WorldWideScience

Sample records for dose group shows

  1. Dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study of the extent of radiation dose received by special work groups in the nuclear power industry. Work groups which chronically get large doses were investigated, using information provided by the industry. The tasks that give high doses to these work groups were examined and techniques described that were found to be particularly successful in reducing dose. Quantitative information on the extent of radiation doses to various work groups shows that significant numbers of workers in several critical groups receive doses greater than 1 and even 2 rem per year, particularly contract personnel and workers at BWR-type plants. The number of radiation workers whose lifetime dose is greater than their age is much less. Although the techniques presented would go some way in reducing dose, it is likely that a sizeable reduction to the high-dose work groups may require development of new dose-reduction techniques as well as major changes in procedures. 10 refs., 26 tabs

  2. Ovalbumin with Glycated Carboxyl Groups Shows Membrane-Damaging Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chia Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate whether glycated ovalbumin (OVA showed novel activity at the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated OVA (Man-OVA was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-dextro (d-mannopyranoside. An increase in the number of modified carboxyl groups increased the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA on cell membrane-mimicking vesicles, whereas OVA did not induce membrane permeability in the tested phospholipid vesicles. The glycation of carboxyl groups caused a notable change in the gross conformation of OVA. Moreover, owing to their spatial positions, the Trp residues in Man-OVA were more exposed, unlike those in OVA. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that the Trp residues in Man-OVA were located on the interface binds with the lipid vesicles, and their microenvironment was abundant in positively charged residues. Although OVA and Man-OVA showed a similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-interacting feature of Man-OVA was distinct from that of OVA. Chemical modification studies revealed that Lys and Arg residues, but not Trp residues, played a crucial role in the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA. Taken together, our data suggest that glycation of carboxyl groups causes changes in the structural properties and membrane-interacting features of OVA, generating OVA with membrane-perturbing activities at the lipid-water interface.

  3. Wild chimpanzees show group differences in selection of agricultural crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Matthew R; Hockings, Kimberley J

    2014-08-05

    The ability of wild animals to respond flexibly to anthropogenic environmental changes, including agriculture, is critical to survival in human-impacted habitats. Understanding use of human foods by wildlife can shed light on the acquisition of novel feeding habits and how animals respond to human-driven land-use changes. Little attention has focused on within-species variation in use of human foods or its causes. We examined crop-feeding in two groups of wild chimpanzees - a specialist frugivore - with differing histories of exposure to agriculture. Both groups exploited a variety of crops, with more accessible crops consumed most frequently. However, crop selection by chimpanzees with long-term exposure to agriculture was more omnivorous (i.e., less fruit-biased) compared to those with more recent exposure, which ignored most non-fruit crops. Our results suggest chimpanzees show increased foraging adaptations to cultivated landscapes over time; however, local feeding traditions may also contribute to group differences in crop-feeding in this species. Understanding the dynamic responses of wildlife to agriculture can help predict current and future adaptability of species to fast-changing anthropogenic landscapes.

  4. OGJ group earnings show big gain for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.J.; Sanders, V.

    1994-01-01

    Earnings for Oil and Gas Journal's group of 22 large US oil companies advanced sharply last year, increasing 70.9% from 1992. Group profits totaled $16.1 billion, with the gain stemming largely from lack of one time charges that depressed earnings in 1992. Adoption of new accounting rules associated with future postretirement costs caused the 1992 charges. US exploration and production earnings were mixed, tied in part to oil and gas production volumes. Higher gas prices and production helped boost earnings for a number of companies. But the earnings improvement from gas was offset by reduced oil production and prices. Results from non-U.S. E and P also were mixed. Average worldwide crude oil export prices were down from year earlier levels. However, for some companies this was offset by higher production levels and lower exploration costs. Earnings from refining and marketing were improved from 1992 levels, particularly for non-US operations. Lower feedstock costs, especially in the fourth quarter, helped boost earnings in this sector. Refining earnings gains also flowed from lower costs due to restructuring and an accompanying improvement in operating efficiency. The paper discusses world trends, operations and prices, US exploration and production, non-US E and P, US and non-US refining and marketing, petrochemicals, and the forecast for future demand

  5. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Heightened levels of glucocorticoids in children and adolescents have previously been linked to prolonged changes in the diurnal regulation of the stress-hormone cortisol, a glucocorticoid regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis). To address this question, we examined...... the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) and daily cortisol output in 36 children and adolescents (25 girls/11 boys) aged 7-16 years previously treated with glucocorticoids for nephrotic syndrome or rheumatic disorder and 36 healthy controls. Patients and controls did not significantly differ in the CAR...... patients showed a positive linear relationship with the mean daily glucocorticoid doses administered during treatment. The observed dose-response associations suggest that glucocorticoid therapy during childhood and adolescence might trigger long-term changes in HPA-axis regulation, which may differ...

  6. Aeromonas hydrophila OmpW PLGA Nanoparticle Oral Vaccine Shows a Dose-Dependent Protective Immunity in Rohu (Labeo rohita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Dubey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes high mortality in different fish species and at different growth stages. Although vaccination has significantly contributed to the decline of disease outbreaks in aquaculture, the use of oral vaccines has lagged behind the injectable vaccines due to lack of proven efficacy, that being from primary immunization or by use of boost protocols. In this study, the outer membrane protein W (OmpW of A. hydrophila was cloned, purified, and encapsulated in poly d,l-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs for oral vaccination of rohu (Labeo rohita Hamilton. The physical properties of PLGA NPs encapsulating the recombinant OmpW (rOmpW was characterized as having a diameter of 370–375 nm, encapsulation efficiency of 53% and −19.3 mV zeta potential. In vitro release of rOmpW was estimated at 34% within 48 h of incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. To evaluate the efficacy of the NP-rOmpW oral vaccine, two antigen doses were orally administered in rohu with a high antigen (HiAg dose that had twice the amount of antigens compared to the low antigen (LoAg dose. Antibody levels obtained after vaccination showed an antigen dose dependency in which fish from the HiAg group had higher antibody levels than those from the LoAg group. The antibody levels corresponded with post challenge survival proportions (PCSPs and relative percent survival (RPS in which the HiAg group had a higher PCSP and RPS than the LoAg group. Likewise, the ability to inhibit A. hydrophila growth on trypticase soy agar (TSA by sera obtained from the HiAg group was higher than that from the LoAg group. Overall, data presented here shows that OmpW orally administered using PLGA NPs is protective against A. hydrophila infection with the level of protective immunity induced by oral vaccination being antigen dose-dependent. Future studies should seek to optimize the antigen dose and duration of oral immunization in rohu

  7. Diethylene glycol-induced toxicities show marked threshold dose response in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Greg M., E-mail: Landry.Greg@mayo.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Dunning, Cody L., E-mail: cdunni@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Abreo, Fleurette, E-mail: fabreo@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pathology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Latimer, Brian, E-mail: blatim@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Orchard, Elysse, E-mail: eorcha@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Division of Animal Resources, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); McMartin, Kenneth E., E-mail: kmcmar@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) exposure poses risks to human health because of widespread industrial use and accidental exposures from contaminated products. To enhance the understanding of the mechanistic role of metabolites in DEG toxicity, this study used a dose response paradigm to determine a rat model that would best mimic DEG exposure in humans. Wistar and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats were treated by oral gavage with 0, 2, 5, or 10 g/kg DEG and blood, kidney and liver tissues were collected at 48 h. Both rat strains treated with 10 g/kg DEG had equivalent degrees of metabolic acidosis, renal toxicity (increased BUN and creatinine and cortical necrosis) and liver toxicity (increased serum enzyme levels, centrilobular necrosis and severe glycogen depletion). There was no liver or kidney toxicity at the lower DEG doses (2 and 5 g/kg) regardless of strain, demonstrating a steep threshold dose response. Kidney diglycolic acid (DGA), the presumed nephrotoxic metabolite of DEG, was markedly elevated in both rat strains administered 10 g/kg DEG, but no DGA was present at 2 or 5 g/kg, asserting its necessary role in DEG-induced toxicity. These results indicate that mechanistically in order to produce toxicity, metabolism to and significant target organ accumulation of DGA are required and that both strains would be useful for DEG risk assessments. - Highlights: • DEG produces a steep threshold dose response for kidney injury in rats. • Wistar and F-344 rats do not differ in response to DEG-induced renal injury. • The dose response for renal injury closely mirrors that for renal DGA accumulation. • Results demonstrate the importance of DGA accumulation in producing kidney injury.

  8. Estimation of individual doses from external exposures and dose-group classification of cohort members in high background radiation area in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling; Shen Hong; Sun Quanfu; Wei Luxin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: In order to estimate annual effective doses from external exposures in the high background radiation area (HBRA) and in the control area (CA) , the authors measured absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial gamma radiation with different dosimeters. A dose group classification was an important step for analyzing the dose effects relationship among the cohort members in the investigated areas. The authors used the hamlet specific average annual effective doses of all the 526 hamlets in the investigated areas. A classification of four dose groups was made for the cohort members (high, moderate, low and control) . Methods: For the purpose of studying the dose effect relationships among the cohort members in HBRA and CA, it would be ideal that each subject has his own record of individual accumulated doses received before the evaluation. However, rt is difficult to realize it in practice (each of 106517 persons should wear TLD for a long time) . Thus the authors planned two sets of measurements. Firstly, to measure the environmental dose rates (outdoor, indoor, over the bed) in every hamlet of the investigated area (526 hamlets) , considering the occupancy factors for males and females of different age groups to convert to the annual effective dose from the data of dose rates. Secondly, to measure the individual cumulative dose with TLD for part of the subjects in the investigated areas. Results: Based on the two sets of measurements, the estimates of average annual effective doses in HBRA were 211.86 and 206.75 x 10 -5 Sv/a, respectively, 68.60 and 67.11 x 10 -5 Sv/a, respectively(gamma radiation only) . The intercomparison between these two sets of measurement showed that they were in good correlation. Thus the authors are able to yield the equations of linear regression: Y = 0.9937 + 6.0444, r = 0.9949. Conclusions: The authors took the value obtained from direct measurement as 'standard' , and 15 % for uncertainty of measurement. Since the estimates of

  9. Influence of Distribution of Animals between Dose Groups on Estimated Benchmark Dose and Animal Welfare for Continuous Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringblom, Joakim; Kalantari, Fereshteh; Johanson, Gunnar; Öberg, Mattias

    2017-10-30

    The benchmark dose (BMD) approach is increasingly used as a preferred approach for dose-effect analysis, but standard experimental designs are generally not optimized for BMD analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the use of unequally sized dose groups affects the quality of BMD estimates in toxicity testing, with special consideration of the total burden of animal distress. We generated continuous dose-effect data by Monte Carlo simulation using two dose-effect curves based on endpoints with different shape parameters. Eighty-five designs, each with four dose groups of unequal size, were examined in scenarios ranging from low- to high-dose placements and with a total number of animals set to 40, 80, or 200. For each simulation, a BMD value was estimated and compared with the "true" BMD. In general, redistribution of animals from higher to lower dose groups resulted in an improved precision of the calculated BMD value as long as dose placements were high enough to detect a significant trend in the dose-effect data with sufficient power. The improved BMD precision and the associated reduction of the number of animals exposed to the highest dose, where chemically induced distress is most likely to occur, are favorable for the reduction and refinement principles. The result thereby strengthen BMD-aligned design of experiments as a means for more accurate hazard characterization along with animal welfare improvements. © 2017 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. A UV-Induced Genetic Network Links the RSC Complex to Nucleotide Excision Repair and Shows Dose-Dependent Rewiring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohith Srivas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage requires the precise coordination of nucleotide excision repair (NER with numerous other biological processes. To map this crosstalk, we generated a differential genetic interaction map centered on quantitative growth measurements of >45,000 double mutants before and after different doses of UV radiation. Integration of genetic data with physical interaction networks identified a global map of 89 UV-induced functional interactions among 62 protein complexes, including a number of links between the RSC complex and several NER factors. We show that RSC is recruited to both silenced and transcribed loci following UV damage where it facilitates efficient repair by promoting nucleosome remodeling. Finally, a comparison of the response to high versus low levels of UV shows that the degree of genetic rewiring correlates with dose of UV and reveals a network of dose-specific interactions. This study makes available a large resource of UV-induced interactions, and it illustrates a methodology for identifying dose-dependent interactions based on quantitative shifts in genetic networks.

  11. A chloroplast DNA phylogeny of lilacs (Syringa, Oleaceae): plastome groups show a strong correlation with crossing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K J; Jansen, R K

    1998-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genomic compatibility were compared for 60 accessions of Syringa using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers. A total of 669 cpDNA variants, 653 of which were potentially phylogenetically informative, was detected using 22 restriction enzymes. Phylogenetic analyses reveal four strongly supported plastome groups that correspond to four genetically incompatible crossing groups. Relationships of the four plastome groups (I(II(III,IV))) correlate well with the infrageneric classification except for ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae. Group I, which includes subg. Ligustrina, forms a basal lineage within Syringa. Group II includes ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae and the two series have high compatibility and low sequence divergence. Group III consists of three well-defined species groups of ser. Pubescentes. Group IV comprises all members of ser. Villosae and has the lowest interspecific cpDNA sequence divergences. Comparison of cpDNA sequence divergence with crossability data indicates that hybrids have not been successfully generated between species with divergence greater than 0.7%. Hybrid barriers are strong among the four major plastome groups, which have sequence divergence estimates ranging from 1.096 to 1.962%. In contrast, fully fertile hybrids occur between species pairs with sequence divergence below 0.4%. Three regions of the plastome have length variants of greater than 100 bp, and these indels identify 12 different plastome types that correlate with phylogenetic trees produced from cpDNA restriction site data. Biparentally inherited nuclear rDNA and maternally inherited cpDNA length variants enable the identification of the specific parentage of several lilac hybrids.

  12. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  13. Benefit of high-dose daunorubicin in AML induction extends across cytogenetic and molecular groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Marlise R; Lee, Ju-Whei; Fernandez, Hugo F; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Bennett, John M; Ketterling, Rhett P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Levine, Ross L; Litzow, Mark R; Paietta, Elisabeth M; Patel, Jay P; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Sun, Zhuoxin; Luger, Selina M

    2016-03-24

    The initial report of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group trial E1900 (#NCT00049517) showed that induction therapy with high-dose (HD) daunorubicin (90 mg/m(2)) improved overall survival in adults cytogenetics or aFLT3-ITD mutation. Here, we update the results of E1900 after longer follow-up (median, 80.1 months among survivors), focusing on the benefit of HD daunorubicin on common genetic subgroups. Compared with standard-dose daunorubicin (45 mg/m(2)), HD daunorubicin is associated with a hazard ratio (HR) for death of 0.74 (P= .001). Younger patients (cytogenetics (HR, 0.51;P= .03 and HR, 0.68;P= .01, respectively). Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics were shown to benefit from HD daunorubicin on multivariable analysis (adjusted HR, 0.66;P= .04). Patients with FLT3-ITD (24%),DNMT3A(24%), and NPM1(26%) mutant AML all benefited from HD daunorubicin (HR, 0.61,P= .009; HR, 0.62,P= .02; and HR, 0.50,P= .002; respectively). HD benefit was seen in the subgroup of older patients (50-60 years) with the FLT3-ITD or NPM1 mutation. Additionally, the presence of an NPM1 mutation confers a favorable prognosis only for patients receiving anthracycline dose intensification during induction. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Dose constraint implementation in AREVA group: an optimization tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    AREVA offers customers reliable technology solutions for CO 2 free power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group counts 68000 employees worldwide and for its nuclear activities there are about 33.000 people who work under ionizing radiation. Risk management and prevention is one of the ten engagements of the sustainable development policy of AREVA, to establish and maintain the highest level of nuclear and occupational safety in all of the group's operations to preserve public and worker health, and to protect the environment. The implementation of these engagements is founded on a voluntary continuous improvement program, AREVA Way: objectives, common for the all entities, are laid down in the policies documents. Indicators are defined and a common reporting method for each indicator and the result of performance self-assessment is set up. AREVA chose to federate the whole of the nuclear entities around a common policy, the Nuclear Safety Charter, implemented at the beginning of 2005. This charter sets up principles of organization, action and engagements of transparency. Regarding radiation protection, the Charter reaffirms the engagement to limit in the installations of the group, at a level as low as reasonably possible, the exposure of the workers, through the implementation of the ALARA principle and the implementation of a continuous improvement policy. This approach, basically different from the simple respect of imposed limits, radically modifies the dynamics of progress. In the activities of engineering, the optimization of protection against radiation is also integrated in the design, by taking account the experience feedback of the operational activities. This determination of constraints is taken on all levels of the organization. Thus sustainable development performance indicators and especially those relating to protection against radiation are discussed between the managers in charge of Units Business and the Top managers

  15. Group and Individual Variability in Mouse Pup Isolation Calls Recorded on the Same Day Show Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terra D. Barnes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mice produce ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs in a variety of social situations, and USVs have been leveraged to study many neurological diseases including verbal dyspraxia, depression, autism and stuttering. Pups produce isolation calls, a common USV, spontaneously when they are isolated from their mother during the first 2 weeks of life. Several genetic manipulations affect (and often reduce pup isolation calls in mice. To facilitate the use of this assay as a means of testing whether significant functional differences in genotypes exist instead of contextual differences, we test the variability inherent in many commons measures of mouse vocalizations. Here we use biological consistency as a way of determining which are reproducible in mouse pup vocalizations. We present a comprehensive analysis of the normal variability of these vocalizations in groups of mice, individual mice and different strains of mice. To control for maturation effects, we recorded pup isolation calls in the same group of C57BL/6J 5 days old mice twice, with 1 h of rest in between recordings. In almost all cases, the group averages between the first and second recordings were the same. We also found that there were high correlations in some parameters in individual mice across recording while others were not well correlated. These findings could be replicated for the majority of features in a separate group of C57BL/6J mice and a group of 129/SvEvBrd-C57BL/6J mice. The averages of these mouse USV features are highly consistent and represent a robust assay to test the effects of genetic and other interventions in the experimental setting.

  16. Profits for OGJ group show big gain in 1993; revenues dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.J.; Sanders, V.

    1994-01-01

    Earnings for Oil ampersand Gas Journal's group of 22 large US oil companies jumped sharply last year, increasing 78.6% from 1992. Profits totaled $16.2 billion in 1993, compared with $9.1 billion in 1992. This is in sharp contrast to performance in 1992, when group net income fell 47%. That was due mainly to costs related to restructuring, staff reductions, and adoption of new accounting rules. The new rules moved forward some charges stemming from future retirement benefits and caused a substantial slide in 1992 profits for a number of companies. The absence of similar charges last year was a major reason for the increase in earnings. The paper describes the earnings by sector, oil and gas prices, financial indicators, exploration and production activities, refining and marketing activities, earnings from petrochemicals, capital spending, and the outlook for 1994 performance

  17. SU-E-T-273: Do Task Group External Beam QA Recommendations Guarantee Accurate Treatment Plan Dose Delivery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, A; Liao, Y; Redler, G; Zhen, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: AAPM task groups 40/142 have provided an invaluable set of goals for physicists designing QA programs, attempting to standardize what would otherwise likely be a highly variable phenomenon across institutions. However, with the complexity of modalities such as VMAT, we hypothesize that following these guidelines to the letter might still allow unacceptable dose discrepancies. To explore this hypothesis we simulated machines bordering on QA acceptability, and calculated the effect on patient plans. Methods: Two errant machines were simulated in Aria/Eclipse, each just within task group criteria for output, percent depth dose, beam profile, gantry and collimator rotations, and jaw and MLC positions. One machine minimized dose to the PTV (machine A) and the other maximized dose to the OARs (machine B). Clinical treatment plans (3-phase prostate, n=3; hypofractionated lung, n=1) were calculated on these machines and the dose distributions compared. A prostate case was examined for contribution of error sources and evaluated using delivery QA data. Results: The prostate plans showed mean decreases in target D95 of 9.9% of prescription dose on machine A. On machine B, The rectal and bladder V70Gy each increased by 7.1 percentage points, while their V45Gy increased by 16.2% and 15.0% respectively. In the lung plan, the target D95 decreased by 12.8% and the bronchial tree Dmax increased by 21% of prescription dose, on machines A and B. One prostate plan showed target dose errors of 3.8% from MLC changes, 2% from output, ∼3% from energy and ∼0.5% from other factors. This plan achieved an 88.4% gamma passing rate using 3%/3mm using ArcCHECK. Conclusion: In the unlikely event that a machine exhibits all maximum errors allowed by TG 40/142, unacceptably large changes in dose delivered are possible especially in highly modulated VMAT plans, despite the machine passing routine QA

  18. A survey of doses to worker groups in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has suggested ''...as guidance for radiation programs that cumulative exposure not exceed the age of the individual in years x 10 mSv (years x 1 rem).'' The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended a dose limit of 10 rem averaged over 5 years. With these developments in mind, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested the ALARA Center of the Brookhaven National Laboratory to undertake two parallel studies. One study, which is still ongoing, is to examine the impact of the newly recommended dose limits on the nuclear industry as a whole; the other study was intended to assist in this larger project by looking more closely at the nuclear power industry. Preliminary data had indicated that the critical industry as far as the impact of new regulatory limits were concerned would be the nuclear power industry, because, it was conjectured, there existed a core of highly skilled workers in some groups which routinely get higher than average exposures. The objectives of the second study were to get a better understanding of the situation vis grave a vis the nuclear power industry, by identifying the high-dose worker groups, quantifying the annual and lifetime doses to these groups to see the extent of the problem if there was one, and finally to determine if there were any dose-reduction techniques which were particularly suited to reducing doses to these groups. In this presentation we describe some of the things learned during our work on the two projects. For more detailed information on the project on dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in the nuclear power industry, see NUREG/CR-5139. An industry/advisory committee has been set up which is in the process of evaluating the data from the larger project on the impact of new dose limits and will shortly produce its report. 7 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, J.; Rehani, M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resource countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group. (authors)

  20. Report of task group on the biological basis for dose limitation in the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    Researchers have drawn attention to what they consider inconsistencies in the manner in which ICRP have considered skin in relation to the effective dose equivalent. They urge that the dose to the skin should be considered routinely for inclusion in the effective dose equivalent in the context of protection of individuals and population groups. They note that even with a weighting factor of only 0.01 that the dose to the skin can be a significant contributor to the effective dose equivalent including skin for practical exposure conditions. In the case of many exposures the risk to the skin can be ignored but exposure in an uniformly contaminated cloud that might occur with 85 Kr the dose to the skin could contribute 60% of the stochastic risk if included in the effective dose equivalent with a W T of 0.01. Through the years and even today the same questions about radiation effects in the skin and dosimetry keep being asked. This report collates the available data and current understanding of radiation effects on the skin, and may make it possible to estimate risks more accurately and to improve the approach to characterizing skin irradiations. 294 refs., 29 figs

  1. NMR-based metabolomics and breath studies show lipid and protein catabolism during low dose chronic T(1)AM treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, J A; Reiland, H; Butz, D E; Tonelli, M; Porter, W P; Zucchi, R; Scanlan, T S; Chiellini, G; Assadi-Porter, F M

    2013-12-01

    3-Iodothyronamine (T1 AM), an analog of thyroid hormone, is a recently discovered fast-acting endogenous metabolite. Single high-dose treatments of T1 AM have produced rapid short-term effects, including a reduction of body temperature, bradycardia, and hyperglycemia in mice. The effect of daily low doses of T1 AM (10 mg/kg) for 8 days on weight loss and metabolism in spontaneously overweight mice was monitored. The experiments were repeated twice (n = 4). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of plasma and real-time analysis of exhaled (13) CO2 in breath by cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) were used to detect T1 AM-induced lipolysis. CRDS detected increased lipolysis in breath shortly after T1 AM administration that was associated with a significant weight loss but independent of food consumption. NMR spectroscopy revealed alterations in key metabolites in serum: valine, glycine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate, suggesting that the subchronic effects of T1 AM include both lipolysis and protein breakdown. After discontinuation of T1 AM treatment, mice regained only 1.8% of the lost weight in the following 2 weeks, indicating lasting effects of T1 AM on weight maintenance. CRDS in combination with NMR and (13) C-metabolic tracing constitute a powerful method of investigation in obesity studies for identifying in vivo biochemical pathway shifts and unanticipated debilitating side effects. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  2. Beta doses in tooth enamel by ''one-group'' theory and the ROSY ESR dating software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, B.J.; Rink, W.J.; McGuirl, E.L.; Schwarcz, H.P.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1997-01-01

    A new method of calculating beta doses for one-dimensional geometries, based on ''one-group'' theory, is presented. In typical situations it is found that this approach leads to average beta doses which are significantly lower (by up to 50%) than those from Gruin's DATA software. For various natural sources, our beta dose rate estimates are slightly greater than expected from calculations based on Monte Carlo data, while the DATA results agree well with the experimental results of Aitken et al. (1985) for the uranium and thorium decay chains. Further experimental evidence is desirable to resolve this issue. We compare age estimates calculated using new ESR dating software ROSY, which incorporates this approach, with those from DATA. Examination of results for El Castillo Cave, Spain, by Rink et al. (1996) suggests that the ROSY age estimates are the more accurate. (author)

  3. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, N.L.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Mazzilli, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95 tb percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  4. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, N.L.D., E-mail: nelson.luiz@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTM/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochedo, E.R.R., E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com [Instituto de Radiprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mazzilli, B.P., E-mail: mazzilli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95{sup tb} percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  5. Dosing anticancer drugs in infants: Current approach and recommendations from the Children's Oncology Group's Chemotherapy Standardization Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Frank M; Womer, Richard B; Berg, Stacey; Winick, Naomi; Adamson, Peter C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    An analysis of dose modifications for infants in 29 Children's Oncology Group protocols across 10 cancer types revealed 11 sets of criteria defining the infant population using age, weight, body surface area (BSA), or a combination of these parameters and eight dose modification methods. A new method of dosing anticancer drugs in infants was developed based on the rationale that prior modifications were implemented to reduce toxicity, which is not cancer-specific. The new method uses BSA dose banding in dosing tables for infants and children with a BSA <0.6 m 2 and gradually transitions from body weight based to BSA-based dosing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The history of critical group doses from the consumption of freshwater fish at Trawsfynydd, North Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, D.R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Radionuclides discharged into the aquatic environment from Trawsfynydd power station are, as for all UK facilities, subject to statutory controls to ensure that the resulting public radiation exposure complies with nationally-accepted criteria. Environmental monitoring by MAFF has shown that near this facility the consumption of freshwater fish is radiologically the most important pathway with Cs-137 the dominant radionuclide. Information gathered from consumers over a twenty-five year period has been interpreted so as to derive doses to the public. Committed effective doses (CEDs) are presented using ICRP 1990 methodology and compared with the recommended dose limit of 1 mSv year -1 . Doses to the critical group are shown to have exceeded 1 mSv year -1 for two years but do not exceed this limit when averaged over a period of 5 years. Because of the changing habits of the consumers it is suggested that the average annual CED over the lifetime of any member of the public will not exceed 1 mSv year -1 during the operation of the station. (author)

  7. Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual and Average Member of Critical Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Montague

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop additional Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for the periods 10,000 years and 1,000,000 years after the repository closure. In addition, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for the average member of a critical group are calculated for those additional radionuclides postulated to reach the environment during the period after 10,000 years and up to 1,000,000 years. After the permanent closure of the repository, the engineered systems within the repository will eventually lose their abilities to contain radionuclide inventory, and the radionuclides will migrate through the geosphere and eventually enter the local water table moving toward inhabited areas. The primary release scenario is a groundwater well used for drinking water supply and irrigation, and this calculation takes these postulated releases and follows them through various pathways until they result in a dose to either a member of critical group or a reasonably maximally exposed individual. The pathways considered in this calculation include inhalation, ingestion, and direct exposure

  8. Polymorphism of CRISPR shows separated natural groupings of Shigella subtypes and evidence of horizontal transfer of CRISPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojie; Li, Peng; Su, Wenli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Guang; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Wang, Jian; Cui, Xianyan; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Jia, Leili; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) act as an adaptive RNA-mediated immune mechanism in bacteria. They can also be used for identification and evolutionary studies based on polymorphisms within the CRISPR locus. We amplified and analyzed 6 CRISPR loci from 237 Shigella strains belonging to the 4 species groups, as well as 13 Escherichia coli strains. The CRISPR-associated (cas) gene sequence arrays of these strains were screened and compared. The CRISPR sequences from Shigella were conserved among subtypes, suggesting that CRISPR may represent a new identification tool for the detection and discrimination of Shigella species. Secondary structure analysis showed a different stem-loop structure at the terminal repeat, suggesting a distinct recognition mechanism in the formation of crRNA. In addition, the presence of "self-target" spacers and polymorphisms within CRISPR in Shigella indicated a selective pressure for inhibition of this system, which has the potential to damage "self DNA." Homology analysis of spacers showed that CRISPR might be involved in the regulation of virulence transmission. Phylogenetic analysis based on CRISPR sequences from Shigella and E. coli indicated that although phenotypic properties maintain convergent evolution, the 4 Shigella species do not represent natural groupings. Surprisingly, comparative analysis of Shigella repeats with other species provided new evidence for CRISPR horizontal transfer. Our results suggested that CRISPR analysis is applicable for the detection of Shigella species and for investigation of evolutionary relationships.

  9. Polymorphism of CRISPR shows separated natural groupings of Shigella subtypes and evidence of horizontal transfer of CRISPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojie; Li, Peng; Su, Wenli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Guang; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Wang, Jian; Cui, Xianyan; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Jia, Leili; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) act as an adaptive RNA-mediated immune mechanism in bacteria. They can also be used for identification and evolutionary studies based on polymorphisms within the CRISPR locus. We amplified and analyzed 6 CRISPR loci from 237 Shigella strains belonging to the 4 species groups, as well as 13 Escherichia coli strains. The CRISPR-associated (cas) gene sequence arrays of these strains were screened and compared. The CRISPR sequences from Shigella were conserved among subtypes, suggesting that CRISPR may represent a new identification tool for the detection and discrimination of Shigella species. Secondary structure analysis showed a different stem-loop structure at the terminal repeat, suggesting a distinct recognition mechanism in the formation of crRNA. In addition, the presence of “self-target” spacers and polymorphisms within CRISPR in Shigella indicated a selective pressure for inhibition of this system, which has the potential to damage “self DNA.” Homology analysis of spacers showed that CRISPR might be involved in the regulation of virulence transmission. Phylogenetic analysis based on CRISPR sequences from Shigella and E. coli indicated that although phenotypic properties maintain convergent evolution, the 4 Shigella species do not represent natural groupings. Surprisingly, comparative analysis of Shigella repeats with other species provided new evidence for CRISPR horizontal transfer. Our results suggested that CRISPR analysis is applicable for the detection of Shigella species and for investigation of evolutionary relationships. PMID:26327282

  10. Thyroid-specific questions on work ability showed known-groups validity among Danes with thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexo, Mette Andersen; Watt, Torquil; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to identify the best approach to work ability assessment in patients with thyroid disease by evaluating the factor structure, measurement equivalence, known-groups validity, and predictive validity of a broad set of work ability items. Based on the literature and interviews with thyroid patients, 24 work ability items were selected from previous questionnaires, revised, or developed anew. Items were tested among 632 patients with thyroid disease (non-toxic goiter, toxic nodular goiter, Graves' disease (with or without orbitopathy), autoimmune hypothyroidism, and other thyroid diseases), 391 of which had participated in a study 5 years previously. Responses to select items were compared to general population data. We used confirmatory factor analyses for categorical data, logistic regression analyses and tests of differential item function, and head-to-head comparisons of relative validity in distinguishing known groups. Although all work ability items loaded on a common factor, the optimal factor solution included five factors: role physical, role emotional, thyroid-specific limitations, work limitations (without disease attribution), and work performance. The scale on thyroid-specific limitations showed the most power in distinguishing clinical groups and time since diagnosis. A global single item proved useful for comparisons with the general population, and a thyroid-specific item predicted labor market exclusion within the next 5 years (OR 5.0, 95 % CI 2.7-9.1). Items on work limitations with attribution to thyroid disease were most effective in detecting impact on work ability and showed good predictive validity. Generic work ability items remain useful for general population comparisons.

  11. Following Musical Shows: A Study with Focal Groups on Satisfaction of Musical Concerts Regular Visitors and Socialization between Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúmia Massa Garcia Pires

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed to identify which attributes impact more significantly on the satisfaction of concerts’ regular visitors and socialization between them when inserted in these kinds of events. Thus, we used a qualitative methodology, performing focus groups. Among the main results of this study, we found, regarding satisfaction of concerts’ visitors, the attributes that most influence the public are related to services - especially for beverage supply, cleaning of bathrooms and lines formed inside the event - organization, show infrastructure and performance artists. Furthermore, considering the socialization of the visitors, we found that most respondents often go to concerts together with other people, but some did not exclude the possibility to attend the concerts alone when it comes to a familiar artist.

  12. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 μg/kg). At higher doses (50-500 μg/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ERα or ERβ, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ERα in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ERβ in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research highlights: → The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. → The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. → The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to the estimated

  13. The system for automatic dose rate measurements by mobile groups in field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Filgas, R.; Cespirova, I.; Ejemova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of characteristics between a pressurized ionization chamber, plastic scintillator and proportional counter is given. Based on requirements and comparison of properties of various probes, the system for automatic dose rate measurement and integration of geographic co-ordinates in field was designed and tested.The system consists of proportional counter. This is so-called intelligent probe can be easily connected to a personal computer. The probe measures in the energy range 30 keV - 1.3 MeV with reasonable energy and angular response, it can measure the dose rate in the range 50 nSv/h - 1 Sv/h with the typical efficiency 9.5 imp/s/μSv/h. The probe is fixed in the holder placed on the front mask of a car. For the simultaneous determination of geographical co-ordinates the personal GPS navigator Garmin 95 is used. Both devices are controlled by a notebook via two serial ports. The second serial port that is not quite common in notebook can be easily realised by a PCMCIA card. The notebook is used in the field by a mobile group can be transmitted to the assessment centre by the cellular GSM phone. The system Nokia 2110 connected to notebook by PCMCIA card is used. The whole system is powered up from the car battery. The system is controlled by specially developed software. The software was developed in the FoxPro 2.5 environment and works under MS-DOS 6.22. It has no problems to work in Windows 95 DOS window. The results of dose rate measurements obtained during route monitoring are stored in files. They can be displayed on a graphic screen, presenting the geographical distribution of the dose rate values colour coded on a map and the time sequence of the measured data. (authors)

  14. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penza, M; Jeremic, M; Marrazzo, E; Maggi, A; Ciana, P; Rando, G; Grigolato, P G; Di Lorenzo, D

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5μg/kg). At higher doses (50-500μg/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ERα or ERβ, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ERα in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ERβ in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  16. Antimalarial iron chelator, FBS0701, shows asexual and gametocyte Plasmodium falciparum activity and single oral dose cure in a murine malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ferrer

    Full Text Available Iron chelators for the treatment of malaria have proven therapeutic activity in vitro and in vivo in both humans and mice, but their clinical use is limited by the unsuitable absorption and pharmacokinetic properties of the few available iron chelators. FBS0701, (S3"-(HO-desazadesferrithiocin-polyether [DADFT-PE], is an oral iron chelator currently in Phase 2 human studies for the treatment of transfusional iron overload. The drug has very favorable absorption and pharmacokinetic properties allowing for once-daily use to deplete circulating free iron with human plasma concentrations in the high µM range. Here we show that FBS0701 has inhibition concentration 50% (IC(50 of 6 µM for Plasmodium falciparum in contrast to the IC(50 for deferiprone and deferoxamine at 15 and 30 µM respectively. In combination, FBS0701 interfered with artemisinin parasite inhibition and was additive with chloroquine or quinine parasite inhibition. FBS0701 killed early stage P. falciparum gametocytes. In the P. berghei Thompson suppression test, a single dose of 100 mg/kg reduced day three parasitemia and prolonged survival, but did not cure mice. Treatment with a single oral dose of 100 mg/kg one day after infection with 10 million lethal P. yoelii 17XL cured all the mice. Pretreatment of mice with a single oral dose of FBS0701 seven days or one day before resulted in the cure of some mice. Plasma exposures and other pharmacokinetics parameters in mice of the 100 mg/kg dose are similar to a 3 mg/kg dose in humans. In conclusion, FBS0701 demonstrates a single oral dose cure of the lethal P. yoelii model. Significantly, this effect persists after the chelator has cleared from plasma. FBS0701 was demonstrated to remove labile iron from erythrocytes as well as enter erythrocytes to chelate iron. FBS0701 may find clinically utility as monotherapy, a malarial prophylactic or, more likely, in combination with other antimalarials.

  17. Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency expert group on gut transfer factors: implications for dose per unit intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This note describes the gut transfer factors recommended by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency for intakes of certain important elements in food and drinking water. The evidence behind the recommendations is discussed and their implications for dose per unit intake is investigated. It is found that in many cases the dose per unit intake calculated using the gut uptake factor recommended by the Expert Group is similar to that calculated using the recommendations of ICRP Publication 30. However, in some cases there are substantial increases in dose per unit intake. The largest increases are by a factor of fifty for intakes of certain thorium isotopes by infants. (author)

  18. Dose Specification and Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 95-17; a Cooperative Group Study of Iridium-192 Breast Implants as Sole Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hanson, W.F.; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Kuske, Robert R.; Arthur, Douglas; Rabinovitch, Rachel; White, Julia; Wilenzick, Raymond M.; Harris, Irene; Tailor, Ramesh C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 95-17 was a Phase I/II trial to evaluate multicatheter brachytherapy as the sole method of adjuvant breast radiotherapy for Stage I/II breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery. Low- or high-dose-rate sources were allowed. Dose prescription and treatment evaluation were based on recommendations in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), Report 58 and included the parameters mean central dose (MCD), average peripheral dose, dose homogeneity index (DHI), and the dimensions of the low- and high-dose regions. Methods and Materials: Three levels of quality assurance were implemented: (1) credentialing of institutions was required before entering patients into the study; (2) rapid review of each treatment plan was conducted before treatment; and (3) retrospective review was performed by the Radiological Physics Center in conjunction with the study chairman and RTOG dosimetry staff. Results: Credentialing focused on the accuracy of dose calculation algorithm and compliance with protocol guidelines. Rapid review was designed to identify and correct deviations from the protocol before treatment. The retrospective review involved recalculation of dosimetry parameters and review of dose distributions to evaluate the treatment. Specifying both central and peripheral doses resulted in uniform dose distributions, with a mean dose homogeneity index of 0.83 ± 0.06. Conclusions: Vigorous quality assurance resulted in a high-quality study with few deviations; only 4 of 100 patients were judged as representing minor variations from protocol, and no patient was judged as representing major deviation. This study should be considered a model for quality assurance of future trials

  19. Image guidance doses delivered during radiotherapy: Quantification, management, and reduction: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group 180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Alaei, Parham; Curran, Bruce; Flynn, Ryan; Gossman, Michael; Mackie, T Rock; Miften, Moyed; Morin, Richard; Xu, X George; Zhu, Timothy C

    2018-02-22

    With radiotherapy having entered the era of image guidance, or image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging procedures are routinely performed for patient positioning and target localization. The imaging dose delivered may result in excessive dose to sensitive organs and potentially increase the chance of secondary cancers and, therefore, needs to be managed. This task group was charged with: a) providing an overview on imaging dose, including megavoltage electronic portal imaging (MV EPI), kilovoltage digital radiography (kV DR), Tomotherapy MV-CT, megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), and b) providing general guidelines for commissioning dose calculation methods and managing imaging dose to patients. We briefly review the dose to radiotherapy (RT) patients resulting from different image guidance procedures and list typical organ doses resulting from MV and kV image acquisition procedures. We provide recommendations for managing the imaging dose, including different methods for its calculation, and techniques for reducing it. The recommended threshold beyond which imaging dose should be considered in the treatment planning process is 5% of the therapeutic target dose. Although the imaging dose resulting from current kV acquisition procedures is generally below this threshold, the ALARA principle should always be applied in practice. Medical physicists should make radiation oncologists aware of the imaging doses delivered to patients under their care. Balancing ALARA with the requirement for effective target localization requires that imaging dose be managed based on the consideration of weighing risks and benefits to the patient. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Thyroid-specific questions on work ability showed known-groups validity among Danes with thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexo, Mette A.; Watt, Torquil; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We aimed to identify the best approach to work ability assessment in patients with thyroid disease by evaluating the factor structure, measurement equivalence, known-groups validity, and predictive validity of a broad set of work ability items. METHODS: Based on the literature...... and interviews with thyroid patients, 24 work ability items were selected from previous questionnaires, revised, or developed anew. Items were tested among 632 patients with thyroid disease (non-toxic goiter, toxic nodular goiter, Graves' disease (with or without orbitopathy), autoimmune hypothyroidism......-to-head comparisons of relative validity in distinguishing known groups. RESULTS: Although all work ability items loaded on a common factor, the optimal factor solution included five factors: role physical, role emotional, thyroid-specific limitations, work limitations (without disease attribution), and work...

  1. High-dose irradiation: wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization, in association with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency to consider the implications of food irradiated to doses higher than those recommended in 1980 by the Joint Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food. Irradiation ensures the hygienic quality of food and extends shelf-life. The public perception of the safety of food irradiation has generally precluded its widespread use. However, current applications of food irradiation to doses over 10 kGy have been in the development of high-quality shelf-stable convenience foods for specific target groups such as immunosuppressed individuals and those under medical care, astronauts and outdoor enthusiasts. The Study Group reviewed data relating to the toxicological, nutritional, radiation chemical and physical aspects of food irradiated to doses above 10 kGy from a wide range and number of studies carried out over the last forty years. This report presents a comprehensive summary, along with references, of the effectiveness and safety of the irradiation process. It concludes that foods treated with doses greater than 10 kGy can be considered safe and nutritionally adequate when produced under established Good Manufacturing Practice.

  2. High-dose irradiation: Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a joint FAO/IAEA/WHO study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization, in association with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency, to consider the implications of food irradiated to doses higher than those recommended in 1980 by the Joint Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food. Irradiation ensures the hygienic quality of food and extends shelf-life. The public perception of the safety of food irradiation has generally precluded its widespread use. However, current applications of food irradiation to doses over 10 kGy have been in the development of high-quality shelf-stable convenience foods for specific target groups such as immunosuppressed individuals and those under medical care, astronauts and outdoor enthusiasts. The Study Group reviewed data relating to the toxicological, nutritional, radiation chemical and physical aspects of food irradiated to doses above 10kGy from a wide range and number of studies carried out over the last forty years. This report presents a comprehensive summary, along with references, of the effectiveness and safety of the irradiation process. It concludes that foods treated with doses greater than 10kGy can be considered safe and nutritionally adequate when produced under established Good Manufacturing Practice

  3. The blink reflex test does not show abnormalities in a large group of patients with chronic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The blink reflex – a simple, non-invasive and inexpensive test – may be indicative of lesions or dysfunctions of the brainstem, and particularly assesses the trigeminal-facial arch. Results from alterations of the blink reflex in patients with headaches have provided controversial data. Method Registration of the waves R1 and R2 (ipsilateral to the stimulus and R2c (contralateral to the stimulus by electroneuromyography. Results A large number of controls (n=160 and patients with chronic migraine (n=160 were studied. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. Conclusion It is possible that this relatively simple and primitive reflex is not affected unless there is significant damage to the brainstem.

  4. Dose and time response of ruminally infused algae on rumen fermentation characteristics, biohydrogenation and Butyrivibrio group bacteria in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglong; Fievez, Veerle; Mao, Shengyong; He, Wenbo; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Micro-algae could inhibit the complete rumen BH of dietary 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acid (UFAs). This study aimed to examine dose and time responses of algae supplementation on rumen fermentation, biohydrogenation and Butyrivibrio group bacteria in goats. Six goats were used in a repeated 3 × 3 Latin square design, and offered a fixed diet. Algae were infused through rumen cannule with 0 (Control), 6.1 (L-Alg), or 18.3 g (H-Alg) per day. Rumen contents were sampled on d 0, 3, 7, 14 and 20. H-Alg reduced total volatile fatty acid concentration and acetate molar proportion (P Algae induced a dose-dependent decrease in 18:0 and increased trans-18:1 in the ruminal content (P Algae had no effect on the abundances of Butyrivibrio spp. and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus (P > 0.10), while H-Alg reduced the total bacteria abundance (P algae were related to the supplementation level, but there was no evidence of shift in ruminal biohydrogenation pathways towards t10-18:1. L-Alg mainly induced a transient effect on rumen biohydrogenation of 18-carbon UFAs, while H-Alg showed an acute inhibition and these effects were not associated with the known hydrogenating bacteria.

