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Sample records for dorsalis hood thysanoptera

  1. Development and Survivorship of Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae in Different Growth Stages of Mango and Selected Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affandi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The research objective was to quantify the development and survivorship rate of S. dorsalis in different phenological stages of mango and selected weeds. The research was conducted in the laboratory of PT. Trigatra Rajasa, Mango plantation in Ketowan, Arjasa, Situbondo, East Java, Indonesia from February to September 2015. The development and survivorship rate were done through observation of life span of S. dorsalis from egg to pupa. Analysis of Variance and Duncan Multiple Range Test (p = 0.05 with 5 replications were applied to ensure the significant differences among the treatments. The result showed that development and survivorship of Scirtothrips dorsalis were supported by mango flushes and flower as well as some weeds such as Leucania leucochepala, Ipomoea triloba, Achalypha indica, Desmanthus leptophyllus and Azadirachta indica as source of food. Achalypha indica was the most suitable host with development time (12.82 ± 0.21 days and survivorship (33 %. Weed Tridax procumbent, Momordica charantia and Mimosa pudica were unable to provide the living requirement for immature developmental stage of S. dorsalis.

  2. HOODS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleja, Albert; Jensen, Lars J

    2015-01-01

    Clustering algorithms are often used to find groups relevant in a specific context; however, they are not informed about this context. We present a simple algorithm, HOODS, which identifies context-specific neighborhoods of entities from a similarity matrix and a list of entities specifying...... the context. We illustrate its applicability by finding disease-specific neighborhoods of functionally associated proteins, kinase-specific neighborhoods of structurally similar inhibitors, and physiological-system-specific neighborhoods of interconnected diseases. HOODS can be used via a simple interface...

  3. Tabes Dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy to deal with muscle wasting and weakness. Preventive treatment for those who come into ... disorders, such as tabes dorsalis, in an effort to find ways to prevent, treat, and, ultimately, ...

  4. Towards understanding thysanoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce L. Parker; Margaret Skinner; eds.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-one papers and three posters on the systematics, biology, behavior and management of Thysanoptera, with particular reference to Taeniothrips inconsequens (Uzel), pear thrips, presented at an international conference in Burlington, Vermont.

  5. Chemical ecology of the Thysanoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray S. Blum

    1991-01-01

    The chemical ecology of the Thysanoptera is identified with a variety of natural products discharged in anal droplets during confrontations with adversaries. These exudates are fortified with defensive allomones that may function as repellents, contact irritants, or in some cases, fumigants. Thrips synthesize a large diversity of allomonal products that include...

  6. Thrips (Thysanoptera) of coffee flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of thrips (Thysanoptera) associated with coffee flowers was conducted in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. The main objectives were to identify them and to determine whether they were carrying coffee pollen grains. A total of 40 thrips species in 22 genera were identified. The most com...

  7. NeighborHood

    OpenAIRE

    Corominola Ocaña, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    NeighborHood és una aplicació basada en el núvol, adaptable a qualsevol dispositiu (mòbil, tablet, desktop). L'objectiu d'aquesta aplicació és poder permetre als usuaris introduir a les persones del seu entorn més immediat i que aquestes persones siguin visibles per a la resta d'usuaris. NeighborHood es una aplicación basada en la nube, adaptable a cualquier dispositivo (móvil, tablet, desktop). El objetivo de esta aplicación es poder permitir a los usuarios introducir a las personas de su...

  8. Investigation of thysanoptera populations in Hungarian greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orosz Szilvia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were performed on sweet pepper and on weeds in their surroundings from 2005 to 2007 in the Jászság region, on different vegetables and ornamentals from 2015 to 2016 throughout Hungary, and on some indoor ornamental plants in Budapest and Kecskemét in 2017. These studies were carried out in greenhouses. The main objectives of this work was to clarify the consistency of Thysanoptera populations in these greenhouses and, secondly, as part of the official monitoring of Thrips palmi Karny and Thrips setosus Moulton, the study also focused on the first appearance of these pests in Hungary. An important additional aim was to determine which reservoirs were significant in the risk of Thysanoptera species transmitting tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV. Regarding the surveys conducted, the most frequent Thysanoptera species present in large numbers during the investigation period in every greenhouse was Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande. Also, a significant amount of Echinothrips americanus Morgan was found on ornamentals in southern Hungary, whereas on indoor ornamental plants only Hercinothrips femoralis O. M. Reuter was found.

