetus has been led by dose measurement on phantom. With the dose limit ( 100 mGy) recommended in the publication 84 of the ICRP neither modification of the treatment nor abortion was necessary. (N.C.)

  20. Optimum dose and effects of 60Co-γ irradiation on potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xianquan; Wang Cui; Zhao Pin; Liu Yongqiang

    2010-01-01

    Tubers of 3 potato varieties were irradiated by of 60 Co γ-irradiation.Effects of irradiation on survival rate, physiological characteristics of seedling stage were analyzed. The results showed that irradiation had remarkable lethal effect on 3 tested varieties, and optimum doses of irradiation were 31.7∼39.9 Gy. Irradiation affected seedling development by decreasing seedling rate, delaying seedling stage and extending seedling period. There were different sensitivities among varieties. No distinct morphologic variant was observed in M 1 . Analyses of physiological characteristics of S6-3 leaves indicated that effect of irradiation on M 1 plant was damage and/or suppression. It is suggested that lower dose rate might be applied for mutation inducing;and precisely morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular biological investigation should be carried out to screen mutant within offspring(VM 2 ) lines. (authors)

  1. DNA-electrophoresis of single cells - a method to screen for irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leffke, A.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrophoresis of single cells can be used to detect γ-irradiation over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. It is a simple and rapid test for DNA damages and can be used for screening. The method was tested on cell suspensions of bone marrow and muscle cells from frozen chicken legs, chicken heart, turkey liver, beef and pork irradiated with doses up to 3 kGy. Cell suspensions were prepared by incubation of tissues in EDTA-SDS-buffer at pH 8. Single cell electrophoresis was performed in 0.75% agarose gel. DNA was visualised by silver staining. In unirradiated samples no or only a small amount of DNA penetrated the cell membranes. Cells of irradiated samples appeared like a ''comet'' due to to migration of DNA-fragments out of cell. (orig.)

  2. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Y. Chuang

    2006-08-31

    It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose γ-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

  3. Effect of irradiation on the acinar cells of submandibular gland in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2003-01-01

    To observe the histologic changes and clusterin expression in the acinar cells of the submandibular gland in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat following irradiation. Mature Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control, diabetic, and diabetic-irradiated groups. Diabetes mellitus was induced in the Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting streptozotocin, while the control rats were injected with citrate buffer only. After 5 days, rats in diabetic-irradiated group were irradiated with single absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the head and neck region. The rats were killed at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after irradiation. The specimen including the submandibular gland were sectioned and observed using histologic and immunohistochemical methods. Morphologic change of acinar cells was remarkable in the diabetic group, but was not observed in the diabetic-irradiated group. Necrotic tissues were observed in the diabetic-irradiated group. Coloring of toluidine blue stain was most increased at 14 days in the diabetic group, however there were no significant change throughout the period of the experiment in the diabetic-irradiated group. Expression of clusterin was most significant at 14 days in the diabetic group, but gradually decreased with time after 7 days in the diabetic-irradiated group. Degeneration of clusterin was observed in the diabetic-irradiated group. This experiment suggests that the acinar cells of submandibular gland in rats are physiologically apoptosis by the induction of diabetes, but that the apoptosis is inhibited and the acinar cells necrotized after irradiation.

  4. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorozu, Atsunori

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p 50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose 30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author)

  5. Irradiation effect on the apoptosis induction in the human cancer cell lines and the gingival fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mu Soon; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo

    1998-01-01

    The radiation-induced apoptosis was studied for two human cancer cell lines (KB cells, RPMI 2650 cells) and the human gingival fibroblast cell line (HGF-1 cells). The single irradiation of 2, 10, 20 Gy was done with 241.5 cGy/min dose rate using the 137 Cs MK cell irradiator. The cell were stained with propidium iodide and examined under the fluoro-microscope and assayed with the flow cytometry a day after irradiation. Also, the LDH assay was done to determine the amount of necrotic cells. The obtained results were as follows : 1. On the fluoro-microscope, many fragmented nuclei were detected in the KB, RPMI 2650, and HGF-1 cells after irradiation. 2. On the DNA content histogram obtained from the flow cytometry, the percentages of the pre-G1 peak of the control and 2, 10 and 20 Gy irradiation group were 4.5, 55.0, 52.3, and 66.6% on KB cells, 2.7, 3.3, 31.8, and 32.6% on RPMI 2650 cells and 2.8, 21.8, 30.4, and 40.2% on HGF-1 cells respectively. 3. The number of G1-stage cells was abruptly decreased after 2 Gy irradiation on KB cells and 10 Gy irradiation on RPMI 2650 cells, But there was a slight decrease without regard to irradiation dose on HGF-1 cells. 4. There was no significantly different absorbance in extracellular LDH assay along the experimental cell lines

  6. Effect of the rate and dose rate of irradiation on the quality of mushrooms, shrimps and marinated poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Mahrour, A.; Beaulieu, M.; Jobin, M.; Nketsa-Tabiri, J.; Gagnon, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this research programme, three investigations involving irradiation in combination with other preservation treatments are described. The first study evaluated the effect of the gamma irradiation dose rate combined with control storage at 15 deg. C and 90% relative humidity on the biochemical, microbiological and physical quality of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). A 2 kGy dose was necessary to control the pathogenic microorganisms and to decrease the ageing process of mushrooms. The shelf-life of the mushrooms, as assessed by colour, was extended by 4 days at the lower dose rate (4.5 kGy/h) and by only 2 days at the higher dose rate (32 kGy/h). The higher dose rate caused stress to the cells and altered cell permeability. The second study was to verify the efficacy of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co) on frozen shrimps in eliminating or reducing the pathogenic bacteria that may occasionally be present and to increase the cold storage life of thawed shrimps. A dose of 2.5 kGy permitted storage at 4 deg. C for 1 month without affecting the quality of the product. The third study investigated the anti-oxidant and anti-microbial properties of the natural substances added to fresh poultry before irradiation. Irradiation of poultry at 5 kGy was found to be highly effective in eliminating Salmonella and reducing the number of spoilage microorganisms to ensure safety and quality. Moreover, use of marinating techniques had a synergistic effect with irradiation in reducing the microbial load and the oxidation rate of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly C18:2. The essential oils in rosemary and thyme were the most potent anti-microbial agents investigated and prevented the deterioration of stored foods by bacteria. Several phenolic compounds with anti-oxidant activities were also isolated from rosemary. (author)

  7. Patterns of neuropsychological deficits in children with medulloblastoma according to craniospatial irradiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer-Renaux, V; Bulteau, C; Grill, J; Kalifa, C; Viguier, D; Jambaque, I

    2000-11-01

    This study aimed to analyse the relationship between supratentorial irradiation dose and the intellectual outcome in 36 children (aged between 5 and 15 years) treated for medulloblastoma. The supratentorial radiation dose was reduced to 25 Gy in 23 children and given at the standard dose, 35 Gy, in 13 other children. Neuropsychological evaluation was performed at a mean of 4.3 years (SD 4.7 years) after radiotherapy. The supratentorial radiation dose was the principal risk factor associated with impaired intellectual outcome. Verbal fluency, immediate word list recall, block design, and fine motricity of the dominant hand were significantly lower in children irradiated at the standard doses than in those irradiated at reduced doses. These findings suggest that the dose of radiotherapy applied to the brain strongly influences later verbal and non-verbal skills in children with medulloblastoma. This should be taken into account in treatment planning and in rehabilitation programs.

  8. Regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle in irradiated mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Yong; Song, Mi Hee; Hung, Eun Ji; Seong, Jin Sil; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    To investigate the regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle in mouse brain irradiation. 8-week old male mice, C57B 1/6J were given whole body {gamma} -radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy using Cobalt 60 irradiator. At different times 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24hr after irradiation, mice were killed and brain tissues were collected. Apoptotic cells were scored by TUNEL assay. Expression of p53, Bcl-2, and Bax and cell cycle regulating molecules; cyclins BI, D1, E and cdk2, cdk4, p34{sup cdc2} were analysed by Western blotting. Cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. The peak of radiation induced apoptosis is shown at 8 hour after radiation. With a single 25 Gy irradiation, the peak of apoptotic index in C57B1/6J is 24.0{+-}0.25 (p<0.05) at 8 hour after radiation. Radiation upregulated the expression of p53/tubulin, Bax/tubulin, and Bcl-2/tubulin with 1.3, 1.1 and 1.45 fold increase, respectively were shown at the peak level at 8 hour after radiation. The levels of cell cycle regulating molecules after radiation are not changed significantly except cyclin D1 with 1.3 fold increase. Fractions of Go-G 1, G2-M and S phase in the cell cycle does not specific changes by time. In mouse brain tissue, radiation induced apoptosis is particularly shown in a specific area, subependyma. These results and lack of radiation induced changes in cell cycle offer better understanding of radiation response of normal brain tissue.

  9. Polyamines and post-irradiation cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiek, O.; Wronowski, T.; Lerozak, K.; Kopec, M.

    1978-01-01

    The results of three sets of experiments will be presented. Firstly polyamines and DNA content was determined in bone marrow, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver and kidney of rabbits at the 1, 5, 10 and 20th day after exposure to 600 R of X-irradiation. Polyamine concentration in bone marrow, spleen and lymph nodes was found to be markedly increased during the period of postirradiation recovery. Secondly, effect of 10 -5 M methyl glyoxalbis, guanylhydrazone (MGBG), an inhibitor of spermidine and spermine synthesis, on multiplication of X-irradiated cultures of murine lymphoblaste L5178Y-S was assessed. MGBG-induced inhibition of cell proliferation could be prevented by concurrent administration of 10 -4 M spermidine. Thirdly the influence of putrescine on bone marrow cellularity and 3 H-thymidine incorporation into bone marrow cells was investigated in X-irradiated mice. The results obtained indicate close relation of polyamines to cell proliferation processes after irradiation. (orig./AJ) [de

  10. The re-establishment of hypersensitive cells in the crypts of irradiated mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two doses of γ-radiation separated by various time intervals have been used to investigate when after irradiation the cell population susceptible to acute cell death is re-established. Dead cells were scored 3 or 6 h after the second dose. Within 1-2 days of small doses (0.5 Gy) the sensitive cells, recognized histologically as apoptotic cells, are re-established at the base of the crypt (around cell position 6). After higher doses (9.0 Gy) they are not re-established until about the fourth day after irradiation. Even in the enlarged regenerating crypts the sensitive cells are found at the same position at the crypt base. It has been estimated that the crypt contains five or six cells that are susceptible to low doses (0.5 Gy) (hypersensitive cells) and up to a total of only seven or eight susceptible cells that can be induced by any dose to enter the sequence of changes implicit in apoptosis. Between 4 and 10 days after an intitial irradiation of 9.0 Gy the total number of susceptible cells increased from seven to eight to about 10 to 13 per crypt. (author)

  11. [Induction of glutathione and activation of immune functions by low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji

    2006-10-01

    We first examined the relation between the induction of glutathione and immune functions in mice after low-dose gamma-ray irradiation. Thereafter, inhibition of tumor growth by radiation was confirmed in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST)-bearing mice. The total glutathione level of the splenocytes transiently increased soon after irradiation and reached a maximum at around 4 h postirradiation. Thereafter, the level reverted to the 0 h value by 24 h postirradiation. A significantly high splenocyte proliferative response was also recognized 4 h postirradiation. Natural killer (NK) activity was also increased significantly in a similar manner. The time at which the response reached the maximum coincided well with that of maximum total glutathione levels of the splenocytes in the gamma-ray-irradiated mice. Reduced glutathione exogenously added to splenocytes obtained from normal mice enhanced the proliferative response and NK activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of radiation on tumor growth was then examined in EST-bearing mice. Repeated low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy, four times, before and within an early time after inoculation) significantly delayed the tumor growth. Finally, the effect of single low-dose (0.5 Gy), whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on immune balance was examined to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antitumor immunity. The percentage of B cells in blood lymphocytes was selectively decreased after radiation, concomitant with an increase in that of the helper T cell population. The IFN-gamma level in splenocyte culture prepared from EST-bearing mice was significantly increased 48 h after radiation, although the level of IL-4 was unchanged. IL-12 secretion from macrophages was also enhanced by radiation. These results suggest that low-dose gamma-rays induce Th1 polarization and enhance the activities of tumoricidal effector cells, leading to an inhibition of tumor growth.