  5. Use of a booster dose of capsular group C meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine to demonstrate immunologic memory in children primed with one or two vaccine doses in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, David; Khatami, Ameneh; Attard-Montalto, Simon; Voysey, Merryn; Finn, Adam; Faust, Saul N; Heath, Paul T; Borrow, Ray; Snape, Matthew D; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-12-07

    Use of a polysaccharide vaccine challenge to demonstrate immunologic memory after priming with capsular group C meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MenCC) risks induction of immunologic hyporesponsiveness. For this reason, MenCC vaccines are now used as probes of immunologic memory, however, no studies have demonstrated their ability to distinguish primed from unprimed children. This study was part of a randomised controlled trial investigating the immunogenicity of a booster dose of the combined Haemophilus influenzae type b and MenC-tetanus toxoid vaccine (Hib-MenC-TT) in infants receiving reduced dose MenCC vaccine priming schedules (one MenC-CRM/MenC-TT or two MenC-CRM vaccine doses) compared with an unprimed group. Antibody kinetics were studied in a subset of 269 children by measuring changes in the MenC serum bactericidal antibody, using rabbit complement, (MenC rSBA) titres and MenC specific IgG memory B-cells before and at 6 and 28days following the 12month booster vaccination. At 6days after the 12monthMenCC vaccine, the rise in MenC rSBA titres and MenC specific IgG memory B-cells of the primed groups were significantly higher than the infant MenCC naïve group. Participants primed with one MenC-TT dose had the highest increase in MenC rSBA titres compared with all other groups. The MenC rSBA titres at the 28th compared with the 6th day after boosting was significantly higher in those primed with a single MenC-TT/MenC-CRM vaccine in infancy compared with those who were not primed or who were primed with two doses of the MenC-CRM vaccine. Immunologic memory can be demonstrated by a MenCC booster vaccination but is affected by the type and number of MenCC doses used for infant priming. The MenC rSBA responses can be used to demonstrate successful immunologic priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene batteries and synexpression groups applied in a multivariate statistical approach to dose-response analysis of toxicogenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfett, C; Williams, A; Zheng, J L; Zhou, G

    2013-10-01

    Univariate statistical analyses have limited strength when employed in low-dose toxicogenomic studies, due to diminished magnitudes and frequencies of gene expression responses, compounded by high data dimensionality. Analysis using co-regulated gene sets and a multivariate statistical test based upon ranks of expression were explored as means to improve statistical confidence and biological insight at low-doses. Sixteen gene regulatory groups were selected in order to investigate murine hepatic gene expression changes following low-dose oral exposure to the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (IPR). Gene sets in this focussed analysis included well-defined gene batteries and synexpression groups with co-regulated responses to toxin exposures and linkage of chronic responses to adverse outcomes. Significant changes of target gene expression within Nfkb, Stat3 and 5' terminal oligopryrimidine (5'TOP) batteries, as well as the acute phase and angiogenesis synexpression groups, were detected at IPR doses 100-fold lower than doses producing significant individual gene expression values. IPR-induced changes in these target gene groups were confirmed using a similar analysis of rat toxicogenomic data from published IPR-induced cardiotoxicity studies. Cumulative expression differences within gene sets were useful as aggregated metrics for benchmark dose calculations. The results supported the conclusion that toxicologically-relevant, co-regulated genes provide an effective means to reduce microarray dimensionality, thereby providing substantial statistical and interpretive power for quantitative analysis of low-dose, toxin-induced gene expression changes. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Multiple-Dose, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group QT/QTc Study to Evaluate the Electrophysiologic Effects of THC/CBD Spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M; Schoedel, Kerri; Bartlett, Cindy; Romach, Myroslava; Russo, Ethan B; Stott, Colin G; Wright, Stephen; White, Linda; Duncombe, Paul; Chen, Chien-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray has proved efficacious in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and chronic pain. A thorough QT/QTc study was performed to investigate the effects of THC/CBD spray on electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters in compliance with regulatory requirements, evaluating the effect of a recommended daily dose (8 sprays/day) and supratherapeutic doses (24 or 36 sprays/day) of THC/CBD spray on the QT/QTc interval in 258 healthy volunteers. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profile of THC/CBD spray were also evaluated. Therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of THC/CBD spray had no effect on cardiac repolarization with primary and secondary endpoints of QTcI and QTcF/QTcB, respectively, showing similar results. There was no indication of any effect on heart rate, atrioventricular conduction, or cardiac depolarization and no new clinically relevant morphological changes were observed. Overall, 19 subjects (25.0%) in the supratherapeutic (24/36 daily sprays of THC/CBD spray) dose group and one (1.6%) in the moxifloxacin group withdrew early due to intolerable AEs. Four psychiatric serious adverse events (AEs) in the highest dose group resulted in a reduction in the surpatherapeutic dose to 24 sprays/day. In conclusion, THC/CBD spray does not significantly affect ECG parameters. Additionally, THC/CBD spray is well tolerated at therapeutic doses with an AE profile similar to previous clinical studies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Assessment of the effective supplementary doses for people belonging to a critical group placed nearby an uranium mining zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurelian, Florian; Popescu, Mihai; Georgescu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents a case study concerning the impact on environment and population of a exploration uranium mining area. The paper is structured on three levels and presents: First stage will consist of the investigation and characterization of the sources, respectively the transfer pathways: terrestrial, aerial and aquatic ones followed by the assessment of the effective supplementary doses received by the people of population through all the transfer pathways based on some scenarios according to which their presence was permanent or temporary. Second stage concerns the assessment of the supplementary effective doses for the working staff during the caring out the closing workings. There are references concerning the monitoring 'of rehabilitation' during the time when the disaffection workings are ongoing beside the survey of the professional exposed people and the calculation of the supplementary doses for people of population and the ones belonging to the critical group during the disaffection time. Within the third stage framework there are calculated, described and discussed the individual and collective effective doses for people belonging to the population and to the critical groups, which it is expected to be recorded after the disaffection works cessation. The last part of the paper focuses on the long-term miniaturization of the environmental factors following the disaffection works conclusion and on the long-term evolution of the supplementary doses as well. (author)

  9. Flexible and precise dosing of enalapril maleate for all paediatric age groups utilizing orodispersible minitablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Yasmin; Walsh, Jennifer; Breitkreutz, Joerg

    2018-04-25

    Enalapril is an off-patent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor for which no paediatric age-appropriate formulation is commercially available in Europe, and enalapril maleate (EM) orodispersible minitablets (ODMTs) have previously been formulated within the LENA (labelling enalapril from neonates to adolescents) project. In this study, a dilution method has been developed by dispersing the lowest dose strength ODMTs to enable flexible and precise EM dosing during the dose titration phase of the therapy. Furthermore, the physicochemical stability of the ODMTs has been investigated in child-friendly beverages and the administration of ODMTs via nasogastric tubes (NGT) of different sizes and materials has been evaluated. The results for the ODMT dilution procedure reveal that dispersion within an oral syringe is preferred over dispersion in a separate container, leading to flexible and precise dosing down to 0.025 mg EM. Although ODMTs were stable in the beverages over the investigated time period, dispersion in tap water only is recommended due to prolonged disintegration times within the other beverages. Dispersed ODMTs can be administered through NGTs of CH5. Almost no adsoprtion of EM on silicone, polyurethane or polyvinyl chloride could be observed. The ODMT concept together with the investigated dispersion method enables the safe administration of EM for all paediatric subpopulations from new-borns to adolescents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the health of a group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Ledesma, F.; Crespo, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of exposure to low radiation doses, the health status of professional staff exposed to ionizing radiation is investigated. Based on archived material of medical and radiation exposure records taken over a time span of 13 years, a variety of medical parameters are explored. Findings of surveys made are given. (author)

  11. Improvement of heart function in postinfarct heart failure swine models after hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer: comparison of low-, medium- and high-dose groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-jian; Chen, Bo; Sheng, Zhang; Zhang, Ding-guo; Jia, En-zhi; Wang, Wei; Ma, Dong-chao; Zhu, Tie-bing; Wang, Lian-sheng; Li, Chun-jian; Wang, Hui; Cao, Ke-jiang; Ma, Wen-zhu

    2010-04-01

    Despite advances in surgical and reperfusion therapy, there is no effective therapy currently exists to prevent the progressive decline in cardiac function following myocardial infarction. Hepatocyte growth factor has potent angiogenic and anti-apoptotic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and dose-effect relationship on postinfarction heart failure with different doses of adenovirus-mediated human hepatocyte growth factor (Ad(5)-HGF) transference in swine models. Totally twenty swine were randomly divided into four groups: (a) control group (null- Ad(5), 1 ml); (b) low-dose group (1 x 10(9) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml); (c) medium-dose group (5 x 10(9) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml); (d) high-dose group (1 x 10(10) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml). Four weeks after left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation, different doses of Ad(5)-HGF were transferred in three therapeutic groups via right coronary artery. Four and seven weeks after LAD ligation, gate cardiac perfusion imaging was performed to evaluate cardiac perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Seven weeks after surgery, the apoptotic index of cardiocyte was observed by TUNEL, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, alpha-SMA and Factor VIII in the border zones were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, respectively. Four weeks after myocardial infarction, no significant difference was observed among four groups. Three weeks after Ad(5)-HGF transfer, the improvement of cardiac perfusion and LVEF was obviously observed, especially after 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF transfer. TUNEL assay showed that 5 x 10(9) Pfu and 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF treatment had a obvious reduction in the apoptotic index compared with the null-Ad(5) group, especially after 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF treatment. The expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased and the expression of Bax protein was inhibited in the 5 x 10(9) Pfu and 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF groups compared with the null-Ad(5) group. The vessel

  12. RADIATION MONITORING THE INDUSTRIAL NUCLEAR EXPLOSION SITES AND EVALUATION OF THE DOSES TO THE CRITICAL GROUPS OF POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the key elements of the radiation monitoring system at the sites of industrial nuclear explosions in the Russian Federation. The proposed recommendations describe sampling and measurements procedures, registration of the results and their cartographic presentation. The algorithm and formulas for calculating the doses to the critical groups of population are given. The recommendations are proposed, first of all, for practical application by the regional units of the State Sanitary Inspection.

  13. Efficacy and tolerability of orlistat in the treatment of obesity: a 6-month dose-ranging study. Orlistat Dose-Ranging Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gaal, L F; Broom, J I; Enzi, G; Toplak, H

    1998-04-01

    To determine the weight-reducing efficacy of orlistat, a novel gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor, and to define the optimal dosage regimen and establish the tolerability of the drug when used for a 6-month treatment period. The study was a multicentre randomised, double-blind, parallel group in design and involved 676 obese male and female subjects aged at least 18 years with a body mass index between 28 and 43 kg x m(-2) Following a 5-week placebo run-in period, subjects were randomised to receive orlistat 30 mg, 60 mg, 120 mg, 240 mg or matching placebo three times a day (tid) for 24 weeks during meals. Patients were maintained on a mildly hypocaloric diet throughout the study period. The primary efficacy parameter was body weight change over time. Orlistat resulted in a significantly greater mean loss of body weight than observed in the placebo group. In absolute terms, mean weight loss was greatest in the 120 mg group (9.8%). More orlistat- than placebo-treated patients lost > 10% of initial body weight (37% of the 120 mg group vs 19% of the placebo group). Orlistat was well tolerated. Predictably, in view of its known pharmacological effects, more orlistat-treated patients experienced gastrointestinal events. Mean levels of vitamins A, D and E, and beta-carotene remained within the clinical reference ranges in all treatment groups and rarely required supplementation. After 24 weeks, plasma concentrations of orlistat were either non-measurable or detected at the assay's limit of quantitation. Orlistat treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in body weight in obese subjects and is well tolerated. Orlistat 120 mg tid represents the optimal dosage regimen.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  15. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce

    Full Text Available It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D, Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  16. Dose-tailoring of FEC adjuvant chemotherapy based on leukopenia is feasible and well tolerated. Toxicity and dose intensity in the Scandinavian Breast Group phase 3 adjuvant Trial SBG 2000-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Per; Ahlgren, Johan; Bjerre, Karsten; Andersson, Michael; Bergh, Jonas; Mouridsen, Henning; Holmberg, Stig B; Bengtsson, Nils-Olof; Jakobsen, Erik; Møller, Susanne; Lindman, Henrik; Blomqvist, Carl

    2011-04-01

    The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer. After a first standard dosed FEC course (5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m(2), epirubicin 60 mg/mg(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2)), patients who did not reach leukopenia grade III or IV were randomised to standard doses (group standard) or doses tailored to achieve grade III leukopenia (group tailored) at courses 2-7. Patients who achieved leukopenia grade III or more after the first course were not randomised but continued on standard doses (group registered). Both planned and actually delivered number of courses (seven) were the same in all three arms. The relative dose intensity was increased by a factor of 1.31 (E 1.22, C 1.43) for patients in the tailored arm compared to the expected on standard dose. Ninety percent of the patients in the tailored arm achieved leukopenia grade III-IV compared with 29% among patients randomised to standard dosed therapy. Dose tailoring was associated with acceptable acute non-haematological toxicity with more total alopecia, nausea, vomiting and fatigue. Dose tailoring according to leukopenia was feasible. It led to an increased dose intensity and was associated with acceptable excess of acute non-haematological toxicity.

  17. Propofol for pediatric tracheal intubation with deep anesthesia during sevoflurane induction: dosing according to elapsed time for two age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, George D; Stemland, Christopher J; Balireddy, Ravi K; Brockhaus, Julie; Hughes, Kevin R; Goins, Matthew D; McMurry, Timothy L

    2014-02-01

    To determine, for two different age groups, the effect of duration of sevoflurane administration on the amount of propofol needed when performing tracheal intubation. Classic Dixon's Up-and-Down sequential method. University based operating rooms. 106 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients aged one to 11 years. Patients were allocated to the 1-6 year (≥ 12 and age groups. Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg was given orally to the 1-6 year group, and all patients were induced with 8% dialed sevoflurane and 67% nitrous oxide (N2O), with N2O discontinued and sevoflurane dialed to 5% after one minute and 1.5 minutes for the younger and older age groups, respectively. Intravenous access was obtained and propofol was promptly administered. Propofol dose was determined according to age group and whether propofol was given 2-4, 4-6, or 6-8 minutes after the start of sevoflurane induction, with Dixon's Up and Down Method used separately for each specific age/time group. Tracheal intubation conditions one minute after propofol were evaluated. Isotonic regression determined propofol ED50 estimates for excellent tracheal intubation conditions, and linear regression determined the effect of propofol dose on change in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Estimated propofol ED50 doses for 1-6 year olds, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were 1.48 mg/kg (0.80, 2.03), 0.00 mg/kg (0.00, 0.38), and 0.07 mg/kg (0.00, 0.68) in the 2-4, 4-6, and 6-8 minute groups, respectively, with estimated differences between the 2-4 minute group versus the 4-6 and 6-8 minute groups being 1.47 mg/kg (95% CI = 1.04, 2.06) and 1.41 mg/kg (95% CI = 0.74, 2.04), respectively. Estimated propofol ED50 doses for 6-11 year olds, with 95% CIs, were 2.35 mg/kg (1.97, 2.45) and 2.33 mg/kg (1.59, 2.45) in the 2-4 and 4-6 minute groups, respectively. Diminutions in SBP at one minute and two minutes after propofol administration were dose dependent for children 1-6 years of age, decreasing 5.3% and 8.1% for each 1 mg/kg of propofol

  18. Heterogeneous dose calculations for Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study eye plaques using actual seed configurations and Task Group Report 43 formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques (EPs) contain silastic and Modulay materials that introduce 15-30% dose differences compared with all-water dosimetry. A Task Group Report 43 (TG43) dose rate calculation method is presented that includes silastic and Modulay heterogeneous effects, uses the actual plaque seed configuration, is not restricted to a particular commercial treatment planning system, and does not require purchase of additional software. Dose rate is calculated using TG43 formalism: Dos˙e(EP)(r,θ)=S(K)Λ(G(L)(r,θ)/G(L)(r0,θ0))g(EP)(r)F(EP)(r,θ), with revised radial dose, g(EP)(r), and anisotropy, F(EP)(r,θ), functions specific to (125)I or (103)Pd seeds in COMS EPs. The EP signifies that the functions are specific to COMS EPs. The g(EP)(r) is obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) data for EPs that contain just a single center seed. The F(EP)(r,θ) is obtained by performing a Nelder-Mead Simplex routine to find a least squares solution that minimizes differences between MC dose rate and Do˙seEP(r,θ). The TG43 formalism calculations agree with MC results, for 10-22-mm (125)I and (103)Pd EPs, to within 2% along and near the plaque central axis and within 4% in the penumbra region for depths of 1 mm or greater. Methods and data are provided for COMS plaque calculations using seed models other than (125)I Model 6711 and (103)Pd Model 200. Because actual seed configurations are used in dose rate calculations, this formalism may also be used to estimate dosimetry for nonstandard seed loadings. This manuscript enables the clinical user to perform accurate heterogeneity-corrected dose rate calculations for COMS EPs using TG43 formalism in a spreadsheet or commercial treatment planning system that has a TG43 line source geometry function calculation capabilities. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Burn healing with a diode laser: 670 nm at different doses as compared to a placebo group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Watban, Farouk A H; Delgado, Glenda D

    2005-06-01

    A study on burn healing in rats was initiated using a diode laser at varied doses for determination of optimum dosimetry and treatment schedule. A number of male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to several groups. Anesthesia (a mixture of ketamine HCl and Xylocaine) was administered intraperitoneally. Burn on both flanks was created using a preheated metal probe and measured daily using a caliper. The right side of the treated rats was irradiated five times and three times per week. Slopes from the actual burn areas were obtained and compared against the control with the healing rate calculated and expressed in percent. In reference to the control group, no significant difference in healing was observed. In comparing both treatment schedules, there was likewise no significant difference at any day in both age-groups. Notably in younger rats, accelerated healing was observed with the highest rate in the lower range of doses (1 and 5 J/cm2), 12.4% and 11.6%, respectively. This experiment affirms that the beneficial effect on burn healing in rats is indeed affected by an interplay of several factors.

  20. Measurement of the natural radiation environment and its dependence on various parameters in Austria and assessment of the natural external and internal radiation dose of various population groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, E.

    1978-06-01

    The natural mean values of natural radionuclides in the air and external gamma radiation were determined from measurements carried out in various parts of Austria and the mean values were used as a basis for the determination of body and organ doses. Moreover frequency distributions of several specific organ doses within various population groups were investigated. Measurements of natural air activity were carried out indoors and outdoors as well as gamma radiation at the following sites - Salzburg Town, Badgastein, Gastein Valley and Mallnitz and several other places at a line crossing the Alps from South to North (Corinthia, Schwarzach, Forstau, Hallein, Kuchl, Grodig and Voggenberg - Bergheim) and in 15 different mines in the Counties of Salzburg and Upper Austria. The methods of calculation of the radiation burden due to inhalation is published in the Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological and Environmental Effects of Low Level Radiation, IAEA, Chicago 1976, Vol. II pages 305-315. It can be concluded from the work that great local differences of some components occur even within relatively small areas. The radioactivity in the air shows great temporal differences at one and the same site. In addition radiation doses had to be calculated separately for various organs and tissues due to the inhomogeneous distribution of doses within the body. Also the estimation had to be made for a variety of individuals depending on sex, age, weight and various physiological states of activity. The highest doses to tissues from inhalation of natural radioactivity are the basal cells of the sigmental epithelium and subsigmental bronchi 4th - 9th generation in the lung model of Weibel. 46% of the population investigated received more than 0.5 rem per year, 25% more than 1.5 rem per year and 1.3% more than 3 rem per year. The different air activities in the living and working rooms are due to differences in the building materials and in the construction of houses

  1. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment: a single-dose, open-label, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobalava, Zhanna; Villevalde, Svetlana; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Hinrichsen, Holger; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Zaehringer, Andreas; Pang, Yinuo; Rajman, Iris; Canadi, Jasna; Dahlke, Marion; Lloyd, Peter; Halabi, Atef

    2015-06-01

    Serelaxin is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2 in development for treatment of acute heart failure. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment. Secondary objectives included evaluation of immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of serelaxin. This was an open-label, parallel group study (NCT01433458) comparing the PK of serelaxin following a single 24 h intravenous (i.v.) infusion (30 μg kg(-1)  day(-1) ) between patients with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A, B, C) and healthy matched controls. Blood sampling and standard safety assessments were conducted. Primary non-compartmental PK parameters [including area under the serum concentration-time curve AUC(0-48 h) and AUC(0-∞) and serum concentration at 24 h post-dose (C24h )] were compared between each hepatic impairment group and healthy controls. A total of 49 subjects (including 25 patients with hepatic impairment) were enrolled, of which 48 subjects completed the study. In all groups, the serum concentration of serelaxin increased over the first few hours of infusion, reached steady-state at 12-24 h and then declined following completion of infusion, with a mean terminal half-life of 7-8 h. All PK parameter estimates were comparable between each group of patients with hepatic impairment and healthy controls. No serious adverse events, discontinuations due to adverse events or deaths were reported. No serelaxin treatment-related antibodies developed during this study. The PK and safety profile of serelaxin were not affected by hepatic impairment. No dose adjustment is needed for serelaxin treatment of 48 h i.v. infusion in patients with hepatic impairment. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Computerized tomography dose index weighted comparison between two groups of computer tomography equipment; Comparacao do indice de dose em tomografia computadorizada - ponderado (CTDI{sub W}) entre dois grupos de equipamentos de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capeleti, Felipe F., E-mail: fcapeleti@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Nersissian, Denise Y.; Furquim, Tania A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2010-07-01

    This work intended to compare the results of the Computerized Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between the head and abdomen protocols for different equipment configurations: the first group was composed by equipment with 10 up to 16 slices, the second group presented 40 up to 320 slices detectors. The results has shown variation higher than 20 % for both protocols of the group 1 and variation of 14.5 % and 7.3 %, in group 2, for head and abdomen protocols, respectively. Although having different slices configurations, the other comparison between both groups has shown similar dose impartation to the patients, considering the associated uncertainties with this measurement. (author)

  3. Past smoking and current dopamine agonist use show an independent and dose-dependent association with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Guilherme T; Glass, Philip G; Negreiros, Nadja N; Duarte, Meirelayne B; Ventura, Lais M G B; Mueller, Mila; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have described the association between dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders. A case-control study was performed to establish the prevalence of four of these behaviors in Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease on stable dopamine replacement therapy and the possible associated risk factors. We investigated 152 patients and 212 healthy controls for pathological gambling, compulsive sexual behavior and compulsive buying and eating. Overall, patients had more impulsive control disorders than controls (18.4% vs. 4.2%, P < 0.001). Impulse control disorders were more common in younger patients (P = 0.008) and in those taking dopamine agonist (P < 0.001) and levodopa (P = 0.02). Higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score (P = 0.03) and past smoking (P = 0.02) were also associated in the univariate analysis. Variables independently associated with impulse control disorders were history of smoking (odds ratio = 1.059 for each year of smoking, P = 0.010) and current use of pramipexole (odds ratio = 2.551 for each increase in 1 mg, P < 0.001). Dopaminergic stimulation and previous exposure to smoking are independently associated with impulse control disorders in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatiotemporal Mapping Techniques Show Clozapine Impairs Neurogenic and Myogenic Patterns of Activity in the Colon of the Rabbit in a Dose-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger G. Lentle

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clozapine, an antipsychotic used in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, has adverse gastrointestinal effects with significant associated morbidity and mortality. However, its effects on defined patterns of colonic contractile activity have not been assessed.Method: We used novel radial and longitudinal spatiotemporal mapping techniques, combined with and monitoring of ambient lumen pressure, in ex vivo preparations of triply and of singly haustrated portions of rabbit colon. We identified the contractile patterns of mass peristalses, fast phasic, and ripple contractions and directly qualified the effects of clozapine, at concentrations of 10 μmol/L, 20 μmol/L, and 30 μmol/L, and of norclozapine, the main metabolite of clozapine, on contractile patterns. The effects of carbachol, serotonin and naloxone on clozapine-exposed preparations were also determined. Tetradotoxin was used to distinguish neurogenic from myogenic contractions.Results: At 10 μmol/L, clozapine temporarily abolished the longitudinal contractile components of mass peristalsis, which on return were significantly reduced in number and amplitude, as was maximal mass peristaltic pressure. These effects were reversed by carbachol (1 μmol/L and to some extent by serotonin (15 μmol/L. At 10 μmol/L, myogenic ripple contractions were not affected. At 20 μmol/L, clozapine had a similar but more marked effect on mass peristalses with both longitudinal and radial components and corresponding maximal pressure greatly reduced. At 30 μmol/L, clozapine suppressed the radial and longitudinal components of mass peristalses for over 30 min, as well as ripple contractions. Similar dose-related effects were observed on addition of clozapine to the mid colon. At 20 μmol/L, norclozapine had opposite effects to those of clozapine, causing an increase in the frequency of mass peristalsis with slight increases in basal tone. These slightly augmented contractions were abolished on

  5. A phase II clinical trial does not show that high dose simvastatin has beneficial effect on markers of bone turnover in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Teis Esben; Pedersen, PT; Levin Andersen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    metabolism showed no change. None of the patients showed any reduction in free monoclonal light chains or monoclonal proteins in serum during treatment with HD-Sim. In spite of the fact that bone turn over effects of HD-Sim may have been blunted by concomitant treatment of patients with other drugs we...... acid phosphatase, TRACP); (ii) bone resorption (collagen fragments CTX and NTX); (iii) bone formation (osteocalcin and aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen PINP); (iv) cholesterol; (v) regulators of bone metabolism [osteoprotegerin (OPG) and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1)] and (vi) disease activity...... (monoclonal proteins or free light chains in serum). TRACP activity in serum and levels of collagen fragments (NTX) in urine increased for all patients temporarily during the 7 days of treatment with HD-Sim indicating that osteoclasts may have been stimulated rather than inhibited. The other markers of bone...

  6. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster (Germany); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mauch, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mikhaeel, N. George [Department of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines.

  7. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines

  8. Modern radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: field and dose guidelines from the international lymphoma radiation oncology group (ILROG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High dose melphalan in the treatment of advanced neuroblastoma: results of a randomised trial (ENSG-1) by the European Neuroblastoma Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritchard, Jon; Cotterill, Simon J.; Germond, Shirley M.; Imeson, John; de Kraker, Jan; Jones, David R.

    2005-01-01

    High dose myeloablative chemotherapy ("megatherapy"), with haematopoietic stem cell support, is now widely used to consolidate response to induction chemotherapy in patients with advanced neuroblastoma. In this study (European Neuroblastoma Study Group, ENSG1), the value of melphalan myeloablative

  10. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement experiments show that the monoclonal antibody strep 9 selects a local minimum conformation of a Streptococcus group A trisaccharide-hapten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, T; Harris, S L; Pitner, J B; Bock, K; Pinto, B M

    1995-10-17

    Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement (TRNOE) experiments have been performed to investigate the bound conformation of the trisaccharide repeating unit of the Streptococcus Group A cell-wall polysaccharide. Thus, the conformations of propyl 3-O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyran osyl)- alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside [C(A')B] (1) as a free ligand and when complexed to the monoclonal antibody Strep 9 were examined. Improved insights about the conformational preferences of the glycosidic linkages of the trisaccharide ligand showed that the free ligand populates various conformations in aqueous solution, thus displaying relatively flexible behavior. The NOE HNAc-H2A', which was not detected in previous work, accounts for a conformation at the beta-(1-->3) linkage with a phi angle of approximately 180 degrees. Observed TRNOEs for the complex are weak, and their analysis was further complicated by spin diffusion. With the use of transferred rotating-frame Overhauser enhancement (TRROE) experiments, the amount of spin diffusion was assessed experimentally, proving that all of the observed long-range TRNOEs arose through spin diffusion. Four interglycosidic distances, derived from the remaining TRNOEs and TRROEs, together with repulsive constraints, derived from the absence of TRROE effects, were used as input parameters in simulated annealing and molecular mechanics calculations to determine the bound conformation of the trisaccharide. Complexation by the antibody results in the selection of one defined conformation of the carbohydrate hapten. This bound conformation, which is a local energy minimum on the energy maps calculated for the trisaccharide ligand, shows only a change from a +gauche to a -gauche orientation at the psi angle of the alpha-(1-->2) linkage when compared to the global minimum conformation. The results infer that the bound conformation of the Streptococcus Group A cell-wall polysaccharide is different from its

  11. Acne cosmetica revisited: a case-control study shows a dose-dependent inverse association between overall cosmetic use and post-adolescent acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur; Tiwary, Narendra K

    2013-01-01

    Case-control studies to support the concept of acne cosmetica are lacking. To examine the association of post-adolescent acne with the use of cosmetics and cosmetic procedures. 910 post-adolescent patients with acne and an equal number of matched controls were studied for exposure to cosmetics and cosmetic procedures. A cumulative cosmetic exposure index was stratified into four quarters of increasing exposure. Comparison of different cumulative exposure categories with the lowest exposure category (multivariate analysis, logistic regression) showed that the odds ratios, which were always cosmetic exposure increased [odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 0.679 (0.501-0.922), 0.355 (0.258-0.487), 0.307 (0.217-0.433)]. However, some individual cosmetics had odds ratios >1. Overall cosmetic use was negatively associated with post-adolescent acne. The term 'acne cosmetica' is appropriate in the sense that some cosmetics may cause acne.

  12. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  13. 'You don't show everyone your weakness': Older adults' views on using Family Group Conferencing to regain control and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Rosalie N; Kwekkeboom, Rick H; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-08-01

    Family Group Conferencing (FGC), a model in which a person and his or her social network make their own 'care' plan, is used in youth care and might also be useful in elderly care to support older persons living at home. In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, FGC was implemented for older adults but they showed resistance. Reasons for this resistance have been researched and are described in this article. We examine existing views and attitudes of older adults concerning the use of FGC, and report on how older adults see the possibility to regain control over their lives using FGC. To do this, focus group sessions, duo interviews and individual interviews were held with older adults with varying characteristics: living at home, in sheltered housing, or in a home for the elderly; and living in urban, suburban or rural areas. Themes were: views on and contentment with the control and autonomy that they experience in their lives, and the willingness to use FGC to improve this. The main reasons for our respondents to resist FGC were: expecting people to be there for them without a FGC, not feeling ready yet for a FGC, feeling embarrassed when asking for help, being reluctant to open up about their problems, and having the fear of losing control when organizing a FGC. We conclude that, for this generation of older adults, FGC means losing control and autonomy rather than gaining it. To be appealing to older adults, a relational empowerment strengthening model should most likely be focused on reciprocity, peer-to-peer support, and solutions instead of problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows an IgG-isotype-specific defect in ABO blood group antibody formation in patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bernhard Fischer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is the most common clinically severe primary immunodeficiency and comprises a heterogeneous group of patients with recurrent severe bacterial infections due to the failure to produce IgG antibodies after exposure to infectious agents and immunization. Diagnostic recommendations for antibody failure include assessment of isoagglutinins. We have readdressed this four decades old but still accepted recommendation with up to date methodology.Methods: Anti-A/B IgM- and IgG-antibodies were measured by Diamed-ID Micro Typing, surface plasmon resonance (SPR using the Biacore® device and flow cytometry.Results: When Diamed-ID Micro Typing was used, CVID patients (n=34 showed IgG- and IgM-isoagglutinins that were comparable to healthy volunteers (n=28, while all XLA patients (n=8 had none. Anti-A/B IgM-antibodies were present in more than 2/3 of the CVID patients and showed binding kinetics comparable to anti-A/B IgM-antibodies from healthy individuals. A correlation could be found in CVID patients between levels of anti-A/B IgM-antibodies and levels of serum IgM and PnP-IgM-antibodies. In contrast in CVID patients as a group ABO antibodies were significantly decreased when assessed by SPR, which correlated with levels of switched memory, non-switched memory and naïve B cells, but all CVID patients had low/undetectable anti-A/B IgG-antibodies.Conclusion: These results indicate that conventional isoagglutinin assessment and assessment of anti-A/B IgM antibodies are not suited for the diagnosis of impaired antibody production in CVID. Examination of anti-A/B IgG antibodies by SPR provides a useful method for the diagnosis of IgG antibody failure in all CVID patients studied, thus indicating an important additional rationale to start immunoglobulin replacement therapy early in these patients, before post-infectious sequelae develop.

  15. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-09

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  16. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum annual dose equivalent level for an individual in a group of occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, N.T.

    1980-02-01

    An analysis is described for predicting the consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum dose equivalent level to individuals in a group of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiations, for the situation in which no changes are made to the working environment. This limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent is accommodated by allowing the number of individuals in the working group to increase. The derivation of the analysis is given, together with worked examples, which highlight the important assumptions that have been made and the conclusions that can be drawn. The results are obtained in the form of the capacity of the particular working environment to accommodate the limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent, the increase in the number of workers required to carry out the productive work and any consequent increase in the occupational collective dose equivalent. (author)

  18. Survival, causes of death, and estimated tissue doses in a group of human beings injected with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Durbin, P.W.

    1975-01-01

    To determine the relationship between urinary excretion and plutonium body content, 18 persons of short life expectancy were injected with plutonium between 1945 and 1947. Seventeen of these 18 individuals have been identified; eight were found to have survived for at least eight years and four are still alive today (1975). The causes of death of 13 of these individuals have been determined from death certificates; none appear to be related to the administered plutonium. Doses to the liver and to the cells on the surface of bone have been calculated for these plutonium cases. The liver doses do not appear to be high enough to be carcinogenic, but comparison of the bone-surface doses with radium doses that have induced bone tumors indicates that six of these cases have received doses high enough to be considered carcinogenic. However, no bone tumors have yet appeared. (auth)

  19. AAPM recommendations on dose prescription and reporting methods for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Report of Task Group 137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravinder; Bice, William S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Chen, Zhe; Meigooni, Ali S.; Narayana, Vrinda; Rivard, Mark J.; Yu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, permanent radioactive source implantation of the prostate has become the standard of care for selected prostate cancer patients, and the techniques for implantation have evolved in many different forms. Although most implants use 125I or 103Pd sources, clinical use of 131Cs sources has also recently been introduced. These sources produce different dose distributions and irradiate the tumors at different dose rates. Ultrasound was used originally to guide the planning and implantation of sources in the tumor. More recently, CT and∕or MR are used routinely in many clinics for dose evaluation and planning. Several investigators reported that the tumor volumes and target volumes delineated from ultrasound, CT, and MR can vary substantially because of the inherent differences in these imaging modalities. It has also been reported that these volumes depend critically on the time of imaging after the implant. Many clinics, in particular those using intraoperative implantation, perform imaging only on the day of the implant. Because the effects of edema caused by surgical trauma can vary from one patient to another and resolve at different rates, the timing of imaging for dosimetry evaluation can have a profound effect on the dose reported (to have been delivered), i.e., for the same implant (same dose delivered), CT at different timing can yield different doses reported. Also, many different loading patterns and margins around the tumor volumes have been used, and these may lead to variations in the dose delivered. In this report, the current literature on these issues is reviewed, and the impact of these issues on the radiobiological response is estimated. The radiobiological models for the biological equivalent dose (BED) are reviewed. Starting with the BED model for acute single doses, the models for fractionated doses, continuous low-dose-rate irradiation, and both homogeneous and inhomogeneous dose distributions, as well as tumor cure

  20. A comparison of dose-response models for the parotid gland in a large group of head-and-neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houweling, Antonetta C; Philippens, Marielle E P; Dijkema, Tim; Roesink, Judith M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Schilstra, Cornelis; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J

    2010-03-15

    The dose-response relationship of the parotid gland has been described most frequently using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. However, various other normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models exist. We evaluated in a large group of patients the value of six NTCP models that describe the parotid gland dose response 1 year after radiotherapy. A total of 347 patients with head-and-neck tumors were included in this prospective parotid gland dose-response study. The patients were treated with either conventional radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Dose-volume histograms for the parotid glands were derived from three-dimensional dose calculations using computed tomography scans. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before and 1 year after radiotherapy. A threshold of 25% of the pretreatment flow rate was used to define a complication. The evaluated models included the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, the mean dose model, the relative seriality model, the critical volume model, the parallel functional subunit model, and the dose-threshold model. The goodness of fit (GOF) was determined by the deviance and a Monte Carlo hypothesis test. Ranking of the models was based on Akaike's information criterion (AIC). None of the models was rejected based on the evaluation of the GOF. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model based on the AIC. The TD(50) in these models was approximately 39 Gy. The mean dose model was preferred for describing the dose-response relationship of the parotid gland. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comprehensive genotyping for 18 blood group systems using a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay shows a high degree of accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Ji, Yanli; Lodén, Martin; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Veldhuisen, Barbera

    2013-01-01

    In recent years genotyping methods have been implemented in blood banks as alternative to comprehensive serologic typing. We evaluated a newly developed assay for convenient and comprehensive genotyping of blood group alleles based on multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA)

  2. 'You don't show everyone your weakness': Older adults' views on using Family Group Conferencing to regain control and autonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, R.N.; Kwekkeboom, R.H.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Family Group Conferencing (FGC), a model in which a person and his or her social network make their own 'care' plan, is used in youth care and might also be useful in elderly care to support older persons living at home. In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, FGC was implemented for older adults but

  3. Specific-locus experiments show that female mice exposed near the time of birth to low-LET ionizing radiation exhibit both a low mutational response and a dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.; Lee, S.S.; Kelly, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Raymer, G.D.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Female mice were exposed to 300 R of 73-93 R/min X-radiation either as fetuses at 18.5d post conception (p.c.) or within 9h after birth. Combining the similar results from these 2 groups yielded a specific-locus mutation frequency of 9.4x10 -8 mutation/locus/R, which is statistically significantly higher than the historical-control mutation frequency, but much lower than the rate obtained by irradiating mature and maturing oocytes in adults. Other females, exposed at 18.5 days p.c. to 300 R of 0.79 R/min γ-radiation, yielded a mutation frequency that was statistically significantly lower than the frequency at high dose rates. The low-dose-rate group also had markedly higher fertility. It appears that the doe-rate effect for mutations induced near the time of birth may be more pronounced than that reported for mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A hypothesis sometimes advanced to explain low mutation frequencies recovered from cell populations that experience considerable radiation-induced cell killing is that there is selection against mutant cells. The reason for the relatively low mutational response following acute irradiation in the experiments is unknown; however, the finding of a dose-rate effect in these oocytes in the presence of only minor radiation-induced cell killing (as judged from fertility) makes it seem unlikely that selection was responsible for the low mutational response following acute exposure. Had selection been an important factor, the mutation frequency should have increased when oocyte killing was markedly reduced. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. A COMPARISON OF DOSE-RESPONSE MODELS FOR THE PAROTID GLAND IN A LARGE GROUP OF HEAD-AND-NECK CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Antonetta C.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.; Dijkema, Tim; Roesink, Judith M.; Terhaard, Chris H. J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response relationship of the parotid gland has been described most frequently using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. However, various other normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models exist. We evaluated in a large group of patients the value of six NTCP models that

  5. Yearly stepwise increments of the growth hormone dose results in a better growth response after four years in girls with Turner syndrome. Dutch Working Group on Growth Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Teunenbroek, A.; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S. M.; Stijnen, T.; Jansen, M.; Otten, B. J.; Delemarre-van de Waal, H. A.; Vulsma, T.; Wit, J. M.; Rouwé, C. W.; Reeser, H. M.; Gosen, J. J.; Rongen-Westerlaken, C.; Drop, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    To optimize the growth promoting effect of growth hormone (GH), 65 previously untreated girls with Turner syndrome (TS), chronological age (CA) 2-11 yr, were randomized into 3 dosage regimen groups: A, B, and C, with a daily recombinant-human GH dose during 4 study years of 4-4-4-4, 4-6-6-6, and

  6. Novel Method To Identify Source-Associated Phylogenetic Clustering Shows that Listeria monocytogenes Includes Niche-Adapted Clonal Groups with Distinct Ecological Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nightingale, K. K.; Lyles, K.; Ayodele, M.

    2006-01-01

    in humans and different animal species and which can be isolated from a number of environments including food, as a model organism to develop and implement a two-step statistical approach to the identification of phylogenetic clades that are significantly associated with different source populations......, including humans, animals, and food. If the null hypothesis that the genetic distances for isolates within and between source populations are identical can be rejected (SourceCluster test), then particular clades in the phylogenetic tree with significant overrepresentation of sequences from a given source......Stats test identified 10 clades with significant (P animal-, and food-associated clusters. Epidemiological and virulence phenotype data supported the fact that the source-associated clonal groups identified here...

  7. Pediatric primary central nervous system germ cell tumors of different prognosis groups show characteristic miRNome traits and chromosome copy number variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Muh-Lii

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial pediatric germ cell tumors (GCTs are rare and heterogeneous neoplasms and vary in histological differentiation, prognosis and clinical behavior. Germinoma and mature teratoma are GCTs that have a good prognosis, while other types of GCTs, termed nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (NGMGCTs, are tumors with an intermediate or poor prognosis. The second group of tumors requires more extensive drug and irradiation treatment regimens. The mechanisms underlying the differences in incidence and prognosis of the various GCT subgroups are unclear. Results We identified a distinct mRNA profile correlating with GCT histological differentiation and prognosis, and also present in this study the first miRNA profile of pediatric primary intracranial GCTs. Most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were downregulated in germinomas, but miR-142-5p and miR-146a were upregulated. Genes responsible for self-renewal (such as POU5F1 (OCT4, NANOG and KLF4 and the immune response were abundant in germinomas, while genes associated with neuron differentiation, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, invasiveness and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (including SNAI2 (SLUG and TWIST2 were abundant in NGMGCTs. Clear transcriptome segregation based on patient survival was observed, with malignant NGMGCTs being closest to embryonic stem cells. Chromosome copy number variations (CNVs at cytobands 4q13.3-4q28.3 and 9p11.2-9q13 correlated with GCT malignancy and clinical risk. Six genes (BANK1, CXCL9, CXCL11, DDIT4L, ELOVL6 and HERC5 within 4q13.3-4q28.3 were more abundant in germinomas. Conclusions Our results integrate molecular profiles with clinical observations and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms causing GCT malignancy. The genes, pathways and microRNAs identified have the potential to be novel therapeutic targets.

  8. High-dose imatinib versus high-dose imatinib in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine in patients with first chronic phase myeloid leukemia: a randomized phase III trial of the Dutch-Belgian HOVON study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Ammerlaan, Rianne A. H. M.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; Deenik, Wendy; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Kersten, Marie José; Sinnige, Harm A. M.; Schipperus, Martin; Schattenberg, Anton; van Marwijk Kooy, Rien; Smit, Willem M.; Chu, Isabel W. T.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the revolutionary change in the prognosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with the introduction of imatinib, patients with resistant disease still pose a considerable problem. In this multicenter, randomized phase III trial, we investigate whether the combination of high-dose

  9. A phase 2a randomized, parallel group, dose-ranging study of molindone in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and persistent, serious conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Jennifer Dugan; Taneja, Baldeo K; Baroldi, Paolo; Findling, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate safety and tolerability of four doses of immediate-release molindone hydrochloride in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and serious conduct problems. This open-label, parallel-group, dose-ranging, multicenter trial randomized children, aged 6-12 years, with ADHD and persistent, serious conduct problems to receive oral molindone thrice daily for 9-12 weeks in four treatment groups: Group 1-10 mg (5 mg if weight conduct problems. Secondary outcome measures included change in Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form-Typical Intelligence Quotient (NCBRF-TIQ) Conduct Problem subscale scores, change in Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) subscale scores from baseline to end point, and Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham rating scale-revised (SNAP-IV) ADHD-related subscale scores. The study randomized 78 children; 55 completed the study. Treatment with molindone was generally well tolerated, with no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory or physical examination findings. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) included somnolence (n=9), weight increase (n=8), akathisia (n=4), sedation (n=4), and abdominal pain (n=4). Mean weight increased by 0.54 kg, and mean body mass index by 0.24 kg/m(2). The incidence of AEs and treatment-related AEs increased with increasing dose. NCBRF-TIQ subscale scores improved in all four treatment groups, with 34%, 34%, 32%, and 55% decreases from baseline in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. CGI-S and SNAP-IV scores improved over time in all treatment groups, and CGI-I scores improved to the greatest degree in group 4. Molindone at doses of 5-20 mg/day (children weighing <30 kg) and 20-40 mg (≥ 30 kg) was well tolerated, and preliminary efficacy results suggest that molindone produces dose-related behavioral improvements over 9-12 weeks. Additional double-blind, placebo-controlled trials are needed to further investigate molindone in this pediatric population.

  10. Local Control With Reduced-Dose Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group D9602 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breneman, John, E-mail: john.breneman@uchealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Meza, Jane [Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Raney, R. Beverly [Children' s Cancer Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Children' s Ambulatory Blood and Cancer Center, Dell Children' s Medical Center of Central Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Meyer, William [Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Walterhouse, David [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of reduced-dose radiotherapy on local control in children with low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated in the Children's Oncology Group D9602 study. Methods and Materials: Patients with low-risk RMS were nonrandomly assigned to receive radiotherapy doses dependent on the completeness of surgical resection of the primary tumor (clinical group) and the presence of involved regional lymph nodes. After resection, most patients with microscopic residual and uninvolved nodes received 36 Gy, those with involved nodes received 41.4 to 50.4 Gy, and those with orbital primary tumors received 45 Gy. All patients received vincristine and dactinomycin, with cyclophosphamide added for patient subsets with a higher risk of relapse in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV studies. Results: Three hundred forty-two patients were eligible for analysis; 172 received radiotherapy as part of their treatment. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 15% in patients with microscopic involved margins when cyclophosphamide was not part of the treatment regimen and 0% when cyclophosphamide was included. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 14% in patients with orbital tumors. Protocol-specified omission of radiotherapy in girls with Group IIA vaginal tumors (n = 5) resulted in three failures for this group. Conclusions: In comparison with Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV results, reduced-dose radiotherapy does not compromise local control for patients with microscopic tumor after surgical resection or with orbital primary tumors when cyclophosphamide is added to the treatment program. Girls with unresected nonbladder genitourinary tumors require radiotherapy for postsurgical residual tumor for optimal local control to be achieved.