  9. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [BA-PIRC, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  10. Management Observation Facility Fume Hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundsmo, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    I reviewed all the hoods used for AS&I work in buildings 253, 254, and 255. All have had the minimum annual surveys conducted and some have had semi-annual reviews. The operating parameter labels are posted consistent to the right or above right (with the only exception the perchloric acid hood in 1734- on the left) which facilitates users knowing where to check for information. All hoods with sash doors (except the SE one in 1734 have a note on the Operating Parameters label to "keep sash doors closed". Again, this was checking consistency. No surveys were missed.

  11. Hood Canal Steelhead - Hood Canal Steelhead Supplementation Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hood Canal Steelhead Project is a 17-year before-after-control-impact experiment that tests the effects of supplementation on natural steelhead populations in...

  12. Nomenclatural problems among Thysanoptera (Insecta of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Goldarazena

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We present data to argue that several recent papers on the Thysanoptera of Costa Rica are affected by unsatisfactory technical procedures, including failure to recognize intraspecific structural variation. Fourteen new synonyms are recognized for Costa Rica Thysanoptera, nine generic and five specific. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (2: 961-968. Epub 2008 June 30.Presentamos datos para apoyar nuestro argumento de que varios artículos recientes sobre los Thysanoptera de Costa Rica se han visto afectados por procedimientos técnicos insatisfactorios, incluyendo el no reconocer la variación estructural intraespecífica. Presentamos nueve sinonimias en los tisanópteros de Costa Rica: nueve a nivel de género y cinco a nivel de especie.

  13. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory

  14. "Ameeriklane" Robin Hood / Timo Diener

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diener, Timo

    2005-01-01

    Mängufilmi "Robin Hood : varaste prints" võtetest. Režissöör Kevin Reynolds, peaosas Kevin Costner, USA 1991. Järg: Teleleht nr. 14, 11. aprill 2005, lk. 38 : ill ja Teleleht nr. 15, 18. aprill 2005, lk. 38 : ill

  15. Gynaikothrips uzeli (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae), new record from Tartous, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ali Yaseen

    2014-01-01

    The weeping fig thrips Gynaikothrips uzeli Zimmermann (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) is newly recorded for the first time in the leaf galls of the weeping fig tree Ficus benjamina L. (Rosales: Moraceae) in the coastal area of Tartous, Syria. The thrips caused purplish red spots on the leaf surface of the host plant and the leaves curl. G. uzeili appears to be successfully adapted to this area. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Ecological Baseline, Fort Hood, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    cedar eTm (Uiimus crassifolia), Texas ash (Fraxinus texansis), and Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana). Conversely, the two predominant tree species...Ilex decidua), Mex- ican buckeye (Ungnadia spjeciosa), and Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana). Vines included greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox) and white...Hedgehey Cactus (Echinocereus sp.) has been observed on Fort Hood. Due to the brief period of flowering for this genus , the individual species were not

  17. Pilgrim Souvenir: Hood of Cherries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Jeffs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This lead alloy badge from the British Museum represents a medieval hood repurposed as a sack for a harvest of cherries. It measures 38 by 30 millimetres and was cast integrally with its pin and clasp in a three-part mould. When first made, it would have shone like silver. Badges were purchased in their millions by pilgrims between the late twelfth and early sixteenth centuries, as attractive, wearable and cheap souvenirs of their visits to holy sites. By the later Middle Ages badges were also worn as general symbols of devotion, as livery insignia, and as humorous or amorous tokens; which of these categories the “hood of cherries” badge falls into is debatable. Five of them have been found: three in Salisbury, and another in London, while the provenance of the fifth is unknown. Their cataloguers reluctantly associate them with the cult of St Dorothy, whose emblem is a basket of fruit, although Spencer expressed concern that, “a fashionable hood seems far removed from her story.” There are also possible alternative explanations to its meaning, which will be explored here.