  12. RBE of cells irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Wei Zengquan; Wang Jufang; Dang Bingrong; Li Qiang; Xie Hongmei

    2002-01-01

    The mouse melanoma cells (B16), human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (HeLa), Chinese hamster pulmonary cells V79, and human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) were collected for studying. The cells of 5 x 10 5 /ml were seeded in 35 mm diameter petri dish and allowed to grow one day, and then the medium in petri dishes was removed away, the cells were washed once with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), petri dishes was covered with 4μm thickness Mylar film. The cells were irradiated by 12 C ion beam with LETs of 125.5, 200, 700 keV/μm in water generated from HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou). For 60 Co γ-ray experiment, the cells of 5 x 10 4 /ml were grown in 20 ml culture flasks including 1.5 ml cell suspension and directly used for irradiation. Following irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, counted, plated at appropriate densities in growth medium and then seeded in 60 mm diameter culture dishes. Each dish was filled 4 ml standard medium, and incubated for 8-12 days at 37 degree C incubator containing 5% CO 2 . The cultures were then rinsed with PBS buffer at pH 6.8, fixed with Carnoy's fluid, stained for 8 min with Giemsa (1:20, pH 6.8), and colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored. Their relative biological effectivenesses (RBE) were investigated. The results show that RBE depends on cellular types and increases with increasing of cellular survival level when LET is at 125.5 keV/μm, and decreases with increasing LET when LET ≥ 125.5 keV/μm

  13. DNA replication kinetics in x-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerner, E.W.

    1977-08-01

    The kinetics of semiconservative DNA replication have been studied in both asynchronous and synchronized Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) irradiated with x-ray doses up to 3000 rad. Amounts of DNA replicated were determined by isopycnic gradient centrifugation of DNA from cells which were incubated after irradiation in medium containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine (50 ..mu..g/ml) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (0.1 ..mu..g/ml). The results confirm that cells irradiated in early G/sub 1/ phase experience a delay in their entry into S phase. This G/sub 1/ block is dose independent in the range from 300 to 3000 rad and is 0.5 to 0.7 hr in length. Cells at the G/sub 1//S boundary are insensitive to x-ray induced perturbations of bulk DNA synthetic rates when exposed to doses less than 1000 rad. At doses in excess of 1000 rad, these cells are inhibited from replicating their DNA for a time, but ultimately replicate near-control levels of their DNA. Cells irradiated in S phase again show no effects of x-ray doses below 1000 rad on their ability to replicate bulk DNA. After a 3000-rad exposure, however, the rate of DNA replication in these S-phase cells is markedly reduced compared to that of controls. Irradiation of asynchronous cells with doses from 150 to 3000 rad does reduce the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in these cultures in a dose-dependent manner. These results confirm that x-ray doses greater than 1000 rad reduce the rate of DNA synthesis in irradiated S-phase cells, thus prolonging the length of S phase. The combined data from asynchronous or synchronized cultures, irradiated with x-ray doses less than 1000 rad, indicate that at least a portion of the reduction in DNA replication rates in irradiated asynchronous CHO cultures is due to the x-ray induced G/sub 1/ block, which reduces the overall number of cells in S phase after irradiation.

  14. High-dose MeV electron irradiation of Si-SiO2 structures implanted with high doses Si+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschieva, S.; Angelov, Ch; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2018-03-01

    The influence was studied of 22-MeV electron irradiation on Si-SiO2 structures implanted with high-fluence Si+ ions. Our earlier works demonstrated that Si redistribution is observed in Si+-ion-implanted Si-SiO2 structures (after MeV electron irradiation) only in the case when ion implantation is carried out with a higher fluence (1016 cm-2). We focused our attention on the interaction of high-dose MeV electron irradiation (6.0×1016 cm-2) with n-Si-SiO2 structures implanted with Si+ ions (fluence 5.4×1016 cm-2 of the same order magnitude). The redistribution of both oxygen and silicon atoms in the implanted Si-SiO2 samples after MeV electron irradiation was studied by Rutherford back-scattering (RBS) spectroscopy in combination with a channeling technique (RBS/C). Our results demonstrated that the redistribution of oxygen and silicon atoms in the implanted samples reaches saturation after these high doses of MeV electron irradiation. The transformation of amorphous SiO2 surface into crystalline Si nanostructures (after MeV electron irradiation) was evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon nanocrystals are formed on the SiO2 surface after MeV electron irradiation. The shape and number of the Si nanocrystals on the SiO2 surface depend on the MeV electron irradiation, while their size increases with the dose. The mean Si nanocrystals height is 16-20 nm after irradiation with MeV electrons at the dose of 6.0×1016 cm-2.

  15. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  16. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d -1 ). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 ampersand 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity

  17. Alterations in water and electrolyte absorption in the rat colon following neutron irradiation: influence of neutron component and irradiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublineau, I; Ksas, B; Joubert, C; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N M

    2002-12-01

    To study the absorptive function of rat colon following whole-body exposure to neutron irradiation, either to the same total dose with varying proportion of neutrons or to the same neutron proportion with an increasing irradiation dose. Different proportions of neutron irradiation were produced from the reactor SILENE using a fissile solution of uranium nitrate (8, 47 and 87% neutron). Water and electrolyte fluxes were measured in the rat in vivo under anaesthesia by insertion into the descending colon of an agarose gel cylinder simulating the faeces. Functional studies were completed by histological analyses. In the first set of experiments, rats received 3.8 Gy with various neutron percentages and were studied from 1 to 14 days after exposure. In the second set of experiments, rats were exposed to increasing doses of irradiation (1-4Gy) with a high neutron percentage (87%n) and were studied at 4 days after exposure. The absorptive capacity of rat colon was diminished by irradiation at 3-5 days, with a nadir at 4 days. The results demonstrate that an increase in the neutron proportion is associated with an amplification of the effects. Furthermore, a delay in the re-establishment of normal absorption was observed with the high neutron proportion (87%n). A dose-dependent reduction of water absorption by rat colon was also observed following neutron irradiation (87%n), with a 50% reduction at 3 Gy. Comparison of this dose-effect curve with the curve obtained following gamma (60)Co-irradiation indicates an RBE of 2.2 for absorptive colonic function in rat calculated at 4 days after exposure.

  18. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  19. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  20. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  1. The dependence of the magnitude of induced adaptive responseon on the dose of pre-irradiation of cultured human lymphocytes under the optimum irradiation time scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Mozdarani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of X-rays, become less susceptible to the induction of chromosome aberrations by subsequent exposure to high doses of X-rays. This has been termed the radioadaptive response. One of the most important questions in the adaptive response studies was that of the possible existence of an optimum adapting dose. Early experiments indicated that this response could be induced by low doses of X-rays from 1 cGy to 20 cGy. Recently, it has been interestingly shown that the time scheme of exposure to adapting and challenge doses plays an important role in determination of the magnitude of the induced adaptive response. In this study, using the optimum irradiation time scheme (24-48), we have monitored the cytogenetic endpoint of chromosome aberrations to assess the magnitude of adaptation to ionizing radiation in the cultured human lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were pre-exposed to an adapting dose of 1-20 cGy at 24 hours, before an acute challenge dose of 1 or 2 Gy at 48 hours. Cells were fixed at 54 hours. Lymphocytes, which were pretreated with 5 as well as 10 cGy adapting doses, had significantly fewer chromosome aberrations. In spite of the fact that lymphocytes of some of our blood donors which were pre-treated with 1 or 20 cGy adapting doses, showed an adaptive response, the pooled data (all donors) indicated that such an induction of adaptive response can not be observed in these lymphocytes. The overall pattern of the induced adaptive response, indicated that in human lymphocyte (at least under the above mentioned irradiation scheme), 5 cGy and 10 cGy adapting doses are the optimum doses. (author)

  2. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soares, Diego Moura [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm{sup 2}). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering.

  3. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda; Soares, Diego Moura; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm 2 ). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm 2 , especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm 2 , but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering

  4. Development of Radiation Fusion Technology with Food Technology by the Application of High Dose Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Won; Kim, Jae Hun; Choi, Jong Il

    2010-04-15

    This study was studied to achieve stable food supply and food safety with radiation fusion technology as a preparation for food weaponization. Results at current stage are following: First, for the development of radiation and food engineering fusion technology using high dose irradiation, the effects of high dose irradiation on food components were evaluated. The combination treatment of irradiation with food engineering were developed. Irradiation condition to destroy radiation resistant food borne bacteria were determined. Second, for the development of E-beam irradiation technology, the effects of radiation sources on food compounds, processing conditions, and food quality of final products were compared. Food processing conditions for agricultural/aquatic products with different radiation sources were developed and the domination of E-beam irradiation foods were determined. The physical marker for E-beam irradiated foods or not were developed. Third, for the fundamental researches to develop purposed foods to extreme environmental, ready-to-eat foods were developed using high dose irradiation. Food processing for export strategy foods such as process ginseng were developed. Food processing with irradiation to destroy mycotoxin and to inhibit production of mycotoxin were developed. Mathematical models to predict necessary irradiation doses and radiation sources were developed and validated. Through the fundamental researches, the legislation for irradiation approval on meat products, sea foods and dried sea foods, and use of E-beam were introduced. Results from this research project, the followings are expected. (1) Improvement of customer acceptance and activation of irradiation technology by the use of various irradiation rays. (2) Increase of indirect food productivity, and decrease of SOC and improvement of public health by prevention of food borne outbreaks. (3) Build of SPS/TBT system against imported products and acceleration of domestic product export

  5. Development of radiation fusion technology with food technology by the application of high dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juwoon; Kim, Jaehun; Choi, Jongil; and others

    2012-04-15

    This study was performed to achieve stable food supply and food safety with radiation fusion technology as a preparation for food weaponization. Results at current stage are following: First, for the development of radiation and food engineering fusion technology using high dose irradiation, the effects of high dose irradiation on food components were evaluated. The combination treatment of irradiation with food engineering was developed. Irradiation condition to destroy radiation resistant foodborne bacteria were determined. Second, for the development of E-beam irradiation technology, the effects of radiation sources on food compounds, processing conditions, and food quality of final products were compared. Food processing conditions for agricultural/aquatic products with different radiation sources was developed and the domination of E-beam irradiation foods were determined. The physical marker for E-beam irradiated foods or not was developed. Third, for the fundamental researches to develop purposed foods to extreme environmental, ready-to-eat foods were developed using high dose irradiation. Food processing for export strategy foods such as process ginseng were developed. Food processing with irradiation to destroy mycotoxin and to inhibit production of mycotoxin was developed. Mathematical models to predict necessary irradiation doses and radiation sources were developed and validated. Through the fundamental researches, the legislation for irradiation approval on meat products, sea foods and dried sea foods, and use of E-beam was introduced. Results from this research project, the followings are expected. Improvement of customer acceptance and activation of irradiation technology by the use of various irradiation rays. Increase of indirect food productivity, and decrease of SOC and improvement of public health by prevention of foodborne outbreaks. Build of SPS/TBT system against imported products and acceleration of domestic product export. Systemized

  6. Development of Radiation Fusion Technology with Food Technology by the Application of High Dose Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ju Won; Kim, Jae Hun; Choi, Jong Il