  11. How Acceptable Is A Wireless Pill Bottle That Monitors and Texts In Response To Missed Doses: Focus Groups With Young African American MSM Living With HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Mark; Panchal, Palak; Jimenez, Antonio; Garofalo, Robert; Haberer, Jessica E; Wiebel, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background African American MSM (AAMSM) living with HIV are less likely to have viral suppression than other racial groups. Wisepill, a wireless pill bottle, transmits a cellular signal to a server when opened and is designed to measure antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. The objective of this study was to explore the acceptability of a proposed intervention in these young AAMSM using the Wisepill device opening data to trigger a real-time text alert that ART may not have been taken during a planned time to either the user, a trusted social contact, or a healthcare worker, depending on the duration of consecutively missed doses (1 dose, 3 doses, 7 doses, respectively). Methods From December 2016 – May 2017, AAMSM living with HIV age 18–34 years (N = 25) participated in a study that included five focus groups (n = 23) and one on one interviews (n = 2). We performed theory-based discussion grounded in the Technology Acceptance Model. Specifically, we explored usefulness, convenience, concerns, and intention to use. Results Fifty-two percent missed at least one dose in the 4 days prior to the focus group meeting. Almost all participants (94%) favored the idea of a wireless pill bottle monitor and linked text message notification that ART may have been missed. The device was considered convenient for use at home or in a backpack, but too large for a pocket. Stigma and privacy were common concerns. For example, participants did not want to carry the device with them if the pills would “sound like a walking pharmacy” and did not want a text message that said, “You missed your HIV meds.” They preferred text message notifications that ranged from emoji icons to cryptic short texts and wanted to receive an email as a backup plan. Most believed that the device appearance would not gain unwanted attention. Thirty percent of the participants identified a partner as a social contact to whom the 3-day missed dose reminders would be sent whereas others

  12. Radiosensitive xrs-5 and parental CHO cells show identical DNA neutral filter elution dose-response: implications for a relationship between cell radiosensitivity and induction of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, George; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Seaner, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate a possible correlation between DNA elution dose-response and cell radiosensitivity. For this purpose neutral (pH 9.6) DNA filter elution dose-response curves were measured with radiosensitive xrs-5 and the parental Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the logarithmic and plateau phase of growth. No difference was observed between the two cell types in the DNA elution dose-response curves either in logarithmic or plateau phase, despite the dramatic differences in cell radiosensitivity. This observation indicates that the shape of the DNA elution dose-response curve and the shape of the cell survival curve are not causally related. It is proposed that the shoulder observed in the DNA elution dose-response curve reflects either partial release of DNA from chromatin, or cell cycle-specific alterations in the physicochemical properties of the DNA. (author)

  13. Risk management or mind control? Possible messages in the report by the working group on the risk management of low-dose exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Takayuki; Shirabe, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima accident discharged a large amount of radioactive materials to the air and brought about a long-term low-dose radiation exposure risk in contaminated area. In December 2011 the government working group (WG) on the risk management of low-dose radiation exposure issued the report on subjects: (1) health effects from annual radiation exposure of 20 mSv, (2) special consideration necessary for children and pregnant women and (3) proper way communicating citizens on radioactive materials and radiation doses in relation to health risks from low-dose radiation exposure. This article recommended making radiation protection strategies based on discussions among experts, government and citizens in consideration of “uncertainty” of scientific knowledge, and it criticized the WG's report mainly in the following respects. 1) The report mixed evacuation order level and ICRP's reference level in its discussion on “20 mSv”. 2) It was over-optimistic and frequently misleading on health risks of low-dose radiation. For example, it sometimes discussed the risks employing data and knowledge against recommendations of international authorities like UNSCEAR and ICRP. 3) It regarded Fukushima residents’ anxieties and stresses to be controlled as the only source of health risks. This attitude offered a counterpoint to UNSCEAR's deliberate attitude to “radiophobia”. 4) Against the spirit of ICRP Publ.111, only experts of WG made decisions about radiation protection in the absence of stakeholders. As its result, 5) risk communication recommended in the report was not interactive, in fact, based on “deficit model” of science communication. (author)

  14. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning...... tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles...... of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT...

  15. Systematic review using meta-analyses to estimate dose-response relationships between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status in different population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Dullemeijer, Carla; Tepsić, Jasna; Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Popović, Tamara; Arsić, Aleksandra; Glibetić, Marija; Souverein, Olga W; Collings, Rachel; Cavelaars, Adriënne; de Groot, Lisette; van't Veer, Pieter; Gurinović, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies investigating iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status, to assess the data of the selected studies, and to estimate dose-response relationships using meta-analysis. All randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, nested case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies that supplied or measured dietary iodine and measured iodine biomarkers were included. The overall pooled regression coefficient (β) and the standard error of β were calculated by random-effects meta-analysis on a double-log scale, using the calculated intake-status regression coefficient (β) for each individual study. The results of pooled randomized controlled trials indicated that the doubling of dietary iodine intake increased urinary iodine concentrations by 14% in children and adolescents, by 57% in adults and the elderly, and by 81% in pregnant women. The dose-response relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status indicated a 12% decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone and a 31% decrease in thyroglobulin in pregnant women. The model of dose-response quantification used to describe the relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status may be useful for providing complementary evidence to support recommendations for iodine intake in different population groups.

  16. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT

  17. ACCEPTABILITY EVALUATION FOR USING ICRP TISSUE WEIGHTING FACTORS TO CALCULATE EFFECTIVE DOSE VALUE FOR SEPARATE GENDER-AGE GROUPS OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Repin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An article describes radiation risk factors for several gender-age population groups according to Russian statistical and medical-demographic data, evaluates the lethality rate for separate nosologic forms of malignant neoplasms based on Russian cancer registries according to the method of the International Agency for Cancer Research. Relative damage factors are calculated for the gender-age groups under consideration. The tissue weighting factors recommended by ICRP to calculate effective doses are compared with relative damage factors calculated by ICRP for the nominal population and with similar factors calculated in this work for separate population cohorts in theRussian Federation. The significance of differences and the feasibility of using tissue weighting factors adapted for the Russian population in assessing population risks in cohorts of different gender-age compositions have been assessed.

  18. Pharmacodynamic effects of steady-state fingolimod on antibody response in healthy volunteers: a 4-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Craig; Meiser, Karin; David, Olivier J; Schmouder, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Fingolimod, a first-in-class oral sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator, is approved in many countries for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, at a once-daily 0.5-mg dose. A reduction in peripheral lymphocyte count is an expected consequence of the fingolimod mechanism of S1PR modulation. The authors investigated if this pharmacodynamic effect impacts humoral and cellular immunogenicity. In this double-blind, parallel-group, 4-week study, 72 healthy volunteers were randomized to steady state, fingolimod 0.5 mg, 1.25 mg, or to placebo. The authors compared T-cell dependent and independent responses to the neoantigens, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPV-23), respectively, and additionally recall antigen response (tetanus toxoid [TT]) and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to KLH, TT, and Candida albicans. Fingolimod caused mild to moderate decreases in anti-KLH and anti-PPV-23 IgG and IgM levels versus placebo. Responder rates were identical between placebo and 0.5-mg groups for anti-KLH IgG (both > 90%) and comparable for anti-PPV-23 IgG (55% and 41%, respectively). Fingolimod did not affect anti-TT immunogenicity, and DTH response did not differ between placebo and fingolimod 0.5-mg groups. Expectedly, lymphocyte count reduced substantially in the fingolimod groups versus placebo but reversed by study end. Fingolimod was well tolerated, and the observed safety profile was consistent with previous reports.

  19. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Buck, Georgina; le Cessie, Saskia; Richards, Sue; Beverloo, H. Berna; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Littlewood, Tim; Muus, Petra; Bareford, David; van der Lelie, Hans; Green, Anthony R.; Roozendaal, Klaas J.; Milne, Alison E.; Chapman, Claire S.; Shepherd, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research

  20. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illidge, Tim, E-mail: Tim.Illidge@ics.manchester.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Aleman, Berthe [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dharmarajan, Kavita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  1. Dose-response relationship of nasopharyngeal carcinoma above conventional tumoricidal level: A study by the Hong Kong nasopharyngeal carcinoma study group (HKNPCSG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Peter M.L.; Leung, S.F.; Tung, Stewart Y.; Zee, Benny; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Lee, Anne W.M.; Lau, W.H.; Kwan, W.H.; Leung, T.W.; Chua, Daniel; Sze, Wai Man; Au, Joseph S.K.; Yu, K.H.; O, Sai Ki; Kwong, Dora; Yau, T.K.; Law, Stephen C.K.; Sze, Wing Kin; Au, Gordon; Chan, Anthony T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define the dose-response relationship of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) above the conventional tumoricidal dose level of 66 Gy when the basic radiotherapy (RT) course was given by the 2D Ho's technique. Patients and methods: Data from all five regional cancer centers in Hong Kong were pooled for this retrospective study. All patients (n=2426) were treated with curative-intent RT with or without chemotherapy between 1996 and 2000 with the basic RT course using the Ho's technique. The primary endpoint was local control. The prognostic significance of dose-escalation ('boost') after 66 Gy, T-stage, N-stage, use of chemotherapy, sex and age (≤40 years vs >40 years) was studied. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: On multivariate analysis, T-stage (P< 0.01; hazard ratio [HR], 1.58) and optimal boost (P=0.01; HR, 0.34) were the only significant factors affecting local failure for the whole study population, and for the population of patients treated by radiotherapy alone, but not for patients who also received chemotherapy. The following were independent determinants of local failure for patient groups with different T-stages treated by radiotherapy alone: use of a boost in T1/T2a disease (P=0.01; HR, 0.33); use of a boost (P<0.01; HR, 0.60) and age (P=0.01; HR, 1.02) in T3/T4 tumors. Among patients with T2b tumors treated by radiotherapy alone and given a boost, the use of a 20 Gy-boost gave a lower local failure rate than a 10 Gy-boost. There was no apparent excess mortality attributed to RT complications. Conclusions: Within the context of a multi-center retrospective study, dose-escalation above 66 Gy significantly improved local control for T1/T2a and T3/4 tumors when the primary RT course was based on the 2D Ho's technique without additional chemotherapy. 'Boosting' in NPC warrants further investigation. Caution should be taken when boosting is considered because of possible increase in radiation toxicity

  2. Population parameters for dose calculations: initial estimates of municipal, city and provincial age group population within 20, 50 and 80 kilometers of the PNPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The study attempts to determine the total population and population growth rates of four (4) age groups per municipality/city within twenty (20), fifty (50) and eighty (80) kilometers from the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP-1). The population estimates were done at five (5) year intervals covering the next fifty years. The latest National Census and Statistics Office (NCSO) population projections at the provincial level under the assumption of moderate fertility and moderate mentality decline (series no. 2) were used to derive the estimates of the total population and population growth rates at the minicipality/city levels. The Bureau of Coastal and Geodetic Survey (BCGS) and the NCSO maps served as the bases for delineating the geographic and political boundaries covered by the study. The results will complement the findings of the PAEC project on agricultural parameters for radiation dose calculations and useful for related environmental studies. (author)

  3. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-09-01

    To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineural and VWF disorders were staged according to the Stockholm workshop scales. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of percussive and rotary tools. The 8 h energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration (A (8)) and lifetime vibration doses were calculated for each of the exposed stone workers. Sensorineural and musculoskeletal symptoms occurred more frequently in the workers exposed to vibration than in the controls, but trend statistics did not show a linear exposure-response relation for these disorders. The prevalence of VWF was found to be 30.2% in the entire group exposed to vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was discovered in 4.3% of the controls. VWF was strongly associated with exposure to vibration and a monotonic dose-response relation was found. According to the exposure data of this study, the expected percentage of stone workers affected with VWF tends to increase roughly in proportion to the square root of A(8) (for a particular exposure period) or in proportion to the square root of the duration of exposure (for a constant magnitude of vibration). Even although limited to a specific work situation, the dose-response relation for VWF estimated in this study suggests a time dependency such that halving the years of exposure allows a doubling of the energy equivalent vibration. According to these findings, the vibration exposure levels currently under discussion within the European Community seem to represent reasonable exposure limits for the protection of workers against

  4. Therapy with low-dose azacitidine for MDS in children and young adults: a retrospective analysis of the EWOG-MDS study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Annamaria M; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Yoshimi, Ayami; Catala, Albert; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasle, Henrik; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Mary M; Lauten, Melchior; De Moerloose, Barbara; Smith, Owen P; Bernig, Toralf; Gruhn, Bernd; Kulozik, Andreas E; Metzler, Markus; Olcay, Lale; Suttorp, Meinolf; Furlan, Ingrid; Strahm, Brigitte; Flotho, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose azacitidine is efficient and safe in the therapy of malignant myeloid disorders in adults but data in children are lacking. We present a retrospective analysis of 24 children and young adults with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who received azacitidine at the time of first diagnosis or relapse after allotransplant (2 children were treated with azacitidine both initially and for relapse). Diagnoses were refractory cytopenia of childhood (N = 4), advanced primary MDS (N = 9) and secondary MDS (N = 11). The median duration of treatment was four cycles. Azacitidine was well tolerated, but cytopenias led to dose reduction in five cases. Treatment was discontinued in one child because of impaired renal function. Sixteen MDS patients were treated with azacitidine at first diagnosis. One complete clinical remission was observed and one child showed complete marrow remission; six children experienced stable disease with haematological improvement. Ten children received azacitidine for relapsed MDS after transplant: of these, seven experienced stable disease for 2-30 cycles (median 3), including one patient with haematological improvement for seven cycles. In summary, azacitidine is effective in some children with MDS and appears to be a non-toxic option in palliative situations to prolong survival. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimen using low-dose total body irradiation before allogeneic transplant for hematologic malignancies: Experience from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Labopin, Myriam; Hennequin, Christophe; Hoffstetter, Sylvette; Mungai, Raffaello; Wygoda, Marc; Lundell, Marie; Finke, Jurgen; Aktinson, Chris; Lorchel, Frederic; Durdux, Catherine; Basara, Nadezda

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The high rate of toxicity is the limitation of myelobalative regimens before allogeneic transplantation. A reduced intensity regimen can allow engraftment of stem cells and subsequent transfer of immune cells for the induction of a graft-vs.-tumor reaction. Methods and Materials: The data from 130 patients (80 males and 50 females) treated between 1998 and 2003 for various hematologic malignancies were analyzed. The median patient age was 50 years (range, 3-72 years). Allogeneic transplantation using peripheral blood or bone marrow, or both, was performed in 104 (82%), 22 (17%), and 4 (3%) patients, respectively, from HLA identical sibling donors (n = 93, 72%), matched unrelated donors (n = 23, 18%), mismatched related donors (4%), or mismatched unrelated donors (6%). Total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 2 Gy delivered in one fraction was given to 101 patients (78%), and a total dose of 4-6 Gy was given in 29 (22%) patients. The median dose rate was 14.3 cGy/min (range, 6-16.4). Results: After a median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 1-62 months), engraftment was obtained in 122 patients (94%). Acute graft-vs.-host disease of Grade 2 or worse was observed in 37% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed three favorable independent factors for event-free survival: HLA identical sibling donor (p < 0.0001; relative risk [RR], 0.15), complete remission (p < 0.0001; RR, 3.08), and female donor to male patient (p = 0.006; RR 2.43). For relapse, the two favorable prognostic factors were complete remission (p < 0.0001, RR 0.11) and HLA identical sibling donor (p = 0.0007; RR 3.59). Conclusions: In this multicenter study, we confirmed high rates of engraftment and chimerism after the reduced intensity regimen. Our results are comparable to those previously reported. Radiation parameters seem to have no impact on outcome. However, the lack of a statistically significant difference in terms of dose rate may have been due, in part, to the small population

  6. Towards new methods for the determination of dose limiting toxicities and the assessment of the recommended dose for further studies of molecularly targeted agents--dose-Limiting Toxicity and Toxicity Assessment Recommendation Group for Early Trials of Targeted therapies, an European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-led study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Collette, Laurence; Paoletti, Xavier; Rizzo, Elisa; Massard, Christophe; Olmos, David; Fowst, Camilla; Levy, Bernard; Mancini, Pierre; Lacombe, Denis; Ivy, Percy; Seymour, Lesley; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Siu, Lillian L; Kaye, Stan B; Verweij, Jaap; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-08-01

    Traditional dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) definition, which uses grade (G) 3-4 toxicity data from cycle 1 (C1) only, may not be appropriate for molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) of prolonged administration, for which late or lower grade toxicities also deserve attention. In collaboration with pharmaceutical companies and academia, an European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-led initiative, Dose-Limiting Toxicity and Toxicity Assessment Recommendation Group for Early Trials of Targeted therapies (DLT-TARGETT), collected data from completed phase 1 trials evaluating MTAs as monotherapy. All toxicities at least possibly related to the study drugs that occurred during C1-6, their type, grade (CTCAEv3.0), and duration as well as patients' relative dose-intensity (RDI), were recorded. The 54 eligible trials enrolled 2084 evaluable adult patients with solid tumours between 1999 and 2013, and evaluated small molecules (40), antibodies (seven), recombinant peptides (five) and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (two). A maximum tolerated dose was set in 43 trials. Fifteen percent of the patients received 75% RDI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of OROS methylphenidate in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A; Zimmerman, Brenda; Starr, H Lynn; Silber, Steve; Palumbo, Joseph; Orman, Camille; Spencer, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of OROS methylphenidate (Concerta; McNeil Pediatrics Division of Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Titusville, NJ) in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. A randomized, 7-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation, parallel-group study of OROS methylphenidate 36, 54, 72, 90, or 108 mg/d versus placebo was conducted in adults with ADHD. The primary end point was the Adult ADHD Investigator Symptom Report Scale. Other assessments included the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale, a post hoc responder analysis, adverse events, and vital signs. Two hundred twenty-six subjects (56.2% male; mean age, 39.0 years; range, 18-65 years) were included in the intention-to-treat population (110 subjects on OROS methylphenidate; 116 subjects on placebo). OROS methylphenidate resulted in greater ADHD symptom improvement than placebo as demonstrated by a statistically significantly lower least squares mean change from baseline in Adult ADHD Investigator Symptom Report Scale total score at the final visit (last observation carried forward [LOCF]; P = 0.012). Subjects on OROS methylphenidate also had a significantly lower least squares mean Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement score at the final visit (LOCF; P = 0.008). A significantly greater proportion of subjects on OROS methylphenidate (36.9%, 38/103 subjects) were responders at the final visit (LOCF) compared with placebo (20.9%, 24/115 subjects; P = 0.009). OROS methylphenidate was well tolerated. Adverse events were reported by 93 (84.5%) of the 110 OROS methylphenidate-treated subjects versus 74 (63.8%) of the 116 placebo-treated subjects. No serious treatment-emergent adverse events and no deaths were reported. Similar mean changes from baseline to final visit (LOCF) for systolic and diastolic blood pressures for the OROS methylphenidate and placebo groups were observed. In a dose escalation ranging from 36 to 108 mg

  8. Analysis of workers' dose records from the Greek Dose Registry Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Dimitriou, P.; Proukakis, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this work is the study of the individual film badge annual dose information of classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System. The statistical analysis refers to the years 1989-93 and deals with the distribution of individuals in the occupational groups, the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialties and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose limits. Results concerning the annual dose summaries, demonstrate a year-by-year reduction in the mean individual dose to workers in the health sector. Conversely, exposures in the industrial sector did not show any decreasing tendency during the period under consideration. (Author)

  9. CRESCIMENTO INICIAL DE ESPÉCIES FLORESTAIS DE DIFERENTES GRUPOS SUCESSIONAIS EM RESPOSTA A DOSES DE FÓSFORO INITIAL GROWTH OF FOREST SPECIES OF DIFFERENT SUCCESSIONAL GROUPS IN RESPONSE TO PHOSPHORUS DOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁLVARO VILELA DE RESENDE

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando avaliar a resposta de espécies florestais ao fornecimento de P, conduziu-se um ensaio sob condições de casa de vegetação, cultivando-se mudas das espécies arbóreas pioneiras (aroeira - Lithraea molleoides; aroeirinha - Schinus terebinthifolius; jacaré - Piptadenia gonoacantha; sabiá - Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia; sesbânia - Sesbania virgata, clímax exigente em luz (jatobá - Hymenaea courbaril, e clímax tolerantes a sombra (guanandi - Calophyllum brasiliensis; ipê-amarelo - Tabebuia serratifolia; óleo-bálsamo - Myroxylon peruiferum. Utilizaram-se cinco doses de P, correspondentes a 0, 100, 250, 500 e 800 mg dm-3 de P. Foram avaliados o diâmetro do caule, a altura e a matéria seca de raízes, parte aérea e total das plantas. As espécies pioneiras foram mais responsivas ao fornecimento de P, indicando a necessidade do suprimento deste nutriente para o adequado desenvolvimento destas espécies. As espécies clímax mostraram-se pouco sensíveis ao suprimento de P, refletindo um baixo requerimento na fase de mudas. Diferenças em relação à taxa de crescimento e ao tamanho das sementes podem estar ligadas ao comportamento contrastante observado para espécies pioneiras e clímax.With the aim of evaluating the responses of forest species to phosphorus supply, an assay under greenhouse conditions was carried out, where seedlings of pioneer tree species (Lithraea molleoides, Schinus terebinthifolius, Piptadenia gonoacantha, Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Sesbania virgata, a light-demander climax species (Hymenaea courbaril, and the shade-tolerant climaxes species (Calophyllum brasiliensis, Tabebuia serratifolia, Myroxylon peruiferum were cultivated. Five phosphorus doses were used, corresponding to 0, 100, 250, 500 and 800 mg dm-3 of P. Stem diameter, height, and root, shoot and total dry matter yield of the plants were evaluated. The pioneers species were more responsive to phosphorus furnishing, indicating the need of

  10. Low-Dose Oral Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Maintenance for Hormone Receptor–Negative Early Breast Cancer: International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 22-00

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathryn P.; Gelber, Shari; Láng, István; Thürlimann, Beat; Gianni, Lorenzo; Abdi, Ehtesham A.; Gomez, Henry L.; Linderholm, Barbro K.; Puglisi, Fabio; Tondini, Carlo; Kralidis, Elena; Eniu, Alexandru; Cagossi, Katia; Rauch, Daniel; Chirgwin, Jacquie; Gelber, Richard D.; Regan, Meredith M.; Coates, Alan S.; Price, Karen N.; Viale, Giuseppe; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the benefit of low-dose cyclophosphamide and methotrexate (CM) maintenance, which previously demonstrated antitumor activity and few adverse effects in advanced breast cancer, in early breast cancer. Patients and Methods International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trial 22-00, a randomized phase III clinical trial, enrolled 1,086 women (1,081 intent-to-treat) from November 2000 to December 2012. Women with estrogen receptor– and progesterone receptor–negative (< 10% positive cells by immunohistochemistry) early breast cancer any nodal and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, were randomly assigned anytime between primary surgery and 56 days after the first day of last course of adjuvant chemotherapy to CM maintenance (cyclophosphamide 50 mg/day orally continuously and methotrexate 2.5 mg twice/day orally on days 1 and 2 of every week for 1 year) or to no CM. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS), which included invasive recurrences, second (breast and nonbreast) malignancies, and deaths. Results After a median of 6.9 years of follow-up, DFS was not significantly better for patients assigned to CM maintenance compared with patients assigned to no CM, both overall (hazard ratio [HR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.06;P = .14) and in triple-negative (TN) disease (n = 814; HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.06). Patients with TN, node-positive disease had a nonstatistically significant reduced HR (n = 340; HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.49 to 1.05). Seventy-one (13%) of 542 patients assigned to CM maintenance did not start CM. Of 473 patients who received at least one CM maintenance dose (including two patients assigned to no CM), 64 (14%) experienced a grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse event; elevated serum transaminases was the most frequently reported (7%), followed by leukopenia (2%). Conclusion CM maintenance did not produce a significant reduction in DFS events in hormone receptor–negative early breast cancer. The trend

  11. A Phase II feasibility study of oral etoposide given concurrently with radiotherapy followed by dose intensive adjuvant chemotherapy for children with newly diagnosed high-risk medulloblastoma (protocol POG 9631): A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Kocak, Mehmet; Hershon, Linda; Rousseau, Pierre; Decarie, Jean-Claude; Shaw, Susan; Burger, Peter; Friedman, Henry S; Gajjar, Amar; Moghrabi, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Children with high-risk medulloblastoma historically have had a poor prognosis. The Children's Oncology Group completed a Phase II study using oral etoposide given with radiotherapy followed by intensive chemotherapy. Patients enrolled in the study had high-risk disease defined as ≥1.5 cm 2 of residual disease postsurgery or definite evidence of central nervous metastasis. All patients underwent surgery followed by radiotherapy. During radiation, the patients received oral etoposide (21 days on, 7 off) at an initial dose of 50 mg/m 2 per day (treatment 1), which was reduced to 35 mg/m 2 per day (treatment 2) due to toxicity. After radiotherapy, the patients received chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin and oral etoposide, followed by eight courses of cyclophosphamide and vincristine. Between November 1998 and October 2002, 53 patients were accrued; 15 received treatment 1 and 38 treatment 2. Forty-seven patients (89%) were eligible. Response to radiation was excellent, with 19 (40.4%) showing complete response, 24 (51.1%) partial response, and four (8.5%) no recorded response. The overall 2- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 76.6 ± 6% and 70.2 ± 7%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) was 80.9 ± 6% and 76.6 ± 6%, respectively. Clinical response postradiation and PFS/OS were not significantly different between the treatment groups. There was a trend toward a difference in 5-year PFS between those without and with metastatic disease (P = 0.072). Oral etoposide was tolerable at 35 mg/m 2 (21 days on and 7 days off) when given during full-dose irradiation in patients with high-risk medulloblastoma with encouraging survival data. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dose Intensification of Daunorubicin and Cytarabine during Treatment of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 19802

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Wendy; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Stone, Richard M.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Wetzler, Meir; Westervelt, Peter; Marcucci, Guido; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Vardiman, James W.; McDonnell, Diane; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Larson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose CALGB 19802, a phase II study, evaluated whether dose intensification of daunorubicin and cytarabine could improve disease-free survival (DFS) of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and whether high-dose systemic and intrathecal methotrexate could replace cranial radiotherapy for central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty-one eligible, previously untreated patients age 16–82 years (median, 40 years) were enrolled; 33 (20%) were ≥60years old. Results One hundred twenty-eight patients (80%) achieved a complete remission (CR). Dose intensification of daunorubicin and cytarabine was feasible. With a median follow-up of 10.4 years for surviving patients, 5-year DFS was 25% (95% CI, 18–33%) and overall survival (OS) was 30% (95% CI, 23–37%). Patients <60 years who received the 80 mg/m2 dose of daunorubicin had a DFS of 33% (22–44%) and OS of 39% (29–49%) at 5 years. Eighty-four (52%) patients relapsed, including nine (6%) with isolated CNS relapses. Omission of cranial irradiation did not result in higher than historical CNS relapse rates. Conclusion Intensive systemic, oral, and intrathecal methotrexate dosing permitted omission of CNS irradiation. This intensive approach using higher doses of daunorubicin and cytarabine failed to result in an overall improvement in DFS or OS compared with historical CALGB studies. Future therapeutic strategies for adults with ALL should be tailored to specific age and molecular genetic subsets. PMID:22744771

  14. Safety and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple intravenous bolus doses of diclofenac sodium compared with oral diclofenac potassium 50 mg: A randomized, parallel-group, single-center study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, Sagar; Gautam, Anirudh; Okumu, Franklin; McDowell, James; Allenby, Kent

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized, parallel-group, single-center study in 42 healthy adults, the safety and pharmacokinetic parameters of an intravenous formulation of 18.75 and 37.5 mg diclofenac sodium (DFP-08) following single- and multiple-dose bolus administration were compared with diclofenac potassium 50 mg oral tablets. Mean AUC0-inf values for a 50-mg oral tablet and an 18.75-mg intravenous formulation were similar (1308.9 [393.0]) vs 1232.4 [147.6]). As measured by the AUC, DFP-08 18.75 mg and 37.5 mg demonstrated dose proportionality for extent of exposure. One subject in each of the placebo and DFP-08 18.75-mg groups and 2 subjects in the DFP-08 37.5-mg group reported adverse events that were considered by the investigator to be related to the study drug. All were mild in intensity and did not require treatment. Two subjects in the placebo group and 1 subject in the DFP-08 18.75-mg group reported grade 1 thrombophlebitis; no subjects reported higher than grade 1 thrombophlebitis after receiving a single intravenous dose. The 18.75- and 37.5-mg doses of intravenous diclofenac (single and multiple) were well tolerated for 7 days. Additional efficacy and safety studies are required to fully characterize the product. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Dose-tailoring of FEC adjuvant chemotherapy based on leukopenia is feasible and well tolerated. Toxicity and dose intensity in the Scandinavian Breast Group phase 3 adjuvant Trial SBG 2000-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Per; Ahlgren, Johan; Bjerre, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer....

  16. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of Normal Tissue Doses for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma on the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and Recent Children's Oncology Group Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rachel; Ng, Angela [Department of Radiation Therapy, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T. [Epidemiology/Cancer Control Department, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Friedman, Debra L. [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Kelly, Kara [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); FitzGerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, and Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are recognized to have an increased risk of delayed adverse health outcomes related to radiation therapy (RT). However, the necessary latency required to observe these late effects means that the estimated risks apply to outdated treatments. We sought to compare the normal tissue dose received by children treated for HL and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) (diagnosed 1970-1986) with that of patients treated in recent Children's Oncology Group (COG) trials (enrolled 2002-2012). Methods and Materials: RT planning data were obtained for 50 HL survivors randomly sampled from the CCSS cohort and applied to computed tomography planning data sets to reconstruct the normal tissue dosimetry. For comparison, the normal tissue dosimetry data were obtained for all 191 patients with full computed tomography–based volumetric RT planning on COG protocols AHOD0031 and AHOD0831. Results: For early-stage patients, the mean female breast dose in the COG patients was on average 83.5% lower than that for CCSS patients, with an absolute reduction of 15.5 Gy. For advanced-stage patients, the mean breast dose was decreased on average by 70% (11.6 Gy average absolute dose reduction). The mean heart dose decreased on average by 22.9 Gy (68.6%) and 17.6 Gy (56.8%) for early- and advanced-stage patients, respectively. All dose comparisons for breast, heart, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower for patients in the COG trials than for the CCSS participants. Reductions in the prescribed dose were a major contributor to these dose reductions. Conclusions: These are the first data quantifying the significant reduction in the normal tissue dose using actual, rather than hypothetical, treatment plans for children with HL. These findings provide useful information when counseling families regarding the risks of contemporary RT.

  18. The impact of radiation dose and fractionation on the risk factor of radiation pneumonitis on four radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) lung cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Pajak, Thomas F; Byhardt, Roger; Graham, Mary L; Asbell, Sucha O; Russell, Anthony H; Fu, Karen K; Urtasun, Raul C; Herskovic, Arnold M; Cox, James D

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the relationship between total dose of radiation delivered, the fractionation scheme used, age, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) on the risk of moderate to severe (≥ Grade 2) radiation pneumonitis in patients treated with radiotherapy alone for lung cancer on four RTOG Trials. Materials and Methods: Between February of 1984 and April of 1989, 1701 patients with clinically localized (I-IIIb) lung cancer were entered on clinical trials employing radiotherapy alone. Twelve hundred and forty-seven patients were entered on RTOG 8311 or 8407 (phase I/II trials) and 454 patients were entered on RTOG 8321 or 8403 (phase III trials). RTOG 8403 and 8321 patients received once-a-day irradiation to 60 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 64.8, 69.6, 74.4 or 79.2 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 63 Gy or 70.2 Gy. All patients were assessed for the incidence of Grade 2-5, radiation pneumonitis. One hundred and seven (6%) of patients were either ineligible or canceled (n=60), or were excluded because of incomplete data (n=47). The factors evaluated included total dose of radiation, the fractionation scheme, age and pre-treatment KPS. Patients treated to doses ≥ 72 Gy were considered to have received high doses (72.0 - 81.6 Gy), while the remaining patients treated to doses < 72 Gy (57.6 - 71.9 Gy) were considered to have received standard dose radiation. For the this analysis, information regarding field size and baseline pulmonary function was not available. Results: Age, sex, stage distribution, and the percentage of patients with a KPS ≥90 were similar among the patients treated on these four studies. Patients receiving hyperfractionated radiotherapy to doses ≥ 72 Gy experienced a higher incidence of radiation pneumonitis ≥ Grade 2, than patients treated with standard doses < 72

  19. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group, dose-escalating, repeat dose study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic effects and pharmacokinetics of the once daily rectal application of NRL001 suppositories for 14 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Duffin, A; Jacobs, A; Pediconi, C; Gruss, H J

    2014-03-01

    The 1R,2S stereoisomer of methoxamine hydrochloride, NRL001, is a highly selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist being developed for the local treatment of non-structural faecal incontinence caused by weak internal anal sphincter tone. This study investigated the steady state pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of 2 g rectal suppositories containing NRL001 in different strengths (7.5, 10, 12.5 or 15 mg). Healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years received 14 daily doses of NRL001 2 g suppositories or matching placebo. In each dose group nine participants received NRL001 and three received placebo. Blood samples to determine NRL001 concentrations were taken on Days 1, 7 and 14. Cardiovascular parameters were collected via electrocardiograms, Holter monitoring (three lead Holter monitor) and vital signs. Forty-eight volunteers were enrolled; 43 completed the study and were included in the PK analysis population. AUC and Cmax broadly increased with increasing dose, Tmax generally occurred between 4.0 and 5.0 h. Although the data did not appear strongly dose proportional, dose proportionality analysis did not provide evidence against dose proportionality as the log(dose) coefficients were not significantly < 1. NRL001 did not accumulate over time for any dose. Increasing NRL001 concentrations were related to changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. The most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) in the active treatment groups were paraesthesia and piloerection. Treatment with NRL001 was generally well tolerated over 14 days once daily dosing and plasma NRL001 did not accumulate over time. Treatment was associated with changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. AEs commonly reported with NRL001 treatment were events indicative of a systemic α-adrenergic effect. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Systematic review using meta-analyses to estimate dose-response relationships between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status in different population groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristic-Medic, D.; Dullemeijer, C.; Tepsic, J.; Petrovic-Oggiano, G.; Popovic, Z.; Arsic, A.; Glibetic, M.; Souverein, O.W.; Collings, R.; Cavelaars, A.J.E.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Gurinovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies investigating iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status, to assess the data of the selected studies, and to estimate dose-response relationships using meta-analysis. All randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies,

  1. Showing Value (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available When Su Cleyle and I first decided to start Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, one of the things we agreed upon immediately was that the journal be open access. We knew that a major obstacle to librarians using the research literature was that they did not have access to the research literature. Although Su and I are both academic librarians who can access a wide variety of library and information literature from our institutions, we belong to a profession where not everyone has equal access to the research in our field. Without such access to our own body of literature, how can we ever hope for practitioners to use research evidence in their decision making? It would have been contradictory to the principles of evidence based library and information practice to do otherwise.One of the specific groups we thought could use such an open access venue for discovering research literature was school librarians. School librarians are often isolated and lacking access to the research literature that may help them prove to stakeholders the importance of their libraries and their role within schools. Certainly, school libraries have been in decline and the use of evidence to show value is needed. As Ken Haycock noted in his 2003 report, The Crisis in Canada’s School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Reinvestment, “Across the country, teacher-librarians are losing their jobs or being reassigned. Collections are becoming depleted owing to budget cuts. Some principals believe that in the age of the Internet and the classroom workstation, the school library is an artifact” (9. Within this context, school librarians are looking to our research literature for evidence of the impact that school library programs have on learning outcomes and student success. They are integrating that evidence into their practice, and reflecting upon what can be improved locally. They are focusing on students and showing the impact of school libraries and

  2. Show-Bix &

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The anti-reenactment 'Show-Bix &' consists of 5 dias projectors, a dial phone, quintophonic sound, and interactive elements. A responsive interface will enable the Dias projectors to show copies of original dias slides from the Show-Bix piece ”March på Stedet”, 265 images in total. The copies are...

  3. Doses of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol used in clinical practice: results of a prospective pharmacoepidemiologic study. EFESO Study Group. Estudio Farmacoepidemiologico en la Esquizofrenia con Olanzapina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, J A; Gómez, J C; Montejo, A L; Vieta, E; Gregor, K J

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the doses of olanzapine (OLZ), risperidone (RIS), and haloperidol (HAL) used in clinical practice in outpatients with schizophrenia and the rates of occurrence of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and other adverse events, clinical response, and use of concomitant medications. The present study involved a subset of patients from a 6-month, open-label, prospective observational study. Data were collected by 293 psychiatrists at mental health centers and other outpatient treatment facilities in Spain. Medications and doses used, occurrence of EPS and other adverse events, and scores on the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) of Severity Scale and Global Assessment of Function (GAF) were recorded. Clinical response was defined as a decrease of > or = 2 points on the CGI, with a final CGI score or = 5 received significantly higher overall mean daily doses than did patients with an initial CGI score < 5 (P < 0.001). A significantly lower proportion of OLZ-treated patients (10.2%) were receiving concomitant anticholinergic medication at the end of the study (month 6) compared with RIS-treated (19.9%) and HAL-treated (44.0%) patients (P < 0.001). The mean daily doses recorded in this analysis based on data from a naturalistic setting are consistent with recommendations based on clinical trials. Compared with both RIS- and HAL-treated patients, OLZ-treated patients were less likely to experience EPS or other adverse events, and less likely to use concomitant anticholinergic medications. OLZ-treated patients were also more likely to respond to treatment than were RIS-treated patients.

  4. Simultaneous adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy in high-risk breast cancer--toxicity and dose modification: a trans-tasman radiation oncology group multi-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, James W.; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Christie, David; O'Brien, Maree; Bonaventura, Antonino; Stewart, John F.; Ackland, Stephen P.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Dady, Peter; Atkinson, Christopher H.; Wynne, Christopher; Joseph, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the toxicity profile of simultaneously administered postoperative radiation therapy and CMF chemotherapy as a prelude to a randomized controlled study addressing the sequencing of the two modalities. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty eight breast cancer patients at high risk of locoregional, as well as systemic relapse, who were referred to three centers in Australia and New Zealand were treated with postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy simultaneously. Acute toxicity and dose modifications in these patients were compared with 83 patients treated over the same time frame with chemotherapy alone. In a separate study the long-term radiation and surgical effects in 24 patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy at Newcastle (Australia) following conservative surgery were compared with 23 matched patients treated at Newcastle with radiation therapy alone. Results: Myelotoxicity was increased in patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The effect was not great, but may have contributed to chemotherapy dose reductions. Lymphopenia was observed to be the largest factor in total white cell depressions caused by the simultaneous administration of radiation therapy. Postsurgical appearances were found to so dominate long-term treatment effects on the treated breast that the effect of radiation therapy dose and additional chemotherapy was difficult to detect. Conclusion: Studies addressing the sequencing of radiation therapy and chemotherapy will necessarily be large because adverse effects from administering the two modalities simultaneously are not great. The present study has endorsed the importance in future studies of stratification according to the extent and type of surgery and adherence to a single strict policy of chemotherapy dose modification

  5. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on induction of myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the induction of myeloid leukemia and other kinds of neoplasias in C3H male mice irradiated at several dose rate levels. We compared the incidence of neoplasias among these groups, obtained dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF) for myeloid leukemia. C3H/He male mice were exposed to whole body gamma-ray irradiation at 8 weeks of age. All mice were maintained for their entire life span and teh pathologically examined after their death. Radiation at a high dose-rate of 882 mGy/min (group H), a medium dose-rate of 95.6 mGy/min (group M), and low dose-rates of 0.298 mGy/min (group L-A), 0.067 mGy/min (group L-B) or 0.016 mGy/min (group L-C) were delivered from 137 Cs sources. The mice in group L were irradiated continuously for 22 hours daily up to total doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 Gy over a period of 3 days to 200 days. As for the induction of neoplasias, myeloid leukemia developed significantly more frequently in irradiated groups than in unirradiated groups. The time distribution of mice dying from myeloid leukemia did not show a difference between groups H and L. The incidence of myeloid leukemia showed a greater increase in the high dose-rate groups than in the low and medium dose-rate groups in the dose range over 2 Gy, it also showed significant increases in the groups irradiated with 1 Gy of various dose rate, but the difference between these groups was not clear. These dose effect curves had their highest values on each curve at about 3 Gy. We obtained DDREF values of 2-3 by linear fittings for their dose response curves of dose ranges in which leukemia incidences were increasing. (author)

  6. Reporting and validation of gynaecological Groupe Euopeen de Curietherapie European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) brachytherapy recommendations for MR image-based dose volume parameters and clinical outcome with high dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancers: a single-institution initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Swamidas, Jamema; Khanna, Nehal; Engineer, Reena; Merchant, Nikhil H; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2011-08-01

    The objectives are to report the dosimetric analysis, preliminary clinical outcome, and comparison with published data of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance-based high dose rate brachytherapy (BT) in cervical cancer. The data set of 24 patients with cervical cancer treated with high dose-rate brachytherapy applications was analyzed. All patients received radiation with or without chemotherapy (10 patients received concomitant chemoradiation). Point A, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses, and Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology dose volume parameters, namely, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), D90 and D100 doses, and dose to D0.1cc and D2cc, for rectum, bladder, and sigmoid, were calculated and correlated. Mean ± SD HR-CTV was 45.2 ± 15.8 cc. The mean ± SD point A dose was 73.4 ± 4.5 Gy (median, 74.3 Gy) total biologically equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2), whereas mean ± SD D90 doses were 70.9 ± 10.6 GyEQD2 (median, 68). The mean ± SD ICRU rectal and bladder points were 63.5 ± 8.1 and 80.4 ± 34.4 GyEQD2, respectively. The D0.1cc and D2cc for rectum were 66.0 ± 9.9 GyEQD2 (median, 64.5) and 57.8 ± 7.7 GyEQD2 (median, 58.8), for bladder 139.1 ± 54.7 GyEQD2 (median, 131.9) and 93.4 ± 24.6 GyEQD2 (median, 91), and sigmoid were 109.4 ± 45.2 GyEQD2 (median, 91) and 74.6 ± 19.6 GyEQD2 (median, 69.6). With a median follow-up of 24 months, 3 patients had local nodal failure, 1 had right external iliac nodal failure, and 1 had left supraclavicular nodal failure. The 3-D magnetic resonance image-based high dose-rate brachytherapy approach in cervical cancers is feasible. In our experience, the HR-CTV volumes are large, and D0.1cc and D2cc doses to bladder and sigmoid are higher than published literature so far.

  7. On not showing scalps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Museums are increasingly taking the cultural values of source communities into account in their representational strategies, and that means that they now face the challenge of explaining to their publics how social responsibility toward distant source communities informs the choices each museum m...... on the responsibility of museum institutions toward indigenous groups and a common discourse in Danish political debates that views consideration toward the sensibilities of specific ethnic groups as a threat toward free speech and rational knowledge.......Museums are increasingly taking the cultural values of source communities into account in their representational strategies, and that means that they now face the challenge of explaining to their publics how social responsibility toward distant source communities informs the choices each museum...

  8. Methodological approach of the North-Cotentin radioecological group in charge of the evaluation of doses and risks due to the radiations exposure of the North-Cotentin population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugierr, A.

    1999-01-01

    The group has evaluated and validated the list and quantities of radioelements release(source term) for each of the four nuclear installations of the North Cotentin since their beginning of operation (the reprocessing plant of Cogema la Hague, the Flamanville nuclear power plant, the Manche storage plant and the arsenal of the Cherbourg harbour). The gathering of data relative to radionuclides in environment of the north Cotentin has allowed from one hand the publication of samples inventory and types of radioactivity measurements and in an other hand an analysis of the results. The intercomparison of transfer models in environment and the confrontation of their results with the measures have been used for the doses calculations to the references groups and to the children troop from the Beaumont-Hague district. Finally, the elements necessary to the doses and risks estimation have been itemized and validated. One of the questions that stands out of these works is this one of the aims of the surveillance and measurements in environment according to the different organisms that realize them. It is important to make the distinction between the routine measurements ( to be sure of the correct operation of the facility and that the authorized release limits are well respected) and the measurements that allow to reconstitute the dose to population groups. (N.C.)