  18. Species of thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera in two strawberry production systems in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M. J. Pinent

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Species of thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera in two strawberry production systems in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Thrips are tiny insects responsible for the reduction of strawberry fruit quality. The work aimed to record and quantify the thysanopterofauna present in two strawberry production systems, low tunnel and semi-hydroponic. Leaves, flowers and fruits were collected weekly, from July 2005 to December 2006 in Caxias do Sul and Bom Princípio municipalities, RS. A total of 664 individuals were collected, representing two families, four genus and 10 species: Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande, 1895, F. schultzei (Trybom, 1910, F. rodeos Moulton, 1933, F. simplex (Priesner, 1924, F. williamsi (Hood, 1915, F. gemina (Bagnall, 1919, Frankliniella sp., Thrips tabaci (Lindeman, 1888, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman, 1888, Caliothrips fasciatus (Pergande 1895 from Thripidae and Heterothrips sp. from Heterothripidae. Frankliniella occidentalis represented 89.7% of the samples with 95.8% of the species collected in flowers, 3.9% in fruits and 0.8% in leaves. The results show that flowers are the most important food resource for these insects on strawberry plants. Frankliniella rodeos, F. simplex, F. williamsi, C. fasciatus, and Heterothrips sp. are new records on strawberry for Brazil.

  19. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Fenpropathrin on the Biological Performance of Scolothrips longicornis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Determination of negative nontarget effects of pesticides on beneficial organisms by measuring only lethal effects is likely to underestimate effects of sublethal doses. In this study, the sublethal effects of fenpropathrin on the predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner (Thysanoptera: T...

  20. Evaluation of Orius species for biological control of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommasini, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Key words: Thysanoptera, Frankliniella occidentalis, Heteroptera, Orius leavigatu, Orius majusculu, Orius niger, Orius insidiosus, Biology, Diapause, Biological control.The overall aim of this research was to develop a biological control programme for F. occidentalis through the selection of

  1. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  2. Transmission Biology of Rice Stripe Mosaic Virus by an Efficient Insect Vector Recilia dorsalis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe mosaic virus (RSMV is a newly discovered species of cytorhabdovirus infecting rice plants that is transmitted by the leafhopper Recilia dorsalis. In this study, the transmission characteristics of RSMV by R. dorsalis were investigated. Under suitable growth conditions for R. dorsalis, the RSMV acquisition rate reached 71.9% in the second-generation population raised on RSMV-infected rice plants. The minimum acquisition and inoculation access periods of R. dorsalis were 3 and 30 min, respectively. The minimum and maximum latent transmission periods of RSMV in R. dorsalis were 6 and 18 d, respectively, and some R. dorsalis intermittently transmitted RSMV at 2–6 d intervals. Our findings revealed that the virus can replicate in the leafhopper body, but is likely not transovarially transmitted to offspring. These transmission characteristics will help guide the formulation of RSMV prevention and control strategies.

  3. Checklist of terebrantian thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera recorded from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rachana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A consolidated systematic list of 333 species of terebrantian thrips, belonging to 118 genera (Insecta: Thysanoptera recorded so far from India, is provided in this article.  The list reveals that the family Thripidae has the lion’s share of 307 species, while Aeolothripidae, Melanthripidae, Merothripidae and Stenurothripidae contain very few species.  Further, analysis of the present study shows that around 40% of the listed 333 terebrantian species appear to be endemic based on the comparison of Indian fauna with that of the published data of thrips of adjoining regions.  Reports on the occurrence of exotic flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande and Neohydatothrips samayunkur (Kudo are of concern to the country, as they are notorious for damage to the cultivated plants.  