    2010-04-01

    This study was studied to achieve stable food supply and food safety with radiation fusion technology as a preparation for food weaponization. Results at current stage are following: First, for the development of radiation and food engineering fusion technology using high dose irradiation, the effects of high dose irradiation on food components were evaluated. The combination treatment of irradiation with food engineering were developed. Irradiation condition to destroy radiation resistant food borne bacteria were determined. Second, for the development of E-beam irradiation technology, the effects of radiation sources on food compounds, processing conditions, and food quality of final products were compared. Food processing conditions for agricultural/aquatic products with different radiation sources were developed and the domination of E-beam irradiation foods were determined. The physical marker for E-beam irradiated foods or not were developed. Third, for the fundamental researches to develop purposed foods to extreme environmental, ready-to-eat foods were developed using high dose irradiation. Food processing for export strategy foods such as process ginseng were developed. Food processing with irradiation to destroy mycotoxin and to inhibit production of mycotoxin were developed. Mathematical models to predict necessary irradiation doses and radiation sources were developed and validated. Through the fundamental researches, the legislation for irradiation approval on meat products, sea foods and dried sea foods, and use of E-beam were introduced. Results from this research project, the followings are expected. (1) Improvement of customer acceptance and activation of irradiation technology by the use of various irradiation rays. (2) Increase of indirect food productivity, and decrease of SOC and improvement of public health by prevention of food borne outbreaks. (3) Build of SPS/TBT system against imported products and acceleration of domestic product export

  7. Development of radiation fusion technology with food technology by the application of high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juwoon; Kim, Jaehun; Choi, Jongil

    2012-04-01

    This study was performed to achieve stable food supply and food safety with radiation fusion technology as a preparation for food weaponization. Results at current stage are following: First, for the development of radiation and food engineering fusion technology using high dose irradiation, the effects of high dose irradiation on food components were evaluated. The combination treatment of irradiation with food engineering was developed. Irradiation condition to destroy radiation resistant foodborne bacteria were determined. Second, for the development of E-beam irradiation technology, the effects of radiation sources on food compounds, processing conditions, and food quality of final products were compared. Food processing conditions for agricultural/aquatic products with different radiation sources was developed and the domination of E-beam irradiation foods were determined. The physical marker for E-beam irradiated foods or not was developed. Third, for the fundamental researches to develop purposed foods to extreme environmental, ready-to-eat foods were developed using high dose irradiation. Food processing for export strategy foods such as process ginseng were developed. Food processing with irradiation to destroy mycotoxin and to inhibit production of mycotoxin was developed. Mathematical models to predict necessary irradiation doses and radiation sources were developed and validated. Through the fundamental researches, the legislation for irradiation approval on meat products, sea foods and dried sea foods, and use of E-beam was introduced. Results from this research project, the followings are expected. Improvement of customer acceptance and activation of irradiation technology by the use of various irradiation rays. Increase of indirect food productivity, and decrease of SOC and improvement of public health by prevention of foodborne outbreaks. Build of SPS/TBT system against imported products and acceleration of domestic product export. Systemized

  8. Regularity of wound healing in rats irradiated locally with different doses of soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianzhong; Zhou Yuanguo; Cheng Tianmin; Zhou Ping; Liu Xia; Li Ping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the regular patter of wound healing in rats irradiated locally with different doses of soft X-rays. Methods: Rats were locally irradiated, and wounded immediately thereafter. Gross observation, histopathology and immunohistochemistry examinations, and image analysis were used to study the wound healing process. Results: The authors found that the delayed time of wound healing induced by soft X-ray irradiation of 0.50, 1.01, 1.96, 3,26, 4.00, 5.21 Gy was 1.6, 4.2, 5.4, 6.6, 8.2 and 9.4 days, respectively. Irradiation with 7.0 and 10.0 Gy caused failure of wound healing (up to 40 days). Compared to the non-irradiated wounds, the healing rates of irradiation-impaired wounds were lower during the whole healing process. From day 3 to day 9 after irradiation, the healing rates decreased along with increasing of the radiation dose, indicating the key phase of wound healing was delayed. After irradiation, the collagen synthesis was decreased, its arrangement was disordered, and the structure of granulation tissue was irregular. Conclusion: Soft X-rays irradiation may cause a delay of wound healing in a dose-dependent manner, and irradiation with 7.0 and 10.0 Gy cause failure of wound healing

  9. Effect of low-dose-rate irradiation on the division potential of cells in vitro. V. Human skin fibroblasts from donors with a high risk of cancer. [/sup 60/Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diatloff, C.; Macieira-Coelho, A.

    1979-07-01

    Skin fibroblasts from normal donors, donors with ataxia-telanglectasia or Fanconi's anemia, and from 1 cancer patient were treated with repeated ..gamma.. radiation at about 16 rads per hour. The remaining division potential of all fibroblasts, except for the Fanconi's anemia cells, was reduced to different extents by radiation. The growth potential of Fanconl's anemia cells was increased in all the irradiated cultures. The increase was 54% in the group that survived the longest. These results were identical to those obtained with fibroblasts from certain species that have a high probability of transformation.

  10. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  11. Neurogenic Effects of Low-Dose Whole-Body HZE (Fe) Ion and Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tara B; Hurley, Sean D; Wu, Michael D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the dose-toxicity profile of radiation is critical when evaluating potential health risks associated with natural and man-made sources in our environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose whole-body high-energy charged (HZE) iron (Fe) ions and low-energy gamma exposure on proliferation and differentiation of adult-born neurons within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cells deemed to play a critical role in memory regulation. To determine the dose-response characteristics of the brain to whole-body Fe-ion vs. gamma-radiation exposure, C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 1 GeV/n Fe ions or a static 137 Cs source (0.662 MeV) at doses ranging from 0 to 300 cGy. The neurogenesis was analyzed at 48 h and one month postirradiation. These experiments revealed that whole-body exposure to either Fe ions or gamma radiation leads to: 1. An acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, detected at doses as low as 30 and 100 cGy for Fe ions and gamma radiation, respectively; and 2. A reduction in newly differentiated neurons (DCX immunoreactivity) at one month postirradiation, with significant decreases detected at doses as low as 100 cGy for both Fe ions and gamma rays. The data presented here contribute to our understanding of brain responses to whole-body Fe ions and gamma rays and may help inform health-risk evaluations related to systemic exposure during a medical or radiologic/nuclear event or as a result of prolonged space travel.

  12. Pathomorphology of spleen lymphocyte apoptosis in large dose 60Co γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Linlu; Cui Yufang; Yang Hong; Xia Guowei; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Wang Dewen

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the authors was to investigate the pathomorphology changes of spleen lymphocyte apoptosis after 60 Co γ-irradiation. Methods: The mice were irradiated with 6, 9, 12, 15 and 20 Gy of 60 Co γ-rays. At different times after irradiation, the mice were sacrificed and the pathological changes of spleen lymphocyte were observed by light and transmission electron microscopies. Results: Spleen lymphocyte decreased evidently and the peak of apoptosis in spleen lymphocyte was dependent on radiation dose and the time after irradiation. Conclusion: After γ-irradiation with large doses, pathological changes of spleen lymphocyte apoptosis in mice can be divided into obviously different stages. The main causes of death of spleen lymphocytes are different in different dose groups

  13. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  14. Measurements of integrated components' parameters versus irradiation doses gamma radiation (60Co) dosimetry-methodology-tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuan, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used for the irradiation of the integrated components and the measurements of their parameters, using Quality Insurance of dosimetry: - Measurement of the integrated dose using the competences of the Laboratoire Central des Industries Electriques (LCIE): - Measurement of irradiation dose versus source/component distance, using a calibrated equipment. - Use of ALANINE dosimeters, placed on the support of the irradiated components. - Assembly and polarization of components during the irradiations. Selection of the irradiator. - Measurement of the irradiated components's parameters, using the competences of the societies: - GenRad: GR130 tests equipement placed in the DEIN/SIR-CEN SACLAY. - Laboratoire Central des Industries Electriques (LCIE): GR125 tests equipment and this associated programmes test [fr

  15. Radiation-induced apoptosis in human tumor cell lines: adaptive response and split-dose effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippovich, I V; Sorokina, N I; Robillard, N; Lisbona, A; Chatal, J F

    1998-07-03

    Irradiation of human ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR 3) and myeloma cells (RPMI 8226) with graded doses of 137Cs-gamma-rays led to a 35-40% increase in time-dependent apoptosis 72 hr after 6-8 Gy irradiation. Large individual variations in sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis were noted in human lymphocytes obtained from 5 donors. Pretreatment of OVCAR 3 and RPMI 8226 cells with 0.01 Gy increased their resistance to apoptosis after subsequent 6 Gy irradiation several hours or 48 and 72 hr later. A dose of 4 or 8 Gy given in 2 equal fractions at an interval of a few hours produced a low level of apoptosis compared to that resulting from a single administration of the same total dose. Adaptive response was demonstrated in 2 out of 3 samples of human lymphocytes isolated from different donors, and no split-dose effect for apoptosis was noted in 2 other donors. In split-dose experiments, there was no correlation between the sensitivity of cells to apoptosis and their position in the cell cycle, after the first half-dose. No G1 block was observed in irradiated cell lines. Adaptive response and split-dose effect were prevented by 3-aminobenzamide and okadaic acid which inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and protein phosphatase, respectively. These results imply a common mechanism for acquired resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis in adaptive response and the split-dose effect.

  16. Mechanism of suppressive effect of low dose radiation on cancer cell dissemination in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Haiqing; Li Xiuyi; Chen Yubing; Zhang Yingchun; Liu Shuzheng

    1997-01-01

    Influence of low dose radiation on immunity in C57 BL/6 mice injected with cancer cells was studied. In mice given 75 mGy WBI 24 h before injection of Lewis lung carcinoma cells or B 16 melanoma cells, the percentage of S-phase thymocytes and CD 3+ thymocytes, the splenic NK cell activity, IL-2 secretion and γIFN secretion were found to be potentiated 2∼8 day after irradiation in comparison with the sham-irradiation mice. The results suggest that low dose radiation might suppress cancer cell dissemination via the enhancement of immune reactivity

  17. Shielding of the abdominal region during X-irradiation: Effect on haemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrova, J.; Petyrek, P.

    1984-01-01

    The shielding of the abdominal region during X-irradiation is important for two reasons: 1) it prevents the development of the gastrointestinal syndrome following higher radiation doses; 2) it prevents the development of the lethal form of the bone marrow syndrome by shielding a portion of the spinal column bone marrow and the spleen. The dose reduction factor in partial irradiated mice compared to whole-body irradiated mice was 2.6. 15 mins after irradiation with the dose of 10 Gy, the number of spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) decreased in the femoral bone marrow of both the group receiving whole-body irradiation and the group having the abdominal region shielded. This decrease persisted in both groups for five hours after irradiation. 48 hours after whole-body irradiation, the number of CFU-S in the femoral bone marrow of the unshielded animals decreased almost to zero values. In shielded group, a statistically significant increase in the number of CFU-S in the femur was observed at 48 hours. At 120 hours, the number of CFU-S in so irradiated mice was at the level of the unirradiated group. In the spleen a great decrease in the number of CFU-S was caused by whole-body irradiation of mice as early as 15 mins after irradiation and the low-levels were recorded until the death of animals. In the shielded group, a statistically signifjcant decrease in the number of CFU-S was observed 15 mins after irradiation, which may have been due to the abscopal effect of irradiation. After a transient recovery 2 hours after irradiation, a significant decrease in the number of CFU-S in the spleens was observed in the subsequent interval from five to 120 hours after irradiation. (author)

  18. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, Philip D.

    2016-09-01

    This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.