  9. Talk Show Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  10. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  11. High Dose Cytarabine plus Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 19902

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard M.; Moser, Barry; Sanford, Ben; Schulman, Philip; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven; Stock, Wendy; Galinsky, Ilene; Vij, Ravi; Marcucci, Guido; Hurd, David; Larson, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate, was combined with high dose cytarabine (HiDAC; cytarabine 3 g/m2 over 3 hours daily for 5 days) for adults with relapsed or refractory AML. HiDAC plus GO 9 mg/m2 on day 7 and 4.5 mg/m2 on day 14 was not tolerated, but HiDAC followed by GO 9 mg/m2 on day 7 was safe: 12/37 (32%) patients with relapsed AML achieved complete remission. Median overall survival was 8.9 months. No grade 4 hepatic veno-occlusive disease was observed. This regimen merits further study, both in this setting and as a remission consolidation therapy. PMID:20688393

  12. Physics Reality Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimova, Tatiana

    The attention span of K-12 students is very short; they are used to digesting information in short snippets through social media and TV. To get the students interested in physics, we created the Physics Reality Show: a series of staged short videos with duration no longer than a few minutes. Each video explains and illustrates one physics concept or law through a fast-paced sequence of physics demonstrations and experiments. The cast consists entirely of physics undergraduate students with artistic abilities and substantial experience in showing physics demonstrations at current outreach events run by the department: Physics Shows and Physics & Engineering Festival. Undergraduate students are of almost the same age as their high-school audience. They are in the best position to connect with kids and convey their fascination with physics. The PI and other faculty members who are involved in the outreach advise and coach the cast. They help students in staging the episodes and choosing the most exciting and relevant demonstrations. Supported by the APS mini-outreach Grant.

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, parallel-group clinical trial to assess the effects of teduglutide on gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jolene Kay; Kim, Eric H; Li, Benjamin; Joelsson, Bo; Youssef, Nader N

    2014-02-12

    Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of human glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2, is a novel therapy recently approved for the treatment of adult patients with short bowel syndrome who are dependent on parenteral support. Previous studies assessing the effect of GLP-2 on gastric emptying in humans have yielded inconsistent results, with some studies showing no effect and others documenting a GLP-2-dependent delay in gastric emptying. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of teduglutide on gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects, as measured by the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen. This double-blind, parallel-group, single-center study enrolled and randomized 36 healthy subjects (22 men, 14 women) to receive subcutaneous doses of teduglutide 4 mg or placebo (2:1 ratio; 23:13) once daily on Days 1 through 10 in the morning. Gastric emptying of a mixed nutrient liquid meal was assessed by measuring acetaminophen levels predose and at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 hours after administration of 1000 mg acetaminophen on Days 0 and 10. The primary study endpoint was a pharmacokinetic analysis of acetaminophen absorption in subjects receiving teduglutide or placebo. No significant differences in gastric emptying of liquids (acetaminophen area under the concentration [AUC] vs time curve from time 0 to the last measurable concentration, AUC extrapolated to infinity, maximum concentration [Cmax], and time to Cmax) were observed on Day 10 in subjects receiving teduglutide 4 mg versus subjects receiving placebo. There were no serious adverse events (AEs), deaths, or discontinuations due to an AE reported during the study. Teduglutide 4 mg/day for 10 days does not affect gastric emptying of liquids in healthy subjects as measured by acetaminophen pharmacokinetics. No unexpected safety signals were observed. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01209351.

  14. Not a "reality" show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  15. Intermediate-dose melphalan compared with myeloablative treatment in multiple myeloma : long-term follow-up of the Dutch cooperative group HOVON 24 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, Pieter; van der Holt, Bronno; Segeren, Christine M.; Vellenga, Edo; Croockewit, Alexandra J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Westveer, Petra H. M.; Lokhorst, Henk M.

    Background and Objectives The Dutch-Belgian HOVON group performed a randomized phase 3 trial to compare single non-myeloablative intensive treatment with double, intensive treatment in previously untreated patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Design and Methods Three hundred and three patients with

  16. The Influence of Hepatic and Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of a Treatment for Herpes Zoster, Amenamevir (ASP2151): Phase 1, Open-Label, Single-Dose, Parallel-Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusawake, Tomohiro; Kowalski, Donna; Takada, Akitsugu; Kato, Kota; Katashima, Masataka; Keirns, James J; Lewand, Michaelene; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Marbury, Thomas C; Preston, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    Amenamevir (ASP2151) is a nonnucleoside human herpesvirus helicase-primase inhibitor that was approved in Japan for the treatment of herpes zoster (shingles) in 2017. This article reports the results of two clinical trials that investigated the effects of renal and hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of amenamevir. These studies were phase 1, open-label, single-dose (oral 400 mg), parallel-group studies evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of amenamevir in healthy participants and participants with moderate hepatic impairment and mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment. In the hepatic impairment study, the pharmacokinetic profile of amenamevir in participants with moderate hepatic impairment was generally similar to that of participants with normal hepatic function. In the renal impairment study, the area under the amenamevir concentration versus time curve from the time of dosing up to the time of the last sample with extrapolation to infinity of the terminal phase was increased by 78.1% in participants with severe renal impairment. There was a positive relationship between creatinine clearance and oral and renal clearance for amenamevir in the renal impairment study. In both studies, amenamevir was safe and well tolerated. The findings of the hepatic impairment study indicate that no dosing adjustment is required in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. In the renal impairment study, systemic amenamevir exposure was increased by renal impairment. However, it is unlikely that renal impairment will have a significant effect on the safety of amenamevir given that in previous pharmacokinetic and safety studies in healthy individuals amenamevir was safe and well tolerated after a single dose (5-2400 mg, fasted condition) and repeated doses for 7 days (300 or 600 mg, fed condition), and the amount of amenamevir exposure in the renal impairment study was covered by those studies. These findings suggest that amenamevir does not

  17. A 9-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-finding study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of modafinil as treatment for adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Valerie K; Feifel, David; Earl, Craig Q; Yang, Ronghua; Adler, Lenard A

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of modafinil at a range of doses, versus placebo, in alleviating symptoms of ADHD in adults. Adult patients with ADHD were randomized in 1:1:1:1:1 fashion to double-blind treatment with modafinil 255, 340, 425, or 510 mg daily or placebo for 9 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome was the change from baseline at final visit in the Adult ADHD Investigator Symptom Rating Scale (AISRS) total score. A total of 338 patients were enrolled, of whom 330 received at least 1 dose of study medication (modafinil or placebo). No statistically significant difference in the AISRS total score was observed at final visit between any modafinil group and placebo; however, some observations among patients who completed the trial may warrant further investigation. Modafinil was reasonably tolerated but did not demonstrate a benefit on ADHD symptoms in adults.

  18. Severe pegaspargase hypersensitivity reaction rates (grade ≥3) with intravenous infusion vs. intramuscular injection: analysis of 54,280 doses administered to 16,534 patients on children's oncology group (COG) clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Maloney, Kelly; Angiolillo, Anne; Schore, Reuven; Dunsmore, Kimberly; Larsen, Eric; Mattano, Len A; Salzer, Wanda; Winter, Stuart S; Carroll, William; Winick, Naomi J; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth; Hunger, Stephen P; Bleyer, Archie

    2017-11-08

    PEGylated asparaginase (pegaspargase) can be administered via intramuscular (IM) injection or intravenous (IV) infusion with a hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) incidence ranging 3-41%. We evaluated grade ≥3 HSRs when given IM vs. IV on six Children's Oncology Group (COG) leukemia trials (2003-2015) to determine differences in HSR rates. 54,280 doses were administered to 16,534 patients. Considering all doses of pegaspargase during induction, consolidation, and delayed intensification, grade ≥3 HSR rate with IM injection was 5.4% (n = 482/8981) compared to 3.2% for IV (n = 245/7553) (p rate following IM injection was 10.1% (n = 459/4534) compared to 5.0% (n = 222/4443) for IV (p rates to pegaspargase occurred less frequently with IV infusion than IM injection.

  19. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-05-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated.

  20. A Novel Highly Bioavailable Curcumin Formulation Improves Symptoms and Diagnostic Indicators in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Two-Dose, Three-Arm, and Parallel-Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, Augustine; Varma, Karthik; Jacob, Joby; Divya, Chandradhara; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Stohs, Sidney J; Gopi, Sreeraj

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune, chronic systemic inflammatory disorder. The long-term use of currently available drugs for the treatment of RA has many potential side effects. Natural phytonutrients may serve as alternative strategies for the safe and effective treatment of RA, and curcuminoids have been used in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions for centuries. In this study, a novel, highly bioavailable form of curcumin in a completely natural turmeric matrix was evaluated for its ability to improve the clinical symptoms of RA. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm, parallel-group study was conducted to evaluate the comparative efficacy of two different doses of curcumin with that of a placebo in active RA patients. Twelve patients in each group received placebo, 250 or 500 mg of the curcumin product twice daily for 90 days. The responses of the patients were assessed using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response, visual analog scale (VAS), C-reactive protein (CRP), Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and rheumatoid factor (RF) values. RA patients who received the curcumin product at both low and high doses reported statistically significant changes in their clinical symptoms at the end of the study. These observations were confirmed by significant changes in ESR, CPR, and RF values in patients receiving the study product compared to baseline and placebo. The results indicate that this novel curcumin in a turmeric matrix acts as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent for the management of RA at a dose as low as 250 mg twice daily as evidenced by significant improvement in the ESR, CRP, VAS, RF, DAS28, and ACR responses compared to placebo. Both doses of the study product were well tolerated and without side effects.

  1. High-dose therapy in diffuse large cell lymphoma: results and prognostic factors in 452 patients from the GEL-TAMO Spanish Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, M D; Pérez-Simón, J A; Iriondo, A; Lahuerta, J J; Sierra, J; Marín, J; Gandarillas, M; Arranz, R; Zuazu, J; Rubio, V; Fernández de Sevilla, A; Carreras, E; García-Conde, J; García-Laraña, J; Grande, C; Sureda, A; Vidal, M J; Rifón, J; Pérez-Equiza, C; Varela, R; Moraleda, J M; García Ruíz, J C; Albó, C; Cabrera, R; San Miguel, J F; Conde, E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the results and prognostic factors influencing overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in 452 patients diagnosed with diffuse large cell lymphomas (DLCL) treated with high-dose therapy (HDT) included in the Grupo Español de Linfomas/Trasplante Autólogo de Médula Osea (GEL-TAMO) Spanish registry. At transplantation, median age was 42 years (range 15-73), 146 patients (32%) were transplanted in first complete remission (1st CR), 19% in second CR (2nd CR) and 47% had active disease: sensitive disease in 157 (35%) patients [95 were in first partial remission (1st PR) and 62 in second PR (2nd PR)] and refractory disease in 55 (12%) patients. Age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (IPI) was 2 or 3 in 51 patients (12%). Conditioning regimen consisted of BEAM (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan) in 39% of patients, BEAC (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and cyclophosphamide) in 33%, CBV (carmustine, etoposide and cyclophosphamide) in 10% and cyclophosphamide plus total body irradiation (TBI) in 12%. Estimated overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years were 53% and 43%, respectively. The transplant-related mortality was 11% (53 cases). By multivariate analysis three variables significantly influenced OS and DFS: number of protocols to reach 1st CR, disease status at transplant and TBI in the conditioning regimen. Age-adjusted IPI at transplantation also influenced OS. Prolonged OS and DFS can be achieved in patients with DLCL after HDT and our results suggest that the best line of chemotherapy should be used up-front in patients considered as candidates for HDT in order to obtain an early CR. Resistant patients are not good candidates for HDT and they should be offered newer strategies. Finally, polichemotherapy conditioning regimens offer better results compared with TBI.

  2. North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0543 (Alliance): A phase 2 trial of pharmacogenetic-based dosing of irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine as first-line therapy for patients with advanced small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Foster, Nathan R; Mahoney, Michelle R; Smyrk, Thomas C; Murray, Joseph A; Ames, Matthew M; Horvath, L Elise; Schneider, Daniel J; Hobday, Timothy J; Jatoi, Aminah; Meyers, Jeffrey P; Goetz, Matthew P

    2017-09-15

    Oxaliplatin in combination with either 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine is commonly used as first-line therapy for patients with small bowel adenocarcinoma. The addition of irinotecan improves survival in other gastrointestinal tumors but at the cost of hematologic toxicity. The authors performed a phase 2 cooperative group study (North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0543, Alliance) using genotype-dosed capecitabine, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (gCAPIRINOX), with dosing assigned based on UDP glucuronosyltransferase family 1 member A1 (UGT1A1) genotype to test: 1) whether the addition of irinotecan would improve outcomes; and 2) whether UGT1A1 genotype-based dosing could optimize tolerability. Previously untreated patients with advanced small bowel adenocarcinoma received irinotecan (day 1), oxaliplatin (day 1), and capecitabine (days 2-15) in a 21-day cycle and were dosed with gCAPIRINOX according to UGT1A1*28 genotypes (6/6, 6/7, and 7/7). A total of 33 patients (17 with the 6/6 genotype, 10 with the 6/7 genotype, and 6 with the 7/7 genotype) were enrolled from October 2007 to November 2013; 73% were male, with a mean age of 64 years (range, 41-77 years). Location of the primary tumor included the duodenum (58%), jejunum (30%), and ileum (9%). The regimen yielded a confirmed response rate of 37.5% (95% confidence interval, 21%-56%), with a median progression-free survival of 8.9 months and a median overall survival of 13.4 months. Neither hematologic toxicity (grade ≥3 in 52.9%, 30.0%, and 33.3%, respectively, of the 6/6, 6/7, and 7/7 genotype groups) nor tumor response rate (41.2%, 33%, and 33%, respectively) were found to differ significantly by UGT1A1 genotype. UGT1A1 genotype-directed dosing (gCAPIRINOX) appears to be feasible with favorable rates of hematologic toxicity compared with prior 3-drug studies in unselected patients. Larger studies would be needed to determine the regimen's comparability to oxaliplatin and capecitabine (CapeOx) alone or if

  3. Testing of environmental transfer models using data from the atmospheric release of Iodine-131 from the Hanford site, USA, in 1963. Report of the Dose Reconstruction Working Group of the Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) Programme, Theme 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The IAEA Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment (BIOMASS) was launched in Vienna in October 1996. The programme was concerned with developing and improving capabilities to predict the transfer of radionuclides in the environment. The programme had three themes: Theme 1: Radioactive Waste Disposal. The objective was to develop the concept of a standard or reference biosphere for application to the assessment of the long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. Theme 2: Environmental Releases. BIOMASS provided an international forum for activities aimed at increasing the confidence in methods and models for the assessment of radiation exposure related to environmental releases. Two Working Groups addressed issues concerned with the reconstruction of radiation doses received by people from past releases of radionuclides to the environment and the evaluation of the efficacy of remedial measures. Theme 3: Biosphere Processes. The aim of this Theme was to improve capabilities for modelling the transfer of radionuclides in particular parts of the biosphere identified as being of potential radiological significance and where there were gaps in modelling approaches. This topic was explored using a range of methods including reviews of the literature, model inter-comparison exercises and, where possible, model testing against independent sources of data. Three Working Groups were established to examine the modelling of: (1) long term tritium dispersion in the environment; (2) radionuclide uptake by fruits; and (3) radionuclide migration and accumulation in forest ecosystems. This report describes results of the studies undertaken by the Dose Reconstruction Working Group under Theme 2

  4. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm 2 ) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm 2 ) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  5. Ecologically distinct dinosaurian sister group shows early diversification of Ornithodira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Sterling J; Sidor, Christian A; Irmis, Randall B; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Tsuji, Linda A

    2010-03-04

    The early evolutionary history of Ornithodira (avian-line archosaurs) has hitherto been documented by incomplete (Lagerpeton) or unusually specialized forms (pterosaurs and Silesaurus). Recently, a variety of Silesaurus-like taxa have been reported from the Triassic period of both Gondwana and Laurasia, but their relationships to each other and to dinosaurs remain a subject of debate. Here we report on a new avian-line archosaur from the early Middle Triassic (Anisian) of Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis places Asilisaurus kongwe gen. et sp. nov. as an avian-line archosaur and a member of the Silesauridae, which is here considered the sister taxon to Dinosauria. Silesaurids were diverse and had a wide distribution by the Late Triassic, with a novel ornithodiran bauplan including leaf-shaped teeth, a beak-like lower jaw, long, gracile limbs, and a quadrupedal stance. Our analysis suggests that the dentition and diet of silesaurids, ornithischians and sauropodomorphs evolved independently from a plesiomorphic carnivorous form. As the oldest avian-line archosaur, Asilisaurus demonstrates the antiquity of both Ornithodira and the dinosaurian lineage. The initial diversification of Archosauria, previously documented by crocodilian-line archosaurs in the Anisian, can now be shown to include a contemporaneous avian-line radiation. The unparalleled taxonomic diversity of the Manda archosaur assemblage indicates that archosaur diversification was well underway by the Middle Triassic or earlier.

  6. HEAD - TO - HEAD COMPARISON OF TOLERABILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF SINGLE DOSE OF FOUR TOPICAL NSAIDS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CATARACT SURGERY : A RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL PARALLEL GROUP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Ophthalmic NSAIDs are used to control pain , discomfort and inflammation associated with ocular conditions and also , following ophthalmic cataract surgeries. These drugs can cause ocular discomfort following administration which lasts for a short duration. However , there exist differences in the intensity and duration of burning sensation among the c ommonly used ophthalmic NSAIDs. Hence , we evaluated the tolerability and acceptability of four topical NSAIDS i.e. , 0.3% nepafenac (N , 0.5% ketorolac (K , 0.4% ketorolac (K LS and 0.09% bromfenac (B after instilling a single drop. METHODS: This randomized , open label , parallel group study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology in Narayana Medical College , Nellore. A total number of 80 patients participated in the study. Randomization list was computer generated in a ratio of 1:1:1:1 of N , K , K L Sand B. Each patient received one drop of the study drug either in right or left eye which was also decidedat random.Patients of either gender above21 years of age , having no ocular surface pathology and eligible for cataract surgery were include d in the study. Outcome variables included ocular burning intensity on VAS (0 - 100 mm at 0 min (immediately , 2 min and 6 min after administration of medications , time to complete pain relief and global medication performance rated by patient as 0 (bad , 1 (fair , 2(good or 3 (severe . RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 52.85±17.46 years. All groups were age matched , however there were more females than males (pN>K LS >K on global medication performance. CONCLUSION: Bromfenac had better tolerability and acceptability as compared to other tested topical NSAIDs , which was in the order of B>N> K LS >K.

  7. Failure to show decrease in small pulmonary blood vessels in rats with experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, J M; Suyama, K L; Keane, P M

    1982-01-01

    We induced chronic pulmonary hypertension in one group of rats by exposing them to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (380 mm Hg for three weeks) and in another group by administering a single subcutaneous dose of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg body weight). Both groups of rats showed increase of the right ventricular mean systolic blood pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy. We measured the surface area of histological sections of the left or right lungs and counted all small blood vessels with an exte...

  8. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vocal dose in teachers: correlation with dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Ana Cristina Côrtes; Santos, Juliana Nunes; Pedra, Elisângela de Fátima Pereira; Rabelo, Alessandra Terra Vasconcelos; Magalhães, Max de Castro; Casas, Estevam Barbosa de Las

    2016-04-01

    Teachers are professionals with high prevalence of dysphonia, whose main risk factors are the large work hours in classrooms with the presence of background noise. The purpose of the study was to calculate the phonation time and the cycle dose of teachers with dysphonia and teachers without voice disorders during the class. There were two groups analyzed: five teachers with functional dysphonia were the first group and five teachers without voice disorders were the second group. For the data was used the VoxLog® dosimeter and the parameters were: intensity; fundamental frequency; phonation time and cycle dose. The statistical analysis used ANOVA, Student's T-test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Dysphonic teachers showed major values of phonation time and cycle dose compared with teachers without voice disorders. The dysphonia is related to extended period of speech time and greater exposure of the tissue of the vocal fold to phonotrauma.

  10. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  11. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Bae, Kyounghwa; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non–small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray’s proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control

  12. A comparison of rofecoxib versus celecoxib in treating pain after dental surgery: a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-comparator-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose study using the dental impaction pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Fricke, James R; Kotey, Paul; Kress, Barbara; Morrison, Briggs

    2002-10-01

    Rofecoxib and celecoxib, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, have analgesic efficacy similar to that of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study was designed to confirm earlier findings that the overall analgesic efficacy of rofecoxib 50 mg was superior to that of celecoxib 200 mg and to extend the comparison to include celecoxib 400 mg. In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-comparator-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose study, patients who experienced moderate or severe pain after surgical extraction of at least 2 third molars received a single oral dose of either rofecoxib 50 mg, celecoxib 400 mg, celecoxib 200 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. Patients recorded scores of pain intensity, pain relief, and global assessment at prespecified time intervals throughout the 24-hour period after dosing. The end points were total pain relief (TOPAR) score over 8 hours (TOPAR8; primary end point), TOPAR score over 12 hours (TOPAR12), sum of pain intensity difference (SPID) over 8 and 12 hours (SPID8 and SPID12), patient's global assessment of study drug at 8 hours, time to confirmed perceptible pain relief (ie, time to onset of analgesic effect), peak pain intensity difference (PID), peak pain relief, time to first dose of rescue medication (ie, duration of analgesic effect), and percentage of patients using rescue medication. A total of 482 patients (358 females, 124 males; mean age, 22.1 years) were enrolled. Rofecoxib 50 mg (n = 151 patients) demonstrated significantly greater overall analgesic efficacy compared with celecoxib 400 mg (n = 151), as measured by TOPAR8 (least squares mean [SE] 17.2 [0.8] vs 15.0 [0.8]; P TOPAR12 (25.3 [1.2] vs 21.0 [1.2]; P TOPAR8 scores (17.2 [0.8] vs 11.5 [1.1]; P TOPAR8, TOPAR12, SPID8, SPID12, and patient's global assessment] for all study drugs). The adverse-events (AE) profile was generally similar in all treatment groups. The 3 most common AEs were nausea, postextraction

  13. Cambios en la presión arterial en un grupo de voluntarios normotensos después del consumo de diferentes dosis de café filtrado Changes in blood pressure in a group of normotense volunteers after consumption or different doses of filtered coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria M Agudelo

    2008-12-01

    doses of filtered coffee. This is a prospective clinical controlled study in which four groups were conformed and were submitted during a period of six weeks to consumption of different doses of filtered coffee: group one did not have coffee, group two consumed 200 mL, group three 400 mL and group four 600 mL. Blood pressure values were measured before and at the end of the intervention in each subject; in the control group coffeine concentration was measured before, during and at the end of the intervention. The results showed comparable groups by gender, age and body mass index, without significant differences in basal conditions. After the intervention, systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not show any difference between the groups, with the exception of group four in which diastolic blood pressure diminished significantly (p=0.006. Between the groups, the changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were not significant (p=0.510 and 0.430 respectively. In conclusion, consumption of different doses of filtered coffee did not cause significant changes in blood pressure values; the group that did not have coffee did not show significant lowering of blood pressure values.

  14. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la

    2008-05-01

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  15. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  16. ECPPA: randomised trial of low dose aspirin for the prevention of maternal and fetal complications in high risk pregnant women. ECPPA (Estudo Colaborativo para Prevenção da Pré-eclampsia com Aspirina) Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of low dose aspirin in women at high risk of adverse outcomes associated with pre-eclampsia. A collaborative randomised trial comparing the effects of low dose aspirin (60 mg) with placebo on pre-eclampsia and other materno-fetal complications associated with hypertension. Twelve teaching maternity hospitals and 182 obstetricians' offices in Brazil. One thousand and nine women considered to be at high risk for the development of pre-eclampsia, or its complications, entered the study between 12 and 32 weeks of gestation. They were randomly allocated to receive aspirin (498 women) or placebo (511 women) until delivery, and follow up was obtained for 96%. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups in the incidence of proteinuric pre-eclampsia (6.7% aspirin-allocated compared with 6.0% placebo-allocated women), of preterm delivery (22.3% compared with 26.1%), of intrauterine growth retardation (8.5% compared with 10.1%), or of stillbirth and neonatal death (7.3% compared with 6.0%), nor were there significant differences in the incidence of proteinuric pre-eclampsia in any subgroup of women studied, including those who had systolic blood pressures of 120 mmHg or above at entry (8.5% compared with 7.3%) or those who were chronically hypertensive (10.0% compared with 7.1%). Aspirin was not associated with a significant excess of maternal or fetal bleeding. The results of this study do not support the routine prophylactic administration of low dose aspirin in pregnancy to any category of high risk women (even those who have chronic hypertension or who are considered to be especially liable to early onset pre-eclampsia).

  17. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: a report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology "automatic dose rate and image quality" (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  18. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  19. Collective dose scenario at MAPS - a fifteen year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, V.; Viswambharam, K.R.; Mohandas, P.G.; Chudalayandi, K.; Krishnamoorthy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Madras Atomic Power Station - a two unit PHWR- has provided a large data based on occupational exposure since 1983. ICRP-1990 recommendations have forced ALARA practices to be implemented seriously at MAPS to put a check on collective dose. In this paper, an analysis of collective dose has been made with fifteen years of experience in background (1983-97). The distribution of collective dose among different groups shows definite trend over the years. Focus has been made to identify the critical work group, critical jobs, critical work areas, critical radionuclides and the critical systems vis-a-vis the collective dose. Distribution of dose is off-centered, resulting in selective groups (casual workers, mechanical and operation) getting more than sixty percent of station dose and therefore these groups require special focus on dose reduction strategies. There is a reduction in collective dose by a factor of 2 to 5 in different jobs due to refining work procedures and other ALARA efforts. (author)

  20. Single-dose versus two-dose administration of methotrexate for the treatment of ectopic pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taejong; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kim, Mi-La; Jung, Yong Wook; Yun, Bo Seong; Seong, Seok Ju

    2016-02-01

    Can a two-dose methotrexate treatment protocol improve the treatment success rate compared with a single-dose protocol in women with an ectopic pregnancy? The two-dose protocol was not superior to the single-dose protocol for the treatment of ectopic pregnancy. Although the two-dose methotrexate protocol for ectopic pregnancy was recently introduced to combine the efficacy and convenience of the fixed multi-dose and single-dose protocols, studies comparing the success rates, treatment satisfaction and acceptability of the single-dose and two-dose treatment protocols for ectopic pregnancy are currently lacking. A randomized trial was conducted on 92 participants with tubal ectopic pregnancy, between May 2013 and April 2015. Patients who were diagnosed with tubal ectopic pregnancy and who elected to undergo systemic methotrexate treatment were randomly assigned to follow either the single-dose (n = 46) or two-dose protocol (n = 46). The primary outcome measure was treatment success without surgical intervention. The secondary outcome measures were the incidence of methotrexate-associated side effects, β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-hCG) resolution time, cost of care received and treatment satisfaction. There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The success rates between the single-dose and two-dose groups did not show a significant difference [82.6 versus 87.0%; relative risk (RR) 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.13]. However, the success rate in a subgroup of participants with a pretreatment β-hCG level of >5000 mIU/ml appeared to be higher in the two-dose group than in the single-dose group (80.0 versus 58.8%), although the difference was not statistically significant. No significant differences in methotrexate-associated side effects, cost or treatment satisfaction were observed between the groups. The two-dose group required a lower number of days for the β-hCG level to decrease to ectopic pregnancy. None. www

  1. Survey of computed tomography doses in head and chest protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Giordana Salvi de; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography is a clinical tool for the diagnosis of patients. However, the patient is subjected to a complex dose distribution. The aim of this study was to survey dose indicators in head and chest protocols CT scans, in terms of Dose-Length Product(DLP) and effective dose for adult and pediatric patients, comparing them with diagnostic reference levels in the literature. Patients were divided into age groups and the following image acquisition parameters were collected: age, kV, mAs, Volumetric Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and DLP. The effective dose was found multiplying DLP by correction factors. The results were obtained from the third quartile and showed the importance of determining kV and mAs values for each patient depending on the studied region, age and thickness. (author)

  2. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: the effects of nonuniform dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2007-09-01

    To investigate dose-volume effects in rat spinal cord irradiated with nonuniform dose distributions and to assess regional differences in radiosensitivity. A total of 106 rats divided into three groups were irradiated with (192)Ir gamma-rays at a high dose rate. The groups were irradiated with one, two, or six catheters distributed around the thoracolumbar spinal cord to create different dose distributions. After irradiation, the animals were tested for motor function for 9 months. The response was defined as motor dysfunction and WM or nerve root necrosis. Dose-response data were analyzed with a probit analysis as function of the dose level at a percentage of the volume (D(%)) and with different normal tissue complication probability models. Additionally, the histologic responses of the individual dose voxels were analyzed after registration with the histologic sections. The probit analysis at D(24) (24% of the volume) gave the best fit results. In addition, the Lyman Kutcher Burman model and the relative seriality model showed acceptable fits, with volume parameters of 0.17 and 0.53, respectively. The histology-based analysis revealed a lower radiosensitivity for the dorsal (50% isoeffective dose [ED(50)] = 32.3) and lateral WM (ED(50) = 33.7 Gy) compared with the dorsal (ED(50) = 25.9 Gy) and ventral nerve roots (ED(50) = 24.1 Gy). For this nonuniform irradiation, the spinal cord did not show typical serial behavior. No migration terms were needed for an acceptable fit of the dose-response curves. A higher radiosensitivity for the lumbar nerve roots than for the thoracic WM was found.

  3. A prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multi-centric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, S; Hariharan, R S; Madhavan, R; Periyandavar, I; Samra, S S

    2010-11-01

    The present study was a prospective, parallel group, open-labeled, comparative, multicentric, active controlled study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and benefits of fixed dose combination of acarbose and metformin versus metformin alone in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 229 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled at 5 medical centers across India. They received either acarbose (50 mg) + metformin (500 mg) bid/tid (n=115) or metformin monotherapy (500 mg) bid/ tid (n=114) for 12 weeks. Primary objective was to evaluate safety and tolerability based on the adverse events reported. Secondary objective was efficacy assessment based on changes in fasting, post prandial blood glucose and HbA1c values. In the acarbose + metformin group 10 patients reported 14 adverse events while in metformin group 9 patients reported 10 adverse events. No patient reported any serious adverse event or was withdraw from study because of adverse events. In the acarbose plus metformin group fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from a baseline of 158.85 +/- 18.14 mg/dl to 113.55 +/- 19.38 mg/dl (p fasting blood glucose decreased from a baseline of 158.31 +/- 26.53 mg/dl to 130.55 +/- 28.31 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 27.76 +/- 22.91 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) decreased from a baseline of 264.65 +/- 34.03 mg/dl to 173.22 +/- 31.40 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 91.43 +/- 28.65 mg/dl) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group PPBG decreased from a baseline of 253.56 +/- 36.28 mg/dl to 205.36 +/- 39.49 mg/dl (p < 0.0001) (decrease of 48.20 +/- 32.72 mg/dl) at 12 weeks. In the acarbose plus metformin group glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased from a baseline of 9.47 +/- 0.69% to 7.71 +/- 0.85% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.76 +/- 1.11) at 12 weeks, while in the metformin group HbAlc decreased from a baseline of 9.32 +/- 0.65% to 8.26 +/- 0.68% (p < 0.0001) (% decrease of 1.06 +/- 0.66) at 12 weeks. The

  4. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): Concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Limbergen, Erik van; Barillot, Isabelle; Brabandere, Marisol De; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm 3 ; optional 5 and 10 cm 3 . Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm 3 . Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD 2 )-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Poetter R, Van Limbergen E et al

  5. A Real World Report on Intravenous High-Dose and Non-High-Dose Proton-Pump Inhibitors Therapy in Patients with Endoscopically Treated High-Risk Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Sheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Aims. The optimal dose of intravenous proton-pump inhibitor (PPI therapy for the prevention of peptic ulcer (PU rebleeding remains controversial. This study aimed to understand the real world experiences in prescribing high-dose PPI and non-high-dose PPI for preventing rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of high-risk PU. Patients and Methods. A total of 220 subjects who received high-dose and non-high-dose pantoprazole for confirmed acute PU bleeding that were successfully treated endoscopically were enrolled. They were divided into rebleeding (n=177 and non-rebleeding groups (n=43. Randomized matching of the treatment-control group was performed. Patients were randomly selected for non-high-dose and high-dose PPI groups (n=44 in each group. Results. Univariate analysis showed, significant variables related to rebleeding were female, higher creatinine levels, and higher Rockall scores (≧6. Before case-control matching, the high-dose PPI group had higher creatinine level, higher percentage of shock at presentation, and higher Rockall scores. After randomized treatment-control matching, no statistical differences were observed for rebleeding rates between the high-dose and non-high-dose groups after case-control matching. Conclusion. This study suggests that intravenous high-dose pantoprazole may not be superior to non-high-dose regimen in reducing rebleeding in high-risk peptic ulcer bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy.

  6. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  7. Monte Carlo dose calculations for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using GPU-accelerated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, M; Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Jiang, S B; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are typically based on the Association of American Physicists in Medicine Task Group report 43 (TG-43) guidelines, which approximate patient geometry as an infinitely large water phantom. This ignores patient and applicator geometries and heterogeneities, causing dosimetric errors. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is commonly recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This article presents our recent developments of a fast MC dose calculation package for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, gBMC, built on a graphics processing unit (GPU) platform. gBMC-simulated photon transport in voxelized geometry with physics in (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy energy range considered. A phase-space file was used as a source model. GPU-based parallel computation was used to simultaneously transport multiple photons, one on a GPU thread. We validated gBMC by comparing the dose calculation results in water with that computed TG-43. We also studied heterogeneous phantom cases and a patient case and compared gBMC results with Acuros BV results. Radial dose function in water calculated by gBMC showed GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gBMC, for HDR brachytherapy make it attractive for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prescribed dose versus calculated dose of spinal cord in standard head and neck irradiation assessed by 3-D plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Majumder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Spinal cord toxicity can be dreaded complication while treating head and neck cancer by conventional radiotherapy. Cord sparing approach is applied by two phase planning in conventional head neck radiotherapy. In spite of cord sparing approach spinal cord still receives considerable scatter dose. Our study aims to do the volumetric analysis of spinal cord dosimetry and to correlate with the clinical findings. Materials and Methods: Treatment planning was done in two phases. First phase treatment fi elds include gross disease- both tumor and involved nodes. in the second phase, treatment field shrinkage was done to cover the gross disease sparing the spinal cord. These fields are termed as off-cord fields. 42 patients with histological proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region were analysed with two groups. In Group A, 46 Gy was given in 23 fractions, and then tumor-boost with off-cord fi eld received 24 Gy in 12 fractions. In Group B 50 Gy was prescribed in 25 fractions initially, then off-cord fi eld given 20 Gy in 10 fractions to analyze theoutcome. Planning Computed tomography (CT scan was done Philips Brilliance 16 slice CT scan machine, and contouring and dose calculation were done at ASHA treatment planning software. Results: Maximum dose and dose at 1 cm3, 2 cm3, and 5 cm3 were calculated. Maximum dose to cord was 52.6 Gy (range 48.1-49.7 Gy in Group A and 54.3 Gy (range 51.48-52.33 Gy in Group B initially. Off-cord fi elds received mean dose 8.07 Gy (85.85% of maximum in Group A and 5.47 Gy (86.84% of maximum in Group B. At the end of 6 months from the last date of radiotherapy, grade 1 spinal cord toxicity found in two patients in Group A and one patient in Group B respectively (P = 0.55. Both groups received additional dose, which are higher than the prescribed dose, but no patients show significant spinal cord toxicity after 6 month of follow-up. Conclusion: Spinal cord received scatter dose

  9. Phase III trial of two investigational schedules of ifosfamide compared with standard-dose doxorubicin in advanced or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma: a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorigan, Paul; Verweij, Jaap; Papai, Zsuzsa; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Le Cesne, Axel; Leahy, Michael G.; Radford, John A.; van Glabbeke, Martine M.; Kirkpatrick, Anne; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Single-agent doxorubicin remains the standard treatment for advanced soft tissue sarcomas. Combining doxorubicin with standard-dose ifosfamide has not been shown to improve survival and is associated with a significantly increased toxicity; it is not known whether higher dose single-agent

  10. An Internal Dose Assessment Associated with Personal Food Intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Wontae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Therefore, had recommended the concept of 'Critical Group'. Recently the ICRP has recommended the use of 'Representative Person' on the new basic recommendation 103. On the other hand the U.S. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has adopted more conservative concept, 'Maximum Exposed Individuals (MEI)' of critical Group. The dose assessment in Korea is based on MEI. Although dose assessment based on MEI is easy to receive the permission of the regulatory authority, it is not efficient. Meanwhile, the internal dose by food consumption takes an important part. Therefore, in this study, the internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. The internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. It showed 13.2% decreased of the annual internal dose due to gaseous effluents by replacing MEI to the concept of representative person. Also, this calculation based on new ICRP's recommendation has to be extended to all areas of individual dose assessment. Then, more accurate and efficient values might be obtained for dose assessment.

  11. Treatment of hyperthyroidism by 131-iodine; Traitement des hyperthyroidies par l'iode 131: dose calculee versus dose fixe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieffe, S.; Cuif-Joba, A.; Testard, A.; Fortuna, I.; Pocharta, J.M.; Papathanassioua, D.; Schvartz, C. [Service d' endocrinologie et medecine nucleaires, institut Jean-Godinot, 1, rue du General Koeing, 51056 Reims, (France)

    2009-05-15

    In a first time, we chose to modify the dose to be administered, on using always the Marinelli formula but on increasing the absorbed dose. In a second time, we wanted to simplify the determination of the dose to be administered by modulating it only in function of the thyroid volume. Two groups of patients were managed for hyperthyroidism recurrence. In a first group the iodine dose ({sup 131}I) was determined with the help of the simplified Marinelli formula: chosen absorbed dose was 150 Gy, gland volume determined by echography, measurement of the fixation at the sixth hour. In the second group, the thyroid volume was determined by echography. The patients with a thyroid from 5 to 30 g received 185 MBq, from 30 to 50 g 370 MBq and superior to 50 g 555 MBq of iodine 131. The two groups of patients have the same characteristics. the results of treatment by iodine 131, evaluated on the dosages of T4L and TSH at three and six months, show the preservation of euthyroidism or the passage in hypothyroidism among 94% of patients in the group 1 and 80% of patients in the group 2. These results are not significantly different. The easiness of the realisation of the treatment in the group 2 lead us to continue this simplified therapy scheme that allows equally to improve the radiation protection of medical personnel by avoiding the use of iodine 131. (N.C.)

  12. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2002-01-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  13. Role of signal dose preoperative antibiotic in acute nonperforated appendicitics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.A.; Rasheed, M.; Abbasi, A.S.; Iqbal, R.A.; Mian, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of a single dose of preoperative antibiotic in preventing post operative infective complications in patients undergoing appendicectomy for non perforated acute appendicitis. Study Design: Randomized controlled trials. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical unit I and II, department of General Surgery, Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore from 1st June to 31st October 2010. Patients and Methods: Seventy patients with acute appendicitis scheduled for appendicectomy were included in the study and randomly divided into two groups of 35 each using random numbers table. Group A received single dose preoperative antibiotic and group B received three-dose regimens of cefuroxime. Postoperative infective complications were the primary endpoint. Results: The rate of postoperative wound infection was not statistically insignificantly different among the groups; (8.57%) group A and (5.71%) group B at 1st post operative week and (5.71%) group A and (5.71%) group B at 2nd post operative week. None of the patients from either group showed any signs of intra abdominal abscess formation. Conclusion: Single dose of preoperative antibiotics is adequate for prevention of postoperative infective complications in patients with non-perforated appendicitis undergoing open appendicectomy. (author)

  14. Switching From Age-Based Stimulus Dosing to Dose Titration Protocols in Electroconvulsive Therapy: Empirical Evidence for Better Patient Outcomes With Lower Peak and Cumulative Energy Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill-Kerr, Alex; Yassin, Anhar; Rogers, Stephen; Cornish, Janie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the proposition that adoption of a dose titration protocol may be associated with better patient outcomes, at lower treatment dose, and with comparable cumulative dose to that in patients treated using an age-based stimulus dosing protocol. This was an analysis of data assembled from archived records and based on cohorts of patients treated respectively on an age-based stimulus dosing protocol and on a dose titration protocol in the National Health Service in England. We demonstrated a significantly better response in the patient cohort treated with dose titration than with age-based stimulus dosing. Peak doses were less and the total cumulative dose was less in the dose titration group than in the age-based stimulus dosing group. Our findings are consistent with superior outcomes in patients treated using a dose titration protocol when compared with age-based stimulus dosing in a similar cohort of patients.

  15. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Yolanda I.; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m 2 ) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 ) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m 2 ) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade ≥4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade ≥3 dyspnea, or Grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade ≥3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine

  17. Risk Aversion in Game Shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten I.

    2008-01-01

    We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large stakes, and in a replicated, structured way. Inferences are generally confounded by the subjective assessment of skill in some games...

  18. The Greatest Show on Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cases a common facet of our ignorance is that we need to find out how best to combine the knowledge of single units (single genes, cells or pathways), and the ways in which they work as coordinated groups, into one picture. These issues are touched on here only tangen- tially. Dawkins has produced yet another marvel-.

  19. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  20. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  1. Measuring performance at trade shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kåre

    2004-01-01

    Trade shows is an increasingly important marketing activity to many companies, but current measures of trade show performance do not adequately capture dimensions important to exhibitors. Based on the marketing literature's outcome and behavior-based control system taxonomy, a model is built...... that captures a outcome-based sales dimension and four behavior-based dimensions (i.e. information-gathering, relationship building, image building, and motivation activities). A 16-item instrument is developed for assessing exhibitors perceptions of their trade show performance. The paper presents evidence...... of the scale's reliability, factor structure, and validity on the basis of analyzing data from independent samples of exhibitors at the international trade shows SIAL (Paris) and ANUGA (Cologne); and it concludes with a discussion of potential managerial applications and implications for future research. New...

  2. Occupational dose trends in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhogora, W.E.; Nyanda, A.M.; Ngaile, J.E.; Lema, U.S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of occupational radiation exposure of monitored workers in Tanzania from 1986 to 1997. The analysis of dose records observes over this period, a fluctuating trend both in the individual and collective doses. The trend is more related to the fluctuations of the number of radiation workers than to the possible radiation safety changes of the working conditions. It has been found that, the maximum annual dose for the worker in all work categories was about 18 mSv y -1 . This suggests that the occupational radiation exposure in all practices satisfies the current dose limitation system. The national exposure summary shows that, the highest collective dose of 12.8 man-Sv which is 90% of the total collective dose, was due to medical applications. The applications in industry and research had a contribution of nearly 0.8 and 0.7 man-Sv respectively. From the professional point of view, the medical diagnostic radiographers received the highest collective dose of 11.2 man-Sv. Although the medical physicists recorded the minimum collective dose of nearly 0.07 man-Sv, the data shows that this profession received the highest mean dose of about 33 mSv in 12 years. Some achievements of the personnel monitoring services and suggestions for future improvement are pointed out. (author)

  3. Use of national metrological references of dose absorbed in water and application of the IAEA TRS nr 398 dosimetry protocol to high energy photon beams. BNM-LNHB-LCIE-SFPM working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvenet, B.; Delaunay, F.; Dolo, J.M.; Le Roy, G.; Bridier, A.; Francois, P.; Sabattier, R.

    2003-01-01

    Metrological references of dose absorbed in water for high energy photon beams used in radiotherapy have been elaborated during the past years by national calibration laboratories, and these new references are the basis of recent dosimetry protocols. However, the passage from metrological references of air kerma to dose absorbed in water, as well as the practical application of new calibration opportunities for dosemeters in high energy X ray beams requires a specific attention to maintain the consistency of dose measurement references over the hospital site. In this respect, this guide aims at the application of these metrological references. It proposes recommendations for the application of metrological references in terms of dose absorbed in water on the hospital site with reference to their determination conditions and to the implementation of the new IAEA dosimetry protocol (TRS nr 398). Thus, this guide proposes an overview of metrological references in French calibration laboratories, presents calibration methods (air kerma in a cobalt 60 gamma photon beam, dose absorbed in water) and a comparison with the IAEA TRS 277 dosimetry protocol. It addresses various practical aspects, and discusses uncertainties

  4. Tokyo Motor Show 2003; Tokyo Motor Show 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, E.

    2004-01-01

    The text which follows present the different techniques exposed during the 37. Tokyo Motor Show. The report points out the great tendencies of developments of the Japanese automobile industry. The hybrid electric-powered vehicles or those equipped with fuel cells have been highlighted by the Japanese manufacturers which allow considerable budgets in the research of less polluting vehicles. The exposed models, although being all different according to the manufacturer, use always a hybrid system: fuel cell/battery. The manufacturers have stressed too on the intelligent systems for navigation and safety as well as on the design and comfort. (O.M.)

  5. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  6. SU-F-T-329: Characteristic Study of a Rado-Photoluminescenct Glass Dosimeter with Accumulated Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Chung, M [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Gangdong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the effect of accumulated dose on radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon. Methods: 45 commercially-available radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD; GD-302M, Asahi Techno Glass Co., Shizuoka, JAPAN) were irradiated to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} open-field with 6, 10 and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm of source to surface distance and dose maximum depths. Each energy has consists of five groups which is consists of three detectors. A group #1 and #2 was irradiated about 1 Gy to 100 Gy, and estimated the integral dose response with and without annealing procedure. A group #3 was read the dose after irradiated 10 Gy of dose by 10 times repeatedly to estimate the fading effect of RPLGD. A group #4 and #5 was produced same ways with different irradiation dose such as 50 Gy for group #4 and 100 Gy for group #5. Results: From the results of group #1 and #2, an annealed detector shows linear response to integral dose but other detectors without the annealing process, has supra linearity for integral dose especially close to 100 Gy dose. For group #3, #4 and #5, the dose response of repeated irradiation, the dose response was decreased about 15%, 12% and 7% for 6 MV, 10 MV and 15MV. Conclusion: It was found that RPLGD response to accumulated dose was supra linear and this respond was altered with amount of accumulated dose to the RPLGD. In addition, the fading effect need to be concern with RPLGD.