  4. Speciation of Bactrocera dorsalis complex based on aedeagus length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osamu Iwahashi

    2000-01-01

    A species complex of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in Southeast Asia is composed of 52 species (Drew and Hancock, 1994) and while some of these species are economically very important, distinguishing them based on morphological characters has been difficult (White and Elson-Harris 1992). Specifically, there is considerable difficulty in differentiating between males of two pairs of sympatric species, B. philippinensis Drew and Hancock/B. occipitalis (Bezzi) in the Philippines and B. carambolae Drew and Hancock/B. papayae Drew and Hancock in Indonesia. This may be, in part, because the evolutionary processes within this species complex are still very dynamic, and that natural hybridisation between sympatric species pairs might be occurring on a regular basis (He and Haymer 1997). Iwaizumi et al. (1997) developed a simple method to differentiate the two sets of sympatric species based on aedeagus lengths. However, these flies had been reared artificially under laboratory conditions and only a small number of specimens (n=5) was used. Consequently, they were not able to obtain a frequency distribution of the aedeagus length for each species. Iwahashi (1998) measured a larger number of wild flies collected on Guimaras Is, Philippines, and found that flies with the aedeagus length of 2.89 mm are B. philippinensis. Iwahashi (1999) also showed that the measurement of the aedeagal length of fruit flies is a reliable characteristic for distinguishing between the 2 sympatric species pairs in the B. dorsalis complex. This being so, it may also be interesting to interpret phylogenetic relationships among B. dorsalis complex species based on the aedeagus length. Thus, aedeagus lengths of different populations of five B. dorsalis complex species are measured and their relationships discussed

  5. Bactrocera dorsalis complex and its problem in control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Keng-Hong

    2003-01-01

    Eight species of fifty-two in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are serious pests in the Asia-Pacific region. Of these, all except one are attracted to methyl eugenol. Four of these pests B. carambolae, B. dorsalis, B. papayae and B. philippinesis are polyphagous species and infest 75, 117, 195 and 18 fruit host species respectively. Common names for B. carambalae and B. papayae (sympatric species) have caused confusion. Both species can interbreed and produce viable offspring; and their natural hybrids have been collected. Bactrocera dorsalis and B. papayae can interbreed readily and produce viable offspring in the laboratory as males produce identical booster sex and aggregation pheromonal components after consuming methyl eugenol. The DNA sequences of one of their respective allelic introns of the actin gene are also identical which suggests that they are not distinct genetic species. Protein bait application and male annihilation techniques have been successful in the management of fruit flies in many cases but they have to compete with natural sources of lures. SIT is amenable for non-methyl engenol species; but for methyl eugenol sensitive species, sterile makes should be allowed to consume methyl eugenol before release to have an equal mating competitiveness with wild males. (author)

  6. Visitors to nests of Hooded Vultures Necrosyrtes monachus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We recommend expanding the Hooded Vulture nest monitoring programme to include more pairs. Keywords: Alopochen aegyptiaca, Chacma Baboon, Egyptian Goose, Hooded Vulture, Kruger-to-Canyons Biosphere Region, Martial Eagle, Necrosyrtes monachus, nest visitors, Papio ursinus, Polemaetus bellicosus ...

  7. Defense.gov Special Report: Fort Hood Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    identify possible insider threats, Army Secretary John M. McHugh told lawmakers. Story Obama: Soldiers ," Army Secretary John M. McHugh told lawmakers. Story President Praises Swift Response to Fort Hood Remarks on Fort Hood Shooting at White House McHugh, Odierno Address Fort Hood Shooting Before Congress

  8. Observations on the flight pattern of some Phlaeothripidae (Thysanoptera species by using suction trap in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orosz Szilvia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the seasonal flight activity of the Phlaeothripidae (Thysanoptera species was studied by using suction trap, in South-East Hungary, in the years 2000 and 2004 from April to October. The flight period of two dominant species, namely Haplothrips angusticornis Priesner and Haplothrips aculeatus Fabricius (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae, was observed in high number in Europe. Also, it was the first record of mass flight observation of H. angusticornis. In addition, the effect of meteorological factors, such as temperature, sunshine duration, relative humidity, air pressure, and their influences, were evaluated.