  19. Changing of expression level of fas-antigen (CD95), cytokines synthesis and production after irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, N.M.; Solntceva, O.S.; Bytchkova, N.V.; Nikiforov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow progenitor (CD34+), tymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are most radiosensitive than other cell types. Even low doses of radiation induce apoptosis. The investigators suggest that it is possible relationship between synthesis and production of cytokines and apoptotic process. With the purpose to determine correlation between expression of Fas-antigen and synthesis of cytokines after low doses irradiation the experiments by irradiation PBL of healthy persons in vitro were held. Cells were X-irradiated by 12,5, 25 and 50 cGy. In consequence of the experiments increasing of Fas-antigen was revealed. This increasing correlated with changing in synthesis and production of cytokines. Also the Chernobyl's accident liquidators (CAL) were investigated. After comparison data in the group CAL (I) with data in the control group (II) increasing of Fas-antigen expression was revealed. Also in I group was discovered increasing of the cell number sinthesied interleukine-4 (IL-4) and interleukine-6 (IL-6). Interleukine-lβ (IL-1 β) producing pell were decreased. These changes have been correlated with degree of immunodeficiency at CAL. These data allow to consider the apoptosis as cell mechanism included in pathogenesis of diseases, which can be showed later long time after irradiation. (author)

  20. Model of the dose rate for a semi industrial irradiation plant. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangusi, Josefina

    2004-01-01

    The second stage of the model for the absorbed dose rate in air for the enclosure of a half-industrialist irradiation plant operating with cobalt-60 sources holden in plan geometry is presented. The sensibility of the model with the treatment of the support structure of the irradiator is analyzed and verified with experimental measurements with good accord. The model of the absorbed dose rate in air in the case of an interposed material between the radioactive sources and the point of interest includes in its calculation a set of secondary radioactive sources created by the Compton scattering of the primary radiation. The accord of the calculated absorbed dose rate and the experimental measured ones is good. The transit dose due to the irradiator moving until its dwell position is also modeled. The isodose curves for a set of irradiator parallel planes are also generated. (author) [es

  1. Neutron flux and gamma dose measurement in the BNCT irradiation facility at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Ferrari, M.; Postuma, I.; Fatemi, S.; Prata, M.; Ballarini, F.; Carante, M. P.; Farias, R.; González, S. J.; Marrale, M.; Gallo, S.; Bartolotta, A.; Iacoviello, G.; Nigg, D.; Altieri, S.

    2018-01-01

    University of Pavia is equipped with a TRIGA Mark II research nuclear reactor, operating at a maximum steady state power of 250 kW. It has been used for many years to support Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. An irradiation facility was constructed inside the thermal column of the reactor to produce a sufficient thermal neutron flux with low epithermal and fast neutron components, and low gamma dose. In this irradiation position, the liver of two patients affected by hepatic metastases from colon carcinoma were irradiated after borated drug administration. The facility is currently used for cell cultures and small animal irradiation. Measurements campaigns have been carried out, aimed at characterizing the neutron spectrum and the gamma dose component. The neutron spectrum has been measured by means of multifoil neutron activation spectrometry and a least squares unfolding algorithm; gamma dose was measured using alanine dosimeters. Results show that in a reference position the thermal neutron flux is (1.20 ± 0.03) ×1010 cm-2 s-1 when the reactor is working at the maximum power of 250 kW, with the epithermal and fast components, respectively, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal component. The ratio of the gamma dose with respect to the thermal neutron fluence is 1.2 ×10-13 Gy/(n/cm2).

  2. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on induction of myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the induction of myeloid leukemia and other kinds of neoplasias in C3H male mice irradiated at several dose rate levels. We compared the incidence of neoplasias among these groups, obtained dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF) for myeloid leukemia. C3H/He male mice were exposed to whole body gamma-ray irradiation at 8 weeks of age. All mice were maintained for their entire life span and teh pathologically examined after their death. Radiation at a high dose-rate of 882 mGy/min (group H), a medium dose-rate of 95.6 mGy/min (group M), and low dose-rates of 0.298 mGy/min (group L-A), 0.067 mGy/min (group L-B) or 0.016 mGy/min (group L-C) were delivered from 137 Cs sources. The mice in group L were irradiated continuously for 22 hours daily up to total doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 Gy over a period of 3 days to 200 days. As for the induction of neoplasias, myeloid leukemia developed significantly more frequently in irradiated groups than in unirradiated groups. The time distribution of mice dying from myeloid leukemia did not show a difference between groups H and L. The incidence of myeloid leukemia showed a greater increase in the high dose-rate groups than in the low and medium dose-rate groups in the dose range over 2 Gy, it also showed significant increases in the groups irradiated with 1 Gy of various dose rate, but the difference between these groups was not clear. These dose effect curves had their highest values on each curve at about 3 Gy. We obtained DDREF values of 2-3 by linear fittings for their dose response curves of dose ranges in which leukemia incidences were increasing. (author)

  3. Irradiation Creep of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852 Irradiated in the BN-350 Reactor over Wide Ranges of Irradiation Temperature and Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Ivanov, A.A.; Shulepin, S.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels appear to be the most promising materials for advanced nuclear systems, especially for fusion reactors. Their main advantages are higher resistance to swelling and lower irradiation creep rate as has been repeatedly demonstrated in examinations of these materials after irradiation. Nevertheless, available experimental data on irradiation resistance of F/M steels are insufficient, with the greatest deficiency of data for high doses and for both low and high irradiation temperatures. From the very beginning of operation the BN-350 fast reactor has been used for irradiation of specimens of structural materials, including F/M steels. The most unique feature of BN-350 was its low inlet sodium temperature, allowing irradiation at temperatures over a very wide range of temperatures compared with the range in other fast reactors. In this paper data are presented on swelling and irradiation creep of three Russian F/M steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852, irradiated in experimental assemblies of the BN-350 reactor at temperatures in the range of 305-700 deg. C to doses ranging from 20 to 89 dpa. The investigation was performed using gas-pressurized creep tubes with hoop stresses in the range of 0 - 294 MPa. (authors)

  4. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  5. Sterility and Sexual Competitiveness of Tapachula-7 Anastrepha ludens Males Irradiated at Different Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Dávila, Dina; Adriano-Anaya, Maria de Lourdes; Quintero-Fong, Luis; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A genetic sexing strain of Anastrepha ludens (Loew), Tapachula-7, was developed by the Mexican Program Against Fruit Flies to produce and release only males in programs where the sterile insect technique (SIT) is applied. Currently, breeding are found at a massive scale, and it is necessary to determine the optimum irradiation dose that releases sterile males with minimum damage to their sexual competitiveness. Under laboratory and field conditions, we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy on the sexual competitiveness of males, the induction of sterility in wild females and offspring survivorship. The results of the study indicate that irradiation doses have a significant effect on the sexual behavior of males. A reduction of mating capacity was inversely proportional to the irradiation dose of males. It is estimated that a dose of 60 Gy can induce more than 99% sterility in wild females. In all treatments, the degree of offspring fertility was correlated with the irradiation dose of the parents. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that a dose of 60 Gy can be applied in sterile insect technique release programs. The application of this dose in the new genetic sexing strain of A. ludens is discussed.

  6. Comparative dosimetric study in the estimation of the dose rate of the Transelektro LGI-01 irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco A, H.; Urena N, F.F.

    2004-01-01

    The 60 Co TRANSELEKTRO, model LGI-0 1, Hungarian, is similar to the Canadian Gamma cell. The evaluation of the dose ratio in the geometric center of the exposition chamber of the LGI-0 1 is presented in this paper. In order to do this two types of dosimeters were used: the alanine, and the L8-C 1 red acrylic (Canadian). Three dosimeters of each type were irradiated at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 h. The respective intensities and absorbencies were measured and used to determine the proper absorbed doses and the dose ratio. The results obtained with both dosimeters were compared with the ratio dose that was reported by the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration of the Metrology Department of the ININ, which used a ionization chamber for the calibration of the LGI-0 1. The alanine dosemeter showed a ± 1.3% dispersion while with the acrylic dosemeter the dispersion was of ± 3.2%, with respect to the value reported by the authorized Calibration Laboratory. This paper was also used to update the calibration table of the L8-C1 red acrylic. (Author)

  7. Dose dependent oxidation kinetics of lipids in fish during irradiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tukenmez, I.; Ersen, M.S.; Bakioglu, A.T. [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Ankara (Turkey). Lalahan Nuclear Research Inst.; Bicer, A.; Pamuk, V. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Kinetic aspects of the development of lipid oxidation in complex foods as fish in the course of irradiation were analyzed with respect to the associated formation of malonaldehyde (MA) through the reactions modified so as to be consistent with those in complex foods as fish. Air-packed anchovy (Engraulis encrasicholus) samples in polyethylene pouches were irradiated at the doses of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15,20 and 25 kGy at 20{sup o} C in a Cs-137 gamma irradiator of 1.806 kGy/h dose rate. Immediately after each irradiation, MA contents of irradiated and unirradiated samples were determined by thiobarbituric acid test. Based on the MA formation, a kinetic model to simulate the apparent oxidation of lipid in fish as a function of irradiation dose was derived from the rate equations consistent with modified reactions. Kinetic parameters and simulation were related to conditions of lipid oxidation, and associated rancidity state of fish with respect to the doses applied in different irradiation-preservation processes. Numerical values of kinetic parameters based on the MA formation were found as a threshold dose of 0.375 kGy, an apparent yield of 1.871 {mu}mol/kg kGy, and a maximum attainable concentration of 15.853 {mu}mol/kg which may be used for process control and dosimetry. (author).

  8. Evaluation of the original dose in irradiated dried fruit by EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Oca, Maria Cristina; Bartolotta, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) is one of the physical methods, recommended by the European Committee for Standardization, for the identification of irradiated food containing cellulose, such as dried fruit. In this work the applicability of EPR as identification method of irradiated pistachios, hazelnuts, peanuts, chestnuts, pumpkin seeds is evaluated; the time stability of the radiation induced signal is studied and the single aliquot additive dose method is used to evaluate the dose in the product.

  9. Evaluation of the original dose in irradiated dried fruit by EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Oca, Maria Cristina, E-mail: mcristina.doca@unipa.it [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Bartolotta, Antonio [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) is one of the physical methods, recommended by the European Committee for Standardization, for the identification of irradiated food containing cellulose, such as dried fruit. In this work the applicability of EPR as identification method of irradiated pistachios, hazelnuts, peanuts, chestnuts, pumpkin seeds is evaluated; the time stability of the radiation induced signal is studied and the single aliquot additive dose method is used to evaluate the dose in the product.

  10. Adrenocorticotrophin and cortisol secretion in children after low dose cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowne, E.C.; Wallace, W.H.B.; Gibson, S.; Moore, C.M.; White, A.; Shalet, S.M. (Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Endocrinology)

    1993-09-01

    We investigated the effect of low dose cranial irradiation (18-24 Gy) on spontaneous ACTH and cortisol secretion in children. We analysed 24-hour plasma ACTH and cortisol profiles sampled at 20-minute intervals. Twenty long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were studied and results compared with those in 14 normal children. No significant disruption of spontaneous ACTH or cortisol secretion, either in the amount or pattern of hormones secreted, was found in children after low dose cranial irradiation. (Author).

  11. The genetic effects induced by an irradiation in low doses at Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Taskaev, A.I.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    The review generalizes the results obtained in researches of genetic radiation effects for Drosophila melanogaster from contamination regions near the Chernobylsk NPP. The results of laboratory investigations of low dose irradiation effects on genotype variability and lifetime of Drosophila are presented too. It supposed that the main effect of low dose irradiation is caused by the induced genetic instability against the background of which the realization of different-directed radiobiological reactions is possible [ru

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Cell Free Supernatant of Irradiated Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaleem, M.A.; AL-Hagar, O.E.Aa.