  7. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  8. Producing Talent and Variety Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    Identifies key aspects of producing talent shows and outlines helpful hints for avoiding pitfalls and ensuring a smooth production. Presents suggestions concerning publicity, scheduling, and support personnel. Describes types of acts along with special needs and problems specific to each act. Includes a list of resources. (MJP)

  9. Evaluation of skin entrance dose imparted on pediatric patients by thorax exams; Avaliacao da dose de entrada na pele ao paciente pediatrico em exames de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mercia L.; Khoury, Helen [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Drexler, Guenter [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas]|[GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. for Radiation Protection; Barros, Edison [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas

    2001-07-01

    In this work the results of a survey of skin entrance dose imparted on pediatric patients are present. Positioning the thermo luminescence dosimeters in contact with the patient's skin, in the center of the incident X-ray beam, collected the skin entrance dose data. The patients were grouped in five age groups: infants, 1,1 to 4 years, 4,1 to 6 years, 6,1 to 10 years and older than 10 years. The results show that the average of skin entrance doses is very higher as compared to the European Community Commission reference levels and to other values found in literature. (author)

  10. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P. (eds.)

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs.

  11. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P.

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs

  12. Efecto del consumo de diferentes dosis de café filtrado sobre los niveles plasmáticos de homocisteína y presión arterial en un grupo de voluntarios sanos Effect of consumption of different doses of filtered coffee on homocysteine plasma levels and blood pressure in a group of healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria M Agudelo O

    2008-04-01

    coffee consumption during a six weeks period. Group 1 did not consume coffee; group 2 consumed 200mL coffee; group 3 consumed 400 mL and group 4 , 600 mL. Blood pressure, homocysteine levels, arterial index, erythrocyte folic acid and B12 and B6 vitamins were measured. The outcomes showed no significant differences between the groups in basal conditions. After the intervention, change in homocysteine levels between the groups did not show any significant difference and remained within the reference values (p = 0,098. Change in systolic and diastolic arterial pressure levels was not significant (p = 0,510 and 0,430 respectively. In conclusion, different filtered coffee doses consumption didn’t show significant changes in homocysteine plasma levels, nor in systolic and diastolic arterial pressure ciphers in a group of healthy normotense subjects; in the group that did not consume coffee, homocysteine levels and blood pressure had no significant decrease in these values.

  13. Pilocarpine tablets for the treatment of dry mouth and dry eye symptoms in patients with Sjögren syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose, multicenter trial. P92-01 Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivino, F B; Al-Hashimi, I; Khan, Z; LeVeque, F G; Salisbury, P L; Tran-Johnson, T K; Muscoplat, C C; Trivedi, M; Goldlust, B; Gallagher, S C

    1999-01-25

    Patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS) experience slowly progressive infiltration of lacrimal and salivary glands by mononuclear cells. This leads to diminished secretions, with resultant symptoms of xerostomia and xerophthalmia. Although pilocarpine hydrochloride tablets are currently indicated for the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia, their effects on dry mouth or dry eyes in patients with SS are unclear. To assess the safety and efficacy of pilocarpine (Salagen) tablets as symptomatic treatment for dry mouth and dry eyes caused by SS in a multicenter, doubleblind, placebo-controlled trial. After providing written informed consent, 373 patients with primary or secondary SS and clinically significant dry mouth and dry eyes were randomized to receive 2.5-mg pilocarpine, 5-mg pilocarpine, or placebo tablets 4 times daily for 12 weeks. Symptoms were assessed by questionnaires with visual analog scales or categorical checkboxes. Whole-mouth salivary flow rates were measured. A significantly greater proportion of patients in the 5-mg pilocarpine group showed improvement compared with the placebo group (Pdry mouth, dry eyes, and other symptoms of dryness (Pdry mouth and dry eyes and other xeroses in patients with SS.

  14. Pharmacokinetic study of single- and multiple-dosing with metolazone tablets in healthy Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueqing; Wang, Rutao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yun; Zheng, Heng; Feng, Yabo; Zhao, Na; Geng, Hongbin; Zhang, Wanzhi; Wen, Aidong

    2017-11-16

    Metolazone is a diuretic, saluretic and antihypertensive chemical compound from the quinazoline category that possesses medicinal features similar to those of other thiazide diuretic drugs. However, the pharmacokinetics of metolazone in the Chinese population has rarely been studied. This study aimed to examine the pharmacokinetic characteristics, safety characteristic, and tolerability of metolazone in healthy Chinese subjects after single and multiple doses taken orally as well as the effects that food and gender have on oral metolazone pharmacokinetic parameters. An open-label, randomized, and single- and multiple-dosing investigation was performed in healthy Chinese subjects. The investigation included 3 study groups: the 0.5 mg, 1 mg and 2 mg dose groups were the single-dose study groups in the first stage. Eligible volunteers were randomly and orally administered a single 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg metolazone tablet. The 0.5 mg dose group was also part of the multiple-dose study group, and the 1 mg dose group was the food-effect study group in the second stage. Human plasma samples were gathered pre-dosing and up to 48 h after dosing. The human plasma sample concentration of metolazone was quantified using a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic data were calculated by a noncompartmental analysis method using WinNonlin version 6.4. Tolerability was evaluated based on adverse events, medical examination, 12-lead ECG, and other clinical laboratory exams. Thirty eligible subjects (15 men and 15 women) were registered in our investigation and completed all of the study stages. The AUC and C max showed dose proportionality after a single dose based on the linear-regression analysis. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic data revealed that the differences between the male and female groups were not statistically significant. The t max of metolazone was increased by approximately 100% in the fed condition. Metolazone was

  15. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  16. Asian consortium on radiation dose of pediatric cardiac CT (ASCI-REDCARD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Peter K.T. [Hong Kong Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Du, Jing [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Ip, Janice J.K. [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Kanzaki, Suzu [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Kim, Young Jin [Yonsei University, Shinchon Severance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Songklanagarind Hospital, Prince of Songkla University, Department of Radiology, Hat Yai (Thailand); Lilyasari, Oktavia [University of Indonesia, National Cardiovascular Center Harapan Kita, Department of Cardiology, Jakarta (Indonesia); Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn [Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Department of Radiology, Salaya (Thailand)

    2017-07-15

    With incremental utilization of pediatric cardiac CT in congenital heart disease, it is imperative to define its current radiation dose levels in clinical practice in order to help imagers optimize CT protocols, particularly in Asia and other developing countries where CT physicists are not readily available. To evaluate current radiation dose levels and influencing factors in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease in Asia by conducting a retrospective multi-center, multi-vendor study. We included 1,043 pediatric cardiac CT examinations performed in 8 centers between January 2014 and December 2014 to evaluate congenital heart disease. In five weight groups, we calculated radiation dose metrics including volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose. Age at CT exam, gender, tube voltage, scan mode, CT indication and image reconstruction algorithm were analyzed to learn whether they influenced CT radiation dose. Volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose of pediatric cardiac CT showed variations in the range of 4.3-23.8 mGy, 4.9-17.6 mGy, 55.8-501.3 mGy circle cm and 1.5-3.2 mSv, respectively, within five weight groups. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment significantly influenced CT radiation dose. This multi-center, multi-vendor study demonstrated variations in radiation dose metrics of pediatric cardiac CT reflecting current practice in Asia. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment should be considered as essential radiation dose-influencing factors in developing optimal pediatric cardiac CT protocols. (orig.)

  17. Asian consortium on radiation dose of pediatric cardiac CT (ASCI-REDCARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Peter K.T.; Goo, Hyun Woo; Du, Jing; Ip, Janice J.K.; Kanzaki, Suzu; Kim, Young Jin; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Lilyasari, Oktavia; Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn

    2017-01-01

    With incremental utilization of pediatric cardiac CT in congenital heart disease, it is imperative to define its current radiation dose levels in clinical practice in order to help imagers optimize CT protocols, particularly in Asia and other developing countries where CT physicists are not readily available. To evaluate current radiation dose levels and influencing factors in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease in Asia by conducting a retrospective multi-center, multi-vendor study. We included 1,043 pediatric cardiac CT examinations performed in 8 centers between January 2014 and December 2014 to evaluate congenital heart disease. In five weight groups, we calculated radiation dose metrics including volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose. Age at CT exam, gender, tube voltage, scan mode, CT indication and image reconstruction algorithm were analyzed to learn whether they influenced CT radiation dose. Volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose of pediatric cardiac CT showed variations in the range of 4.3-23.8 mGy, 4.9-17.6 mGy, 55.8-501.3 mGy circle cm and 1.5-3.2 mSv, respectively, within five weight groups. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment significantly influenced CT radiation dose. This multi-center, multi-vendor study demonstrated variations in radiation dose metrics of pediatric cardiac CT reflecting current practice in Asia. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment should be considered as essential radiation dose-influencing factors in developing optimal pediatric cardiac CT protocols. (orig.)

  18. Asian consortium on radiation dose of pediatric cardiac CT (ASCI-REDCARD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Peter K T; Goo, Hyun Woo; Du, Jing; Ip, Janice J K; Kanzaki, Suzu; Kim, Young Jin; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Lilyasari, Oktavia; Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn

    2017-07-01

    With incremental utilization of pediatric cardiac CT in congenital heart disease, it is imperative to define its current radiation dose levels in clinical practice in order to help imagers optimize CT protocols, particularly in Asia and other developing countries where CT physicists are not readily available. To evaluate current radiation dose levels and influencing factors in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease in Asia by conducting a retrospective multi-center, multi-vendor study. We included 1,043 pediatric cardiac CT examinations performed in 8 centers between January 2014 and December 2014 to evaluate congenital heart disease. In five weight groups, we calculated radiation dose metrics including volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose. Age at CT exam, gender, tube voltage, scan mode, CT indication and image reconstruction algorithm were analyzed to learn whether they influenced CT radiation dose. Volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose of pediatric cardiac CT showed variations in the range of 4.3-23.8 mGy, 4.9-17.6 mGy, 55.8-501.3 mGy∙cm and 1.5-3.2 mSv, respectively, within five weight groups. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment significantly influenced CT radiation dose. This multi-center, multi-vendor study demonstrated variations in radiation dose metrics of pediatric cardiac CT reflecting current practice in Asia. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment should be considered as essential radiation dose-influencing factors in developing optimal pediatric cardiac CT protocols.

  19. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  20. Dose-Dependent Effect of Sitagliptin on Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Receiving Insulin Treatment: A Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Tomoya; Katakami, Naoto; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yoshii, Hidenori; Gosho, Masahiko; Shimomura, Iichiro; Watada, Hirotaka

    2017-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors reduce blood glucose in a dose-dependent manner, but the dose-dependent effect relationship between DPP-4 inhibitors and atherosclerosis has not been investigated. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with insulin were randomized to the sitagliptin (n = 137) or conventional treatment group (n = 137). In the sitagliptin group, each investigator was allowed to adjust the sitagliptin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. In this post hoc analysis, subjects in the sitagliptin group were divided into two groups based on the average dose of sitagliptin during the study period: greater than or equal to median (higher sitagliptin dose group) or less than median (lower sitagliptin dose group). In this study, subjects were divided into three groups: the conventional treatment group (n = 137), lower sitagliptin dose group (n = 42), and higher sitagliptin dose group (n = 95). The higher sitagliptin dose group had a significantly larger reduction in HbA1c (-0.62 ± 1.05%) than the conventional treatment group (-0.20 ± 0.91%, P = 0.007). Over 104 weeks, the higher sitagliptin dose significantly reduced the mean intima media thickness-common carotid artery (IMT-CCA) and left max-IMT-CCA relative to baseline. In addition, the higher sitagliptin dose significantly inhibited the progression in mean-IMT-CCA compared with conventional treatment. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that changes in mean-IMT-CCA and left max-IMT-CCA decreased with higher sitagliptin dose. Addition of sitagliptin to insulin therapy might attenuate the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with T2DM in a dose-dependent manner. Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Co., Ono Pharmaceutical Co., and Novo Nordisk. UMIN000007396.

  1. Survey of computed tomography doses in head and chest protocols; Levantamento de doses em tomografia computadorizada em protocolos de cranio e torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Giordana Salvi de; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: giordana.souza@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Imagens Medicas

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography is a clinical tool for the diagnosis of patients. However, the patient is subjected to a complex dose distribution. The aim of this study was to survey dose indicators in head and chest protocols CT scans, in terms of Dose-Length Product(DLP) and effective dose for adult and pediatric patients, comparing them with diagnostic reference levels in the literature. Patients were divided into age groups and the following image acquisition parameters were collected: age, kV, mAs, Volumetric Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and DLP. The effective dose was found multiplying DLP by correction factors. The results were obtained from the third quartile and showed the importance of determining kV and mAs values for each patient depending on the studied region, age and thickness. (author)

  2. Carbohydrate metabolism during long-term growth hormone (GH) treatment and after discontinuation of GH treatment in girls with Turner syndrome participating in a randomized dose-response study. Dutch Advisory Group on Growth Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.J. Sas (Theo); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); Th. Stijnen (Theo); H-J. Aanstoot (Henk-Jan); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractTo assess possible side-effects of GH treatment with supraphysiological doses on carbohydrate (CH) metabolism in girls with Turner syndrome (TS) during long term GH treatment and after discontinuation of GH treatment, the results of oral glucose tolerance

  3. Dose from drinking water Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Salonen, Laina; Huikuri, Pia; Arvela, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The dose from drinking water originates almost totally from naturally occurring radionuclides in the uranium-238 series, the most important nuclide being radon-222. Second comes lead-210, and third polonium-210. The mean age-group-weighted dose received by ingestion of drinking water is 0.14 mSv per year. More than half of the total cumulative dose of 750 manSv is received by the users of private wells, forming 13% of the population. The most exposed group comprises the users of wells drilled in bedrock, who receive 320 manSv while comprising only 4% of the population. The calculated number of annual cancer incidences due to drinking water is very sensitive to the dose-conversion factors of ingested radon used, as well as to the estimated lung cancer incidences caused by radon released from water into indoor air. (au)

  4. Individualized Neoral doses in pediatric renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Y; Muquillaza, P; Valdebenito, S

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model to calculate individualized Neoral doses based on individual oral clearance (CL/F)(i) and AUC((0-12h)) values. The equation proposed by Dr. Ke-Hua Wu (2005), was employed to calculate the CL/F(i) = 28,5 - (1.24*POD) - 0.252*(TBil-11) + 0,188*(Weight o-58) -0,191*(Age-42) - 2,42*INHI - 0,212*(HCT-28), where CI/F = (L/h), POD = postoperative days, Bil.T = total bilirubin level (umol/L), CBW = in kilograms, age = in years, INHI = concurrent metabolic inhibitors present (1) or absence (0), and HCT = hematocrit percentage. The AUC((0-12h)) was calculated from the C(2) value using the equation AUC((0-12h)) = 815,578 + 4,44696*C(2), derived from the linear correlation observed in earlier work at Clinica Las Condes Hospital. The studied population were 30 kidney transplanted children at Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, between 2002 and 2006, who were divided into 2 similar groups according to accurate C(2) sampling time collections. The control group 1 was composed of 13 patients of age 9.85 +/- 4 years whose samples were collected correctly. Group 2 was composed of 17 patients of age 10.43 +/- 6 years with 252 C(2) samples, which were obtained at medical control. All patients were under oral treatment with prednisone, azathioprine, nifedipine, and Neoral administered twice day according the weight of the patient and the C(2) level. Relating Neoral administered doses to calculated doses according to the proposed model, the control group showed a linear correlation coefficient r = 0.924; r(2) = 85.4%; (P calculate Neoral doses had a predictive value of 85.0% when C(2) samples were collected correctly.

  5. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  6. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  7. Spiral CT and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Czerny, C.; Hojreh, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Kudler, H.; Noebauer, I.; Nowotny, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies in the USA and Europe state that computed tomography (CT) scans compromise only 3-5% of all radiological exams, but they contribute 35-45% of total radiation dose to the patient population. These studies lead to concern by several public authorities. Basis of CT-dose measurements is the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), which was established 1981. Nowadays there are several modifications of the CTDI values, which may lead to confusion. It is suggested to use the standardized CTDI-100 w. value together with the dose length product in all CT-examinations. These values should be printed on all CT-images and allows an evaluation of the individualized patient dose. Nowadays, radiologist's aim must be to work at the lowest maximal diagnostic acceptable signal to noise ratio. To decrease radiation dose radiologist should use low kV and mA, but high pitches. Newly developed CT-dose-reduction soft-wares and filters should be installed in all CT-machines. We should critically compare the average dose used for a specific examination with the reference dose used in this country and/or Europe. Greater differences should caution the radiologist. Finally, we as radiologists must check very carefully all indications and recommend alternative imaging methods. But we have also to teach our customers--patients and medical doctors who are non-radiologists--that a 'good' image is not that which show all possible information, but that which visualize 'only' the diagnostic necessary information

  8. Mike Pentz showing visitors around CESAR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1964-01-01

    Mike Pentz, leader of the CESAR Group, shows visitors around the 2 MeV electron storage ring. Here they are in the vault of the injector (a 2 MV van de Graaff generator), next to the 2 beam lines, one leading to the ring, the other to the spectrometer.

  9. Carboplatin dosing in children: calculation by different formulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würthwein, Gudrun; Krefeld, Barbara; Gerss, Joachim; Boos, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Carboplatin dosing in children is based on renal function and there exists a wealth of formulae available for calculating the body surface area (BSA), the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the carboplatin dose. A fictitious group of children with different ages and body builds was 'constructed'. For comparison of formulae, bias and precision were assessed. BSA calculations according to DuBois-DuBois, Gehan-George, Mosteller, and Boyd showed good agreement. GFR calculations according to the weight-based Cole formula and the Léger formula gave comparable results. Regarding GFR in young children, the weight-and creatinine-based Cole and the Schwartz formula showed clear differences. Again, carboplatin dose calculations according to Marina, Newell, and Chatelut are comparable. Moreover, the precision of the creatinine measurement has a clear influence on the result of the dose calculation. The choice of the GFR formula is more important for the carboplatin dose calculation compared to the BSA or dose equation. GFR calculations in children show marked, age-dependent variations. A sequence of multiple calculation steps (especially for the Schwartz and Marina formulae) may lead to considerable uncertainty and proneness to error in the clinical routine. In high-risk patients, GFR should be measured precisely and complemented by therapeutic drug monitoring. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Prine, J.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  11. Evaluation of a liver micronucleus assay in young rats (IV): a study using a double-dosing/single-sampling method by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, Hironao; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Izumi; Shimada, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Terashima, Yukari; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Oshida, Keiyu; Ohta, Ryo; Imamura, Tadashi; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Minowa, Shigenori; Maeda, Akihisa; Hayashi, Makoto

    2010-04-30

    A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate whether a liver micronucleus assay using four-week-old male F344 rats can be used to detect genotoxic rat hepatocarcinogens using double-dosing with a single-sampling 4 days after the second dose. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by the seven laboratories involved in the study. Seven chemicals, 2,4-diaminotoluene, diethyl nitrosamine, p-dimethylaminoazobenzene, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, 2,4-dinitrotolunene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene and mitomycin C, known to produce positive responses in the single-dosing/triple-sampling method were selected for use in the present study, and each chemical was examined in two laboratories with the exception of 2,4-dinitrotolunene. Although several of the compounds were examined at lower doses for reasons of toxicity than in the single-dosing/triple-sampling method, all chemicals tested in the present study induced micronuclei in liver cells indicating a positive result. These findings suggest that the liver micronucleus assay can be used in young rats to detect genotoxic rat hepatocarcinogens using a double-dosing/single-sampling procedure. Further, the number of animals used in the liver micronucleus assay can be reduced by one-third to a half by using the double-dosing/single-sampling method. This reduction in animal numbers also has significant savings in time and resource for liver perfusion and hepatocyte isolation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Defining a dose-response relationship with radiotherapy for prostate cancer: is more really better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Abner, Anthony; Baglan, Kathy L.; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Data were reviewed addressing the association between radiation therapy (RT) dose and treatment outcome for localized prostate cancer to help clarify the existence of a potential dose-response relationship. Methods and Materials: Articles were identified through the MEDLINE database, CancerLit database, and reference lists of relevant articles. Studies were categorized into four groups based upon the endpoint analyzed, including biochemical control (BC), local control (LC), pathologic control (PC), and cause-specific survival (CSS). The impact of increasing RT dose with each endpoint was recorded. Results: Twenty-two trials involving a total of 11,297 patients were identified. Of the 11 trials addressing the association of RT dose with LC, 9 showed statistically significant improvements. Of the 12 trials that reported BC with RT dose, all showed statistically significant improvements. Two out of 4 studies analyzing PC with increasing dose showed a positive correlation. Finally, 3 out of 9 studies addressing RT dose with CSS showed statistically significant improvements. Despite inconclusive results, patients with poor risk features (e.g., prostate-specific antigen [PSA] ≥10, Gleason score [GS] ≥7, or tumor stage ≥T2b) were most likely to benefit from increasing dose with respect to each endpoint. However, the optimal RT dose and the magnitude of benefit of dose escalation could not be identified. Conclusions: Although RT dose appears to correlate with various measures of treatment outcome, objective, high-quality data addressing this critical issue are still lacking. At the present time, the absolute improvement in outcome due to dose escalation, the subset of patients benefiting most, and the optimal dose remain to be defined

  13. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. METHODS--The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineu...

  14. Short-course aminoglycoside therapy in patients with spinal cord injury. Standard dose versus low dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapico, F L; Lindquist, L B; Montgomerie, J Z; Jimenez, E M; Morrow, J W

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-nine patients with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic urinary tract infection were treated with standard or reduced doses of tobramycin and amikacin. The patients received five days of intramuscular antibiotics. Most of the patients in the tobramycin groups had Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and most of those in the amikacin group had either Proteus rettgeri or Providencia stuartii infections. Only 1 patient had a positive urine antibody coating test. High antibiotic concentrations were demonstrated in the urine of all patients during therapy. Urine cultures were obtained two and seven days after completion of therapy. Forty-eight per cent of the patients were cured, while 31 per cent showed persistence or relapse, and 21 per cent had reinfection with other bacteria. No significant differences in results were observed between the standard-dose and low-dose regimens and between the amikacin and tobramycin groups. The low success rate of the regimens used may indicate the need to evaluate alternative therapeutic regimens to treat urinary tract infections in this special group of patients.

  15. International myeloma working group (IMWG) consensus statement and guidelines regarding the current status of stem cell collection and high-dose therapy for multiple myeloma and the role of plerixafor (AMD 3100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, S; Stadtmauer, E A; Harousseau, J L; Palumbo, A; Bensinger, W; Comenzo, R L; Kumar, S; Munshi, N C; Dispenzieri, A; Kyle, R; Merlini, G; San Miguel, J; Ludwig, H; Hajek, R; Jagannath, S; Blade, J; Lonial, S; Dimopoulos, M A; Einsele, H; Barlogie, B; Anderson, K C; Gertz, M; Attal, M; Tosi, P; Sonneveld, P; Boccadoro, M; Morgan, G; Sezer, O; Mateos, M V; Cavo, M; Joshua, D; Turesson, I; Chen, W; Shimizu, K; Powles, R; Richardson, P G; Niesvizky, R; Rajkumar, S V; Durie, B G M

    2009-10-01

    Multiple myeloma is the most common indication for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (ASCT) in North America today. Stem cell procurement for ASCT has most commonly been performed with stem cell mobilization using colony-stimulating factors with or without prior chemotherapy. The target CD34+ cell dose to be collected as well as the number of apheresis performed varies throughout the country, but a minimum of 2 million CD34+ cells/kg has been traditionally used for the support of one cycle of high-dose therapy. With the advent of plerixafor (AMD3100) (a novel stem cell mobilization agent), it is pertinent to review the current status of stem cell mobilization for myeloma as well as the role of autologous stem cell transplantation in this disease. On June 1, 2008, a panel of experts was convened by the International Myeloma Foundation to address issues regarding stem cell mobilization and autologous transplantation in myeloma in the context of new therapies. The panel was asked to discuss a variety of issues regarding stem cell collection and transplantation in myeloma especially with the arrival of plerixafor. Herein, is a summary of their deliberations and conclusions.

  16. Dose escalation with 3-D CRT in prostate cancer: five year dose responses and optimal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald; Hanlon, Alexandra; Pinover, Wayne; Hunt, Margie; Movsas, Benjamin; Schultheiss, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report 5 yr dose responses in prostate cancer patients treated with 3D-CRT and describe optimal treatment based on dose response. Methods: Dose escalation was studied in 233 consecutive patients treated with 3D-CRT between 3/89 and 10/92. All surviving patients have >32 mo follow-up, the median follow-up is 55 mo. Estimated logistic cumulative distribution functions (logit response models) fit to 5 yr actuarial bNED outcome are reported for 3 dose groups in each of 3 pretreatment PSA groupings (10-19.9 ng/ml and 20+ ng/ml); no dose response is observed for patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml. Logit response models fit to 5 yr actuarial late morbidity rates (grade 2 GI, grade 2 GU, grade 3,4 GI) are also reported for 4 dose groups. Patients are treated with CT planned 4-field conformal technique where the PTV encompasses the CTV by 1.0 cm in all directions including the anterior rectal wall margin. Patients are followed at 6 mo intervals with PSA and DRE, and bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥1.5 ng/ml and rising on two consecutive measures. The Fox Chase modification of the LENT morbidity scale is used for GI morbidity including any blood transfusion and/or more than 2 coagulations as a grade 3 event. GU morbidity follows the RTOG scale. Results: The logit response models based on 5 yr bNED results have slopes of 27% and 18% for pretreatment PSA grouping 10-19.9 ng/ml and 20+ ng/ml, respectively. The 50% bNED response is observed at 71 Gy and 80 Gy respectively, while the 80% bNED response is observed at 76 Gy for the 10-19.9 ng/ml group and estimated at 88 Gy for the 20+ ng/ml group. Logit dose response models for grade 2 GI and grade 2 GU morbidity show markedly different slopes, 23% versus 4%, respectively. The slope for grade 3,4 GI is 12%. The dose response model indicates grade 3,4 GI complication rates at 5 yrs are 8% at 76 Gy and 12% at 80 Gy. Conclusion: Based on 5 yr results, we can draw some conclusions about appropriate dose from these

  17. Dose calculation for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    The joint working group of ICRP/ICRU is advancing the works of reviewing the ICRP publication 51 by investigating the data related to radiation protection. In order to introduce the 1990 recommendation, it has been demanded to carry out calculation for neutrons, photons and electrons. As for electrons, EURADOS WG4 (Numerical Dosimetry) rearranged the data to be calculated at the meeting held in PTB Braunschweig in June, 1992, and the question and request were presented by Dr. J.L. Chartier, the responsible person, to the researchers who are likely to undertake electron transport Monte Carlo calculation. The author also has carried out the requested calculation as it was the good chance to do the mutual comparison among various computation codes regarding electron transport calculation. The content that the WG requested to calculate was the absorbed dose at depth d mm when parallel electron beam enters at angle α into flat plate phantoms of PMMA, water and ICRU4-element tissue, which were placed in vacuum. The calculation was carried out by the versatile electron-photon shower computation Monte Carlo code, EGS4. As the results, depth dose curves and the dependence of absorbed dose on electron energy, incident angle and material are reported. The subjects to be investigated are pointed out. (K.I.)

  18. Consultative exercise on dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, B A; Parker, T; Simmonds, J R; Sumner, D

    2001-06-01

    A summary is given of a meeting held at Sussex University, UK, in October 2000, which allowed the exchange of ideas on methods of assessment of dose to the public arising from potential authorised radioactive discharges from nuclear sites in the UK. Representatives of groups with an interest in dose assessments were invited, and hence the meeting was called the Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments (CEDA). Although initiated and funded by the Food Standards Agency, its organisation, and the writing of the report, were overseen by an independent Chairman and Steering Group. The report contains recommendations for improvement in co-ordination between different agencies involved in assessments, on method development and on the presentation of data on assessments. These have been prepared by the Steering Group, and will be taken forward by the Food Standards Agency and other agencies in the UK. The recommendations are included in this memorandum.

  19. Labour cost of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.; Lockett, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to optimise capital expenditure on measures to protect workers against radiation it would be useful to have a means to measure radiation dose in money terms. Because labour has to be employed to perform radiation work there must be some relationship between the wages paid and the doses received. Where the next increment of radiation dose requires additional labour to be recruited the cost will at least equal the cost of the extra labour employed. This paper examines some of the factors which affect the variability of the labour cost of radiation dose and notes that for 'in-plant' exposures the current cost per rem appears to be significantly higher than values quoted in ICRP Publication 22. An example is given showing how this concept may be used to determine the capital it is worth spending on installed plant to prevent regular increments of radiation dose to workers. (author)

  20. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  1. Biosphere model for assessing doses from nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.; Amiro, B.D.; Davis, P.A.; Sheppard, S.C.; Szekeley, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The biosphere model, BIOTRAC, for predicting long term nuclide concentrations and radiological doses from Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept of a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield is presented. This generic, boreal zone biosphere model is based on scenario analysis and systems variability analysis using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Conservatism is used to bridge uncertainties, even though this creates a small amount of extra nuclide mass. Environmental change over the very long assessment period is mainly handled through distributed parameter values. The dose receptors are a critical group of humans and four generic non-human target organisms. BIOTRAC includes six integrated submodels and it interfaces smoothly with a geosphere model. This interface includes a bedrock well. The geosphere model defines the discharge zones of deep groundwater where nuclides released from the vault enter the biosphere occupied by the dose receptors. The size of one of these zones is reduced when water is withdrawn from the bedrock well. Sensitivity analysis indicates 129 I is by far the most important radionuclide. Results also show bedrock-well water leads to higher doses to man than lake water, but the former doses decrease with the size of the critical group. Under comparable circumstances, doses to the non-human biota are greater than those for man

  2. Evaluation of skin entrance dose imparted on pediatric patients by thorax exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Mercia L.; Khoury, Helen; Drexler, Guenter; GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg; Barros, Edison

    2001-01-01

    In this work the results of a survey of skin entrance dose imparted on pediatric patients are present. Positioning the thermo luminescence dosimeters in contact with the patient's skin, in the center of the incident X-ray beam, collected the skin entrance dose data. The patients were grouped in five age groups: infants, 1,1 to 4 years, 4,1 to 6 years, 6,1 to 10 years and older than 10 years. The results show that the average of skin entrance doses is very higher as compared to the European Community Commission reference levels and to other values found in literature. (author)

  3. Pharmacokinetic comparison of controlled-release and immediate-release oral formulations of simvastatin in healthy Korean subjects: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, single- and multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong Bok; Lee, Yoon Jung; Lim, Lay Ahyoung; Park, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Bong-Ju; Woo, Jong Soo; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Kyungsoo

    2010-01-01

    A controlled-release (CR) formulation of simvastatin was recently developed in Korea. The formulation is expected to yield a lower C(max) and similar AUC values compared with the immediate-release (IR) formulation. The goal of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of the new CR formulation and an IR formulation of simvastatin after single- and multiple-dose administration in healthy Korean subjects. This study was developed as part of a product development project at the request of the Korean regulatory agency. This was a randomized, open-label, parallelgroup, 2-part study. Eligible subjects were healthy male or female volunteers between the ages of 19 and 55 years and within 20% of their ideal weight. In part I, each subject received a single dose of the CR or IR formulation of simvastatin 40 mg orally (20 mg x 2 tablets) after fasting. In part II, each subject received the same dose of the CR or IR formulation for 8 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained for 48 hours after the dose in part I and after the first and the last dose in part II. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for both simvastatin (the inactive prodrug) and simvastatin acid (the active moiety). An adverse event (AE) was defined as any unfavorable sign (including an abnormal laboratory finding) or symptom, regardless of whether it had a causal relationship with the study medication. Serious AEs were defined as any events that are considered life threatening, require hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization, cause persistent or significant disability or incapacity, or result in congenital abnormality, birth defect, or death. AEs were determined based on patient interviews and physical examinations. Twenty-four healthy subjects (17 men, 7 women; mean [SD] age, 29 [7] years; age range, 22-50 years) were enrolled in part I, and 29 subjects (17 men, 12 women; mean age, 33 [9] years; age range, 19-55 years) were enrolled in part II. For simvastatin acid, C

  4. Investigations of peripheral dose for helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissner, Steffen; Schubert, Kai; Sterzing, Florian; Herfarth, Klaus; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wiezorek, Tilo [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Whenever treating a patient with percutaneous radiotherapy, a certain amount of dose is inevitably delivered to healthy tissue. This is mainly due to beam's entry and exit in the region of the target volume. In regions distant from the target volume, dose is delivered by leakage from the MLC and head scatter from the accelerator head and phantom scatter from the target volume (peripheral dose). Helical tomotherapy is a form of radiation therapy with a uniquely designed machine and delivery pattern which influence the peripheral dose. The goal of this work was to investigate peripheral dose in helical tomotherapy. The experiments were used to establish a complex characterization of the peripheral dose. Materials and methods: A 30*30*60cm{sup 3} slab phantom and TLD-100 (Lithium fluoride) were used for the experiments. Treatment procedures were generated with the tomotherapy planning system (TPS). Additionally, procedures were created on the Operator Station of the tomotherapy system without a calculation of the dose distribution. The peripheral dose which was produced by a typical tomotherapy treatment plan was measured. Furthermore, these procedures were used to differentiate the parts of the peripheral dose in phantom scatter dose and head scatter and leakage dose. Additionally, the relation between peripheral dose and treatment time and between peripheral dose and delivered dose was investigated. Additionally, the peripheral dose was measured in an Alderson phantom. Results: Distances of 30cm or more resulted in a decrease of the peripheral dose to less than 0.1% of the target dose. The measured doses have an offset of approximately 1cGy in comparison to the calculated doses from the TPS. The separated head scatter and leakage dose was measured in the range of 1cGy for typical treatments. Furthermore, the investigations show a linear correlation between head scatter leakage dose and treatment time and between scatter dose parts and delivered dose. A

  5. Establishment Of Dose Correlation During Dose Mapping On Medical Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzalina Baharin; Hasan Sham; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab

    2014-01-01

    This paper explains the work done during product dose mapping in order to get the correlation between doses at MINTec-Sinagama plant. Product used was medical devices in aluminium tubes packaged in cardboard kegs packaging with average weight of 12 kg per carton. 12 cartons were loaded in every one tote to give 0.2 g/ cm 3 of density. Ceric cerous dosimeters were placed at specific locations as indicated in SP14: Product Dose Mapping, QMS of MINTec-Sinagama around three planes. Three processes were made at different days as a three replicates to show the reproducibility of measurements. (author)

  6. Benchmarking pediatric cranial CT protocols using a dose tracking software system: a multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondt, Timo de; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Mulkens, Tom [H. Hart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lier (Belgium); Zanca, Federica [GE Healthcare, DoseWatch, Buc (France); KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Pyfferoen, Lotte; Casselman, Jan W. [AZ St. Jan Brugge-Oostende AV Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    To benchmark regional standard practice for paediatric cranial CT-procedures in terms of radiation dose and acquisition parameters. Paediatric cranial CT-data were retrospectively collected during a 1-year period, in 3 different hospitals of the same country. A dose tracking system was used to automatically gather information. Dose (CTDI and DLP), scan length, amount of retakes and demographic data were stratified by age and clinical indication; appropriate use of child-specific protocols was assessed. In total, 296 paediatric cranial CT-procedures were collected. Although the median dose of each hospital was below national and international diagnostic reference level (DRL) for all age categories, statistically significant (p-value < 0.001) dose differences among hospitals were observed. The hospital with lowest dose levels showed smallest dose variability and used age-stratified protocols for standardizing paediatric head exams. Erroneous selection of adult protocols for children still occurred, mostly in the oldest age-group. Even though all hospitals complied with national and international DRLs, dose tracking and benchmarking showed that further dose optimization and standardization is possible by using age-stratified protocols for paediatric cranial CT. Moreover, having a dose tracking system revealed that adult protocols are still applied for paediatric CT, a practice that must be avoided. (orig.)

  7. Soil bacteria show different tolerance ranges to an unprecedented disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques; Jurburg, Stephanie; Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste

    2018-01-01

    of functional response groups (FRGs). Increasing microwaving doses resulted in 90% loss in total and transcriptionally active bacterial communities after 6.8 and 4.7 min, respectively. Four distinct FRGs with peculiar phylogenetic signatures were identified, revealing a link between taxonomy and increasing...

  8. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  9. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr

  10. Varicose veins show enhanced chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá, L del Rio; Aceves, M; Dueñas, A I; González-Fajardo, J A; Vaquero, C; Crespo, M Sanchez; García-Rodríguez, C

    2009-11-01

    Leucocyte infiltration in the wall of varicose veins has been reported previously. This study was designed to investigate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in control and in patients with varicose veins and to test the effect of treating varicose vein patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on cytokine expression prior to removal of varices. Sections of vein were removed during operation from both patient groups, and ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs) were performed to assess the expression of chemokines. Group I included non-varicose saphenous veins from healthy patients undergoing amputation for trauma. Varicose veins were obtained from patients with primary varicose undergoing surgical treatment who received no drug (group II) or treatment with 300 mg day(-1) of ASA for 15 days before surgery (group III). Non-varicose veins constitutively expressed low levels of monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA. Varicose veins had a distinct chemokine expression pattern, since significant up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8 and a marked expression of IP-10, RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta mRNA were detected. Removal of the endothelium did not alter this pattern. Varicose veins obtained from patients treated with ASA showed a consistent decrease in chemokine expression, although it did not reach statistical significance. Varicose veins showed increased expression of several chemokines compared to control veins. A non-significant reduction of activation was observed following treatment with ASA for 15 days.

  11. Feasibility study on standardization of 131I dose in hyperthyrodisom treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yi

    2011-01-01

    To explore feasibility of standardization of 131 I dose in Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment, the data of 681 Graves' disease cases treated with 131 I was retrospective studied. The software was developed to re-calculate the 131 I doses for the patients and compared with original doses given by traditional method. 313 patients with complete information were taken and divided to three groups base on the remedial effect, Cured Group (123 patients), Uncured Group (125 patients) and Hypothyroid Group (65 patients). The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 131 I dose for Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment calculated by two methods (P>0.05). There was obviously statistically significant difference in hypothyroid Group (P 131 I calculated by software method (174.27 MBq) was less than that of traditional method (190.18 MBq). In uncured group, there was still obviously statistically significant difference (P 131 I calculated by software method (187.22 MBq) was more than that of the traditional method (169.46 MBq). In cured group, there was no statistically significant difference (P>0.005), the mean dose of 131 I calculated by software method (185 MBq) was slightly smaller than that of the traditional method(192.03 MBq). The results indicate the calculation of standard 131 I dose for Graves' hyperthyroidism treatment by software developed in this study is feasible. (authors)

  12. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnav R. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s. The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1 and dynamic (group 2 modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3, digital intraoral radiography (group 4, and CBCT scan (group 5 using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α=0.01 in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future.

  13. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.; Watson, E.C.

    1977-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments were estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1975. Fifty-year dose commitments from one year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. Results are given in the form of tables giving the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within the 2 to 80-km region around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 750 person-rem to a low of 0.008 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 34 person-rem

  14. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  15. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  16. Estimates of effective equivalent dose commitments for Slovene population following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanduc, M.; Jovanowic, O.; Kuhar, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows the estimates of effective equivalent dose commitments for the two groups of Slovene population, 5 years old children and adults. Doses were calculated on the basis of the ICRP 30 methodology, first from the measurements of the concentrations of the radionuclides in air, water and food samples and then compared with the results of the measurements of radionuclides in composite samples of the prepared food, taken in the kindergarten nearby. Results show that there is certain degree of conservatism hidden in the calculation of the doses on the basis of measurements of the activity concentration in the elements of the biosphere and is estimated to be roughly 50%. (author)

  17. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average dosage of diclofenac suppository and mean time for taking the first dosage of opioids have not statistical difference too (respectively; P = 0.76, P = 0.87). Average dose of pethidine was lesser than placebo statistically. It means, the case group did not take pethidine but this amount was 6 (20%) in the control one (P ...

  18. Validation of GPU based TomoTherapy dose calculation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Yu; Chen, Mingli; Henderson, Douglas; Sterpin, Edmond

    2012-04-01

    The graphic processing unit (GPU) based TomoTherapy convolution/superposition(C/S) dose engine (GPU dose engine) achieves a dramatic performance improvement over the traditional CPU-cluster based TomoTherapy dose engine (CPU dose engine). Besides the architecture difference between the GPU and CPU, there are several algorithm changes from the CPU dose engine to the GPU dose engine. These changes made the GPU dose slightly different from the CPU-cluster dose. In order for the commercial release of the GPU dose engine, its accuracy has to be validated. Thirty eight TomoTherapy phantom plans and 19 patient plans were calculated with both dose engines to evaluate the equivalency between the two dose engines. Gamma indices (Γ) were used for the equivalency evaluation. The GPU dose was further verified with the absolute point dose measurement with ion chamber and film measurements for phantom plans. Monte Carlo calculation was used as a reference for both dose engines in the accuracy evaluation in heterogeneous phantom and actual patients. The GPU dose engine showed excellent agreement with the current CPU dose engine. The majority of cases had over 99.99% of voxels with Γ(1%, 1 mm) GPU dose engine also showed similar degree of accuracy in heterogeneous media as the current TomoTherapy dose engine. It is verified and validated that the ultrafast TomoTherapy GPU dose engine can safely replace the existing TomoTherapy cluster based dose engine without degradation in dose accuracy.

  19. Trends in doses to radiation workers recorded on the Central Index of Dose Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenslade, E.; Kendall, G.M.; Fillary, K.; Bines, W.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the doses stored on the Central Index of Dose Information for the calendar years 1986, 1987 and 1988. Mean doses are low, and both mean doses and the proportion of workers exceeding 15 mSv in a year are decreasing with time. Underground miners are the occupational group receiving the highest doses, though in this and other relatively high dose groups the exposures are falling with time. Only 6% of workers are female and their average individual dose is about half that of men. Patterns of employment are different for women and men but there is a tendency for women to receive lower doses than men even within the same occupation. (author)

  20. Short androgenic suppression and high dose radiotherapy (80 Gy) for prostate cancer with intermediate risk: interim analysis of randomized trial 14 by the Group of uro-genital tumour investigations (Getug); Suppression androgenique courte et radiotherapie de haute dose (80 Gy) pour cancer prostatique de risque intermediaire: analyse interimaire de l'essai randomise 14 du Groupe d'etudes des tumeurs urogenitales (Getug)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubray, B. [CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France); Beckendorf, V.; Harter, V. [CRLCCAIexis-Vautrin, Vandceuvre- les-Nancy (France); Guerif, S. [CHU La Miletrie, Poitiers (France); Le Prise, E. [CRLCCEugene-Marquis, Rennes (France); Reynaud-Bougnoux, A. [Corad Henry-S.-Kaplan, Tours (France); Hannoun Levi, J.M. [CRLCCAntoine-Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nguyeng, T.D. [InstitutJean-Godinot, Reims (France); Hennequin, C. [CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Cretin, J. [Clinique de Valdegour, Nimes (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report an interim analysis of a randomized trial for the assessment of the contribution of a short androgenic suppression to a high-dose irradiation on patients suffering from an intermediate risk localized prostate cancer. The study concerned a bit less than 400 patients treated between 2003 and 2010. About half of them had hormonotherapy, and the other half not. Results are discussed in terms of biochemical or clinical control probability, of cumulative grade-3 and grade-4 toxicity rates. The benefit of androgenic suppression does not reach a statistic significant threshold. Short communication

  1. Th1/2 Immune Response Signature Predicts Outcome after Dose-Dense Immunochemotherapy in Patients with High Risk Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma – Results from Nordic Lymphoma Group Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M, Autio; Jørgensen, Judit Meszaros; SK, Leivonen

    treatment-specific roles in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. For the high risk DLBCL patients treated with dose-dense immunochemotherapy, high expression of type 1/2 immune response signature genes predicts a poor outcome. A detailed characterization of immune cell composition in the tumor microenvironment......Introduction: Despite better therapeutic options and improved survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 30-40% of the patients still relapse and have dismal prognosis. Recently, the impact of genomic aberrations, allowing lymphoma cells to escape immune recognition on DLBCL pathogenesis...... has been recognized. However, whether immune related signatures could be used as determinants for treatment outcome has not been rigorously evaluated. Here, our aim was to elucidate the immunologic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment, and associate the findings with outcome in patients...