  9. Optimization of the Hood of Diesel Electric Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr TOMEK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The new construction of hood of diesel electric locomotive is analyzed in this paper. The whole construction is loaded by inertia effects caused by prescribed acceleration. The parts of the hood are subject to the standards for railway applications CSN EN 12663-1 [1]. Numerical analyses are performed by FEM computer program COSMOSWorks [2]. The original construction of hood is analyzed in first part of this paper. Structural changes are proposed in the next part of this article. Carrying capacity of the new construction of hood is verified by a numerical analysis. The results of the new construction are compared with the original construction of hood.

  10. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  11. Sampling techniques for thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in preflowering tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, P Houston; Riley, David G

    2004-08-01

    Sampling techniques for thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were compared in preflowering tomato plants at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, GA, in 2000 and 2003, to determine the most effective method of determining abundance of thrips on tomato foliage early in the growing season. Three relative sampling techniques, including a standard insect aspirator, a 946-ml beat cup, and an insect vacuum device, were compared for accuracy to an absolute method and to themselves for precision and efficiency of sampling thrips. Thrips counts of all relative sampling methods were highly correlated (R > 0.92) to the absolute method. The aspirator method was the most accurate compared with the absolute sample according to regression analysis in 2000. In 2003, all sampling methods were considered accurate according to Dunnett's test, but thrips numbers were lower and sample variation was greater than in 2000. In 2000, the beat cup method had the lowest relative variation (RV) or best precision, at 1 and 8 d after transplant (DAT). Only the beat cup method had RV values <25 for all sampling dates. In 2003, the beat cup method had the lowest RV value at 15 and 21 DAT. The beat cup method also was the most efficient method for all sample dates in both years. Frankliniella fusca (Pergande) was the most abundant thrips species on the foliage of preflowering tomato in both years of study at this location. Overall, the best thrips sampling technique tested was the beat cup method in terms of precision and sampling efficiency.

  12. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  13. Epicuticular chemistry reinforces the new taxonomic classification of the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae, Dacinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Nagy, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, have been recently synonymized under the name Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The closely related Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock remains as a discrete taxonomic entity. Although the synonymizations have been accepted by most researchers, debate about the species limits remains. Because of the economic importance of this group of taxa, any new information available to support or deny the synonymizations is valuable. We investigated the chemical epicuticle composition of males and females of B. dorsalis, B. invadens, B. papayae, B. philippinensis, and B. carambolae by means of one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, followed by multiple factor analyses and principal component analysis. Clear segregation of complex cuticule profiles of both B. carambolae sexes from B. dorsalis (Hendel) was observed. In addition to cuticular hydrocarbons, abundant complex mixtures of sex-specific oxygenated lipids (three fatty acids and 22 fatty acid esters) with so far unknown function were identified in epicuticle extracts from females of all species. The data obtained supports both taxonomic synonymization of B. invadens, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis with B. dorsalis, as well as the exclusion of B. carambolae from B. dorsalis. PMID:28873446

  14. Minimum acceptable face velocities of laboratory fume hoods and guidelines for their classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, N.E.; Porter, W.E.; Alcorn, S.P.; Everett, W.S.; Hunt, J.B.; Morehead, J.F.; Higdon, H.F.

    1978-06-01

    Data developed to support the requirement of a 100 LFM minimum face velocity requirement for laboratory fume hoods are summarized. Also included is a description of the Y-12 test hood as well as guidelines for a hood classification scheme

  15. Fundamental host range of Pseudophilothrips ichini s.l. (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae): a candidate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, J P; Medal, J C; Gillmore, J L; Habeck, D H; Pedrosa-Macedo, J H