    2015-01-01

    Attempts were made to isolate bio preservatives using food wastes with no value and low cost. Whey is the raw material achieved that value. Whey and many other food wastes are used in our study to isolate Lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Cell free supernatants (CFS) of isolates are used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains. CFS-9 isolate from whey has the highest inhibitory activity compared to all other isolates. The inhibitory activity of CFS-9, Nisin (400 IU / ml) and the standard Lactococcus Lactis Subsp. Lactis ATCC 11454 (Lacto) were determined. Furthermore, isolate-9 and Lacto strains were exposed to irradiation at different doses. The inhibition zones of; control isolate-9 (non-irradiated) showed the highest values against all indicator strains, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 250 Gy was the highest value against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli compared to other irradiation treatments, CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 100 Gy was the highest value against Staph aureus, while the inhibition zone was in the highest value in CFS of irradiated Lacto at dose 500 Gy against Salmonella typhimurium. Nisin (400 IU / ml) was significantly higher than all CFS of irradiated isolate-9 while, the inhibition zones of all CFS-Lacto (irradiated and nonirradiated) are better and higher than nisin-400

  13. Effects of low dose rate γ-rays on cell proliferation and survival in exponentially growing and plateau phase cultures of normal rat kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-rays on cell clonogenicity and cell proliferation were examined in NRK cells in exponential and plateau growth phases during and after irradiation at various dose rates. The typical dese rate effect for the survival responses was observed between acute irradiation and continuous irradiation at dose rates of 9.6-44 rads/h. Similar dose rate effect for the perturbation of the proliferation was observed in exponentially growing cells during irradiation. Some differences were found in survival when the cells were exposed to γ-rays at 9.6 rads/h or at 13.7 rads/h. The survival curves of exponential phase cells irradiated at these dose rates showed a shape different from that observed in plateau phase cells. Namely, a steady state of survival appeared around an accumulated dose of 1000 rads (dose-rate of 9.6 rads/h) and an accumulated dose of 1500 rads (dose-rate of 13.7 rads/h) in the exponential phase cells, while such a steady state of survival was not detected in plateau phase cells after similar conditions of irradiation. Moreover, the extrapolation number of the survival curve was much larger at the lower dose rate in exponential phase cells, in contrast to a value of the unity oberved in plateau phase cells, The radiosensitivity of plateau phase cells was somewhat lower compared to exponential phase cells over the range of accumulated doses at the dose rates used. These differences in cellular responses to the radiation between the two phases could be explained by changes in cell proliferation, the redistribution of the cell cycle compartments and the repair capacity of cellular damage during irradiation. (author)

  14. Susceptible genes and molecular pathways related to heavy ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Kazuaki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Ishigami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Kawata, Tetsuya; Shibahara, Takahiko; Ito, Hisao; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Heavy ion beams are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by a higher relative biologic effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the difference of gene expression between heavy ion beams and X-rays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells. Materials and methods: The OSCC cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon or neon ion irradiation or X-rays using three different doses. We sought to identify genes the expression of which is affected by carbon and neon ion irradiation using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The microarray analysis identified 84 genes that were modulated by carbon and neon ion irradiation at all doses in OSCC cells. Among the genes, three genes (TGFBR2, SMURF2, and BMP7) and two genes (CCND1 and E2F3), respectively, were found to be involved in the transforming growth factor β-signaling pathway and cell cycle:G1/S checkpoint regulation pathway. The qRT-PCR data from the five genes after heavy ion irradiation were consistent with the microarray data (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our findings should serve as a basis for global characterization of radiation-regulated genes and pathways in heavy ion-irradiated OSCC

  15. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  16. Minimal heating dose: a novel biological unit to measure infrared irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoun Seung; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Soyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2006-06-01

    Infrared (IR) rays, which comprise approximately 40% of the solar radiation which reaches the earth's surface, have received relatively scant attention. As no standard method has yet been agreed upon for the biological evaluation of IR irradiation, the objective of this study is to suggest a new unit for IR irradiation. The skin temperature of 38 Korean volunteers was measured after IR irradiation with varying irradiance. Skin temperature after IR irradiation at an irradiance of 2.02 W/cm2 remained unchanged after 652+/-22 s (mean+/-standard error), which corresponds, in this case, to a total radiation dose of IR 1317.3+/-44.84 J/cm2. This quantity was designated as the minimal heating dose (MHD). We also demonstrated that MHD increased with increasing IR irradiance at lower IR irradiance (1.17 and 2.02 W/cm2), whereas it became constant at higher irradiance (2.87 and 3.22 W/cm2). No statistically significant correlations were detected between MHD and volunteers' ages, erythema index, or melanin index. We propose 'MHD' as a biological unit for the measurement of IR irradiation.

  17. Evaluation of dose to cardiac structures during breast irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Korreman, S-S; Pedersen, A N

    2011-01-01

    was still being delivered to the LAD. In 1 case, the dose to the LAD was low while 19% of the contoured heart volume received over 20 Gy. In five patients, the dose to the arch LAD was relatively low while the dose to the whole LAD was considerably higher. CONCLUSION: This study indicates...

  18. Analysis of the radiolytic products on high-dose irradiated food and packing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyong Su; Shim, Sung Lye; Chung, In Sun

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to prepare the government approval for the extension of food irradiation item to food or its products, to promote the industrial application of radiation technology, and to apply basic data in policy for introduction of irradiation. The change of hydrocarbons by irradiation was evaluated for the detection of irradiated meat. The results showed that hydrocarbons were detected in all of irradiated samples, but these hydrocarbons were not detected in non-irradiated samples. There were no difference between vacuum and N 2 - packaging. According to fatty acid compounds and degradation pathway of beef and pork, it could be deliberated that a great amount of produced hydrocarbons such as 8-heptadenene and 1,7-hexadecadien were able to be used as identification factor of irradiated meat. Effects of γ-irradiation on the volatile organic compounds in agricultural products were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. The composition of volatile organic compounds were little changed, but few specific compounds induced by γ-irradiation were identified. The variations of concentration in irradiated samples identified in this study could be due to the radiation sensitivity of compounds with the dose used. Effects of γ-irradiation on the volatile compounds in packaging materials were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. In polyethylene and polypropylene, 1,3-DBB was identified only in irradiated samples. Levels of 1,3-DBB increased with increasing irradiation doses. These results suggest may be useful in evaluation of γ-irradiation effects on food packaging materials

  19. Analysis of the radiolytic products on high-dose irradiated food and packing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyong Su; Shim, Sung Lye; Chung, In Sun [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The aims of this study were to prepare the government approval for the extension of food irradiation item to food or its products, to promote the industrial application of radiation technology, and to apply basic data in policy for introduction of irradiation. The change of hydrocarbons by irradiation was evaluated for the detection of irradiated meat. The results showed that hydrocarbons were detected in all of irradiated samples, but these hydrocarbons were not detected in non-irradiated samples. There were no difference between vacuum and N{sub 2}- packaging. According to fatty acid compounds and degradation pathway of beef and pork, it could be deliberated that a great amount of produced hydrocarbons such as 8-heptadenene and 1,7-hexadecadien were able to be used as identification factor of irradiated meat. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the volatile organic compounds in agricultural products were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. The composition of volatile organic compounds were little changed, but few specific compounds induced by {gamma}-irradiation were identified. The variations of concentration in irradiated samples identified in this study could be due to the radiation sensitivity of compounds with the dose used. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the volatile compounds in packaging materials were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. In polyethylene and polypropylene, 1,3-DBB was identified only in irradiated samples. Levels of 1,3-DBB increased with increasing irradiation doses. These results suggest may be useful in evaluation of {gamma}-irradiation effects on food packaging materials

  20. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  1. Pre-1989 epidemiological surveys of low-level dose pre-conception irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Information from 59 pre-1989 epidemiological surveys concerning pre-conception irradiation at doses less than 0.1 Gy has been collated to determine whether any consistent patterns of health effects emerge. The surveys are considered in three groups: childhood malignancies, Down's syndrome and indicators of reproductive damage. Although a pattern is observed for Down's syndrome, no reliable associations are apparent for childhood malignancies (where all surveys pre-date the Gardner survey at Sellafield) or indications of reproductive damage. The twelve surveys of Down's syndrome in relation to maternal pre-conception irradiation received for medical reasons show a pattern consistent with a doubling dose of about 20 mGy. This doubling dose value is, however, not based on individual measurements of ovarian dose and is inconsistent with results from high-level dose surveys. There is no association between paternal irradiation and Down's syndrome. (author)

  2. Practical implications of backscatter from outside the patient on the dose distribution during total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dam, J.; Rijnders, A.; Vanuytsel, L.; Zhang, H.-Z.

    1988-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) sometimes requires the set-up of the patient very close to the wall of the treatment room in order to obtain sufficiently large irradiation fields. Under these conditions, backscattered electrons can become clinically important. In the present study, an attempt was made to quantify the dose contribution to the patient from these electrons. Measurements were performed both in experimental conditions and on patients during their TBI treatment. It is concluded that, with the patient close to the wall, backscattered electrons constitute a significant (up to 20% of the dose obtained under electronic equilibrium at the exit port of the beam) radiation dose which can (under certain conditions) influence measurements of exit dose leading to an overestimation of the midline dose and contribute a suuperficial irradiation of the patient without therapeutic benefit. This problem can be solved by interposing a 2 cm thick low-Z absorber between wall and patient. 9 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  3. Possible use of EPDM in radioactive waste disposal: Long term low dose rate and short term high dose rate irradiation in aquatic and atmospheric environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacıoğlu, Fırat; Özdemir, Tonguç; Çavdar, Seda; Usanmaz, Ali

    2013-02-01

    In this study, changes in the properties of ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) irradiated with different dose rates in ambient atmosphere and aqueous environment were investigated. Irradiations were carried out both with low dose and high dose rate irradiation sources. EPDM samples which were differentiated from each other by peroxide type and 5-ethylidene 2-norbornene (ENB) contents were used. Long term low dose rate irradiations were carried out for the duration of up to 2.5 years (total dose of 1178 kGy) in two different irradiation environments. Dose rates (both high and low), irradiation environments (in aquatic and open to atmosphere), and peroxide types (aliphatic or aromatic) were the parameters studied. Characterization of irradiated EPDM samples were performed by hardness, compression, tensile, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), TGA-FTIR, ATR-FTIR, XRD and SEM tests. It was observed that the irradiation in water environment led to a lower degree of degradation when compared to that of irradiation open to atmosphere for the same irradiation dose. In addition, irradiation environment, peroxide type and dose rate had effects on the extent of change in the properties of EPDM. It was observed that EPDM is relatively radiation resistant and a candidate polymer for usage in radioactive waste management.

  4. Improvement of dose distribution of esophageal irradiation using the field-within-a-field technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Tsugunori; Okabe, Keigo; Yamato, Hidetada; Murakami, Jyunji; Nakazawa, Yasuo; Kato, Mitsuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The wide radiation field for mediastinal dose distribution should be inhomogeneous with the usual simple opposed beam irradiation. The purpose of this study was to improve the dose distribution of the mediastinum using a conventional planning system with a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and the field-in-field technique. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is obtained in bilateral opposed-field irradiation. An overdose area obtained from the 3D dose distribution is defined and reprojected into the irradiation field. A new reduced field is created by removing the reprojected overdose area. A 3D dose distribution is again obtained and compared with the results from first one. Procedures were repeated until each of the target volumes was within ±5% of the prescribed dose and the irradiation volume within 107% or less of the prescribed dose. From the DVH analysis, our field-within-a-field technique resulted in a more uniform dose distribution within the conventional planning. The field-within-a-field technique involves many parameters, and an inverse planning algorithm is suitable for computation. However, with our method, the forward planning system is adequate for planning, at least in a relatively straightforward planning system such as bilateral opposed fields therapy. (author)

  5. Degradation of physical and mechanical properties of steel G-91 under low-dose neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislitsin, Sergey; Dikov, Alexey; Maksimkin, Oleg; Merezhko, Mikhail; Rofman, Oleg; Turubarova, Lyudmila; Gorlachev, Igor; Sil'nagina, Nadezhda

    2017-12-01

    Changes in the structure and physicomechanical properties of steel G-91 were studied after low-dose neutron irradiation. The irradiation was carried out in the "wet" channel of the WWR-K research nuclear reactor of INP, Almaty, Kazakhstan, to the fast neutron fluencies 8.6×1019 n/cm2 at a temperature of steel G-91. Microstructural changes manifested themselves in a growth of dislocation density and appearance of radiation defects (black dots). The most significant consequence of low-dose irradiation during a long period (up to a year and a half) is severe corrosion, which leads to embrittlement of steel G-91.