  2. Initial results of a phase II trial of high dose radiation therapy, 5-fluorouracil, and cisplatin for patients with anal cancer (E4292): an eastern cooperative oncology group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martenson, James A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Wagner, Henry; Kaplan, Edward H.; Otteman, Larry A.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Mansour, Edward G.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Benson, Al Bowen

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective clinical trial was performed to assess the response and toxicity associated with the use of high dose radiation therapy, 5-fluorouracil, and cisplatin in patients with anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with anal cancer without distant metastasis were eligible for this study. Radiation therapy consisted of 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions; a 2 week break in treatment was taken after 36 Gy had been given. A treatment of 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m 2 per day intravenously, was given for the first 4 days of radiation therapy, and cisplatin, 75 mg/m 2 intravenously, was given on day 1 of radiation therapy. A second course of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was given after 36 Gy of radiation, when the radiation therapy was resumed. Results: Nineteen patients entered this study and received treatment. Thirteen (68%) had a complete response, 5 (26%) had a partial response, and 1 (5%) had stable disease. The patient with stable disease and one of the patients with a partial response had complete disappearance of tumor more than 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Fifteen patients had toxicity of Grade 3 or higher: the worst toxicity was Grade 3 in eight patients, Grade 4 in six patients, and Grade 5 in one patient. The most common form of toxicity of Grade 3 or higher was hematologic. The one lethal toxicity was due to pseudomembranous colitis, which was a complication of antibiotic therapy for a urinary tract infection. Conclusion: Radiation therapy, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil resulted in an overall response rate of 95%. Significant toxicity occurred, an indication that this regimen is near the maximal tolerated dose. A Phase III clinical trial is planned in which radiation therapy, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil will be used as an experimental arm

  3. CT doses in cylindrical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, J.V.; Huda, W.

    1995-01-01

    A single CT scan of thickness T in a cylindrical phantom produces a three-dimensional dose distribution, which depends primarily on the photon energy spectrum, the x-ray beam shaping filter and the size and composition of the irradiated phantom. Monte Carlo simulations employing monoenergetic photons were employed to investigate the effect of each of these factors on phantom dose distributions. The fractional energies scattered, imparted and transmitted through the CT phantom were calculated. A dose index (D(r)), which is a function of phantom radius r, was computed. Phantom materials investigated included lung, fat, water, soft tissue, acrylic and bone with calculations performed for head (160 mm diameter) and body (320 mm diameter) phantoms. All dose and energy imparted data generated for CT phantoms were normalized using an 'in air' dose (D air ), which is defined as the axial dose (in acrylic) at the isocentre in the absence of any phantom. Results obtained show how CT parameters impact on doses in cylindrical phantoms. These dosimetry data are likely to be useful to estimate energy imparted to phantoms (and patients) undergoing CT examinations. (author)

  4. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1987. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 70 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for reach of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mrem to a high of 0.009 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year). 2 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Population Dose Commitments Due to Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plant Sites in 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. A.

    1980-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1977. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ, Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 220 person-rem to a low of 0.003 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 16 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 700 person-rem for the 92 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10{sup -5} mrem to a high of 0.1 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  6. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1987. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 70 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for reach of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 x 10 -6 mrem to a high of 0.009 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year). 2 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1989-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1986. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 66 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 31 person-rem to a low of 0.0007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.7 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 110 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 x 10 -6 mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. 12 refs

  8. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commericial power reactors operating during 1985. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 61 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 73 person-rem to a low of 0.011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 200 person-rem for the 110 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites

  9. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1984. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 56 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 110 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 5 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 280 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 6 x 10 -6 mrem to a high of 0.04 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites

  10. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1982. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1982. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 51 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 30 person-rem to a low of 0.007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 130 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 6 x 10 -7 mrem to a high of 0.06 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites

  11. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear-power-plant sites in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloquin, R.A.; Schwab, J.D.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1978. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 200 person-rem to a low of 0.0004 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 14 person-rem. The total population dose for allsites was estimated at 660 person-rem for the 93 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 3 x 10 -6 mrem to a high of 0.08 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites

  12. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from Nuclear-Power-Plant Sites in 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1979. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 1300 person-rem to a low of 0.0002 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 38 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 1800 person-rem for the 94 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10 - 6 mrem to a high of 0.7 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites

  13. Patient and population doses of x-ray diagnostics in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannikko, S.; Karila, K.T.K.; Toivonen, M.

    1997-09-01

    Periodic surveys of patient and population doses are important because of the large contribution of x-ray diagnostics to the artificial population dose. Measured entrance surface doses and dose-area products are the main quantities used for monitoring patient doses in hospitals, and most population dose studies have been derived from these quantities and from the frequences of x-ray examinations. This study is based on the radiation, exposure geometry, and patient parameters recorded by experienced radiographers and postgraduated students. The software used in the work (ODS-60 of Rados Technology) suits the determination of effective and organ doses from such detailed data using a human-like patient phantom which can be adapted for sex and size. The program, together with the very detailed input data, made it possible to determine organ equivalent and effective doses for complicated dynamic x-ray examinations and interventions in more detail than in previous studies. Collective organ and effective doses were derived for 50 examination types. The annual collective dose from diagnostic x-ray examinations in 1994 was 0.5 mSv per capita in Finland. The five groups of examinations or examinations that had greatest contributions to the collective dose were CT, barium enema: double contrast, lumbar spine, carotid angiography, and intestinal transit. Together they represented for about 60 % of the total dose. The highest dose-area products (about 2000 Gy cm 2 ) were obtained from certain angiographic and interventional examinations. A literature survey showed that Finland patient doses are at the same average level as in other countries of a high standard of health care. (orig.)

  14. Low-dose radiotherapy for Stage I seminoma-long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Freyd, Johanna; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wullich, Bernd; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to review retrospectively the results of low-dose radiotherapy for Stage I seminoma using four different fractionation schedules and target volume definitions. Methods and Materials: A total of 191 patients underwent irradiation for histologically proven Stage I seminoma after undergoing an inguinal orchiectomy. Fractionation schedules were used one after another as follows: Total dose 30 Gy (dose/fraction 1.5 Gy, 16 patients), total dose 25.5 Gy (dose/fraction 1.5 Gy, 62 patients), total dose 20 Gy (dose/fraction 2 Gy, 69 patients), total dose 26 Gy (dose/fraction 2 Gy, 29 patients). The remaining 12 patients were excluded from this study. In the same period the target volume was gradually reduced. In 1983 the paraaortic, pelvic and inguinal regions were irradiated; later the target volume was reduced to the paraaortic region exclusively. Results: Overall survival and event-free survival were identical in all groups ranging from 95% to 100% /5 years. Three patients experienced a lymph node metastasis during follow-up, 3 patients a distant metastasis to the lung and the bones. Mild acute side effects were noted in 8% to 15% of the patients, and very mild long-term side effects in 1% to 5% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed no prognostic significance of total dose, dose per fraction, or target volume. In univariate analysis, a higher frequency of acute side effects to the skin and the bowel was related to a higher total dose, and an elevated frequency of nausea was related to a higher daily dose per fraction. Conclusion: Using lower doses and limiting the target volume to the paraaortic region exclusively did not result in a worse prognosis in our patient series

  15. Low-dose decitabine versus best supportive care in elderly patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy: final results of the randomized phase III study of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Leukemia Group and the German MDS Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbert, M.; Suciu, S.; Baila, L.; Ruter, B.H.; Platzbecker, U.; Giagounidis, A.; Selleslag, D.; Labar, B.; Germing, U.; Salih, H.R.; Beeldens, F.; Muus, P.; Pfluger, K.H.; Coens, C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Eckart Schaefer, H.; Ganser, A.; Aul, C.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Wijermans, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare low-dose decitabine to best supportive care (BSC) in higher-risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) age 60 years or older and ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two-hundred thirty-three patients (median age, 70 years; range, 60 to 90 years)

  16. Efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (adderall XR) in the management of oppositional defiant disorder with or without comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in school-aged children and adolescents: A 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J; Abikoff, Howard B; Connor, Daniel F; Biederman, Joseph; Pliszka, Steven R; Boellner, Samuel; Read, Stephanie C; Pratt, Raymond

    2006-03-01

    30-mg/d group in the intent-to-treat analysis (-0.42; P < 0.005). Throughout the study, MAS XR was well tolerated in these children and adolescents with ODD, and most adverse events were mild to moderate in intensity. The most frequently reported adverse events occurring in MAS XR-treated patients were anorexia/decreased appetite (25.3%), insomnia (19.5%), headache (18.5%), and abdominal pain (10.7%). Statistically, but not clinically, significant decreases in body weight were seen with MAS XR (range, -1.1 to -3.5 lb; P < 0.001 vs placebo). Changes in laboratory values, ECG measurements, and physical and other vital signs were also not clinically significant. The post hoc reanalysis was based on the per-protocol population (n = 229). An assessment of the high baseline symptom severity subgroups showed a good response to MAS XR treatment for the SNAP-IV parent and teacher rating scales (both, P < 0.05). This study found that higher doses ofMAS XR (30 and 40 mg) were effective and well tolerated in the management of ODD in these school aged children and adolescents in the presence or absence of ADHD.

  17. Group: radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.

    1990-01-01

    The main activities of the radiation dosimetry group is described, including the calibration of instruments, sources and radioactive solutions and the determination of neutron flux; development, production and market dosimetric materials; development radiation sensor make the control of radiation dose received by IPEN workers; development new techniques for monitoring, etc. (C.G.C.)

  18. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222 Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings

  19. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There is confusion over radiation dose limits between the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), reports a Friends of the Earth's radiation campaigner. MAFF is suggesting the inadequate ICRP public dose limit does not apply to public exposures which arise from environmental contamination from past radioactive discharges. (author)

  20. How tracking radiologic procedures and dose helps: experience from Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuri, Raija; Rehani, Madan M; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the experience of tracking radiologic procedures and radiation dose for individual patients in terms of impact on justification and optimization. Examples were collected at the Hospital for Children and Adolescents in Helsinki, Finland, through a PACS system that covers 33 institutions in the Helsinki-Uusimaa Hospital District in which reviewing previous radiologic procedures or radiation doses helped in either avoiding the next procedure or provided insight that helped to strengthen dose optimization for CT. With the help of four case reports, our results show that availability of previous imaging studies and radiation dose figures helped to avoid additional new CT examinations by providing required information from previously performed CT examinations, indicate the need for imaging parameter optimization in one facility in view of a better situation detected in another facility, observe the need for further optimization with a specific CT unit and validate the outcome of successful optimization, and make a value judgment in a situation in which a patient has already undergone a number of CT examinations and a critical evaluation could avoid another one. Patient-specific optimization provides a more reliable and effective method than that of comparing average patient group values. Collective dose for a patient was not used in any situation in decision making. Patient-specific justification and optimization becomes possible using the tracking of radiologic procedures and radiation dose of individual patients.

  1. Effects of monthly dose and regular dosing of intravenous active vitamin D use on mortality among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peter, Wendy L; Li, Shuling; Liu, Jiannong; Gilbertson, David T; Arneson, Thomas J; Collins, Allan J

    2009-02-01

    To determine if apparent protective mortality benefits of intravenous active vitamin D in patients undergoing hemodialysis extend across all groups defined by dialysis duration; if higher monthly dose and dosing regularity are associated with reduced mortality; and if intravenous active vitamin D use is associated with reduced cardiovascular, infectious, and cancer-related mortality. Retrospective cohort study. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services End-Stage Renal Disease database. A total of 193,830 patients undergoing hemodialysis during 1999-2000, of whom 94,208 (48.6%) were taking intravenous active vitamin D in the baseline period. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effects of monthly vitamin D dose and dosing regularity over 3-month intervals on risk of all-cause and cause-specific death, by dialysis duration groups (or=5 yrs from dialysis initiation). Models were adjusted for baseline characteristics, time-varying hospital days, monthly epoetin alfa dose, mean hemoglobin level, and urea reduction ratio in the 3-month intervals. Maximum follow-up time was 5.25 years. Adjusted all-cause mortality risk was reduced 7-17% among patients receiving vitamin D each month of the 3-month interval, with the highest reduction among patients with shorter dialysis duration. However, regular vitamin D dosing did not show consistent benefit across dialysis duration groups for cardiovascular, infectious, cancer, or other (all deaths not attributable to cardiovascular disease, infection, or cancer) mortality. Mortality benefits of intravenous vitamin D cannot be easily explained by currently proposed biologic mechanisms. Randomized controlled trials are needed to show definitively whether intravenous vitamin D can reduce all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients undergoing dialysis compared with placebo.

  2. High-dose irradiation for prostate cancer via a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: Results of a phase I to II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Boike, Thomas P.; Spencer, William; Goldstein, Neal; Gustafson, Gary S.; Krauss, Daniel J.; Gonzalez, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients on a prospective dose-escalation study of pelvic external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Methods: From November 1991 to April 2003, 197 patients were treated for intermediate- and high-risk disease features. All patients had prostate-specific antigen >10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical stage ≥T2b, and all received pelvic EBRT (46 Gy) while receiving either two or three HDR boost treatments. HDR dose fractionation increased progressively and was divided into two dose levels. The mean prostate biologic equivalency dose was 88.2 Gy for the low-dose group and 116.8 Gy for the high-dose group (α/β = 1.2). Clinical failure was either local failure or distant metastasis; clinical event-free survival (cEFS) was defined as patients who lived free of clinical failure. Results: Median follow-up was 4.9 years. The 5-year rates were as follows: biologic failure (BF), 18.6%, clinical failure (CF), 9.8%, cEFS 84.8%, cause-specific survival (CSS), 98.3%, and overall survival (OS), 92.9%. Five-year biochemical failure (68.7% vs. 86%, p < 0.001), CF (6.1% vs. 15.6%, p = 0.04), cEFS (75.5% vs. 91.7%, p = 0.003), CSS (95.4% vs. 100%, p = 0.02), and OS (86.2% vs. 97.8%, p = 0.002) were significantly better for the high-dose group. Multivariate analysis showed that high-dose group (p = 0.01, HR 0.35) and Gleason score (p = 0.01, HR 1.84) were significant variables for cEFS. Multivariate analysis showed that high-dose group (p = 0.01, HR 0.14) and age (p = 0.03, HR 1.09 per year) were significant variables for overall survival. Conclusion: There is a strong dose-response relationship for intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients. Improved locoregional control with higher radiation doses alone can significantly decrease biochemical and clinical failures

  3. Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae extract shows protective effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: The results show that a high-dose of CLJE (600 mg/kg) significantly inhibited bone mineral density (BMD) reduction of L4 vertebrae (0.24 ... Keywords: Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae, Post-menopausal osteoporosis, Ovariectomy, Bone mineral density, Trabecular ..... biology of osteoclast function. J Cell Sci. 2000; 113:.

  4. Long-term immunogenicity of two pediatric doses of combined hepatitis A and B or monovalent hepatitis B vaccine in 8 to 10-year-old children and the effect of a challenge dose given seven years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilca, Vladimir; Dionne, Marc; Boulianne, Nicole; Murphy, Donald; De Serres, Gaston

    2009-10-01

    A total of 465 children aged 8 to 10 years were vaccinated with 2 doses of Recombivax-HB 2.5 microg (RB) or Twinrix-Junior 10 microg/360 EL.U (TX), according to a 0 and 6 months schedule. Seven years postsecond dose, a challenge dose of vaccine was given. All vaccinees in the TX and 98% in the RB group showed an anamnestic response. Vaccination at the age of 8 to 10 years with two-pediatric doses of TX or RB given with a 6 months interval induces a long-lasting immunity in most vaccinees.

  5. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  6. A graphical review of radiogenic animal cancer data using the 'dose and dose-rate map'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Hoshi, Yuko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    We have been investigating the effects of low dose or low dose rate irradiation on mice, using our low dose-rate irradiation facilities. In these studies, we found that the effects were highly dependent on both total dose and dose rate. To show this visually, we proposed the 'dose/dose rate map', and plotted the results of our laboratory and our co-workers. The map demonstrated that dose/dose rate plane could be divided into three areas; 1) An area where harmful effects are observed, 2) An area where no harmful effects are observed, and 3) Another area, between previous two areas, where certain protective functions are enhanced. As this map would be a powerful tool to find some trend among the vast numbers of data relating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, we have developed a computer program which plots the collected data on the dose/dose rate map sorting by experimental conditions. In this study, we graphically reviewed and analyzed the data relating to the lifespan studies of animals with a view to determining the relationships between doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation and cancer incidence. The data contains about 800 sets of experiments, which concerns 187,000 animals exposed to gamma ray or X-ray and their 112,000 controls, and total of about 30,000 cancers in exposed animals and 14,000 cancers in controls. About 800 points of data were plotted on the dose/dose rate map. The plot showed that 1) The divided three areas in the dose/dose rate map were generally confirmed by these 800 points of data, and 2) In some particular conditions, e.g. sarcoma by X-rays, the biologically effective area is extended to relatively high dose/dose rate area. (author)

  7. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime facilitates successful resuscitation in a dose-dependent fashion in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Kim, Mu Jin; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Lee, Dong Hun; Min, Yong Il

    2016-06-01

    Ischemic contracture compromises the hemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and resuscitability from cardiac arrest. In a pig model of cardiac arrest, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) attenuated ischemic contracture. We investigated the effects of different doses of BDM to determine whether increasing the dose of BDM could improve the hemodynamic effectiveness of CPR further, thus ultimately improving resuscitability. After 16minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation and 8minutes of basic life support, 36 pigs were divided randomly into 3 groups that received 50mg/kg (low-dose group) of BDM, 100mg/kg (high-dose group) of BDM, or an equivalent volume of saline (control group) during advanced cardiovascular life support. During advanced cardiovascular life support, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and a decrease in LV chamber area. In contrast, the BDM-treated groups showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness and an increase in the LV chamber area in a dose-dependent fashion. Mixed-model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Central venous oxygen saturation at 3minutes after the drug administration was 21.6% (18.4-31.9), 39.2% (28.8-53.7), and 54.0% (47.5-69.4) in the control, low-dose, and high-dose groups, respectively (Pfashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Myocardial protection induced by fentanyl in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita Castro; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sá; Viana, Bruno Gonçalves; Vane, Matheus Fachini; Carmona, Maria Jose Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    The use of high doses of adrenaline is common in critical patients, especially during cardiac arrest. During these situations, myocardial dysfunction can be a result of multiple factors, including adrenaline use. In addition, opioids have been shown to have anti-arrhythmic and anti-ischemic mechanisms that may confer cardiac protection. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fentanyl on myocardial function in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline. After institutional ethics committee approval, 26 pigs were randomly allocated to receive either 20 μg/kg fentanyl (n = 10; fentanyl group) administered 5 min before five doses of adrenaline (20 μg/kg), equivalent-volume saline (n = 10; saline group) using the same adrenaline dosing protocol, or neither fentanyl nor adrenaline (n = 6; sham group). The fentanyl group showed lower levels of troponin at the end of the sixth hour compared with the saline group (1.91 ± 1.47 vs 5.44 ± 5.35 ng/mL, P = 0.019). Transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry also showed less myocardial injury in the fentanyl group. The conclusion was reached that fentanyl attenuates myocardial injury caused by high-dose adrenaline without blunting the hemodynamic effect of adrenaline. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  10. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  11. Dose budget for exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Dose budget is an important management tool to effectively control the collective dose incurred in a nuclear facility. The budget represents a set of yardsticks or guidelines for use in controlling the internal activities, involving radiation exposure in the organisation. The management, through budget can evaluate the radiation protection performance at every level of the organisation where a number of independent functional groups work on routine and non-routine jobs. The discrepancy between the plan and the actual performance is high lighted through the budgets. The organisation may have to change the course of its operation in a particular area or revise its plan with due focus on appropriate protective measures. (author)

  12. Skull base chordomas: analysis of dose-response characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemierko, Andrzej; Terahara, Atsuro; Goitein, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To extract dose-response characteristics from dose-volume histograms and corresponding actuarial survival statistics for 115 patients with skull base chordomas. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data for 115 patients with skull base chordoma treated with combined photon and proton conformal radiotherapy to doses in the range 66.6Gy - 79.2Gy. Data set for each patient included gender, histology, age, tumor volume, prescribed dose, overall treatment time, time to recurrence or time to last observation, target dose-volume histogram, and several dosimetric parameters (minimum/mean/median/maximum target dose, percent of the target volume receiving the prescribed dose, dose to 90% of the target volume, and the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survivor function estimate, the proportional hazards (Cox) model, and parametric modeling of the actuarial probability of recurrence. Parameters of dose-response characteristics were obtained using the maximum likelihood method. Results: Local failure developed in 42 (36%) of patients, with actuarial local control rates at 5 years of 59.2%. The proportional hazards model revealed significant dependence of gender on the probability of recurrence, with female patients having significantly poorer prognosis (hazard ratio of 2.3 with the p value of 0.008). The Wilcoxon and the log-rank tests of the corresponding Kaplan-Meier recurrence-free survival curves confirmed statistical significance of this effect. The Cox model with stratification by gender showed significance of tumor volume (p=0.01), the minimum target dose (p=0.02), and the EUD (p=0.02). Other parameters were not significant at the α level of significance of 0.05, including the prescribed dose (p=0.21). Parametric analysis using a combined model of tumor control probability (to account for non-uniformity of target dose distribution) and the Weibull failure time model (to account for censoring) allowed us to estimate

  13. Type 2 Diabetic Rats on Diet Supplemented With Chromium Malate Show Improved Glycometabolism, Glycometabolism-Related Enzyme Levels and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Feng, Yun; Li, Fang; Zheng, Daheng; Wu, Huiyu; Jin, Dun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes. PMID:25942313

  14. Optimal dose of intra-articular corticosteroids for adhesive capsulitis: a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Young; Lee, Hyun Jung; Kwack, Kyu-Sung

    2013-05-01

    Intra-articular corticosteroid injection is a commonly used therapy for adhesive capsulitis, but there are only few studies that compare the efficacy of corticosteroids according to different doses. To determine whether intra-articular injections with a high-dose corticosteroid improves pain and function in patients with adhesive capsulitis better than a low dose or a placebo. Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. Participants (n = 53) with primary adhesive capsulitis in the freezing stage were randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided intra-articular injections with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide (high-dose group, n = 20), 20 mg triamcinolone acetonide (low-dose group, n = 20), or placebo (n = 13). After a single injection, participants were all instructed to carry out a home exercise program. The outcome measures included the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), visual analog scale (VAS) for average shoulder pain level, and passive range of motion including flexion, abduction, extension, external rotation, and internal rotation before treatment and at weeks 1, 3, 6, and 12 after treatment. There were no significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline between the 3 groups. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests showed improvement in SPADI and VAS scores and in flexion, abduction, and internal rotation especially for the low- and high-dose groups compared with the placebo. Yet, no significant difference was found between the 2 different corticosteroid dose groups. We assessed the efficacy of corticosteroid injections according to 2 different doses that are most widely used in intra-articular injections for adhesive capsulitis. This study shows that there were no significant differences between the high- and low-dose corticosteroid groups, indicating the preferred use of a low dose in the initial stage.

  15. A comparative study of Multiple versus Single infection doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    auratus) were compared with those of single exposure. Multiple infections with low doses of the parasite did not seem to be protective, as suggested by; more worms, worse gross and histopathology in multiple low dose group compared to single high dose group. Most probably there is an antigenic threshold, which needs ...

  16. Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae extract shows protective effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caulis Lonicerae Japonicae extract shows protective effect on osteoporosis in rats. ... Result: The results show that a high-dose of CLJE (600 mg/kg) significantly inhibited bone mineral density (BMD) reduction of L4 vertebrae (0.24 ± 0.02, p < 0.05) and femur (0.24 ± 0.03, p < 0.05) caused by OVX, and prevented the ...

  17. An Adjusted Calculation Model of Reduced Heparin Doses in Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery in a Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Kai; Li, Wei; Xue, Qian; Hong, Jiang; Xu, Jibin; Wu, Lihui; Ji, Guangyu; Sheng, Jihong; Wang, Zhinong

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of an adjusted regimen of heparin infusion in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery in a Chinese population. Prospective, single-center, observational study. University teaching hospital. Patients having cardiac surgery with CPB were selected for this study using the following criteria: 18 to 75 years of age, undergoing first-time cardiac surgery with conventional median sternotomy, aortic clamping time between 40 and 120 minutes, and preoperative routine blood tests showing normal liver, renal, and coagulation functions. The exclusion criteria include salvage cases, a history of coagulopathy in the family, and long-term use of anticoagulation or antiplatelet drugs. Sixty patients were divided randomly into a control group (n = 30) receiving a traditional heparin regimen and an experimental group (n = 30) receiving an adjusted regimen. Activated coagulation time (ACT) was monitored at different time points, ACT>480 seconds was set as the safety threshold of CPB. Heparin doses (initial dose, added dose, and total dose), protamine doses (initial dose, added dose, and total dose), CPB time, aortic clamping time, assisted circulation time, sternal closure time, blood transfusion volume, and drainage volume 24 hours after surgery were recorded. There was no significant difference in achieving target ACT after the initial dose of heparin between the 2 groups; CPB time, aortic clamping time, assisted circulation time, postoperative complication rate, and drainage volume between the 2 groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). However, initial and total dosage of heparin, initial and total dosage of protamine, sternal closure time, and intraoperative blood transfusion volume in the experimental group were significantly lower (pChinese CPB patients, which might reduce the initial and total dosage of heparin and protamine as well as sternal closure time and intraoperative blood transfusion volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  18. Kinetics of the early adaptive response and adaptation threshold dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P.

    2003-01-01

    The expression kinetics of the adaptive response (RA) in mouse leukocytes in vivo and the minimum dose of gamma radiation that induces it was determined. The mice were exposed 0.005 or 0.02 Gy of 137 Cs like adaptation and 1h later to the challenge dose (1.0 Gy), another group was only exposed at 1.0 Gy and the damage is evaluated in the DNA with the rehearsal it makes. The treatment with 0. 005 Gy didn't induce RA and 0. 02 Gy causes a similar effect to the one obtained with 0.01 Gy. The RA was show from an interval of 0.5 h being obtained the maximum expression with 5.0 h. The threshold dose to induce the RA is 0.01 Gy and in 5.0 h the biggest quantity in molecules is presented presumably that are related with the protection of the DNA. (Author)

  19. Ionizing Radiation Dose Due to the Use of Agricultural Fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umisedo, Nancy K.; Okuno, Emico; Medina, Nilberto H.; Colacioppo, Sergio; Hiodo, Francisco Y.

    2008-01-01

    The transference of radionuclides from the fertilizers to/and from soils to the foodstuffs can represent an increment in the internal dose when the vegetables are consumed by the human beings. This work evaluates the contribution of fertilizers to the increase of radiation level in the environment and of dose to the people. Samples of fertilizers, soils and vegetables produced in farms located in the neighbourhood of Sao Paulo city in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil were analysed through gamma spectroscopy. The values of specific activity of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th show that there is no significant transference of natural radionuclides from fertilizers to the final product of the food chain. The annual committed effective dose due to the ingestion of 40 K contained in the group of consumed vegetables analysed in this work resulted in the very low value of 0.882 μSv

  20. Mean glandular dose in a breast screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan, H. A.; Perez-Badillo, M. P.; Villasenor, Y. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col Seccion XVI, Mexico, D. F., C. P. 14080 (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Breast density has an important role in early detection of breast cancer, because has been reported the strong association between breast density and invasive breast cancer risk. Mammography is the gold standard to early detection of breast cancer, despite of this require ionizing radiation that may increase radio-induced cancer risk. This maybe limited with a quality control programme of mammographic units, with the main goal of achieving high quality images with low radiation dose. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 2011 the {sup Q}uality assurance programme for digital mammography{sup ,} where glandular tissue quantity is an important parameter to compute mean glandular dose (MGD), which is necessary to reduce its associated risk. In this work we show the first results in our country applying this protocol and studying breast density in a small group. MGD complies with national and IAEA dose limits.

  1. Long Term assessment of the dose registered by the Sanitary workers of a mutual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anies Escartin, J.; Perramon Llado, A.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of a long time period of time (about 17 years) of the professional exposure to ionising radiation of the workers of an accidents Mutual, that has its own personal Dosimetry Service, allows to establish a relation between the showed global reduction of the registered doses of the people exposed and the circumstances and actions that did it possible. The fact to carry out a dosimetric control is an essential factor directed to accomplish the objective of holding the doses as low as achievable, joined with the fact of passing more strict law. Those factors that fixed a reduction of the doses inherited by the sanitary exposed workers whose relation are demonstrated in this study. The collective dose inherited by the bunch of people exposed is the parameter suitable to measure and assess the time history at medium and long term of the exposure conditions of the workers, and identify the more relevant characteristics of the risk by ionising radiation at workplace. The conclusion of the time history analysis of the quantity shows that the total collective dose for more than a thousand people group, are strongly affected by the doses corresponding to less than a 1,5 % of the users. The number of people that have a value dose higher that the average, and the high value of the dose in some periods because of their activity lead to changes of the value of the collective doses that can be higher than 100%. This great uncertainty in the measured value needs more than ten months of control to guarantee the lowering of doses received. The decreasing doses observed are strongly related with the reduction of this relative short number of cases with incidences in the doses registered. An important part of the work is related to identifying the incidences registered, noticing the evolution and checking the most suitable actions to lower it. (Author) 4 refs

  2. Reducing the radiation dose for CT colonography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicek, Kristina T; Hara, Amy K; Silva, Alvin C; Wu, Qing; Peter, Mary B; Johnson, C Daniel

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of preserving image quality during CT colonography (CTC) using a reduced radiation dose with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A proven colon phantom was imaged at standard dose settings (50 mAs) and at reduced doses (10-40 mAs) using six different ASIR levels (0-100%). We assessed 2D and 3D image quality and noise to determine the optimal dose and ASIR setting. Eighteen patients were then scanned with a standard CTC dose (50 mAs) in the supine position and at a reduced dose of 25 mAs with 40% ASIR in the prone position. Three radiologists blinded to the scanning techniques assessed 2D and 3D image quality and noise at three different colon locations. A score difference of > or = 1 was considered clinically important. Actual noise measures were compared between the standard-dose and low-dose acquisitions. The phantom study showed image noise reduction that correlated with a higher percentage of ASIR. In patients, no significant image quality differences were identified between standard- and low-dose images using 40% ASIR. Overall image quality was reduced for both image sets as body mass index increased. Measured image noise was less with the low-dose technique using ASIR. The results of this pilot study show that the radiation dose during CTC can be reduced 50% below currently accepted low-dose techniques without significantly affecting image quality when ASIR is used. Further evaluation in a larger patient group is warranted.

  3. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (pusability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  4. Comparative transcriptome analysis of rice seedlings induced by different doses of heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as a main factor causing biological effects on plant seeds. To investigate the different effects on genome-wide gene expression of low-dose and high-dose ion radiation, we carried out ground-base carbon particle HZE experiments with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.2Gy, 2Gy) to rice seeds and then performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the rice seedlings. We identified a total of 2551 and 1464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in low-dose and high-dose radiation groups, respectively. Gene ontology analyses indicated that low-dose and high-dose ion radiation both led to multiple physiological and biochemical activities changes in rice. By Gene Ontology analyses, the results showed that only one process-oxidation reduction process was enriched in the biological process category after high-dose ion radiation, while more processes such as response to biotic stimulus, heme binding, tetrapyrrole binding, oxidoreductase activity, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were significantly enriched after low-dose ion radiation. The results indicated that the rice plants only focused on the process of oxidation reduction to response to high-dose ion radiation, whereas it was a coordination of multiple biological processes to response to low-dose ion radiation. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of radiation stress-responsive genes, we identified several DEGs-encoding TFs. AP2/EREBP, bHLH, C2H2, MYB and WRKY TF families were altered significantly in response to ion radiation. Mapman analysis speculated that the biological effects on rice seedlings caused by the radiation stress might share similar mechanisms with the biotic stress. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of radiation response genes, metabolic pathways, and TF-encoding genes in rice seedlings exposed to low-dose and high-dose ion radiation.

  5. Prediction of dose to the relatives of patients treated with radioiodine-131 using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Kardan, Mohammad Reza; Changizi, Vahid; Hosseini Pooya, Seyed Mahdi; Geramifar, Parham

    2017-11-20

    In this study, the effective dose to family members and caregivers of 52 thyroid cancer patients who had been treated with radioiodine I-131 was measured to investigate the ability of neural network for predicting the doses to the relatives. Effectiveness of this method to define the relatives who will receive doses more than 1 mSv was evaluated. The effective doses were measured by TLD. The inputs of neural network were 13 different parameters that potentially could affect the dose and the output was dose to the family members. The neural networks in this study were feed-forward with sigmoid activation function and one hidden layer. The mean and median of measured doses were 0.45 and 0.28 mSv and its range was 0.1 - 3.64mSv. The mean square error of predicted doses by the neural network and measured doses by TLD (Mean Squared Error) for 99 individuals was 0.142. The optimum neural network was able to predict all relatives who receive doses more than 1 mSv. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve for the trained Neural Network was 0.957 that showed the ability of the trained Neural Network in distinguishing these groups. Prediction of dose to the patient's relatives before the release is a helpful and future based strategy for optimization. Neural network is a promising method for predicting dose to the family members and defining high risk patients and relatives. Patient specific criteria for release and patient specific advice and consultation can be used for reducing the dose to family member. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Spirogyra varians mutant generated by high dose gamma-irradiation shows increased antioxidant properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak-Jyung; Yoon, Minchul; Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant (Mut) produced by gamma irradiation. Methanol extracts were prepared from Spirogyra varians wild-type and Mut plants, and their antioxidant activities and total phenolic content (TPC) were determined. Antioxidant parameters, including the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing/antioxidant power, were higher in the Mut extract. Moreover, the TPC level was higher (P<0.05) in the Mut methanol extract. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced S. varians Mut has superior antioxidant properties. - Highlights: ► The antioxidative properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant produced by gamma-irradiation was investiated. ► The antioxidant activities and total phenolic content levels were higher in mutant strain. ► These results suggest that gamma-irradiation induced algae mutant with superior antioxidant properties.

  7. A simple high-dose gentamicin regimen showed no side effects among neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Sofie; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Dalegaard, Mette Correll

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment of infections in neonates with gentamicin is a balance between optimising bactericidal effect and minimising adverse effects. Previously, at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Kolding Hospital, Denmark, neonates suspected of having infections were treated daily...... infection. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Danish Data Protection Agency (2008-58-0035)....

  8. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, W. Tyler, E-mail: watkinswt@virginia.edu; Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Moore, Joseph A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Gordon, James [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  9. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, W Tyler; Moore, Joseph A; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  10. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, W. Tyler; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated

  11. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  12. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Linda X.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R 50% ); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D 2cm ) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ 2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V 100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V 90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D 2cm , 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  13. Report GT2 by the pluralistic expertise group on the Limousin uranium mining sites.Volume 1 and 2: Environmental, ecosystem and health controls. Environmental risk. Dose and health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a presentation of the expertise group and of its mission, the first volume reports the various controls and monitoring actions performed on the environment, on ecosystems, and on health. For each of this field, objectives, equipment, methods and results are presented, as well as the actors involved in data acquiring and gathering. Results are discussed and recommendations are proposed. With the same kind of approach (objectives, equipment, method and results), risks are assessed for the environment and for the population. The different standards of radiological and chemical exposure are presented. The second volume deals with the same topics and contains many documents detailing each of these issues

  14. Biological dose estimation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a radiation. •. In exposure. Biological dose estimation involving low-dose. S. JANSEN, G. J. VAN HUYSSTEEN. Summary. Blood specimens were collected from 8 people 18 days after they had been accidentally exposed to a 947,2 GBq iridium-. 192 source during industrial application. The equivalent whole-body dose ...

  15. Pre-1989 epidemiological surveys of low-level dose pre-conception irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Information from 59 pre-1989 epidemiological surveys concerning pre-conception irradiation at doses less than 0.1 Gy has been collated to determine whether any consistent patterns of health effects emerge. The surveys are considered in three groups: childhood malignancies, Down's syndrome and indicators of reproductive damage. Although a pattern is observed for Down's syndrome, no reliable associations are apparent for childhood malignancies (where all surveys pre-date the Gardner survey at Sellafield) or indications of reproductive damage. The twelve surveys of Down's syndrome in relation to maternal pre-conception irradiation received for medical reasons show a pattern consistent with a doubling dose of about 20 mGy. This doubling dose value is, however, not based on individual measurements of ovarian dose and is inconsistent with results from high-level dose surveys. There is no association between paternal irradiation and Down's syndrome. (author)

  16. Dose estimation from food intake due to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Takahashi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, concerns have arisen about the radiation safety of food raised at home and abroad. Therefore, many measures have been taken to address this. To evaluate the effectiveness of these measures, dose estimation due to food consumption has been attempted by various methods. In this paper, we show the results of dose estimation based on the monitoring data of radioactive materials in food published by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The Radioactive Material Response Working Group in the Food Sanitation Subcommittee of the Pharmaceutical Affairs and Food Sanitation Council reported such dose estimation results on October 31, 2011 using monitoring data from immediately after the accident through September, 2011. Our results presented in this paper were the effective dose and thyroid equivalent dose integrated up to December 2012 from immediately after the accident. The estimated results of committed effective dose by age group derived from the radioiodine and radiocesium in food after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident showed the highest median value (0.19 mSv) in children 13-18 years of age. The highest 95% tile value, 0.33 mSv, was shown in the 1-6 years age range. These dose estimations from food can be useful for evaluation of radiation risk for individuals or populations and for radiation protection measures. It would also be helpful for the study of risk management of food in the future. (author)

  17. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1980. In addition doses derived from the shutdown reactors at the Three Mile Island site were included. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 40 person-rem to a low of 0.02 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 4 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 180 person-rem for the 96 million people considered at risk

  18. The dose-response characteristics of rat oral dyskinesias with chronic haloperidol or clozapine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X M; Hashimoto, T; Cooper, T B; Tamminga, C A

    1997-01-01

    Whether the pathophysiology and treatment of neuroleptic-induced oral dyskinesias in rats parallel that for tardive dyskinesia in humans remains a question. To address the issue further, Sprague Dawley rats were treated for 6 months with multiple oral doses of haloperidol (1.5 and 3.0 mg/ kg/day) or clozapine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg/day) and compared with water treated animals. The rate of oral dyskinesias was monitored at study start and monthly by trained raters who were blind to treatment group. All haloperidol-treated rats developed oral dyskinesias at a significantly higher rate than rats treated with water (p = 0.0007) or those treated with clozapine (p = 0.0017). Each dose of haloperidol produced significantly higher rates of oral dyskinesias than did any dose of clozapine and did so in an apparent dose-sensitive manner. Clozapine lacked a dose-sensitive relationship with the oral dyskinesias, and failed to show a significant difference in rate from control rats at any dose. Plasma levels of haloperidol with these doses were in the human therapeutic range; with clozapine only the highest dose produced plasma levels in the human therapeutic range. These data show little association between rat oral dyskinesias and clozapine treatment, whereas a strong association is present with haloperidol. The data are, thereby, consistent with the clinical association of tardive dyskinesia with typical neuroleptics like haloperidol but not with the atypical neuroleptic clozapine.

  19. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric cranial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Choyin; Wong Yiuchung; Chau Luenfai; Yu Siuki; Lau Pochung

    1999-01-01

    Background. There is no consensus about the optimal milliamperage-second (mAs) settings for computed tomography (CT). Most operators follow the recommended settings of the manufacturers, but these may not be the most appropriate settings. Objective. To determine whether a lower radiation dose technique could be used in CT of the paediatric brain without jeopardising the diagnostic accuracy of the images. Materials and methods. A randomised prospective trial. A group of 53 children underwent CT using manufacturer's default levels of 200 or 250 mAs; 47 underwent scanning at 125 or 150 mAs. Anatomical details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. Results. For both readers there was no statistically significant difference in the confidence level for reaching a diagnosis between the two groups. The 95 % confidence intervals and P values were -0.9-1.1 and 0.13 (reader 1) and -1.29-1.37 and 0.70 (reader 2), respectively. Reliability tests showed the results were consistent. Conclusions. The recommended level may not be the optimum setting. Dose reduction of 40 % is possible on our system in paediatric brain CT without affecting the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  20. [Effective dose from pediatric CT in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsdottir, Jonina; Jonsdottir, Arna Bjork

    2017-11-01

    It is important to know the effective dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effective dose from pediatric CT examinations in Iceland. For all pediatric CT exams (children examination type and dose length product was retrospectively collected from the Landspitali University Hospital's archives, as was the total number of CT examinations. The ratio of pediatric CT exams and the frequency of examination types were calculated and, for the three most common examinations, the effective dose and mean dose length product were calculated for five age groups. The total number of pediatric CT examinations was 662, 3,6% of all the CT examinations performed. The three most common pediatric CT examinations were head (40,3%), abdomen (15,6%) and thorax (10,3%). The mean effective dose in those was, in the above order: for children dose length product was above European diagnostic reference levels in most examination types and age groups. Possibilities for lower effective doses from pediatric CT examinations should be explored. For that purpose, the use of size specific dose estimates is recommended.

  1. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantomsMethods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for different

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE REVIE REVIEW A dose audit of fluoroscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-06

    Aug 6, 2009 ... The large variability in the radia- tion dose delivered shows that fluoroscopic examinations stand to gain from dose optimisation. The usefulness and potential use of DAP meters for dose optimisation in radiology are shown. In line with efforts to opti- mise the dose from diagnostic radiography examinations, ...

  3. Patient and staff dose during hysterosalpinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buls, N.; Osteaux, M.

    2001-01-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a useful and widely employed technique which uses X-ray fluoroscopy to investigate the female genital tract. Fluoroscopy is assessed by a gynaecologist, a physician who is not always trained to work with ionising radiation. Dose-area product measurements in a group of 34 patients allowed an estimation of the median effective dose (0,83 mSv) and the median dose to the ovaries (1,63 mGy) of the patient per procedure. The dose to the staff was estimated using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The following median entrance surface doses were estimated per procedure: 0,22 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0,15 mGy to the neck at thyroid level and 0,19 mGy to the back of the hand. The annual eye dose limit could be exceeded if the gynaecologist is a member of the public. (author)

  4. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m 2 /d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  5. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  6. Enhanced Efficacy of High Dose Oral Vancomycin Therapy in Clostridium difficile Diarrhea for Hospitalized Adults Not Responsive to Conventional Oral Vancomycin Therapy: Antibiotic Stewardship Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy of Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CDD is problematic. Optimal treatment for CDD remains oral vancomycin, but there is little data on oral vancomycin dosing regimens. The objective of this C. difficile diarrhea study was to compare the efficacy of “high dose” vancomycin, 500 mg (PO q6h, as sole treatment and in those who after 72 h failed to respond to conventional doses of oral vancomycin, 125–250 mg (PO q6h. Hospitalized adults with CDD were evaluated by various oral vancomycin regimens, i.e., a conventional dose group (125–250 mg (PO q6h, a “high dose escalation” dose group (250 mg → 500 mg (PO q6h, and a “high dose” group (500 mg (PO q6h. Oral vancomycin treatment groups were compared by time to improvement, i.e., decrease in >50% of watery stools/day and duration of therapy. The high dose escalation and high dose oral vancomycin groups showed the most rapid resolution of diarrhea. There was marked decrease in stools/day after “high dose” vancomycin escalation from conventional dosing, i.e., 250 mg (PO q6h → 500 mg (PO q6h. This study demonstrated that “high dose” escalation or initial high dose oral vancomycin, i.e., 500 mg (PO q6h was the most efficacious regimen for CDD.

  7. A new low-dose CT examination compared with standard-dose CT in the diagnosis of acute sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagtvedt, T.; Aaloekken, T.M.; Noetthellen, J.; Kolbenstvedt, A. [Department of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway)

    2003-05-01

    A low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses was designed with few, thin sections, non-uniform intersection gaps, low milliampere settings and avoidance of direct radiation to the eye lens. The low-dose CT was prospectively compared with standard-dose CT in patients with suspicion of acute sinusitis. Forty-seven patients were examined with low-dose CT immediately after standard-dose CT. The effective dose and the lens dose were calculated and compared. Using standard-dose CT as a gold standard the sensitivity and specificity of low-dose CT was calculated for each sinus group. The effective dose and the lens dose of the low-dose CT were reduced to, respectively, 3 and 2% of the standard-dose CT. The diagnostic yield of the low-dose CT with regard to acute sinusitis was good with a high specificity ({>=}96%) for all sinus groups. The sensitivity was also high ({>=}95%) except for the frontal sinus where the sensitivity was 83%. Low-dose CT offers considerable dose reduction and should be the standard for imaging patients with suspected acute inflammatory paranasal disease. (orig.)

  8. The optimal parameter for radiation dose in pediatric low dose abdominal CT: cross-sectional dimensions versus body weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Young; Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    To investigate the best parameter between cross-sectional dimensions and body weight in pediatric low dose abdominal CT. One hundred and thirty six children consecutively underwent weight-based abdominal CT. The subjects consisted of group 1 (79 children, weight range 10.0-19.9 kg) and group 2 (57 children, weight range 20.0-39.9 kg). Abdominal cross-sectional dimensions including circumference, area, anteroposterior diameters and transverse diameters were calculated. Image noise (standard deviation of CT density) was measured by placing a region of interest in the posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe on a CT image at the celiac axis. The measured image noise was correlated with the cross-sectional abdominal dimensions and body weight for subjects in each group. In group 1 subjects,area, circumference, transverse diameter, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order({gamma} = 0.63, 0.62, 0.61, 0.51, and 0.49; {rho} < 0.0001). In group 2 subjects, transverse diameter, circumference, area, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order ({gamma} = 0.83, 0.82, 0.78, 0.71, and 0.71; {rho} < 0.0001). Cross-sectional dimensions such as area, circumference, and transverse diameter showed a higher positive correlation with image noise than body weight for pediatric low dose abdominal CT.