    2009-12-01

    Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) is a non-native perennial woody plant that is one of the most invasive weeds in Florida, Hawaii, and more recently California and Texas. This plant was introduced into Florida from South America as a landscape ornamental in the late 19th century, eventually escaped cultivation, and now dominates entire ecosystems in south-central Florida. Recent DNA studies have confirmed two separate introductions of S. terebinthifolius in Florida, and there is evidence of hybridization. A thrips, Pseudophilothrips ichini s.l. (Hood) (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae), is commonly found attacking shoots and flowers of S. terebinthifolius in Brazil. Immatures and occasionally adults form large aggregations on young terminal growth (stems and leaves) of the plant. Feeding damage by P. ichini s.l. frequently kills new shoots, which reduces vigor and restricts growth of S. terebinthifolius. Greenhouse and laboratory host range tests with 46 plant species in 18 families and 10 orders were conducted in Paraná, Brazil, and Florida. Results of no-choice, paired-choice, and multiple-choice tests indicated that P. ichini s.l. is capable of reproducing only on S. terebinthifolius and possibly Schinus molle L., an ornamental introduced into California from Peru that has escaped cultivation and is considered invasive. Our results showed that P. ichini s.l. posed minimal risk to mature S. molle plants or the Florida native Metopium toxiferum L. Krug and Urb. In May 2007, the federal interagency Technical Advisory Group for Biological Control Agents of Weeds (TAG) concluded P. ichini s.l. was sufficiently host specific to recommend its release from quarantine.

  16. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large-on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue

  17. Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus and African White-backed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic ecological information is still lacking for many species of African vultures. The Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus is known as a rare breeding resident in north-eastern South Africa. This study set out to monitor the nests of Hooded Vultures and, secondarily, White-backed Vultures Gyps africanus in the Olifants ...

  18. Removal (and attempted removal) of material from a Hooded Vulture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is documented about nest material theft in vultures. We used camera traps to monitor Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus nests for a year. We report camera trap photographs of a starling Lamprotornis sp. removing what appeared to be dung from an inactive Hooded Vulture nest on Cleveland Game ...

  19. Performance assessment of U.S. residential cooking exhaust hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, William W; Singer, Brett C

    2012-06-05

    This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE--exceeding 80% for oven and front burners--had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s(-1) (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

  20. Hood River Conservation Project load analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1987-11-01

    As a part of the Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP), 314 homes were monitored to measure electrical energy use. The total electrical load, space heating load, water heating load (in about 200 homes), wood-stove heat output (in about 100 homes), and indoor temperature were monitored. Data were collected for one full year before and one full year after these homes were retrofit with conservation measures. Local weather information was also collected on a 15-min basis. This data base was used to evaluate the load savings attributable to HRCP. Two methods of weather normalization were used and showed close agreement. The weather-normalized diversified residential load savings on the Pacific Power and Light system and Hood River area peak days were >0.5 kW/household. The average spring, summer, and fall savings were much smaller, <0.1 kW/household. The load factor for the diversified residential load decreased following the conservation retrofit actions. 11 refs., 40 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  2. MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  3. Subscale hood seal test topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versteeg, J.L.; Herold, B.A.; McClintic, J.K.; Schmall, R.A.; Hoetzl, M.

    1991-09-06

    To maximize the transfer of heat from the recirculated gases to the scrap, it is essential to percolate as much of the gases as possible through the scrap. To accomplish this flow path and avoid the bypassing of hot gas around the scrap, the seal between the preheater hood and the scrap bucket must be relatively tight. These tests which are described in this report were designed to measure the performance of several possible seal designs under simulated operating conditions. At the conclusion of the tests, one design was recommended as the primary arrangement with another design considered as an alternate. Both designs met the criteria of low leakage but one design was preferred due an expected greater resistance to wear. The test results also provided valuable information for estimating seal leakage in the full scale installation.