  6. Dose response of thin-film dosimeters irradiated with 80-120 keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film dosimeters (Riso B3 and alanine films) were irradiated at 10 MeV and 80-120 keV electron accelerators, and it has been shown that the radiation response of the dosimeter materials (the radiation chemical yields) are constant at these irradiation energies. However, dose gradients within...... the dosimeters mean that calibration functions at the lower electron energies will be dependent on both irradiation energy and the required effective point of measurement of the dosimeter. These are general effects that apply to any dosimeters that have non-linear response functions and where dose gradients...

  7. Dose response of artificial irradiation of fluvial sediment sample for ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunru; Yin Gongming; Gao Lu; Li Jianping; Han Fei; Lin Min

    2011-01-01

    ESR dating samples need be irradiated to obtain dose response curve and the equivalent dose. The artificial dose rate is about 1 x 10 -1 -1 x 10 2 Gy/min, whereas the natural dose rate is about 3 Gy/ka. Therefore, one must be sure whether the much higher artificial dose rate is suitable for the ESR dating study. In this paper, we use different artificial dose rate to irradiate the same fluvial sample and measure the quartz Al centre ESR signal under the same conditions. The dose response curves are compared, in an attempt to gain a preliminary knowledge on that problem and build a good foundation for our ESR dating studies on fluvial samples. (authors)

  8. Genomic instability induced by 137Cs γ-ray irradiation in CHL surviving cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jingyin; Liu Bingchen; Wu Hongying; Zhou Jiwen; Mu Chuanjie

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study in parallel several possible manifestations of instability of surviving CHL cells after irradiation, namely the frequencies of mutation at locus, micronuclei and apoptosis. Methods: The frequencies of mutation at HGPRT locus, micronuclei and apoptosis were assayed at various times in surviving cells irradiated with γ-rays. Results: The surviving cells showed a persistently increased frequency of mutation at the HGPRT locus after irradiation until 53 days. Mutant fraction as high as 10 -4 was scored, tens of times higher than those assayed in control cells studied in parallel. The frequency of bi nucleated cells with micronuclei determined within 24 hours after irradiation increased with dose and reached a peak value of (26.58 +- 2.48)% at 3 Gy, decreasing at higher doses to a plateau around 20%. The micronucleus frequency decreased steeply to about (14.47 +- 2.39)% within the first 3 days post-irradiation, and fluctuated at around 10% up to 56 days post-irradiation. The delayed efficiency of irradiated cells was significantly decreased. The frequency of apoptosis peaked about (24.90 +- 4.72)% at 10 Gy 48 h post-irradiation (γ-ray dose between 3-10 Gy) and then decreased to about 12% within 3 days. It was significantly higher than in control cells until 14 days. Conclusions: It shows that genomic instability induced by radiation can be transmitted to the progeny of surviving cells and may take many forms of expression such as lethal mutation, chromosome aberrations, gene mutation, etc

  9. Effect of low dose irradiation on renal enlargement in children following nephrectomy for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassady, J.R.; Lebowitz, R.L.; Jaffe, N.; Hoffman, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation on subsequent compensatory renal enlargement in a group of children operated upon with unilateral nephrectomy for Wilms' tumor is reported. Comparison groups were children whose remaining kidney received either no direct irradiation or irradiation to only the upper portion of the kidney. The rate of growth of the kidney in the irradiated group was slightly less but this was not statistically significant. Thus radiation therapy in children with Wilm's tumor, so crucial to optimum survival, does not seem to cause significant renal toxicity. (Auth.)

  10. Medical irradiation and the use of the ''effective dose equivalent'' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the effective dose for all kinds of medical irradiation. In order to estimate the 'somatic effective dose' the weighting factors recommended by ICRP 26 have been separated into those for somatic effects and for genetic effects. Calculation of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology procedures must consider the various technical parameters which determine the absorbed dose in the various organs, i.e. beam quality, typical entrance dose and the number of films of each view. Knowledge about these parameters is not always well established and therefore the effective dose estimates are very uncertain. The average dose absorbed by various organs in the case of administration of radionuclides to the body depends to a much higher degree on biological parameters than in the case of external irradiation. In contrast to the variability and lack of reliability of biological data, the physical methods for internal dose calculation are quite elaborate. However, these methods have to be extended to involve the target dose from the radioactivity distributed within the remaining parts of the body. An attempt was made to estimate the somatic effective dose for the most common diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. This would make it possible to compare the risk of X-ray and nuclear medicine techniques on a more equitable basis. The collective effective dose from medical irradiation is estimated for various countries on the basis of reported statistical data. (H.K.)

  11. Analysis of gamma irradiator dose rate using spent fuel elements with parallel configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Pudjijanto MS; Ardani

    2006-01-01

    To enhance the utilization of the RSG-GAS reactor spent fuel, the gamma irradiator using spent fuel elements as a gamma source is a suitable choice. This irradiator can be used for food sterilization and preservation. The first step before realization, it is necessary to determine the gamma dose rate theoretically. The assessment was realized for parallel configuration fuel elements with the irradiation space can be placed between fuel element series. This analysis of parallel model was choice to compare with the circle model and as long as possible to get more space for irradiation and to do manipulation of irradiation target. Dose rate calculation were done with MCNP, while the estimation of gamma activities of fuel element was realized by OREGEN code with 1 year of average delay time. The calculation result show that the gamma dose rate of parallel model decreased up to 50% relatively compared with the circle model, but the value still enough for sterilization and preservation. Especially for food preservation, this parallel model give more flexible, while the gamma dose rate can be adjusted to the irradiation needed. The conclusion of this assessment showed that the utilization of reactor spent fuels for gamma irradiator with parallel model give more advantage the circle model. (author)

  12. Analysis of Giant-nucleated Cell Formation Following X-ray and Proton Irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, Ashraf Abdu

    Radiation-induced genetic instability has been observed in survivors of irradiated cancerous and normal cells in vitro and in vivo and has been determined in different forms, such as delayed cell death, chromosomal aberration or mutation. A well defined and characterized normal human-diploid AG1522 fibroblast cell line was used to study giant-nucleated cell (GCs) formation as the ultimate endpoint of this research. The average nuclear cross-sectional areas of the AG1522 cells were measured in mum2. The doubling time required by the AG1522 cells to divide was measured. The potential toxicity of the Hoechst dye at a working concentration on the live AG1522 cells was assessed. The yield of giant cells was determined at 7, 14 and 21 days after exposure to equivalent clinical doses of 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of X-ray or proton irradiation. Significant differences were found to exist between X-ray or proton irradiation when compared with sham-irradiated control populations. The frequency of GCs induced by X-rays was also compared to those formed in proton irradiated cultures. The results confirm that 1 Gy X-rays are shown to induce higher rates of mitotically arrested GCs, increasing continually over time up to 21 days post-irradiation. The yield of GCs was significantly greater (10%) compared to those formed in proton populations (2%) 21 days postirradiation. The GCs can undergo a prolonged mitotic arrest that significantly increases the length of cell cycle. The arrest of GCs at the mitotic phase for longer periods of time might be indicative of a strategy for cell survival, as it increases the time available for DNA repair and enables an alternative route to division for the cells. However, the reduction in their formation 21 days after both types of radiation might favour GCs formation, ultimately contributing to carcinogenesis or cancer therapy resistance. The X-ray experiments revealed a dose-dependent increase in the GCs up to 14 days after irradiation. Although the proton

  13. Characterization of membrane lipid fluidity in human embryo cells malignantly transfer med post 238Pu α irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zirong; Sun Ling; Liu Guolian; Shen Zhiyuan

    1992-01-01

    The membrane lipid fluidity of malignantly transformed human embryo cells following 238 Pu α particlce irradiation in vitro has been studied. The results indicate that the ontogenesis depends on irradiation dose (Gy) and the membrane lipid fluidity in malignantly transformed cells is higher than that in normal embryo cells. With the microviscosity (η) of cells plotted against the cell counts, the correlation coefficient (γ) is calculated to be between 0.9936 and 0.9999. Since the malignant transformation of irradiated embryo cells is manifested early on cell membrane lipid, the fluidity of membrane lipid can be used as an oncologic marker

  14. The clinic and pathologic picture in the lethal dose irradiated ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halagan, J.; Stanikova, A.; Maracek, I.

    2004-01-01

    The history of clinical symptoms as well as pathologic histological and morphological changes after long/lasting gamma irradiation were estimated in seven clinical healthy ewes. The animals were irradiated continually seven days with totally 6.7 Gy per ewe. Clinically recognizable symptoms of the radiation sickness were observed commencing the 4 th after last dose of irradiation. Sharp increase of the body temperature, heart and respiratory frequency rate as well as apathy, anorexia, arrhythmia, dyspnoe, diarrhea, dehydration, polyuria were prevalent in clinical founding . All of the animals were death in course of seven days after last irradiated dose. The gastrointestinal radiation syndrome was typical evidence of gastrointestinal tract and the general hemorrhagic enhancing of the gamma irradiation damage effects was confirmed. (authors)

  15. Developmental disturbance of rat cerebral cortex following prenatal low-dose gamma-irradiation: a quantitative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Hoshino, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Inouye, M.; Kameyama, Y. (Kagawa Medical School, (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to a single whole-body gamma-irradiation on Day 15 of gestation at a dose of 0.27, 0.48, 1.00, or 1.46 Gy. They were allowed to give birth and the offspring were killed at 6 or 12 weeks of age for microscopic and electron microscopic examinations of the cerebrum. Their body weight, brain weight, cortical thickness, and numerical densities of whole cells and synapses in somatosensory cortex were examined. Growth of the dendritic arborization of layer V pyramidal cells was also examined quantitatively with Golgi-Cox specimens. A significant dose-related reduction in brain weight was found in all irradiated groups. Neither gross malformation nor abnormality of cortical architecture was observed in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy. A significant change was found in thickness of cortex in the groups exposed to 0.48 Gy or more. Cell packing density increased significantly in the group exposed to 1.00 Gy. Significant reduction in the number of intersections of dendrites with the zonal boundaries were found in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy or more. There was no difference in the numerical density of synapses in layer I between the control and irradiated groups. These results suggested that doses as low as 0.27 Gy could cause a morphologically discernible change in the mammalian cerebrum.

  16. Enhancement of postreplication repair in ultraviolet-light-irradiated Chinese hamster cells by irradiation in G2 or s-phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Aebersold, P.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Postreplication repair in synchronous Chinese hamster cells was determined after split doses of ultraviolet (uv) radiation. Repair was enhanced by irradiation of cells in G 2 or S-phase with a small dose of uv radiation at least 1.5 h before a three-fold larger dose of uv. There was significantly greater enhancement when the first dose was given in G 2 than when it was given in the S-phase 0.5 to 1.5 h before the test dose. These data indicate that enhancement of postreplication repair does not require active DNA replication and qualitatively is independent of when in the cell cycle the cells are irradiated

  17. Self-ion emulation of high dose neutron irradiated microstructure in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Z.; Michalicka, J.; Was, G. S.