  9. The optimal parameter for radiation dose in pediatric low dose abdominal CT: cross-sectional dimensions versus body weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yoon Young; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the best parameter between cross-sectional dimensions and body weight in pediatric low dose abdominal CT. One hundred and thirty six children consecutively underwent weight-based abdominal CT. The subjects consisted of group 1 (79 children, weight range 10.0-19.9 kg) and group 2 (57 children, weight range 20.0-39.9 kg). Abdominal cross-sectional dimensions including circumference, area, anteroposterior diameters and transverse diameters were calculated. Image noise (standard deviation of CT density) was measured by placing a region of interest in the posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe on a CT image at the celiac axis. The measured image noise was correlated with the cross-sectional abdominal dimensions and body weight for subjects in each group. In group 1 subjects,area, circumference, transverse diameter, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order(γ = 0.63, 0.62, 0.61, 0.51, and 0.49; ρ < 0.0001). In group 2 subjects, transverse diameter, circumference, area, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order (γ = 0.83, 0.82, 0.78, 0.71, and 0.71; ρ < 0.0001). Cross-sectional dimensions such as area, circumference, and transverse diameter showed a higher positive correlation with image noise than body weight for pediatric low dose abdominal CT

  10. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  11. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  12. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  13. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137 Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  14. Variation in radiation doses in paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, A. N.; Lobriguito, A. M.; Rafeh, W.

    2008-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterisation involves diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that range from simple to complex and can subject paediatric patients to varying radiation doses. The study aims to determine the variation in entrance doses in patients in terms of dose-area product (DAP) values and to investigate the methods for optimising radiation protection. A total of 190 paediatric patients belonging to age groups 0, 1, 5 and 10 y who underwent diagnostic and six selected therapeutic procedures at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) were included in the study. Therapeutic procedures include coarctation (COA), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), radiofrequency ablation, pulmonary, embolisation and septostomy. Fluoroscopy and cine radiography were used in all procedures. Patient demography (weight, age, gender and height), radiographic technique factors, fluoroscopy and cine time, frame rate, and DAP values were taken from patients records. Effective doses for each procedure were estimated from the DAP values. The mean DAP per procedure were analysed for correlation with patient equivalent cylindrical diameter, weight, fluoroscopy time and number of frames. Factors influencing the variation in doses were investigated. Initial results show that PDA occlusion has the highest mean DAP value of 23.21 Gy-cm 2 , while the diagnostic and septostomy procedures have the lowest value of 7.77 and 6.95 Gy-cm 2 , respectively. (authors)

  15. The Effect of Different Doses of Vitamin D Supplementation on Insulin Resistance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastegar Hoseini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and vitamin D deficiency are both too common during menopause. Since the effect of different doses of vitamin D supplements on blood sugar, insulin concentration  and insulin resistance are unknown, the present study aimed at investigating the effects of different doses of the vitamin D supplements on visceral fat, blood sugar, insulin concentration,  and insulin resistance in ovariectomized rats. Materials and Methods: In this randomized experimental study, 32 female Wistar rats were divided into 4 equal groups  as follows: three groups . that received vitamin D supplements (high, moderate, and low dose and one control group. After 8 weeks of different doses of vitamin D supplementation plasma concentration of glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were measured  in the three groups. The obtained data  was statistically analyzed by means of dependent t-test and ANOVA . at the significance level of P<0.05. Results: After a period of eight-week  intervention, body weight, BMI, waist circumference, visceral fat, insulin, blood glucose and HOMA-IR at high, moderate, and low doses of vitamin D supplementation were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05. High dose of vitamin D compared with moderate and low doses significantly caused reduction in insulin, blood glucose, and HOMA-IR (P<0.001 for all three variables. Conclusion: The findings of the current study showed that a high dose of vitamin D causes significant improvements in FPG, insulin, and insulin resistance  evaluated by HOMA-IR. It was also found that adding vitamin D supplements can improve glucose control in menopause model of rats.

  16. Isopermutation group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muktibodh, A. S. [Department of Mathematics, Mohota College of Science, NAGPUR-440009 India E-mail: amukti2000@yahoo.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  17. Patient Dose From Megavoltage Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Langen, Katja M.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Cox, Andrea; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) can be used daily for imaging with a helical tomotherapy unit for patient alignment before treatment delivery. The purpose of this investigation was to show that the MVCT dose can be computed in phantoms, and further, that the dose can be reported for actual patients from MVCT on a helical tomotherapy unit. Methods and Materials: An MVCT beam model was commissioned and verified through a series of absorbed dose measurements in phantoms. This model was then used to retrospectively calculate the imaging doses to the patients. The MVCT dose was computed for five clinical cases: prostate, breast, head/neck, lung, and craniospinal axis. Results: Validation measurements in phantoms verified that the computed dose can be reported to within 5% of the measured dose delivered at the helical tomotherapy unit. The imaging dose scaled inversely with changes to the CT pitch. Relative to a normal pitch of 2.0, the organ dose can be scaled by 0.67 and 2.0 for scans done with a pitch of 3.0 and 1.0, respectively. Typical doses were in the range of 1.0-2.0 cGy, if imaged with a normal pitch. The maximal organ dose calculated was 3.6 cGy in the neck region of the craniospinal patient, if imaged with a pitch of 1.0. Conclusion: Calculation of the MVCT dose has shown that the typical imaging dose is approximately 1.5 cGy per image. The uniform MVCT dose delivered using helical tomotherapy is greatest when the anatomic thickness is the smallest and the pitch is set to the lowest value

  18. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vally, H; Thompson, P J

    2001-10-01

    Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites. In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine. Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV(1) 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV(1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory flow (FEF(25-75))) between wine

  19. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  20. Low dose versus high dose anti-snake venom therapy in the treatment of haematotoxic snake bite in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Imanto M; Kuriakose, Cijoy K; Dev, Anand Vimal; Philip, George A

    2017-10-01

    Most of the studies on the appropriate dose of anti-snake venom (ASV) are from tertiary hospitals and the guidelines are unclear. Our observational study compared the outcomes of two prevalent treatment regimes for haematotoxic snake bite in a secondary care hospital in South India. The time to normalisation of whole blood clotting time, mortality and complications were not different between the groups. The average dose of ASV required in the low and high dose groups were 106 mL and 246 mL, respectively. Consequently, patients who received low dose ASV incurred approximately 50% less expense. Urticarial rashes were also significantly fewer in the low dose group.

  1. Performances of low-dose dual-energy CT in reducing artifacts from implanted metallic orthopedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); De Waure, Chiara; Calabro, Giovanna Elisa [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Research Centre for Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Rome (Italy); Finkenstaedt, Tim [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the performances of dose-reduced dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in decreasing metallic artifacts from orthopedic devices compared with dose-neutral DECT, dose-neutral single-energy computed tomography (SECT), and dose-reduced SECT. Thirty implants in 20 consecutive cadavers underwent both SECT and DECT at three fixed CT dose indexes (CTDI): 20.0, 10.0, and 5.0 mGy. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV, and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. In each group, the image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visually rating and by measuring the maximum streak artifact respectively. The comparison between SECT and OPTkeV evaluated overall within all groups showed a significant difference (p <0.001), with OPTkeV images providing better images. Comparing OPTkeV with the other DECT images, a significant difference was shown (p <0.001), with OPTkeV and 130-keV images providing the qualitatively best results. The OPTkeV images of 5.0-mGy acquisitions provided percentages of images with scores 1 and 2 of 36 % and 30 % respectively, compared with 0 % and 33.3 % of the corresponding SECT images of 10- and 20-mGy acquisitions. Moreover, DECT reconstructions at the OPTkeV of the low-dose group showed higher CT numbers than the SECT images of dose groups 1 and 2. This study demonstrates that low-dose DECT permits a reduction of artifacts due to metallic implants to be obtained in a similar manner to neutral-dose DECT and better than reduced or neutral-dose SECT. (orig.)

  2. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  3. Safety assessments of subcutaneous doses of aragonite calcium carbonate nanocrystals in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaji, Alhaji Zubair; Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar; Mahmud, Rozi; Loqman, Mohamad Yusof; Hezmee, Mohamad Noor Mohamad; Abba, Yusuf; Isa, Tijani; Mahmood, Saffanah Khuder

    2017-05-01

    Calcium carbonate nanoparticles have shown promising potentials in the delivery of drugs and metabolites. There is however, a paucity of information on the safety of their intentional or accidental over exposures to biological systems and general health safety. To this end, this study aims at documenting information on the safety of subcutaneous doses of biogenic nanocrystals of aragonite polymorph of calcium carbonate derived from cockle shells (ANC) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. ANC was synthesized using the top-down method, characterized using the transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope and its acute and repeated dose 28-day trial toxicities were evaluated in SD rats. The results showed that the homogenous 30 ± 5 nm-sized spherical pure aragonite nanocrystals were not associated with mortality in the rats. Severe clinical signs and gross and histopathological lesions, indicating organ toxicities, were recorded in the acute toxicity (29,500 mg/m2) group and the high dose (5900 mg/m2) group of the repeated dose 28-day trial. However, the medium- (590 mg/m2 body weight) and low (59 mg/m2)-dose groups showed moderate to mild lesions. The relatively mild lesions observed in the low toxicity dosage group marked the safety margin of ANC in SD rats. It was concluded from this study that the toxicity of CaCO3 was dependent on the particulate size (30 ± 5 nm) and concentration and the route of administration used.

  4. Efficacy and safety of quinine loading dose in patients with severe falciparum malaria at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Saleem, Taimur; Ullah, Hamid; Mehraj, Vikram; Samdani, Abdul Jawwad; Kazmi, Syeda Hena; Ayaz, Syed Imran; Riaz, Mehmood; Patel, Mohammed Junaid; Akhtar, Jaweed; Beg, Mohammed Asim

    2011-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of a loading dose regimen of quinine with a uniform dose regimen in patients with severe falciparum malaria. A retrospective chart review of 315 patients admitted with severe falciparum malaria and treated with quinine at a tertiary care teaching hospital of Karachi, Pakistan during 1999-2006 was conducted. Group A with 103 patients (32.7%) was given an initial loading dose of quinine while group B with 212 patients (67.3%) did not receive the loading dose. The two groups were compared in terms of reduction of parasite load, resolution of fever, recovery of consciousness and incidence of adverse effects. Outcome parameters were measured on the third day of therapy. More individuals in group A (62.1%) were afebrile as compared to group B (54.7%) at day 3 of therapy. Patients in group B showed greater reduction in parasitaemia (47.2% at baseline to 4.7% on day 3) as compared to group A (56.3 % at baseline to 9.7% on day 3). Following therapy, fewer patients in group B had altered consciousness (7.1% at baseline to 4.7% on day 3) as compared to patients in group A (7.8% at baseline to 5.8% on day 3). However, these associations were not statistically significant. The incidence of thrombocytopenia was higher in Group A (5.8%) as compared to Group B (0.9%). Although quinine loading dose may be more effective than uniform dose in rapid fever clearance; it also appears to be associated with higher toxicity. Uniform dose of quinine may be prescribed in severe falciparum malaria in view of its better safety profile.

  5. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  6. Exposure to low-dose barium by drinking water causes hearing loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Hori, Sohjiro; Ohgami, Kyoko; Tamura, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    We continuously ingest barium as a general element by drinking water and foods in our daily life. Exposure to high-dose barium (>100mg/kg/day) has been shown to cause physiological impairments. Direct administration of barium to inner ears by vascular perfusion has been shown to cause physiological impairments in inner ears. However, the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels has not been clarified in vivo. We analyzed the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels and inner ears in mice. We orally administered barium at low doses of 0.14 and 1.4 mg/kg/day to wild-type ICR mice by drinking water. The doses are equivalent to and 10-fold higher than the limit level (0.7 mg/l) of WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water, respectively. After 2-week exposure, hearing levels were measured by auditory brain stem responses and inner ears were morphologically analyzed. After 2-month exposure, tissue distribution of barium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Low-dose barium in drinking water caused severe hearing loss in mice. Inner ears including inner and outer hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion neurons showed severe degeneration. The Barium-administered group showed significantly higher levels of barium in inner ears than those in the control group, while barium levels in bone did not show a significant difference between the two groups. Barium levels in other tissues including the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, liver and kidney were undetectably low in both groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time that low-dose barium administered by drinking water specifically distributes to inner ears resulting in severe ototoxicity with degeneration of inner ears in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  8. Doses from portable gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linauskas, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Field studies to measure actual radiation exposures of operators of commercial moisture-density gauges were undertaken in several regions of Canada. Newly developed bubble detector dosimeter technology and conventional dosimetry such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), integrating electronic dosimeters (DRDs), and CR-39 neutron track-etch detectors were used to estimate the doses received by 23 moisture-density gauge operators and maintenance staff. These radiation dose estimates were supported by mapping radiation fields and accounting for the time an operator was near a gauge. Major findings indicate that gauge maintenance and servicing workers were more likely than gauge operators to receive exposures above the level of 5 mSv, and that neutron doses were roughly the same as gamma doses. Gauge operators receive approximately 75% of their dose when transporting and carrying the gauge. Dose to their hands is similar to the dose to their trunks, but the dose to their feet area is 6 to 30 times higher. Gamma radiation is the primary source of radiation contributing to operator dose

  9. Paediatric dose display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.W.; Derges, S.; Hesslewood, S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact, inexpensive unit, based on an 8085 microprocessor, has been designed for calculating doses of intravenous radioactive injections for children. It has been used successfully for over a year. The dose is calculated from the body surface area and the result displayed in MBq. The operator can obtain the required dose on a twelve character alphanumeric display by entering the age of the patient and the adult dose using a hexadecimal keyboard. Circuit description, memory map and input/output, and firmware are dealt with. (U.K.)

  10. Estimation of patient dose in abdominal CT examination in some Sudanese hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ebthal Adam Shikhalden

    2016-04-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. The aim of this study was to estimate radiation doses in abdomen CT examinations of patients in two Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 80 CT examinations and included all age groups ( adults and pediatric). The results from the two hospitals were compared with each other as well as with the IAEA guidance level for this particular investigation. The estimation of radiation doses were carried out by calculating volume dose index (CTD1vol), dose length product (DLP), doses to some organs of interest and effective dose (E) using the software program C T EXPO V2.1 . The study showed that the mean DLP of the one hospitals ASH is 1736.7 mGy.cm which is by far much higher than that for the other hospital NMDC which stands at 185.3 mGy.cm, as well as higher than the IAEA level which is 696 mGy.cm. The study showed that the mean CTD1vol for patients in ASH is 36.2 mGy which again higher than that for the other hospital which is 3.9 mGy and higher than the IAEA level which is 10.9 mGy calculating the effective dose for patients in the two hospitals reveals that the mean effective dose of patient in one hospital (ASH) is 26.25 mSv, which is quite high compared with other hospital (NMDC), which has the mean value of 2.8 mGv and also higher than the IAEA level from this investigation which is 7.6 mSv. Regarding organ doses, the study showed that organ doses in hospital ASH are always higher than that calculated in hospital NMDC and the highest doses in both hospital were delivered to the kidneys with mean values of 50.24 mGy and 5045 mGy for the two hospitals respectively. The study showed that there is an urgent need for optimizing patient doses in such CT examinations. This can be ensured by providing training and retraining for workers and conducting quality control measurements and preventive maintenance regularly so

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of small doses of colchicine combined with glucocorticoid for acute gouty arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying LIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the clinical effect of small dose of colchicine combined with glucocorticoid for acute gouty arthritis. Methods Ninety-two patients with acute gouty arthritis were equally and randomly divided into small doses of colchicine combined with dexamethasone treatment group (treatment group and conventional large dose colchicine treatment group (control group between January 2009 and December 2013. The articular lesion scoring and clinical efficacy evaluation were performed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72h after treatment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, white blood cells, hepatorenal function and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were determined before and 72h after treatment respectively. The gastrointestinal adverse events and recurrence rate were observed within one month after treatment. Results The articular lesion scores were significantly decreased at 6, 12, 48, and 72h after treatment in treatment group compared with control group (P0.05. Serum uric acid, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase in serum (SGPT, and GFR did not show any change before and 72h after the treatment, and there was also no significant difference between groups (P>0.05. The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events were obviously higher in control group (76.1% compared with that of the treatment group (P<0.05, and the differences was statistically significant. There was no statistical difference in recurrence rate between the control group and treatment group after a follow-up of one month. Conclusions Compared with conventional large dose colchicine, small dose of colchicine combined with dexamethasone can more rapidly and effectively control acute gouty arthritis, with good tolerability and safety, thus being worthy of popularization clinically. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.10

  12. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives

  13. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1991. Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1995-04-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1991. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 22 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 88 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives

  14. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1990: Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1990. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 15 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 78 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives

  15. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1992. Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1992. Fifty-year dose commitments for a 1-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager, and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses, which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I, design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 3.7 person-rem to a low of 0.0015 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 0.66 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 47 person-rem for the 130-million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the 10 CFR 50, Appendix I, design objectives

  16. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1991. Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1991. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 22 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 88 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives.

  17. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1992. Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1992. Fifty-year dose commitments for a 1-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager, and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses, which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I, design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 3.7 person-rem to a low of 0.0015 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 0.66 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 47 person-rem for the 130-million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the 10 CFR 50, Appendix I, design objectives.

  18. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  19. Comparative study of high dose mono-therapy of amlodipine or telmisartan, and their low dose combination in mild to moderate hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Jaswant; Khan, Zafer Yab; Upadhyaya, Prerna; Goyal, Barkha; Jain, Shipra

    2014-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the major public health challenges worldwide. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are among the first line antihypertensive drugs. However, optimal treatment strategies in mild to moderate hypertensives who failed to achieve blood pressure (BP) control with low-dose mono-therapy are not well established. This study was done to compare efficacy and safety of high dose mono-therapy of Amlodipine, Telmisartan and their low dose combination in mild to moderate hypertensives who failed to achieve BP control with low dose mono-therapy of either drug. A total of 96 patients, fulfilling inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study after obtaining informed consent. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups i.e. Telmisartan 80 mg, Amlodipine 10 mg and low dose combination of Telmisartan 40 mg +Amlodipine 5 mg once daily for two months. The systolic BP, Diastolic BP, and ADRs were recorded at 0, 2, 4, 8 weeks. In the present study, significant reduction of mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was seen in all the three treatment groups. Low dose combination of Amlodipine 5 mg and Telmisartan 40 mg showed statistically significant reduction in SBP as compared to Telmisartan 80 mg mono-therapy and in DBP as compared to Amlodipine 10 mg mono-therapy. Maximum adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were reported in Amlodipine mono-therapy group, like ankle oedema, constipation, headache and fatigue. In term of BP control, low-dose combination therapy appears a better therapeutic approach than high-dose mono-therapy.

  20. Application of a new style silicon absorbed dose calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Jinxia; Ba Weizhen; Wu Qinzhi; He Chengfa; Chen Zhaoyang

    2000-01-01

    The structure and electrical calibration and measurement principle of a new style silicon absorbed dose calorimeter are described. The distribution of dose rate with the distance in a 60 Co radiation room is given, and the dose during lifting-falling 60 Co radiation is also measured. Its results show that dose during lifting-falling 60 Co radiation can not be ignored, especially the radiation for the short time, for short distance or for little dose

  1. Buprenorphine dosing choices in specific populations: review of expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maremmani, Icro; Rolland, Benjamin; Somaini, Lorenzo; Roncero, Carlos; Reimer, Jens; Wright, Nat; Littlewood, Richard; Krajci, Peter; Alho, Hannu; D'Agnone, Oscar; Simon, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of opioid dependence with buprenorphine improves outcomes. Typical dosing ranges for all patients from clinical evidence and as defined in the product information are wide. For specific groups with complex clinical scenarios, there is no clear consensus on dosing choices to achieve best possible outcomes. The doses of buprenorphine used in 6 European countries was reviewed. A review of published evidence supported rapid induction with buprenorphine and the benefits of higher doses but did not identify clearly useful guidance on dosing choices for groups with complex clinical scenarios. An expert group of physicians with experience in addiction care participated in a discussion meeting to share clinical practice experience and develop a consensus on dosing choices. There was general agreement that treatment outcomes can be improved by optimising buprenorphine doses in specific subgroups. Specific groups in whom buprenorphine doses may be too low and who could have better outcomes with optimised dosing were identified on the basis of clinical practice experience. These groups include people with severe addiction, high tolerance to opioids, and psychiatric comorbidities. In these groups it is recommended to review dosing choices to ensure buprenorphine dosing is sufficient.

  2. [Treatment of Kawasaki disease by different doses of immunoglobulin: a Mata analysis of therapeutic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ma, Bin; Lin, Li-Xing; Xue, Yi-Ming

    2011-08-01

    To assess the therapeutic effects and safety of different doses of immunoglobulin in the treatment of Kawasaki disease. The papers related to the treatment of Kawasaki disease were electronically searched in the databases of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, VIP and Wanfang. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) on the treatment of Kawasaki disease with different doses of immunoglobulin were included and assessed for quality. A Mata analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0. Twenty-eight RCTs involved 2596 cases were included. The results of Meta analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the incidences of coronary artery injuries at various phases, adverse effects and fever disappearance time between the immunoglobulin treatment groups at the doses of 1 g/(kg•d) for 1-2 days and 2 g/(kg•d) for single use. The fever disappearance time in the immunoglobulin treatment group at the dose of 1 g/(kg•d) for 1-2 days was significantly shorter than that in the immunoglobulin treatment group at the dose of 400 mg/(kg•d) for 4-5 days, but there were no significant differences in the incidences of coronary artery injuries at the acute phase and 6 months after treatment and adverse effects between the two groups. The incidence of coronary artery injuries at the acute phase and 6 months was lower and the fever disappearance time was shorter in the immunoglobulin treatment group at the dose of 2 g/(kg•d) for single use than those in the immunoglobulin treatment group at the dose of 400 mg/(kg•d) for 4-5 days, but there were no significant differences in the incidences of coronary artery injuries at the subacute phase and 12 months after treatment and adverse effects between the two groups. There are similar therapeutic effects for Kawasaki disease between the immunoglobulin treatment groups at the doses of 1 g/(kg•d) for 1-2 days and 2 g/(kg•d) for single use. The fever disappearance time in the two groups is shorter than that in the treatment

  3. Use of dose constraints in public exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tageldein, Amged

    2015-02-01

    An overview of the dose constraints in public exposures has been carried out in this project. The establishment, development and the application of the concept of dose constraints are reviewed with regards to public exposure. The role of dose constraints in the process of optimization of radiation protection was described and has been showed that the concept of the dose constraints along with many other concept of radiation protection is widely applied in the optimization of exposure to radiation. From the beginning of the establishment of dose constraints as a concept in radiation protection, the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published a number of documents that provides detailed application related to radiation protection and safety of public exposure from ionizing radiation. This work provides an overview of such publications and related documents with special emphasis on optimization of public exposure using dose constraints. (au)

  4. The dose-area product in DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfirtner, H.

    1995-01-01

    In DSA, the dose-area product shows a very good correlation with the maximum incidence dose. It may therefore serve as a reliable basis for the assessment of radiation doses to patients. The dose-area product is also a useful tool for the detection pf peak shifts in the radiation curves for certain investigations. In view of the considerable scatter of the values for the dose-area product these must, however, be subjected to an additional statistical analysis. Provided that this rule is observed, the dose-area product will considerably gain in importance for the monitoring of radiation exposures of patients. A very noteworthy learning effect could be achieved, if it would be made mandatory for those statistical analyses to be carried out not only on an investigation-specific but also an investigator-specific basis. The latter is particularly true of teaching hospitals. (orig./VHE) [de

  5. Initial dosing of paricalcitol based on PTH levels in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos, Efstathios; Zanos, Stavros; Ginikopoulou, Eudoxia; Kyriklidou, Parthena; Meimaridou, Dafni; Sakellariou, Georgios

    2006-07-01

    Adjustment of the initial dose of paricalcitol in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) on the basis of severity of SHPT generally is preferred in current practice. Whether the proposed dose, based on the formula baseline intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH [picograms per milliliter]) divided by 80, is the most appropriate has not been assessed adequately. A double-blind randomized trial comparing iPTH/80 dose with the immediately lower iPTH/120 dose was undertaken. Forty-three hemodialysis patients with iPTH levels between 300 and 900 pg/mL (300 and 900 ng/L) were followed up for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was control of iPTH levels within a target range between 150 and 300 pg/mL (150 and 300 ng/L). No difference between the 2 dose groups was noted in time to achieve target iPTH levels of 150 to 300 pg/mL (150 to 300 ng/L). More episodes of excessive decrease in iPTH levels occurred in the iPTH/80 group compared with the iPTH/120 group (P = 0.003). Nine patients in the iPTH/80 group (45%) versus 2 patients in the iPTH/120 group (10%) had iPTH levels less than 150 pg/mL (<150 ng/L) in at least half the measurements performed during the second half of the study (P = 0.034). Increases in calcium levels were greater in the iPTH/80 group at all times during the study (P < 0.05 at weeks 4 and 10). The number of required dose reductions was significantly greater in the iPTH/80 group compared with the iPTH/120 group (P = 0.008). In hemodialysis patients with SHPT, a lower initial dose of iPTH/120 shows efficacy similar to that of the already widely used iPTH/80 scheme in reaching target iPTH levels (150 to 300 pg/mL [150 to 300 ng/L]), with less required dose adjustments, lower increase in calcium levels, and lower cost. In addition, the initial dose of paricalcitol based on the iPTH/80 formula leads significantly more patients to excessive suppression of iPTH (<150 pg/mL [<150 ng/L]) than the iPTH/120 dose.

  6. Low-dose ketoconazole-fluconazole combination versus fluconazole in single doses for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Susilo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal candidiasis (VC is one of the most common fungal diseases. Candida albicans is the most common causative fungus and has been isolated from more than 80% of specimens obtained from women with VC. Ketoconazole is the first orally active antifungal, the dosage for VC is 200 mg twice daily for 5 days. Fluconazole is the newer oral antifungal, its dosage for VC is a single oral dose of 150 mg. Since fluconazole 150 mg is considerably expensive, a single dose of 100 mg ketoconazole and 40 mg fluconazole in combination has been tested for the treatment of VC. The results showed that from 11 women with confirmed VC, 1-2 weeks after drug administration, the mycological culture was negative in 8 women, positive in 1 woman, and 2 woman lost to follow-up. This promising result led to the present study with the objective to confirm the efficacy and safety of the above combination in a formal clinical trial.Methods: A total of 165 female patients, aged 18 years or older, with the diagnosis of VC from clinical symptoms (pruritus or burning or excessive discharge and positive microscopic smear (pseudohyphae and/or yeast cells were randomized to receive a single dose of either keto-fluco combination (n = 85 or fluconazole (n = 80, and returnedfor follow-up visit on day 8.Results: Among these patients, 39 patients had negative baseline culture, leaving 126 patients eligible for efficacy evaluation. The mycological eradication in the keto-fluco group was 74.5% (41 patients from a total of 55 patients with available mycological culture, while that in the fluconazole group was 70.2% (40 patients from 57 patients with available culture and this difference was not significant. The clinical favorable response (clinical cure and clinical improvement in the keto-fluco arm (n = 60 was 98.3%, while that in the fluconazole group (n = 66 was 100%. Adverse events were found in 5 patients, 3 patients in the keto-fluco group (3/85 = 3.5% and 2

  7. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  8. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  9. Ten-Year Progression-Free and Overall Survival in Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic GI Stromal Tumors: Long-Term Analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Italian Sarcoma Group, and Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group Intergroup Phase III Randomized Trial on Imatinib at Two Dose Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, Paolo G; Zalcberg, John; Le Cesne, Axel; Reichardt, Peter; Blay, Jean-Yves; Lindner, Lars H; Judson, Ian R; Schöffski, Patrick; Leyvraz, Serge; Italiano, Antoine; Grünwald, Viktor; Pousa, Antonio Lopez; Kotasek, Dusan; Sleijfer, Stefan; Kerst, Jan M; Rutkowski, Piotr; Fumagalli, Elena; Hogendoorn, Pancras; Litière, Saskia; Marreaud, Sandrine; van der Graaf, Winette; Gronchi, Alessandro; Verweij, Jaap

    2017-05-20

    Purpose To report on the long-term results of a randomized trial comparing a standard dose (400 mg/d) versus a higher dose (800 mg/d) of imatinib in patients with metastatic or locally advanced GI stromal tumors (GISTs). Patients and Methods Eligible patients with advanced CD117-positive GIST from 56 institutions in 13 countries were randomly assigned to receive either imatinib 400 mg or 800 mg daily. Patients on the 400-mg arm were allowed to cross over to 800 mg upon progression. Results Between February 2001 and February 2002, 946 patients were accrued. Median age was 60 years (range, 18 to 91 years). Median follow-up time was 10.9 years. Median progression-free survival times were 1.7 and 2.0 years in the 400- and 800-mg arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.91; P = .18), and median overall survival time was 3.9 years in both treatment arms. The estimated 10-year progression-free survival rates were 9.5% and 9.2% for the 400- and 800-mg arms, respectively, and the estimated 10-year overall survival rates were 19.4% and 21.5%, respectively. At multivariable analysis, age (< 60 years), performance status (0 v ≥ 1), size of the largest lesion (smaller), and KIT mutation (exon 11) were significant prognostic factors for the probability of surviving beyond 10 years. Conclusion This trial was carried out on a worldwide intergroup basis, at the beginning of the learning curve of the use of imatinib, in a large population of patients with advanced GIST. With a long follow-up, 6% of patients are long-term progression free and 13% are survivors. Among clinical prognostic factors, only performance status, KIT mutation, and size of largest lesion predicted long-term outcome, likely pointing to a lower burden of disease. Genomic and/or immune profiling could help understand long-term survivorship. Addressing secondary resistance remains a therapeutic challenge.

  10. Evaluation of the image quality criteria and study of doses in a mammography department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Marcela Costa

    2009-01-01

    The mammographic image quality criteria published by European Commission were implemented in three mammography equipment of a same radiology department in a hospital of Sao Paulo city. Among the mammography equipment, two use the screen-film system and one of them uses the indirect digital system. During the data collection, it was noted the need to conduct a study about image rejection in each mammography equipment. Therefore, this study was realized and, after that, the results in each mammography equipment of image rejection and image percentage that present each quality criterion it were compared. At the same time of this studies, it was realized other study about surface entrance dose and average glandular dose. These doses it was estimated based on different methods published by different groups of researcher, for all combinations anode filter available in the equipment. To estimate the surface entrance dose following the methodology published in Avenue's' guide and the average glandular dose following the Wu' methodology, it was developed a phantom, in different thicknesses of acrylic, to simulate a breast. Finally, the image quality it was associated with the dose received by patient. The digital equipment shows better results in the evaluation of quality criteria, lower rate of image rejection and lower values of average glandular dose and surface entrance dose in all methods studied. But it is not sufficient, because is not adequate for patients with great breast. (author)

  11. Patient doses and radiation risks in film-screen mammography in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T.; Komppa, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Screen-film mamography is the most sensitive method for the early detection of breast cancer. Breast doses in mamography should be measured for several reasons, especially for the evaluation of patient risk in a screening programme, but also for the assessment and comparison of imaging techniques and equipment performance. In this study, the factors affecting patient doses were assessed by making performance and patient dose measurements; about 50 mammographic units used for screening were included in the study. The lifetime risk as a function of age at exposure was calculated using the average glandular dose, the relative risk model shown in the BEIR V report, and the breast cancer mortality in Finland. The mean surface dose of a 4.5 cm thick phantom was 6.3 mGy, and the mean glandular dose 1.0 mGy. Analysis of the surface dose with respect to film optical density, relative speed of film processing, sensitivity of image receptors, and antiscatter grid showed that the mean surface dose could be decreased by more than 50%. For the screened age group of 50 to 59 years, the risk of exposure-induced death (REID) of breast cancer is about 1.4 x 10{sup -6} mSv{sup -1}, and the average loss of life expectancy due to the radiation-induced breast cancer deaths (LLE/REID) is about 9.5 years. (Author).

  12. Performance of thermoluminescent materials for high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texeira, Maria I.; Cecatti, Sonia G.P.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cases involving high-doses of ionizing radiation are becoming increasingly common.The objective of this work was to characterize thermoluminescent materials for the dosimetry of workers exposed to high doses. Samples of TLD-200, TLD-400 and TLD-800 pellets from Thermo Electron Corporation were studied in gamma high-doses. Dose-response curves were obtained for doses between 100 mGy and 100 Gy. The reproducibility, the lower detection limits and dose-response curves were obtained for all three materials. The different kinds of detectors show usefulness for dosimetry of workers exposed accidentally to high doses. (author)

  13. Dose trend analysis of the PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernilogar Radez, M.; Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2002-01-01

    The analyses of occupational dose trends in Krsko NPP in the period from 1995 to 2001 are given in comparison to the worldwide data. The Central Dose Register of Workers in Nuclear Installations at the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration enables the comprehensive dose trend analysis of the occupational doses in Krsko NPP. The time dose trend of the collective annual effective dose at the Krsko NPP shows somehow different trend than the trends of the ISOE data [1]. The performance indicators describing dose data distributions related to the radiation protection standards [2, 3] are discussed.(author)

  14. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 x 10 -7 mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year)

  15. Electiveness of photorepair, influence of dark-repair on shape of dose-response curves, and high-dose decline, in UV-induced colour mutations of Serratia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Strain CV of Serratia marcescens mutates by UV with high frequency to 3 groups of mutants (w, h, s) differing in colour from the red wild-type. The mutational dose-response curve has a curvature corresponding to about 3 hits. It reaches a peak and declines at high doses. Inactivation curves have a broad shoulder and mostly, but not always, a break to a lesser slope at UV doses near the peak of mutations. Photo reactivation (PR) gives a dose reduction of about 2 for both inactivation and mutation including the break and peak. The dose curve with PR for w-mutations shows 1 hit-, the other types 2-hit curvature leading to a change of mutation spectrum with dose due to PR. The UV-sensitive mutant uvs21 of CV has a survival curve with a small shoulder and a long upward concavity without a break, and the mutation curve is of the one-hit type without a peak and decline. PR gives a dose reduction of 12 for inactivation and of 7.5 for mutation. The 3-hit mutation curve of CV is interpreted by assuming that 2 further hits are required to protect the 1-hit pre-mutations from being abolished by the repair lacking in uvs21. UV induction of SOS repair cannot be responsible for the 3-hit curvature because UVR of phages and induction of prophage are already saturated at rather low doses. As high-dose decline is not observed in uvs21, possibly the non-mutagenic repair lacking from uvs21 interferes with the mutation finishing processes at high doses in the repair-proficient strain CV. However, UV induction of this interference cannot be a one-hit process but requires a very large number of hits. (Auth.)

  16. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-04: An Evaluation of Out-Of-Field Doses for Electron Beams From Modern Varian and Elekta Linear Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, C; Nitsch, P; Kudchadker, R; Howell, R; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurately determining out-of-field doses when using electron beam radiotherapy is of importance when treating pregnant patients or patients with implanted electronic devices. Scattered doses outside of the applicator field in electron beams have not been broadly investigated, especially since manufacturers have taken different approaches in applicator designs. Methods: In this study, doses outside of the applicator field were measured for electron beams produced by a 10×10 applicator on two Varian 21iXs operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, a Varian TrueBeam operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV. Peripheral dose profiles and percent depth doses were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom at 100 cm SSD with a Farmer ion chamber. Doses were compared to peripheral photon doses from AAPM’s Task Group #36 report. Results: Doses were highest for the highest electron energies. Doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. Substantial dose differences were observed between different accelerators; the Elekta accelerator had much higher doses than any Varian unit examined. Surprisingly, doses were often similar to, and could be much higher than, doses from photon therapy. Doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that proper shielding may be very important when utilizing electron beams, particularly on a Versa HD, while treating pregnant patients or those with implanted electronic devices. Applying a water equivalent bolus of Emax(MeV)/4 thickness (cm) on the patient would reduce fetal dose drastically for all clinical energies and is a practical solution to manage the potentially high peripheral doses seen from modern electron beams. Funding from NIH Grant number: #CA180803.

  17. Diagnostic value of fourth-generation iterative reconstruction algorithm with low-dose CT protocol in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion in rectal cancer: comparison with magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Talei Franzesi, C R; Casiraghi, Alessandra; Sironi, Sandro

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the article is to compare the diagnostic performance about radiation dose and image quality of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction algorithm (iDose4) and standard-dose CT in the assessment of mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy-proven primary rectal adenocarcinoma underwent CT staging: 42 underwent low-dose CT, 49 underwent standard CT protocol. Low-dose contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 (ICT, Philips) scanner using 120 kV, automated mAs modulation, iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm. Standard-dose MDCT scans were performed on the same scanner with 120 kV, 200-300 mAs. All patients underwent a standard lower abdomen MR study (on 1.5T magnet), including multiplanar sequences, considered as reference standard. Diagnostic accuracy of MRF assessment was determined on CT images for both CT protocols and compared with MRI images. Dose-length product (DLP) and CT dose index (CTDI) calculated for both groups were compared and statistically analyzed. Low-dose protocol with iDose4 showed high diagnostic quality in assessment of MRF with significant reduction (23%; p = 0.0081) of radiation dose (DLP 2453.47) compared to standard-dose examination (DLP 3194.32). Low-dose protocol combined with iDose4 reconstruction algorithm offers high-quality images, obtaining significant radiation dose reduction, useful in the evaluation of MRF involvement in rectal cancer patients.

  18. Dose-response relationship in local radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jinsil; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Moon, Young Myoung; Suh, Chang Ok

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is based on the hypothesis that increasing the dose can enhance tumor control. This study aimed to determine whether a dose-response relationship exists in local radiotherapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: One hundred fifty-eight patients were enrolled in the present study between January 1992 and March 2000. The exclusion criteria included the presence of an extrahepatic metastasis, liver cirrhosis of Child class C, tumors occupying more than two-thirds of the entire liver, and a performance status on the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale of more than 3. Radiotherapy was given to the field, including the tumor, with generous margin using 6- or 10-MV X-rays. The mean radiation dose was 48.2 ± 7.9 Gy in daily 1.8-Gy fractions. The tumor response was assessed based on diagnostic radiologic examinations, including a computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging, and hepatic artery angiography 4-8 weeks after the completion of treatment. Liver toxicity and gastrointestinal complications were evaluated. Results: An objective response was observed in 106 of 158 (67.1%) patients. Statistical analysis revealed that the total dose was the most significant factor associated with the tumor response. The response rates in patients treated with doses 50 Gy were 29.2%, 68.6%, and 77.1%, respectively. Survivals at 1 and 2 years after radiotherapy were 41.8% and 19.9%, respectively, with a median survival time of 10 months. The rate of liver toxicity according to the doses 50 Gy was 4.2%, 5.9%, and 8.4%, respectively, and the rate of gastrointestinal complications was 4.2%, 9.9%, and 13.2%, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed the existence of a dose-response relationship in local radiotherapy for primary HCC. Only the radiation dose was a significant factor for predicting an objective response. The results of this study showed that 3D

  19. Effect of Residential Radon Decay Product Dose Factor Variability on Reporting of Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Naomi H

    2018-04-01

    Guidelines for occupational exposure to radiation are based on annual absorbed or effective dose. Guidelines for Rn exposure are currently based on air concentrations of Rn or decay products. Models of bronchial dose from decay product exposure are based on calculations that have five major parameters with parameter variabilities ranging from 20 to 50%. Many countries currently use the ICRP dose conversion convention, which is a ratio of lifetime Rn lung cancer risk to lifetime atomic bomb dose risk. The results of ongoing epidemiology changed both lifetime risk values, and the dose conversion convention has increased by a factor of 2. Therefore, the current dose conversion convention risk ratio is to be replaced by biokinetic dosimetric models. The main effect of variability in the value of Rn dose factors on industry is that the workplace atmosphere must be characterized accurately, and at present, this is not possible. A history of the dose factor models is central to factor development. The values of the dose model parameters are described illustrating the difficulty in calculation of a dose factor with universal applicability. The objective is to show the range of each parameter and the effect of the dose factor used when reporting occupational or residential bronchial dose.

  20. Experimental observation of lens damage after low doses of γ-ray irradiation to rabbit eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xicheng; Hu Chunzhi; Wang Huijun; Zeng Aiping

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and evaluate low dose γ-ray radiation induced lens damage. Methods: Both eyes of each rabbit were exposed to a single dose of 25 or 50 cGy γ-rays in two groups, respectively. Samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and slit lamp microscopy (SLM)after irradiation. Results: Three days after 25 and 50 cGy irradiation,the epithelial cells of lens equator al region showed marked swelling and many vacuoles formed in intercellular space and cytoplasm,and accompanied by increased multi-lamellar bodies. Five months after irradiation, SLM of both groups showed that the posterior sub-capsule cortex exhibited clusters of vacuoles; 11 months after 50 cGy irradiation,the posterior sub-capsule and deep cortex manifested marked cloudy opacities. Conclusion: Low doses of γ-ray (25 and 50 cGy) irradiation can markedly damage lens of rabbits

  1. Deleterious Effects of High Dose Connexin 43 Mimetic Peptide Infusion After Cerebral Ischaemia in Near-Term Fetal Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J. Gunn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury at birth is associated with 1–3/1000 cases of moderate to severe encephalopathy. Previously, we have shown that connexin 43 hemichannel blockade, with a specific mimetic peptide, reduced the occurrence of seizures, improved recovery of EEG power and sleep state cycling, and improved cell survival following global cerebral ischaemia. In the present study, we examined the dose response for intracerebroventricular mimetic peptide infusion (50 µmol/kg/h for 1 h, followed by 50 µmol/kg/24 h (low dose or 50 µmol/kg/h for 25 h (high dose or vehicle only (control group, starting 90 min after the end of ischaemia, following global cerebral ischaemia, induced by 30 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion, in near-term fetal sheep (128 ± 1 days gestation. Both peptide infusion groups were associated with a transient significant increase in EEG power between 2–12 h after ischaemia. The ischaemia-low dose group showed a significant recovery of EEG power from day five compared to the ischaemia-vehicle and -high dose groups. In contrast, the high dose infusion was associated with greater secondary increase in impedance (brain cell swelling, as well as a trend towards a greater increase in lactate concentration and mortality. These data suggest that higher doses of connexin mimetic peptide are not beneficial and may be associated with adverse outcomes, most likely attributable to uncoupling of connexin 43 gap junctions leading to dysfunction of the astrocytic syncytium.

  2. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1981. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1981. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways from 48 sites ranged from a high of 20 person-rem to a low of 0.008 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 160 person-rem for the 98 million people considered at risk

  3. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1983. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 52 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 45 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 170 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk

  4. Minimum Effective Dose of Cattle and Sheep BSE for Oral Sheep Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    Full Text Available The minimum dose required to cause infection of Romney and Suffolk sheep of the ARQ/ARQ or ARQ/ARR prion protein gene genotypes following oral inoculation with Romney or Suffolk a sheep Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE-derived or cattle BSE-derived agent was investigated using doses ranging from 0.0005g to 5g. ARQ/ARQ sheep which were methionine (M / threonine (T heterozygous or T/T homozygous at codon 112 of the Prnp gene, dosed ARQ/ARR sheep and undosed controls did not show any evidence of infection. Within groups of susceptible sheep, the minimum effective oral dose of BSE was found to be 0.05g, with higher attack rates following inoculation with the 5g dose. Surprisingly, this study found no effect of dose on survival time suggesting a possible lack of homogeneity within the inoculum. All clinical BSE cases showed PrPd accumulation in brain; however, following cattle BSE inoculation, LRS involvement within Romney recipients was found to be significantly lower than within the Suffolk sheep inoculated group which is in agreement with previous reports.

  5. A comparison of quantum limited dose and noise equivalent dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Isaias D.; Boyce, Sarah J.; Petrillo, Michael J.; Zhou, Kungang

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-limited-dose (QLD) and noise-equivalent-dose (NED) are performance metrics often used interchangeably. Although the metrics are related, they are not equivalent unless the treatment of electronic noise is carefully considered. These metrics are increasingly important to properly characterize the low-dose performance of flat panel detectors (FPDs). A system can be said to be quantum-limited when the Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) is proportional to the square-root of x-ray exposure. Recent experiments utilizing three methods to determine the quantum-limited dose range yielded inconsistent results. To investigate the deviation in results, generalized analytical equations are developed to model the image processing and analysis of each method. We test the generalized expression for both radiographic and fluoroscopic detectors. The resulting analysis shows that total noise content of the images processed by each method are inherently different based on their readout scheme. Finally, it will be shown that the NED is equivalent to the instrumentation-noise-equivalent-exposure (INEE) and furthermore that the NED is derived from the quantum-noise-only method of determining QLD. Future investigations will measure quantum-limited performance of radiographic panels with a modified readout scheme to allow for noise improvements similar to measurements performed with fluoroscopic detectors.