  4. Insecticide toxicity to oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is influenced by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuying; Jin, Tao; Zeng, Ling; Lu, Yongyue

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of environmental factors (temperature, dose, dietary source, and feeding density) on the insecticide tolerance of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). The results indicated that the toxicities of trichlorphon and abamectin to B. dorsalis increased with an increase in temperature. At 15-35 degrees C, the toxicity of beta-cypermethrin decreased with an increase in temperature at low doses (0.82 and 1.86 mg/L), but was similar at a high dose (4.18 mg/L). These results demonstrated that the temperature coefficient of beta-cypermethrin was related to both temperature and dosage. The insecticide sensitivity of B. dorsalis reared on different dietary sources was significantly different. Trichlorphon sensitivity of B. dorsalis fed on banana was the highest with an LC50 of 1.61 mg/L, followed by on apple, carambola, semiartificial diet, pear, mango, guava, orange, and papaya. With an increasing feeding density, the sensitivity of B. dorsalis adults to trichlorphon increased, while the sensitivities of B. dorsalis adults to abamectin and beta-cypermethrin decreased. The differences between LC50 values of insects reared at densities of 10 and 13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet to trichlorphon, abamectin and beta-cypermethrin were not significant. This result suggested that representative toxicity could be obtained by using adults developed at a feeding density between 10-13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet. Adult body weight was positively correlated with the LC50 value of trichlorphon, but was negatively correlated with the toxicities of abamectin and beta-cypermethrin. These results suggested that the effects of adult body weight on the toxicity of insecticides were different among different chemicals.

  5. Hood River production program monitoring and evaluation. Report B: Hood River and Pelton Ladder. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, M.B.; Jennings, M.; McCanna, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is jointly implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWS) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The primary goals of the HRPP are (1) to re-establish naturally sustaining spring chinook salmon using Deschutes River stock in the Hood River subbasin, (2) rebuild naturally sustaining runs of summer and winter steelhead in the Hood River subbasin, (3) maintain the genetic characteristics of the populations, and (4) contribute to tribal and non-tribal fisheries, ocean fisheries, and the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) interim goal of doubling salmon runs

  6. Measurements of Capture Efficiency of Range Hoods in Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2015-01-01

    mapped the pollution distribution in the room, and showed that the pollutants escape more at the sides of the cooktop. These preliminary results suggest that more measurements should be conducted investigating the capture efficiency at different pollutant source temperature, size and location...... want a range hood to use little energy and have high capture efficiency to minimize the required air flow to capture the cooking pollutants. Currently there are no standards for rating range hoods for capture efficiency In this study, measurements of range hood capture efficiency were made a tight...... kitchen-room built in a laboratory chamber, and a methodology for standardizing measurement of capture efficiency was developed. The results for a wall mounted range hood, showed that up to half of the cooking pollutants were not captured at a flow rate of 230 m3/h. A more detailed set of measurements...

  7. Humboldt Open Ocean Disposal Site (HOODS) Survey Work 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Humboldt Open Ocean Disposal Site (HOODS) is a dredged material disposal site located 3 nautical miles (nm) offshore of Humboldt Bay in Northern California....

  8. Sexual aggression by intruders in hooded crow Corvus cornix

    OpenAIRE

    Zduniak, Piotr; Kosicki, Jakub Z.; Yosef, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    The hooded crow Corvus cornix is a west Palaearctic, solitary nesting, monogamous corvid. In the breeding season, populations are characterized by a social organization wherein breeding pairs are territorial and non-breeding individuals, called floaters, live in flocks. During a study of the breeding ecology of the hooded crow, conducted in a protected flooded area, we monitored nests with video cameras. We recorded two separate incidents when intruders attacked a female at the nest. We belie...

  9. Phytosanitary treatments against Bactrocera dorsalis(Diptera: Tephritidae): current situation and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae) is arguably the most important tephritid attacking fruits after Ceratitis capitata(Wiedemann)(Diptera: Tephritidae). In 2003, it was found in Africa and quickly spread to most of the sub-Saharan part of the continent destroying fruits and creating re...