    2018-04-01

    Solution-annealed 304L stainless steel (SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, and to 15 dpa at 500 °C and 600 °C, and cold-worked 316 SS (CW 316 SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C using 5 MeV Fe++/Ni++ to produce microstructures and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) for comparison with that from neutron irradiation at 320 °C to 46 dpa in the BOR60 reactor. For the 304L SS alloy, self-ion irradiation at 380 °C produced a dislocation loop microstructure that was comparable to that by neutron irradiation. No voids were observed in either the 380 °C self-ion irradiation or the neutron irradiation conditions. Irradiation at 600 °C produced the best match to radiation-induced segregation of Cr and Ni with the neutron irradiation, consistent with the prediction of a large temperature shift by Mansur's invariant relations for RIS. For the CW 316 SS alloy irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, both the irradiated microstructure (dislocation loops, precipitates and voids) and RIS reasonably matched the neutron-irradiated sample. The smaller temperature shift for RIS in CW 316 SS was likely due to the high sink (dislocation) density induced by the cold work. A single self-ion irradiation condition at a dose rate ∼1000× that in reactor does not match both dislocation loops and RIS in solution-annealed 304L SS. However, a single irradiation temperature produced a reasonable match with both the dislocation/precipitate microstructure and RIS in CW 316 SS, indicating that sink density is a critical factor in determining the temperature shift for self-ion irradiations.

  18. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...... survival (OS) and to investigate the influence of steroid dose on acute toxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 2007 to 2010 a total of 118 consecutive patients underwent PCI (25 Gray in 10 fractions). In total, 114/118 received full PCI dose, all 118 were included in the study. Data were analyzed......-one patients out of 118 developed brain metastases after PCI: five of the twenty-one had metastases located in the limbic system. The study showed that prophylactic steroid use might reduce acute toxicity to PCI. Survival data and recurrence rates are comparable to other clinical studies....

  19. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  20. Gamma irradiation: Effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burditt, Arthur K.; Hungate, Frank P.; Toba, H. Harold

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to γ-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortility. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min.

  1. Gamma irradiation: effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Toba, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to γ-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortality. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min. (author)

  2. Gamma irradiation: effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Toba, H.H. (Department of Agriculture, Yakima, WA (USA). Agricultural Research Lab.); Hungate, F.P. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortality. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min. (author).

  3. Biological X-ray irradiator characterization for use with small animals and cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Colello Bruno

    Full Text Available This study presents the characterization of an X-ray irradiator through dosimetric tests, which confirms the actual dose rate that small animals and cells will be exposed to during radiobiological experiments. We evaluated the linearity, consistency, repeatability, and dose distribution in the positions in which the animals or cells are placed during irradiation. In addition, we evaluated the performance of the X-ray tube (voltage and tube operating current, the radiometric survey (leakage radiation and safety devices. The irradiator default setting was established as 160 kV and 25 mA. Tests showed that the dose rate was linear overtime (R2=1 and remained stable for long (constant and short (repeatability intervals between readings. The mean dose rate inside the animal cages was 1.27±0.06 Gy/min with a uniform beam of 95.40% (above the minimum threshold guaranteed by the manufacturer. The mean dose rate inside the cell plates was 0.92±0.19 Gy/min. The dose rate dependence with tube voltage and current presented a quadratic and linear relationship, respectively. There was no observed mechanical failure during evaluation of the irradiator safety devices and the radiometric survey obtained a maximum ambient equivalent dose rate of 0.26 mSv/h, which exempts it from the radiological protection requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The irradiator characterization enables us to perform radiobiological experiments, and assists or even replaces traditional therapy equipment (e.g., linear accelerators for cells and small animal irradiation, especially in early research stages.

  4. Optimizing irradiation dose for sterility induction and quality of Bactrocera tryoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S R; Weldon, C W; Banos, C; Taylor, P W

    2009-10-01

    The current study is an important step toward calibrating, validating, and improving irradiation methods used for Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) sterile insect technique (SIT). We used routine International Atomic Energy Agency/U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food and Agriculture Organization quality control tests assessing percentage of emergence, flight ability, sex ratio, mortality under stress, reproductive sterility, and sexual competitiveness, as well as a nonstandard test of longevity under nutritional stress to assess the impact of a range of target irradiation doses (60, 65, 70, 75, and 80 Gy) on the product quality of mass reared B. tryoni used in SIT. Sterility induction remained adequate (>99.5%) for sterile male-fertile female crosses, and 100% sterility was achieved in fertile male-sterile female crosses and sterile male-sterile female crosses for each irradiation doses tested. There was significant increase in mortality under stress as irradiation dose increased, and reduced participation in mating by males irradiated at higher doses. The current target-sterilizing dose for SIT of 70-75 Gy is associated with significant reduction in fly product "quality". Our data suggest that adequate sterility and improved fly quality could be achieved through a small reduction in target sterilizing dose.

  5. Absorbed Dose Distributions in Irradiated Plastic Tubing and Wire Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Plastic tubing and wire insulation were simulated by radiochromic dye dosimeter films having electron absorbing properties similar to the materials of interest (polyethylene and PVC). A 400-keV electron accelerator was used to irradiate from 1, 2, 3 and 4 sides simulating possible industrial...

  6. Development of a facility for high-precision irradiation of cells with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Compared to photons, using particle radiation in radiotherapy reduces the dose and irradiated volume of normal tissues, potentially reducing side effects. The biological effect of dose deposited by particles such as carbon ions, however, differs from that of dose deposited by photons. The inaccuracy in models to estimate the biological effects of particle radiation remains the most important source of uncertainties in particle therapy. Improving this requires high-precision studies on biological effects of particle radiation. Therefore, the authors aimed to develop a facility for reproducible and high-precision carbon-ion irradiation of cells in culture. The combined dose nonuniformity in the lateral and longitudinal direction should not exceed {+-}1.5%. Dose to the cells from particles than other carbon ions should not exceed 5%. Methods: A uniform lateral dose distribution was realized using a single scatter foil and quadrupole magnets. A modulator wheel was used to create a uniform longitudinal dose distribution. The choice of beam energy and the optimal design of these components was determined using GEANT4 and SRIM Monte Carlo simulations. Verification of the uniformity of the dose distribution was performed using a scintillating screen (lateral) and a water phantom (longitudinal). The reproducibility of dose delivery between experiments was assessed by repeated measurements of the spatial dose distribution. Moreover, the reproducibility of dose-response measurements was tested by measuring the survival of irradiated HEK293 cells in three independent experiments. Results: The relative contribution of dose from nuclear reaction fragments to the sample was found to be <5% when using 90 MeV/u carbon ions. This energy still allows accurate dosimetry conforming to the IAEA Report TRS-398, facilitating comparison to dose-effect data obtained with other radiation qualities. A 1.3 mm long spread-out Bragg peak with a diameter of 30 mm was created, allowing

  7. In pediatric leukemia, dose evaluation according to the type of compensators in total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Catholic University of Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are the pre-treatment method of a stem cell transplantations of the childhood leukemia. in this study, we evaluate the Quantitative human body dose prior to the treatment. The MCNPX simulation program evaluated by changing the material of the tissue compensators with imitation material of pediatric exposure in a virtual space. As a result, first, the average skin dose with the material of the tissue compensators of Plexiglass tissue compensators is 74.60 mGy/min, Al is 73.96 mGy/min, Cu is 72.26 mGy/min and Pb 67.90 mGy/min respectively. Second, regardless of the tissue compensators material that organ dose were thyroid, gentile, digestive system, brain, lungs, kidneys higher in order. Finally, the ideal distance between body compensator and the patient were 50 cm aparting each other. In conclusion, tissue compensators Al, Cu, Pb are able to replace of the currently used in Plexiglass materials.

  8. The hazards of low dose irradiation - science or science fiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danster, Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the dependence of radiobiological effect on radiation dose, in particular, leuhemia and pulmonary cancer in people are given in the lecture of Director of National Office of Radiation Safety of Great Britain. The thresholdless linear hypothesis is analyzed as well as objections to it. The conclusion is made that low radiation doses can not bring about disastrous effects

  9. Radiation doses to normal tissues during craniospinal irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This dosimetric study is aiming to report the results of the analysis of doses received by target volumes and organs outside the target volumes during the treatment of medulloblastoma patients. And also by comparing the doses reaching the eyes and the lens with the use of different shielding methods.

  10. Autoradiographic studies on the cell kinetics after the whole body X-irradiation. 2. Regularities of the post-irradiation death of differentiating and proliferating cells of the rat brain subependimal zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    A wave-like character of death of proliferating and differentiating (D) cells is shown autoradiographically using /sup 3/H-thymidine introduced 60-80 min before the whole body X-ray irradiation in doses of 50, 150 or 300 R on subependymal cells of rat brain. Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G/sub 2/ and S-phases, resulted in 4 peaks of death in mitosis by following the first postradiational mitotic cycle (MC). Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase lost ability for DNA synthesis as cells irradiated in a dose of 300 R did not include additionally introduced (3 hrs before death) /sup 14/C-thymidine from 12 to 17 hrs after /sup 3/H-thymidine injection. However, in the first 4 hrs after irradiation there were no cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase among dead ones, as indirectly shown in the calculations of data obtained while studying Pliss lymphosarcoma. A supposition is made that the death of cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase is attributed to mitotic phase of the first MC after irradiation. Waves of death of lethally damaged D-cells repeated the peaks of death and corresponded to the mitotic peaks of proliferating cells, which permitted to presuppose the presence of ''short cycle'' (SC) in D-cells, which have the rhythm similar to MC and their death has been attributed to the final SC phase, which corresponds to MC mitotic phase in time. According to the peaks of cell death position of one hour block independent of dose in six MC(SC) points is determined. The cells have experienced the block in the point of MC(SC) in subphase of which they were caught by irradiation. Dose effect is manifested in the number of dead cells.

  11. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  12. Apoptotic cell death in erythrocytes of p53-deficient medaka (Oryzias latipes) after γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din Hamid; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have examined the effects of γ-irradiation (γ-IR) on wild-type and p53 mutant Medaka (Oryzias latipes) 24 hours after irradiation and in the present work, apoptosis and alterations in erythrocytes of 4, 8 and 24 h and 14 days after gamma-ray irradiation were reported as genotoxic biomarkers of γ-irradiation. Sexually mature wild-type, WT (Hd-rR) and p53(-/-) adult female medaka (O. latipes) were exposed to 4 Gy dose of γ-IR and sampling were collected after 4, 8 and 24 h and 14 days. Apoptosis and morphological alterations were observed from 4 h after irradiation and remarkably increased 8 h after irradiation in the wild-type. Apoptotic cell death has been observed 8 h after irradiation most prominently but subtle in p53 mutant medaka. All these phenotypes were recovered 14 days after irradiation in both strains. Although no micronuclei were seen in any group, nuclear abnormalities were observed in red blood cells. Both apoptosis and morphological alterations in erythrocytes were decreased after 24 and 14 days after γ-irradiation. We conclude that apoptosis and malformations caused by 4 Gy γ-irradiation in the erythrocytes of medaka fish occurs from 4-24 h and the initial response until 8 h was p53-dependent.