  6. Single-dose Intravenous Toxicology Testing of Daebohwalryeok Pharmcopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Seung-Ho; Park, Sunju; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yu, Jun-Sang; Seo, Hyung-Sik; Kwon, Ki-Rok

    2015-06-01

    The aims of the study were to test the single-dose intravenous toxicity of Daebohwalryeok pharmacopuncture (DHRP) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and to estimate the crude lethal dose. The experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Co., a Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratory, according to the GLP regulation and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Biotoxtech Co. (Approval no: 110156). The rats were divided into three groups: DHRP was injected into the rats in the two test groups at doses of 10 mL/kg and 20 mL/kg, respectively, and normal saline solution was injected into the rats in the control group. Single doses of DHRP were injected intravenously into 6 week old SD rats (5 male and 5 female rats per group). General symptoms were observed and weights were measured during the 14 day observation period after the injection. After the observation period, necropsies were done. Then, histopathological tests were performed. Weight data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by using statistical analysis system (SAS, version 9.2). No deaths and no statistical significant weight changes were observed for either male or female SD rats in either the control or the test groups during the observation period. In addition, no treatment related general symptoms or necropsy abnormalities were observed. Histopathological results showed no DHRP related effects in the 20 mL/kg DHRP group for either male or female rats. Under the conditions of this study, the results from single-dose intravenous injections of DHRP showed that estimated lethal doses for both male and female rats were above 20 mL/kg.

  7. Single-dose Intravenous Toxicology Testing of Daebohwalryeok Pharmcopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of the study were to test the single-dose intravenous toxicity of Daebohwalryeok pharmacopuncture (DHRP in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and to estimate the crude lethal dose. Methods: The experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Co., a Good Laboratory Practice (GLP laboratory, according to the GLP regulation and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Biotoxtech Co. (Approval no: 110156. The rats were divided into three groups: DHRP was injected into the rats in the two test groups at doses of 10 mL/kg and 20 mL/kg, respectively, and normal saline solution was injected into the rats in the control group. Single doses of DHRP were injected intravenously into 6 week old SD rats (5 male and 5 female rats per group. General symptoms were observed and weights were measured during the 14 day observation period after the injection. After the observation period, necropsies were done. Then, histopathological tests were performed. Weight data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA by using statistical analysis system (SAS, version 9.2. Results: No deaths and no statistical significant weight changes were observed for either male or female SD rats in either the control or the test groups during the observation period. In addition, no treatment related general symptoms or necropsy abnormalities were observed. Histopathological results showed no DHRP related effects in the 20 mL/kg DHRP group for either male or female rats. Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the results from single-dose intravenous injections of DHRP showed that estimated lethal doses for both male and female rats were above 20 mL/kg.

  8. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  9. Group Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  10. Occupational dose constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The revision process of the international radiological protection regulations has resulted in the adoption of new concepts, such as practice, intervention, avoidable and restriction of dose (dose constraint). The latter deserving of special mention since it may involve reducing a priori of the dose limits established both for the public and to individuals occupationally exposed, values that can be further reduced, depending on the application of the principle of optimization. This article aims to present, with clarity, from the criteria adopted to define dose constraint values to the public, a methodology to establish the dose constraint values for occupationally exposed individuals, as well as an example of the application of this methodology to the practice of industrial radiography

  11. Some remarks on the significance of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.

    1989-12-01

    The criteria of the present system of individual dose limitation are considered as well as the evolution of the limiting values. The assumption of the linearity of the dose-effect relationship without any threshold is probably the best approach to adopt for recommendations in radiation protection and for accounting the doses acquired by exposure to ionizing radiation. On the other hand the present evaluation of the natural background could imply a different dose-effect relationship in the low doses region and perhaps the existence of a threshold. Therefore the extrapolations which are usually made after exposures of different groups of people to low doses cannot be considered as scientifically sound. (author)

  12. How to Appropriately Calculate Effective Dose for CT Using Either Size-Specific Dose Estimates or Dose-Length Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L; Mirro, Amy E; Moore, Bria M; Kaufman, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how to calculate effective dose in CT using size-specific dose estimates and to correct the current method using dose-length product (DLP). Data were analyzed from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT images. Size-specific dose estimate was used as a surrogate for organ dose in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. Organ doses were averaged by patient weight-based populations and were used to calculate effective dose by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 103 method using tissue-weighting factors (EICRP). In addition, effective dose was calculated using population-averaged CT examination DLP for the chest and abdominopelvic region using published k-coefficients (EDLP = k × DLP). EDLP differed from EICRP by an average of 21% (1.4 vs 1.1) in the chest and 42% (2.4 vs 3.4) in the abdominopelvic region. The differences occurred because the published kcoefficients did not account for pitch factor other than unity, were derived using a 32-cm diameter CT dose index (CTDI) phantom for CT examinations of the pediatric body, and used ICRP 60 tissue-weighting factors. Once it was corrected for pitch factor, the appropriate size of CTDI phantom, and ICRP 103 tissue-weighting factors, EDLP improved in agreement with EICRP to better than 7% (1.4 vs 1.3) and 4% (2.4 vs 2.5) for chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Current use of DLP to calculate effective dose was shown to be deficient because of the outdated means by which the k-coefficients were derived. This study shows a means to calculate EICRP using patient size-specific dose estimate and how to appropriately correct EDLP.

  13. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  14. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  15. Curcumin Shows Antiviral Properties against Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minji; Lee, GilJae; Si, Jiyeon; Lee, Sung-Joon; You, Hyun Ju; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-10-20

    Phytochemicals provide environmentally friendly and relatively inexpensive natural products, which could potentially benefit public health by controlling human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. In this study, 18 different phytochemicals were evaluated for antiviral effects against norovirus using murine norovirus (MNV) as a model for norovirus biology. Among these phytochemicals, curcumin (CCM) was the most potent anti-noroviral phytochemical, followed by resveratrol (RVT). In a cell culture infection model, exposure to CCM or RVT for 3 days reduced infectivity of norovirus by 91% and 80%, respectively. To confirm the antiviral capability of CCM, we further evaluated its antiviral efficacy at various doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mg/mL) and durations (short-term: 10, 30, 60, and 120 min; long-term: 1, 3, 7, and 14 days). The anti-noroviral effect of CCM was verified to occur in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of each phytochemical on the replication of HuNoV using a HuNoV replicon-bearing cell line (HG23). Neither CCM nor RVT had a strong inhibitory effect on HuNoV replication, which suggests that their antiviral mechanism may involve viral entry or other life cycle stages rather than the replication of viral RNA. Our results demonstrated that CCM may be a promising candidate for development as an anti-noroviral agent to prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness.

  16. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  17. Duodenal morphology and immune responses of broiler chickens fed low doses of deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Revajová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometry and flow cytometry for intraepithelial lymphocyte phenotyping were used to determine the changes in duodenal mucosae after administration of low doses of deoxynivalenol in chickens. Moreover, functions of phagocytes and immunocompetent cells in peripheral blood were evaluated by flow cytometry. In total, sixty chickens of Ross hybrid broilers 308 were used in this experiment. Two experimental groups of 20 birds were continually fed for 14 days a diet containing deoxynivalenol at a dose of 1 and 3 mg·kg-1; 20 birds of the control group were fed uncontaminated diet. Morphometry showed only tendency to decrease the height of villi and surface area of duodenal mucosae in chickens fed the diet supplemented with 3 mg·kg-1 deoxynivalenol. Phenotyping of intraepithelial lymphocytes showed a decrease of CD45+ (P P -1 of deoxynivalenol. Both experimental groups revealed higher metabolic burst of peripheral blood heterophils (P P P -1 dose of deoxynivalenol. The experimental feeding of chickens with deoxynivalenol resulted in immunomodulation of immunocompetent cells in duodenum and blood with mild atrophy of intestinal villi, mainly after the feeding of the dose of 3 mg·kg-1. We proved that even low doses of deoxynivalenol can cause changes in haemathological, immunological and morphological profiles already during two weeks, and lead to the activation of compensatory-adaptive mechanisms with unfavourable impact on health and performance of birds.

  18. ESR measurements of background doses in teeth of Japanese residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, S., E-mail: toyoda@dap.ous.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Okayama (Japan); Kondo, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Okayama (Japan); Zumadilov, K.; Hoshi, M. [Research Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Miyazawa, C. [Deparment of Dentistry, Ohu University, Fukushima (Japan); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The background doses for the teeth of Japanese residents were obtained by electron spin resonance (ESR) method. The doses obtained from 77 of 92 samples are less than 100 mGy while the doses of the other samples are high up to 250 mGy. The doses for buccal part of the teeth are higher than lingual part possibly due to contributions from dental X ray examination. A positive correlation was found between the ages of the donors and the obtained doses. The averaged annual ESR dose was calculated to be 0.87 mGy/y. These doses have to be considered in actual retrospective dosimetry studies for possible radiation accidents. The statistically significant critical level for Japanese residents would be about 200 mGy for individual doses and about 100 mGy for averaged group doses for {alpha} = 5% for those with ages older than 50.

  19. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  20. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  1. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  2. Environmental Change in Post-closure Safety Assessment of Solid Radioactive Waste Repositories. Report of Working Group 3 Reference Models for Waste Disposal of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Reference Models for Waste Disposal Working Group

  3. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  4. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These fields are interrelated and each of these fields contributes to the other. 2. Examples and classification. We first give some examples of Lie groups. The most frequently occurring ones are the linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), ...

  5. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S RAGHUNATHAN and T N VENKATARAMANA. ∗. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental ... linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), SOn(R),. SOn(C), Spn(R) and Spn(C). Let us call a con- nected Lie ..... split groups due respectively to C C Moore and. V Deodhar. B Sury solved the congruence subgroup ...

  6. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achudume, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) of the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The FHF is a surface facility supporting waste handling operations i.e. receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results are also limited to normal operations only. Results of this calculation will be used to support the FHF design and License Application

  7. Patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose to patient resulting from interventional procedures to assess the risk of deterministic effect. To this end, various dose indicators like dose area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used in clinical practice. The study aims at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribe to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). For the study the local MSD and related to their areas are investigated and compared for coronary angiography CA and intervention (PCI). Two methods implying radiographic films Kodak EDR2 and matrixes of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are applied for direct measurements of dose distribution for selected procedures. Both methods are compared. Additionally, for patient dosimetry the following data: MSD, CD, EFD, fluoroscopy time (FT), number of acquired images, total DAP, fluoro-DAP and record-DAP were collected for randomly selected procedure. The statistical quantities like: median, 3 rd quartile, mean and standard deviation for all dosimetric parameters are determined. Preliminary study showed that the values of data collected for coronary procedures are in the ranges 0,7 - 27,3 min for fluoroscopy time, 50 - 350 Gy cm 2 for total DAP, 300 - 2000 mGy for CD, 140 - 2000 mGy for EFD and 100 - 1500 mGy for local maximal skin dose. For interventions the ranges are, accordingly 3,0 - 43,6 min , 25 - 450 Gy cm 2 , 270 - 6600 mGy, 80 - 2600 mGy and 80 - 1500 mGy. As a result of the study the correlations between dose indicators and local MSD are analyzed. The concentration of dose on irradiated films are going to be investigated in some detail as well. (author)

  8. Influence of high-dose methotrexate therapy on the primordial follicles of the mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, Mert; Saygili, Ugur; Koyuncuoglu, Meral; Uslu, Turhan

    2009-06-01

    High-dose methotrexate (MTX) is one of the most prescribed agents in many malignant diseases affecting girls and young women of reproductive ages. This animal study directly measures the primordial follicle loss following exposure to high-dose MTX. Nine inbred Balb/c mice aged 7-8 weeks in the study group were administered 5 gr/m(2) MTX as a single agent intraperitoneally, whereas nine mice in the control group received saline. Seven days later the mice were killed and total numbers of the primordial follicles remaining in both ovaries were counted. In the high-dose MTX group, the mean number of primordial follicles (mean +/- standard deviation) was significantly different (202 +/- 38) versus the control group (327 +/- 81.7; P = 0.002). Our study shows that high-dose MTX causes damage to the primordial follicles of the ovaries of mice. This result may be important because young women taking high-dose MTX may suffer diminished reproductive performance and premature cessation of menses in the years following therapy.

  9. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC{sup 1638N/+} Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Shay, Jerry W. [Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC{sup 1638N/+} mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, or {sup 56}Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after {sup 28}Si, followed by {sup 56}Fe and {sup 12}C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after {sup 28}Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with {sup 28}Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  10. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC(1638N/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling; Shay, Jerry W; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Male and female APC(1638N/+) mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, (12)C, (28)Si, or (56)Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. The highest number of tumors was observed after (28)Si, followed by (56)Fe and (12)C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after (28)Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with (28)Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC1638N/+ Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling; Shay, Jerry W.; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC 1638N/+ mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, 12 C, 28 Si, or 56 Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after 28 Si, followed by 56 Fe and 12 C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after 28 Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with 28 Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  12. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  13. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  14. Efficacy and safety of combination therapy of high-dose losartan and hydrochlorothiazide in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Yuhei; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Norimatsu, Kenji; Hitaka, Yuka; Nagata, Itsuki; Koyoshi, Rie; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Uehara, Yoshinari; Inoue, Asao; Shirotani, Tetsuro; Fujisawa, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Eiyu; Saku, Keijiro

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of high-dose losartan (100 mg/day) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, 12.5 mg/day) compared with those of the combination of high-dose telmisartan (80 mg/day) and HCTZ (12.5 mg/day). Forty hypertensive patients who received a combination of high-dose telmisartan and HCTZ were enrolled. We applied a changeover strategy with switching from a combination of high-dose telmisartan and HCTZ to high-dose losartan and HCTZ. We divided the patients into two groups; those who achieved the target blood pressure (controlled group) and those who did not reach the target blood pressure (uncontrolled group) before the changeover and performed further analysis. The uncontrolled group showed a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (143±12 mmHg to 126±11 mmHg at three months). In addition, serum uric acid significantly decreased in all subjects, and in each of the controlled and uncontrolled groups. There were no significant changes in other biochemical parameters, such as potassium and hemoglobin A1c, at three months after the changeover in all subjects. Combination therapy with high-dose losartan and HCTZ was superior to the combination of telmisartan and HCTZ with respect to significant decreases in systolic blood pressure and serum uric acid in hypertensive patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Warfarin maintenance dose in older patients: higher average dose and wider dose frequency distribution in patients of African ancestry than those of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Candice L; Clemente, Jennifer L; Ibe, George N; Kandula, Vijay A; Curtis, Kristy D; Whittaker, Peter

    2010-06-15

    Studies report that warfarin doses required to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation decrease with age; however, these studies almost exclusively enrolled patients of European ancestry. Consequently, universal application of dosing paradigms based on such evidence may be confounded because ethnicity also influences dose. Therefore, we determined if warfarin dose decreased with age in Americans of African ancestry, if older African and European ancestry patients required different doses, and if their daily dose frequency distributions differed. Our chart review examined 170 patients of African ancestry and 49 patients of European ancestry cared for in our anticoagulation clinic. We calculated the average weekly dose required for each stable, anticoagulated patient to maintain an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0, determined dose averages for groups 80 years of age and plotted dose as a function of age. The maintenance dose in patients of African ancestry decreased with age (PAfrican ancestry required higher average weekly doses than patients of European ancestry: 33% higher in the 70- to 79-year-old group (38.2+/-1.9 vs. 28.8+/-1.7 mg; P=0.006) and 52% in the >80-year-old group (33.2+/-1.7 vs. 21.8+/-3.8 mg; P=0.011). Therefore, 43% of older patients of African ancestry required daily doses >5mg and hence would have been under-dosed using current starting-dose guidelines. The dose frequency distribution was wider for older patients of African ancestry compared to those of European ancestry (PAfrican ancestry indicate that strategies for initiating warfarin therapy based on studies of patients of European ancestry could result in insufficient anticoagulation and thereby potentially increase their thromboembolism risk. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Possible benefit of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine on overall survival of adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Azevedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML, high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy has been shown to influence survival in selected patients, although the appropriate doses and schemes have not been defined. We evaluated survival after calculating the actual dose of cytarabine that patients received for consolidation therapy and divided them into 3 groups according to dose. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study involving 311 non-promyelocytic AML patients with a median age of 36 years (16-79 years who received curative treatment between 1978 and 2007. The 131 patients who received cytarabine consolidation were assigned to study groups by their cytarabine dose protocol. Group 1 (n=69 received <1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The remaining patients received high-dose cytarabine (≥1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The actual dose received during the entire consolidation period in these patients was calculated, allowing us to divide these patients into 2 additional groups. Group 2 (n=27 received an intermediate-high-dose (<27 g/m2, and group 3 (n=35 received a very-high-dose (≥27 g/m2. Among the 311 patients receiving curative treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 20.2% (63 patients. The cytarabine consolidation dose was an independent determinant of survival in multivariate analysis; age, karyotype, induction protocol, French-American-British classification, and de novo leukemia were not. Comparisons showed that the risk of death was higher in the intermediate-high-dose group 2 (hazard ratio [HR]=4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81-11.21 and the low-dose group 1 (HR=4.43; 95% CI: 1.97-9.96 than in the very-high-dose group 3, with no significant difference between those two groups. Our findings indicated that very-high-dose cytarabine during consolidation in adults with non-promyelocytic AML may improve survival.

  17. Normal-release oral morphine starting dose in cancer patients with pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Carla I; Campa, Tiziana; Fagnoni, Elena; Brunelli, Cinzia; Luzzani, Massimo; Maltoni, Marco; De Conno, Franco

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate whether the current European Association for Palliative Care recommendation regarding the starting dose of 5 mg of normal-release morphine (NRM) sulfate oral solution every 4 hours in opioid naive patients or 10 mg in patients already being treated with "weak" opioids is effective and could be proposed as starting routine dose in clinical practice. Secondary aims were to estimate the percentage of patients who were high responders to NRM and to study the association of baseline patient characteristics with both high analgesic responsivity and the need of opioid dose escalation. Consecutive strong opioid-naive patients with cancer pain were enrolled in a multicenter uncontrolled phase 4 clinical trial. Oral NRM was administered at 2 different dosages: 5 and 10 mg every 4 hours, respectively, for opioids-naive (group A) and nonopioids-naive (group B) patients as starting therapy. Average daily dosages of NRM and opioid escalation index (OEI) were calculated and the reduction in pain score was tested through Student t test both in group A and in group B patients. One hundred fifty-nine consecutive patients were enrolled and data analysis was conducted on 151 (95%) patients. On an average the OEIs were: 3.2 in group A and 6.5 in group B and a significant reduction in pain score both after 3 and 5 days from baseline (POEI. These data show that empiric standard doses of NRM during titration, recommended by European Association for Palliative Care, are effective in clinical practice.

  18. Comparative study of low dose 131I treatment in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Lan; Shan Menglin; Wang Junqi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the low dose 131 I therapy for Graves' disease we compared the results of 277 patients in our department with the report of Howarth D et al. Methods: 277 patients were classified as 45 Gy group and 77 Gy group according to the dose level. The results of these two groups were compared separately with results of 60 Gy group and 90 Gy group reported by Howarth D et al. Results: The euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate among these four groups had no significant statistical difference after 6 months of 131 I therapy, but there were high significant statistical difference between our study and Howarth D research about euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate 24 months later. Conclusion: The low dose 131 i management refered by Howarth D et al was an effective method for Graves' disease which could reduce or delay the incidence of hypothyroidism. Our study show that subsection on the foundation of this low dose procedure could further reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism and improve the euthyroidism rate. (authors)

  19. A Progress Evaluation of Four Bilingual Children's Television Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    An evaluation of a bilingual education TV series was conducted involving 6-year-old English speaking, Spanish speaking, and bilingual children at four sites. Children were assigned to control and experimental groups with the latter group seeing four 30 minute shows. A pretest-posttest design was employed with the pretest serving as the covariate…

  20. The dose-response relationship for UV-tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruijl, F.R. de.

    1982-01-01

    The main objective of the investigations was to extend the knowledge on experimental UV-carcinogenesis and to use the experimental results as guidelines for developing a dose-response model for UV-carcinogenesis. The animal experiments carried out were all long-term ones. It was decided that - in anticipation of the data to be obtained - a model for such an assessment should be developed using the experimental results available at the start of the present study (1977). This initial study is presented. The results of two animal experiments are presented, which show that UV radiation is capable of inducing a systemic effect that enhances the de novo formation of UV induced tumors. The results of the main experiment are presented. In this experiment groups of mice were subjected to daily exposure to a certain dose of UV radiation in order to find the dose-response relationship. The relation between the daily dose and the duration of the treatment till the appearance of tumors (for instance, as measured by the yield) was ascertained for tumors of different sizes. It appears that the growth of a tumor is dose-independent, and, therefore, only the initiation of a tumor is dose-dependent. Finally an experiment is presented in which it was measured that, if a mouse is subjected to daily UV exposure, the transmission of the epidermis in the shortwave UV region decreases continuously. This decrease is due to hyperplasia of the epidermis, i.e., thickening of the epidermis by an increase in the number of cells per unit surface area. (Auth.)

  1. Modeling for Dose Rate Calculation of the External Exposure to Gamma Emitters in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, K. A.; El-Mongy, S. A.; El-Tahawy, M. S.; Mohsen, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the model proposed and developed in Ph.D thesis of the first author of this work, the dose rate conversion factors (absorbed dose rate in air per specific activity of soil in nGy.hr - 1 per Bq.kg - 1) are calculated 1 m above the ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. This new and simple dose rate calculation software was used for calculation of the dose rate in air 1 m above the ground. Then the results were compared with those obtained by five different groups. Although the developed model is extremely simple, the obtained results of calculations, based on this model, show excellent agreement with those obtained by the above-mentioned models specially that one adopted by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  2. Assessment of 226Ra age-dependent dose from water intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porntepkasemsan, Boonsom; Srisuksawad, Kanitha

    2008-01-01

    The radioactivity in canal and ground waters collected in a 2-year long observation from the vicinity of the Rare Earth Research and Development Center (RRDC), Phathumthani Province, Thailand, was measured in order to determine the concentration of 226 Ra and to estimate the age-dependent effective dose to humans due to consumption. 226 Ra activities in both canal and ground waters were well below the WHO guidance level for drinking water quality of 1 Bq L -1 . The highest 226 Ra effective doses per year were found for infants and teens. However, the observed levels of calculated 226 Ra effective doses for all age groups in both canal and ground waters show satisfactory low values (less than 15 μSv yr -1 ). These values are acceptable in accordance with the WHO recommended reference dose level of 100 μSv yr -1 from water intake of 2 L day -1

  3. Is a split-dose regimen of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid tolerable for colonoscopy in an early morning visit to a comprehensive medical check-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Changhyun; Jin, Eun Hyo; Yun, Mi Hyun; Lim, Joo Hyun; Kang, Hae Yeon; Yang, Jong In; Chung, Su Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Kim, Joo Sung

    2017-02-14

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of a split-dose 2 L polyethylene glycol (PEG)/ascorbic acid (AA) regimen for healthy examinees who visited for comprehensive medical check-up in the early morning. From February 2015 to March 2015, examinees of average risk who were scheduled for a colonoscopy in the morning were retrospectively enrolled. The 189 examinees were divided into split-dose and non-split-dose groups. The adequacy of bowel preparation for the split-dose group vs the non-split-dose group was 96.8% vs 85.2%, respectively, P morning colonoscopy was more effective and showed better compliance for diet restriction without any difference in satisfaction and discomfort. Introducing a split-dose regimen of 2 L PEG/AA to morning colonoscopy examinees is effective and tolerable in a comprehensive medical check-up setting.

  4. A Pilot Study on Single-dose Toxicity Testing of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Hwan Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture when used as a single-dose in 6 week old, male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech (Chungwon, Korea, an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. SD rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and 0.5 mL doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted. Hematologically, some changes in the male rats in two experimental groups were observed, but those changes had no clinical or toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed cell infiltration in the male rats in one of the experimental groups; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning. Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy. Conclusion: As a result of single-dose tests of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed.

  5. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  6. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  7. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  8. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jtar@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  9. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child, call your provider. Proper Dosing of Suppositories If your child is vomiting or will not take oral medicine, you can use suppositories. Suppositories are placed in the anus to deliver ...

  10. Dose in conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna D, E.; Padilla R, Z. P.; Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    It has been pointed out that medical exposures are the most significant sources of exposure to ionizing radiation for the general population. Inside the medical exposures the most important is the X-ray use for diagnosis, which is by far the largest contribution to the average dose received by the population. From all studies performed in radiology the chest radiography is the most abundant. In an X-ray machine, voltage and current are combined to obtain a good image and a reduce dose, however due to the workload in a radiology service individual dose is not monitored. In order to evaluate the dose due to chest radiography in this work a plate phantom was built according to the ISO recommendations using methylmethacrylate walls and water. The phantom was used in the Imaging department of the Zacatecas General Hospital as a radiology patient asking for a chest study; using thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD 100 the kerma at the surface entrance was determined. (Author)

  11. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  12. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  13. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug P. Aubrey; David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus...

  14. Fingerprinting using extrolite profiles and physiological data shows sub-specific groupings of Penicillium crustosum strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, Silva; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    water activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using micromorphological data, temperature- and water-dependent growth rates, and extrolite profiles obtained by HPLC analysis. The micromorphological data were less informative, while the growth-rate data were informative only......Fingerprinting of Penicillium crustosum strains was performed using different phenotypic characteristics. Seven strains of this extremely homogenous species were selected; of these, five originated from geographical locations characterized by low temperatures, and one from a location with a low...... by previous amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) study. We thus demonstrate here for the first time that combined qualitative and quantitative extrolite profiles can be used as a tool for phenotypic fingerprinting, to complement, or replace, molecular fingerprinting techniques....

  15. Comparison of post cesarean infection after single dose versus three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Mohammadian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cesarean delivery is a surgical operation which is applied to prevent maternal and fetal complications. Cesarean delivery isn’t without complication and has some complications such as infection. Postoperative infection includes endometritis, wound infection and septic pelvic thrombophlebitis that depend to prophylactic antibiotics and surgical technique. The aim of this study was comparison of post operative infection after single dose and three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimens. . Material and Methods: This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on all pregnant women referd to the Vali-Asr Hospital of Zanjan University of Medical Sciences and underwent cesarean delivery during one year from starting study. Participants subsequently were randomized into two groups: A (recieved single dose of prophylactic antibiotic and B (recieved three doses of prophylactic antibiotic. Subjects were checked up for the clinical signs of infection during hospitalization and 10 days after discharge. The results were analyzed by SPSS Software Ver16 and Chi-Square Test. Results: During one year, 146 pregnant women with cesarean delivery entered 2 equal groups (A and B which each group had 73 subjects. During hospitalization after cesarean delivery, 5(6.8% patients of group A and 2(2.7% patients of group B had fever. There was no significant correlation between the two groups. Conclusion: There was no significant correlation between single dose and three doses of prophylactic antibiotic regimens in groups A and B. Therefore, it seems thatthere is no need to use three doses of prophylactic antibiotic for cesarean delivery.Therfore, because of drug resistance and economic loss, single dose of prophylactic antibiotic is recommended for prevention of post cesarean infection

  16. High- vs Low-Dose Corticosteroid Injection in the Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis with Severe Pain: A Randomized Controlled Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyou Hyun; Park, Jong Wook; Kim, Sang Jun

    2017-10-07

    To compare the degree of pain relief between high-dose (40 mg of triamcinolone acetonide) and low-dose (20 mg of triamcinolone acetonide) corticosteroid injections in patients with severe pain due to adhesive capsulitis. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, dose-comparative study. A total of 32 patients who were diagnosed with adhesive capsulitis and who expressed severe pain intensity, 8 or more points on a numeric rating scale (NRS). Patients received injections of high- or low-dose triamcinolone acetonide under ultrasound guidance. NRS, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and the passive range of motion (PROM) in four directions were evaluated before and three weeks after the injection. NRS scores showed significant improvement three weeks after the injection in both groups (P = 0.01 in both the low-dose group and high-dose group), but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.63). SPADI score significantly improved at three weeks after the injection in both groups (P = 0.02 in the low-dose group and P adhesive capsulitis; hence, 20 mg of triamcinolone acetonide can be recommended in patients with adhesive capsulitis with severe pain. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  18. Gonadal doses from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The method of calculation of gonadal doses arising from different radiotherapeutic procedures is described. The measurement of scatter factors to the gonads from superficial and deep therapy is detailed and the analytic fits to the experimental data, as a function of field position, field size and beam energy are given. The data used to calculate the gonadal doses from treatments using linear accelerators, teletherapy and sealed sources are described and the analytic fits to the data given

  19. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on life span prolongation of human premature-aging syndrome model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that Type II diabetes model mice prolonged of their life span by life long low dose rate irradiation. We also found that antioxidant function in variety tissues of some strain of mice were enhancement after low dose/low dose rate irradiation. The prolongation of life span might depend on certain damaged level of reactive oxygen species. We thought the effect of the prolongation was due to the enhancement of the antioxidant activities after irradiation. We investigated whether the enhancement of antioxidant activities after low dose rate irradiation had an effect on life span prolongation. Four-week-old female human premature-aging syndrome model mice, kl/kl (klotho) mice, which the life span of this model mouse is about 65 days, were irradiated with gamma rays at 0.35, 0.70 or 1.2 mGy/hr. The 0.70 mGy/hr-irradiated group remarkably effected on the prolongation of their life span. Some mice of the group were extremely survived for about and more 100 days. Antioxidant activities in the irradiated groups were enhancement by low dose rate irradiation, however the dependence of the dose rates were not clearly difference. These results suggest that the antioxidant activities in this model mouse were enhanced by the low dose rate irradiation, and may make it possible to prolong the life span of this mouse. (author)

  20. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  1. Refining dosing by oral gavage in the dog: a protocol to harmonise welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Laura E; Robinson, Sally; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M

    2015-01-01

    The dog is a frequently-used, non-rodent species in the safety assessment of new chemical entities. We have a scientific and ethical obligation to ensure that the best quality of data is achieved from their use. Oral gavage is a technique frequently used to deliver a compound directly into the stomach. As with other animals, in the dog, gavage is aversive and the frequency of its use is a cause for welfare concern but little research has been published on the technique nor how to Refine it. A Welfare Assessment Framework (Hall, 2014) was previously developed for use with the laboratory-housed dog and a contrasting pattern of behaviour, cardiovascular and affective measures were found in dogs with positive and negative welfare. Using the framework, this study compared the effects of sham dosing (used to attempt to habituate dogs to dosing) and a Refined training protocol against a control, no-training group to determine the benefit to welfare and scientific output of each technique. Our findings show that sham dosing is ineffective as a habituation technique and 'primes' rather than desensitises dogs to dosing. Dogs in the control group showed few changes in parameters across the duration of the study, with some undesirable changes during dosing, while dogs in the Refined treatment group showed improvements in many parameters. It is recommended that if there is no time allocated for pre-study training a no-sham dosing protocol is used. However, brief training periods show a considerable benefit for welfare and quality of data to be obtained from the dogs' use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Refining dosing by oral gavage in the dog: A protocol to harmonise welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Laura E.; Robinson, Sally; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dog is a frequently-used, non-rodent species in the safety assessment of new chemical entities. We have a scientific and ethical obligation to ensure that the best quality of data is achieved from their use. Oral gavage is a technique frequently used to deliver a compound directly into the stomach. As with other animals, in the dog, gavage is aversive and the frequency of its use is a cause for welfare concern but little research has been published on the technique nor how to Refine it. A Welfare Assessment Framework (Hall, 2014) was previously developed for use with the laboratory-housed dog and a contrasting pattern of behaviour, cardiovascular and affective measures were found in dogs with positive and negative welfare. Methods Using the framework, this study compared the effects of sham dosing (used to attempt to habituate dogs to dosing) and a Refined training protocol against a control, no-training group to determine the benefit to welfare and scientific output of each technique. Results Our findings show that sham dosing is ineffective as a habituation technique and ‘primes’ rather than desensitises dogs to dosing. Dogs in the control group showed few changes in parameters across the duration of the study, with some undesirable changes during dosing, while dogs in the Refined treatment group showed improvements in many parameters. Discussion It is recommended that if there is no time allocated for pre-study training a no-sham dosing protocol is used. However, brief training periods show a considerable benefit for welfare and quality of data to be obtained from the dogs' use. PMID:25575806

  3. Reducing Radiation Dose in Pediatric Diagnostic Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodadra, Anish; Bartoletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To assess radiation dose in common pediatric diagnostic fluoroscopy procedures and determine the efficacy of dose tracking and dose reduction training to reduce radiation use. Fluoroscopy time and radiation dose area product (DAP) were recorded for upper GIs (UGI), voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs), and barium enemas (BEs) during a six-month period. The results were presented to radiologists followed by a 1-hour training session on radiation dose reduction methods. Data were recorded for an additional six months. DAP was normalized to fluoroscopy time, and Wilcoxon testing was used to assess for differences between groups. Data from 1,479 cases (945 pretraining and 530 post-training) from 9 radiologists were collected. No statistically significant difference was found in patient age, proportion of examination types, or fluoroscopy time between the pre- and post-training groups (P ≥ .1), with the exception of a small decrease in median fluoroscopy time for VCUGs (1.0 vs 0.9 minutes, P = .04). For all examination types, a statistically significant decrease was found in the median normalized DAP (P < .05) between pre- and post-training groups. The median (quartiles) for pretraining and post-training normalized DAPs (μGy·m(2) per minute) were 14.36 (5.00, 38.95) and 6.67 (2.67, 17.09) for UGIs; 13.00 (5.34, 32.71) and 7.16 (2.73, 19.85) for VCUGs; and 33.14 (9.80, 85.26) and 17.55 (7.96, 46.31) for BEs. Radiation dose tracking with feedback, paired with dose reduction training, can reduce radiation dose during diagnostic pediatric fluoroscopic procedures by nearly 50%. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-01-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. We assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Federal Guidance Report No. 13, we show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk that applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age. (author)

  5. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.

    1979-12-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1976. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups - infant, child, teenager and adult - residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. Results are given in the form of tables giving the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within the 2 to 80-km region around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 160 person-rem to a low of 0.0002 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 11 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 470 person-rem for the 90 million people considered at risk

  6. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-01-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency's Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age

  7. Fenbendazole efficacy in lambs: a comparison of oral dosing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fenbendazole efficacy in lambs: a comparison of oral dosing and feed block additive modes of administration. ... The mean haematocrit values, mean percentage egg reduction and mean liveweight gains were higher at the end of the trial for the single monthly dosed group than for the untreated control group, while the ...

  8. Doses and population irradiation factors for Canadian radiation technologists (1978 to 1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Bews, J.; Gordon, K.; Sutherland, J.B.; Sont, W.N.; Ashmore, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Individual and collective radiation doses received by Canadian radiation technologists (RTs) working in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy are summarized for the period 1978 to 1988. The data were obtained directly from the National Dose Registry, Department of National Health and Welfare. Over the 11-year study period the mean annual dose equivalent fluctuated around 0.2, 1.8 and 1.1 mSv for RTs working in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy respectively. Over the same period the occupational collective dose equivalent decreased in diagnostic radiology by 44% and radiotherapy by 35%, and increased in nuclear medicine by 45%. Approximately 10 000 RTs are monitored each year, with an estimated total occupational collective dose equivalent of about 3.6 person-sievert. Analysis of dose distribution data showed that only 1.3% of all monitored RTs received an annual whole-body dose equivalent greater than the current legal limit for members of the public (5 mSv). Approximately half of the RTs working in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy received an annual dose equivalent in excess of 0.5 mSv; only 7.3% of their diagnostic radiology counterparts exceeded this level. Demographic data showed a high preponderance of young women in all three RT classifications, and an analysis of the radiation risks to this occupational group revealed increases of up to 12% above the risk associated with a 'standard' adult working population exposed to the same collective dose equivalent. (20 refs., 4 tabs., fig.)

  9. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Viulet, Tiberiu [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562 (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  10. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution

  11. Sildenafil for pulmonary hypertension: dose-dependent improvement in exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Riina Marjaana; Ulrich, Silvia; Huber, Lars C; Speich, Rudolf; Maggiorini, Marco; Treder, Ursula; Fischler, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Sildenafil has been widely used as an orphan drug for several years, mostly at a dose of 50mg tid. Since a recent randomized study showed no dose-response relationship, the target dose in future will be 20mg tid. This might, however, have a negative effect on patients being already on 50mg tid. During the past years we usually up-titrated the sildenafil dosage in monthly intervals from 12.5 to 25mg, and then finally to 50mg tid. Therefore, we wondered if a dose-response relationship could be found in a group of 23 patients, in whom we had measured a 6-min walking distance (6-MWD) at all time points. The 6-MWD was virtually unchanged during the treatment with sildenafil 12.5 and 25mg tid, respectively. However, there was a significant improvement by 34+/-63 and 26+/-47m in the 6-MWD after increasing the sildenafil dose to 50mg tid compared with baseline (p=0.015) and 25mg tid (p=0.014), respectively. In conclusion, these data suggest that sildenafil has a clinically relevant dose-response relationship with a significant improvement in 6-MWD only at a dose of 50mg tid.

  12. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  13. Late-night talk show v USA

    OpenAIRE

    Halamásek, Šimon

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the history of talk show in USA with emphasis on its specific form, which is late-night talk show. The first chapter focuses on the creation of new television networks and the overall state of american broadcasting during the first era of the television talk show format. The thesis briefly describes radio broadcasting which served not only as an important source of inspiration for television but also as a starting platform for most talk show hosts. Next chapter theoreti...

  14. Dose-dependent hepatotoxicity effects of Zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esrafil Mansouri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNP are increasingly used in sunscreens, biosensors, food additives and pigments. In this study the effects of ZNP on liver of rats was investigated. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups received 5, 50 and 300 mg/kg ZNP respectively for 14 days. Control group received only distilled water. ALT, AST and ALP were considered as biomarkers to indicate hepatotoxicity. Lipid peroxidation (MDA, SOD and GPx were detected for assessment of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological studies and TUNEL assay were also done. Results: Plasma concentration of zinc (Zn was significantly increased in 5 mg/kg ZNP-treated rats. Liver concentration of Zn was significantly increased in the 300 mg/kg ZNP-treated animals. Weight of liver was markedly increased in both 5 and 300 mg/kg doses of ZNP. ZNP at the doses of 5 mg/kg induced a significant increase in oxidative stress through the increase in MDA content and a significant decrease in SOD and GPx enzymes activity in the liver tissue. Administration of ZNP at 5 mg/kg induced a significant elevation in plasma AST, ALT and ALP. Histological studies showed that treatment with 5 mg/kg of ZNP caused hepatocytes swelling, which was accompanied by congestion of RBC and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Apoptotic index was also significantly increased in this group. ZNP at the dose of 300 mg/kg had poor hepatotoxicity effect. Conclusion: It is concluded that lower doses of ZNP has more hepatotoxic effects on rats, and recommended to use it with caution if there is a hepatological problem.

  15. Dose levels and image quality of second-generation 128-slice dual-source coronary CT angiography in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Julian L; Hu, Xiaohan; Engler, Alexander; Kerl, J Matthias; Beeres, Martin; Frellesen, Claudia; Luboldt, Wolfgang; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W; Lehnert, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    To compare radiation exposure and image quality of second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography (cCTA) protocols. We retrospectively analyzed data from four groups with 25 patients, each examined by one of the following DSCT cCTA protocols: prospectively ECG-gated high-pitch (group 1) or sequential (group 2) acquisition, retrospectively ECG-gated acquisition in dual-energy (DECT, group 3) or dual-source (group 4) mode. CT dose index volume, dose length product, estimated radiation dose, contrast-to-noise- and signal-to-noise-ratios were compared. Subjective image quality was rated by two observers blinded to the protocols. High-pitch DSCT showed a mean estimated radiation dose of 1.27 ± 0.62 mSv, significantly (p source (8.11 ± 4.95 mSv) acquisition. Image noise showed no statistical difference (p > 0.91), ranging from 15.2 ± 4.4 (group 2) up to 24.5 ± 22.0 (group 4). Each protocol showed diagnostic image quality in at least 98.1 % of evaluated coronary segments without significant differences (p > 0.05). Prospectively ECG-gated DSCT protocols enable cCTA with significant dose reduction and consistently diagnostic image quality. In patients requiring retrospectively ECG-gated DSCT for functional analysis or due to arrhythmia, dual-energy mode should be preferred over dual-source mode as it significantly decreases estimated dose without compromising image quality.

  16. Randomized clinical trial comparing fixed-time split dosing and split dosing of oral Picosulfate regimen for bowel preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae Hyuck; Han, Koon Hee; Park, Jong Kyu; Seo, Hyun Il; Kim, Young Don; Lee, Sang Jin; Jun, Baek Gyu; Hwang, Min Sik; Park, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, Myeong Jong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2017-08-28

    To compare the efficacy of fixed-time split dose and split dose of an oral sodium picosulfate for bowel preparation. This is study was prospective, randomized controlled study performed at a single Institution (2013-058). A total of 204 subjects were assigned to receive one of two sodium picosulfate regimens ( i.e ., fixed-time split or split) prior to colonoscopy. Main outcome measurements were bowel preparation quality and subject tolerability. There was no statistical difference between the fixed-time split dose regimen group and the split dose regimen group (Ottawa score mean 2.57 ± 1.91 vs 2.80 ± 2.51, P = 0.457). Cecal intubation time and physician's satisfaction of inspection were not significantly different between the two groups ( P = 0.428, P = 0.489). On subgroup analysis, for afternoon procedures, the fixed-time split dose regimen was equally effective as compared with the split dose regimen (Ottawa score mean 2.56 ± 1.78 vs 2.59 ± 2.27, P = 0.932). There was no difference in tolerability or compliance between the two groups. Nausea was 21.2% in the fixed-time split dose group and 14.3% in the split dose group ( P = 0.136). Vomiting was 7.1% and 2.9% ( P = 0.164), abdominal discomfort 7.1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.484), dizziness 1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.113), cold sweating 1% and 0% ( P = 0.302) and palpitation 0% and 1% ( P = 0.330), respectively. Sleep disturbance was two (2%) patients in the fixed-time split dose group and zero (0%) patient in the split dose preparation ( P = 0.143) group. A fixed-time split dose regimen with sodium picosulfate is not inferior to a split dose regimen for bowel preparation and equally effective for afternoon colonoscopy.

  17. Analysis of CT radiation dose based on radiation-dose-structured reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weipeng; Zhang Yi; Zhang Menglong; Zhang Dapeng; Song Shaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT radiation dose statistically using the standardized radiation-dose-structured report (RDSR) of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). Methods: Using the self-designed software, 1230 RDSR files about CT examination were obtained searching on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The patient dose database was established by combination of the extracted relevant information with the scanned sites. The patients were divided into adult group (over 10 years) and child groups (0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years) according to the age. The average volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) of all scans were recorded respectively, and then the effective dose (E) was estimated. The DLP value at 75% quantile was calculated and compared with the diagnostic reference level (DRL). Results: In adult group, CTDI vol and DLP values were moderately and positively correlated (r = 0.41), the highest E was observed in upper abdominal enhanced scan, and the DLP value at 75% quantile was 60% higher than DRL. In child group, their CTDI vol in group of 5-10 years was greater than that in groups of 0-1 and 1-5 years (t = 2.42, 2.04, P < 0.05); the DLP value was slightly and positively correlated with the age (r = 0.16), while E was moderately and negatively correlated with the age (r = -0.48). Conclusions: It is a simple and efficient method to use RDSR to obtain the radiation doses of patients. With the popularization of the new equipment and the application of regionalized medical platform, RDSR would become the main tool for the dosimetric level surveying and individual dose recording. (authors)

  18. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  19. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid_rbp@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiri, Isaac [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Yazdan [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Deevband, Mohammad Reza [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Ahmad [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad, E-mail: bitarafan@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  20. Radiation dose reduction without compromise to image quality by alterations of filtration and focal spot size in cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Min Keun; Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Jung Han; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Different angiographic protocols may influence the radiation dose and image quality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of filtration and focal spot size on radiation dose and image quality for diagnostic cerebral angiography using an in-vitro model and in-vivo patient groups. Radiation dose and image quality were analyzed by varying the filtration and focal spot size on digital subtraction angiography exposure protocols (1, inherent filtration + large focus; 2, inherent + small; 3, copper + large; 4, copper + small). For the in-vitro analysis, a phantom was used for comparison of radiation dose. For the in-vivo analysis, bilateral paired injections, and patient cohort groups were compared for radiation dose and image quality. Image quality analysis was performed in terms of contrast, sharpness, noise, and overall quality. In the in-vitro analysis, the mean air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP)/frame were significantly lower with added copper filtration (protocols 3 and 4). In the in-vivo bilateral paired injections, AK and DAP/frame were significantly lower with filtration, without significant difference in image quality. The patient cohort groups with added filtration (protocols 3 and 4) showed significant reduction of total AK and DAP/patient without compromise to the image quality. Variations in focal spot size showed no significant differences in radiation dose and image quality. Addition of filtration for angiographic exposure studies can result in significant total radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Focal spot size does not influence radiation dose and image quality. The routine angiographic protocol should be judiciously investigated and implemented.