  13. Estimation of effective dose equivalente from external irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.

    1985-07-01

    A methodology for computing effective dose equivalent, derived from the computer code ALGAM: Monte Carlo Estimation of Internal Dose from Gamma-ray Sources in a Phantom Man, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is presented. The modified code was run for 12 different photon energy levels, from 0,010 Mev to 4.0 Mev, which provides computing the absorved dose, for these energy levels, in each one of the 97 organs of the original code. The code also was run for the principal energy levels used in the calibration of the dosimetric films. The results of the absorved doses per photon obtained for these levels of energy have been transformed in effective dose equivalents. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Effects of Gamma Irradiation and Dose Accumulation on the Histology of Spodoptera littoralis (Boisd.) Male Testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, H.A.; El-Naggar, S.E.M.; Shibel, M.M.; El-Dossouki, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full-grown male pupae of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis (Boisd.) were gamma irradiated with low doses of 25, 50, 75 or 100 Gy. The effects of accumulating doses applied to these pupae through three consequent filial generations and the retarded influence on their F 1 , F 2 and F 3 generations progeny were examined. The histological observations showed that the damage in the testes was correlated with increasing the dose applied to the male parents and was the highest among the adults of F 1 . Also, the damage at any acute dose was less than the damage occurred in the same accumulated dose. The deteriorations on the testes were more evident in case of F 1 males resulting from parental males irradiated through two or three successive generations or three accumulated doses of 25 or 50 Gy

  15. Immobilization of cellulose producing cells (sporotrichum cellulophilum) using irradiated rice husk as a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lina, M.R.; Tamada, M.; Kumakura, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of irradiated rice husk as a substrate on cellulase production of free and immobilized cells of S. cellulophium was carried out. Radiation pretreatment of rice husk was done using electron beam accelerator (Dynamitron IEA 3000-25,2), with doses of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 MGy. The substrate used in cellulase production of free and immobilized cells were cellulose powder as a standard, and 1.0 MGy irradiated rice husk. Concentrations of cellulose powder for free and immobilized cells were 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8% (w/v). Irradiated rice husk concentrations for free cells were 3, 6, 9, 15, and 24% (w/v), whereas for immobilized cells were 3, 6, and 9% (w/v). Results showed that glucose concentration in 1.0 MGy irradiated rice husk was the highest of all irradiated and unirradiated rice husks. The GPA (glucose production activity) values used of free immobilized cells of S. cellulophium in medium containing 1.0 MGy irradiated rice husk were about 50% lower than in cellulose powder medium. Cellulase solution resulted by immobilized cells, either in cellulose powder or in irradiated rice husk media, were clear and did not contain mycelium. (authors). 7 refs, 7 figs

  16. Cell death by apoptosis following X-irradiation of the foetal and neonatal rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobe, G.C.; Harmon, B.V.

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was undertaken to determine the type of cell death induced by X-irradiation in the developing kidney. Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a whole-body dose of either 2 or 5 Gy, and foetuses in the eighteenth day of development were exposed to a dose of 4 Gy. The kidneys were examined at 4, 8 and 24 h, and at 1 and 2 weeks post-irradiation. The dying cells from both control and treated kidneys showed the morphological features of apoptosis, a distinct form of cell death that has been identified in mammalian tissues under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Necrosis was not detected. Apoptosis was infrequent in control kidneys and insignificant in extent when compared with the proliferative activity of the cells of the superficial nephrons. There was a pronounced increase in apoptosis during the first day after irradiation. (author)

  17. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, P [Univ New Mexico Radiology Dept., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heintz, B [Texas Oncology, PA, Southlake, TX (United States); Sandoval, D [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  18. Regulation of the cell cycle by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Makoto

    1995-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cell proliferation is extremely complex; deregulation results in neoplastic transformation. In eukaryotes, proliferation of cells is finely regulated through the cell cycle. Studies have shown that the cell cycle is regulated by s series of enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The activities of CDKs are controlled by their association with regulatory subunits, cyclins; the expression of cyclins and the activation of the different cyclin-CDK complexes are required for the cell to cycle. Thus, the cell cycle is regulated by activating and inhibiting phosphorylation of the CDK subunits and this program has internal check points at different stages of the cell cycle. When cells are exposed to external insults such as DNA damaging agents, negative regulation of the cell cycle occurs; arrest in either G1 or G2 stage is induced to prevent the cells from prematurely entering into the next stage before DNA is repaired. Recently, a potent inhibitor of CDKs, which inhibits the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene product by cyclin A-CDK2, cyclin E-CDK2, cyclin D1-CDK4, and cyclin D2-CDK4 complexes has been identified. This protein named WAF1, Sdi1, Cip1, or p21 (a protein of Mr 21,000) contains a p53-binding site in its promoter and studies have reported that the expression of WAF1 was directly regulated by p53; cells with loss of p53 activity due to mutational alteration were unable to induce WAF1. This chapter will be focused on the mechanisms of the cell cycle including inhibitors of CDKs, and the induction of WAF1 by irradiation through a pathway independent of p53 will be also described. (author)

  19. Regulation of the cell cycle by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Makoto [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1995-12-01

    The molecular mechanism of cell proliferation is extremely complex; deregulation results in neoplastic transformation. In eukaryotes, proliferation of cells is finely regulated through the cell cycle. Studies have shown that the cell cycle is regulated by s series of enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The activities of CDKs are controlled by their association with regulatory subunits, cyclins; the expression of cyclins and the activation of the different cyclin-CDK complexes are required for the cell to cycle. Thus, the cell cycle is regulated by activating and inhibiting phosphorylation of the CDK subunits and this program has internal check points at different stages of the cell cycle. When cells are exposed to external insults such as DNA damaging agents, negative regulation of the cell cycle occurs; arrest in either G1 or G2 stage is induced to prevent the cells from prematurely entering into the next stage before DNA is repaired. Recently, a potent inhibitor of CDKs, which inhibits the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene product by cyclin A-CDK2, cyclin E-CDK2, cyclin D1-CDK4, and cyclin D2-CDK4 complexes has been identified. This protein named WAF1, Sdi1, Cip1, or p21 (a protein of Mr 21,000) contains a p53-binding site in its promoter and studies have reported that the expression of WAF1 was directly regulated by p53; cells with loss of p53 activity due to mutational alteration were unable to induce WAF1. This chapter will be focused on the mechanisms of the cell cycle including inhibitors of CDKs, and the induction of WAF1 by irradiation through a pathway independent of p53 will be also described. (author)

  20. Effect of Gamma Irradiation Doses on Some Chemical Characteristics of Cotton Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, O.I.

    2011-01-01

    Cotton Seeds c.v. Giza 85 (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were exposed to gamma irradiation doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy to improve some chemical characteristics of cotton seed oil i.e. saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, gossypol and βsitosterol that were bound oil. The presented study showed that, the saturated fatty acids; lauric, palmitic and stearic increased when the cotton seeds were exposed to gamma irradiation doses of 0.5 up to 1.5 kGy, On the other hand, arachidic acid content decreased in all the irradiated treatments compared with untreated cotton seed. The unsaturated fatty acid oleic was increased in irradiated cotton seed samples compared with untreated one, while linoleic, the major unsaturated fatty acid decreased in irradiated cotton seed oil than untreated seeds. Gossypol and βsitosterol, bound oil, in irradiated cotton seeds increased gradually with gamma irradiated doses compared with untreated control samples

  1. ATP-dependent modification of gamma irradiation effects on red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galutzov, B.; Ivanov, S.; Ratcheva-Kantcheva, M.

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro gamma irradiation effects on human red blood cell membrane properties were investigated. Osmotic fragility, rate of hemolysis, electrophoretic mobility and cell size distribution were monitored during nutrient-free in vitro storage and postirradiation incubation at the 1st, 5th and 25th hour. Experimental results confirm a time-dependent radiation-induced cell membrane damage. The increase of osmotic fragility, rate of hemolysis and cell size and the decrease in electrophoretic mobility are discussed as compared to membrane destabilization during in vitro ageing. Exogeneous ATP treatment of erythrocytes before and after irradiation results in some dose-dependent membrane protection. (author)

  2. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational radiotherapy and stereotaxic irradiation: The heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendorpe, B; Servagi Vernat, S; Ramiandrisoa, F; Bazire, L; Kirova, Y M

    2017-10-01

    Radiation therapy of breast cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer and others thoracic irradiations induce an ionizing radiation dose to the heart. Irradiation of the heart, associated with patient cardiovascular risk and cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity, increase cardiovascular mortality. The long survival after breast or Hodgkin lymphoma irradiation requires watching carefully late treatment toxicity. The over-risk of cardiac events is related to the dose received by the heart and the irradiated cardiac volume. The limitation of cardiac irradiation should be a priority in the planning of thoracic irradiations. Practices have to be modified, using modern techniques to approach of the primary objective of radiotherapy which is to optimize the dose to the target volume, sparing healthy tissues, in this case the heart. We have reviewed the literature on cardiac toxicity induced by conformational tridimensional radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy, in order to evaluate the possibilities to limit cardiotoxicity. Finally, we summarise the recommendations on dose constraints to the heart and coronary arteries. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of gamma irradiation dose rate on microbiological and physical quality of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, M.; Lacroix, M.; Charbonneau, R.; Laberge, I.; Gagnon, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation (2 kGy) and dose rate of irradiation (4.5 and 32.0 kGy/h) on increasing the shelf-life and some quality properties of the mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) were investigated during storage at 15 deg C and 90% R.H. The retardation of mushroom growth and ageing by reduction of gamma irradiation dose rate (4.5 kGy) was observed by measurements of the cap opening, the stipe increase, the cap diameter, the weight loss and the color of the caps. The color was measured in order to evaluate the lightness with the L value measurement and the color changes were measured in terms of lightness, hue and chroma. The control of fungal and bacterial diseases were also evaluated. The irradiation of mushrooms at both dose rates of irradiation was found to be effective in lowering microorganism counts initially and throughout storage and increased the shelf-life by four days. This study also showed that mushrooms exposed to a lower dose rate (4.5 kGy/h) of irradiation preserve the whiteness and reduce the stripe increase of mushrooms during storage

  4. Time-dose relationship of erythema in high energy photon irradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi (Gifu Prefectural Tajimi Hospital (Japan)); Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1992-01-01

    Skin doses of 100 patients who were treated with high energy ionizing irradiation during conventional irradiation therapy were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). In 87 of the 100 patients, acute hyperemic change of the skin (erythema) of the irradiated region was observed. In the other 13 patients, alopetia of the scalp was observed. The following conclusions were reached. The time-dose relationship was linear when erythema tolerance was used as an index, but not when alopecia was used. The tolerance dose for erythema was lower than previously reported. The slope of the isoeffect curve on the log-log plot of total absorbed skin dose against total number of days after the first irradiation was 0.68 when erythema was used as an index. This number is larger than previously reported results. We considered that erythema is significantly influenced by fraction size and that hyperfractionation is a promising method of irradiation, especially in Japan. Combined use of chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-FU, accelerated erythema. The slope of combined treatment was 0.86. Observing acute hyperemic change of skin is considered to be a useful method of investigating the combined effects of chemotherapeutic agents on irradiation. (author).

  5. Chemical inhibition of cell recovery after irradiation with sparsely and densely ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evastratova, Ekaterina S.; Petin, Vladislav [A. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Centre-branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Youg Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The dependence of cell survival on exposure dose and the duration of the liquid holding recovery (LHR) was obtained for diploid yeast cells irradiated with ionizing radiation of different linear energy transfer (LET) and recovering from radiation damage without and with various concentrations of cisplatin - the most widely used anticancer drug. The ability of yeast cells to recover from radiation damage was less effective after cell exposure to high-LET radiation, when cells were irradiated without drug. The increase in cisplatin concentration resulted in the disappearance of this difference whereas the fraction of irreversible damage was permanently enlarged independently of radiation quality. The probability of cell recovery was shown to be constant for various conditions of irradiation and recovery. A new mechanism of cisplatin action was suggested according with which the inhibition of cell recovery after exposure to ionizing radiations was completely explained by the production of irreversible damage.

  6. Prediction of response to continuous irradiation at low dose rate for repeated administrations in radiotherapy with beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Carlos; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Quesada, Waldo

    2009-01-01

    The absorbed dose to tumors after systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals is not sufficient to achieve acceptable levels of probability of tumor control without compromising on critical tissue toxicity (kidney and / or bone marrow (BM)). There are reports of trials with multiple administrations, about tolerance level inter-administration intervals to allow recovery of the BM, with good results. The biokinetic behavior of some rad