  10. Nonhost status of mangosteen to Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unahawutti, Udorn; Intarakumheng, Rachada; Oonthonglang, Pitawat; Phankum, Salukjit; Follett, Peter A

    2014-08-01

    Postharvest quarantine treatments (irradiation or vapor heat) are used to control fruit flies and other pests in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) exported to the United States and Japan from Thailand. No-choice tests were conducted in the laboratory to determine whether Thai mangosteen is a host for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (oriental fruit fly) and Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (carambola fruit fly). Ripe commercial quality fruit (1 wk after harvest) that were either undamaged or damaged by puncturing or peeling the pericarp were exposed to a high density of gravid flies in screen cages and then held for 10 d and dissected to inspect for immature life stages. Undamaged mangosteen fruit were not infested by B. dorsalis and B. carambolae. Partially damaged fruit with shallow punctures in the pericarp that did not extend to the aril also were not infested. Both fruit flies could infest damaged fruit if the pericarp damage allowed oviposition in the aril. Results suggest that natural infestation of mangosteen by B. dorsalis and B. carambolae can only occur if fruit exhibit physical cracks or mechanical injury. Resistance appears to be due to the pericarp hardness and thickness as well as latex secretion. Nonhost status could be used without additional quarantine measures to achieve quarantine security against B. dorsalis and B. carambolae in mangosteen exported from Thailand.

  11. Western Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) preference for thrips-damaged leaves over fresh leaves enables uptake of symbiotic gut bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.J.; Vos, R.A.; Jacobs, G.; Breeuwer, J.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    To understand the evolution of insect gut symbionts it is important to determine how they are passed on to the next generation. We studied this process in Erwinia species bacteria that inhabit the gut of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). This is

  12. Thrips species (Insecta: Thysanoptera) associated with flowers in a restinga fragment in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, I M B; Almeida-Filho, M A; Lima, M G A; Bonilla, O H; Lima, E F B

    2018-03-22

    With the growing volume of research involving Thysanoptera in Brazil, studies were carried out to improve our understanding of the diversity of thrips in areas where the fauna has historically been neglected. Accordingly, we recorded the diversity of thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) associated with a restinga fragment located on the campus of the State University of Ceará (UECE), Fortaleza, Ceará state, and computed the estimated richness and diversity indices. Samples were collected from 2011 through 2013 from flowers of 86 plant species. The material was taken to the Laboratory of Insect-Plant Interaction, where thrips were screened under stereomicroscope. We collected 456 adults and 58 immatures, representing 14 species, in addition to one unidentified species of Treherniella. Microcephalothrips abdominalis was found on a large number of host plants, and Frankliniella insularis was the most common species. About two-thirds of the total richness of thrips species was associated with three plant families (Amaranthaceae, Caesalpiniaceae and Poaceae); six thrips species were each associated with only one plant species. The richness of the species collected was close to that estimated by Bootstrap and Jackknife 1 analysis. The Shannon-Wiener (H') and Simpson (D) diversity indexes were 1,7607 and 0.7769, respectively. Although the species are common, 46 new associations between plant species and thrips were established, 13 of which are true host associations, which demonstrates the importance of coastal vegetation in maintaining populations of thrips.

  13. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room

  14. An Evaluation of the Species Status of Bactrocera Invadens and the Systematics of the Bactrocera Dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose, Michael San; Leblanc, Luc; Rubinoff, Daniel [Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Geib, Scott M. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Full text: The genus Bactrocera (Tephritidae) contains 500 species, including many severe pests of fruits and vegetables. Although native to tropical and subtropical areas of Africa, India, Southeast Asia, and Australasia, a number of the pest species, largely members of the Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) complex, have become wide- spread through accidental introduction associated with agricultural trade. The B. dorsalis complex includes several morphologically and ecologically similar pests, making species designations uncertain. One of these, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta, and White, endemic to Sri Lanka, has spread across Africa in the last decade and become a major agricultural pest. We sequenced one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes from 73 specimens, belonging to 19 species to construct phylogenies and examine species relationships and limits within the genus Bactrocera and several species of the B. dorsalis complex specifically addressing the placement of B. invadens. Results indicate the B. dorsalis complex is polyphyletic. B. invadens and several other species within the B. dorsalis complex (B. dorsalis, Bactrocera papaya Drew and Hancock, and Bactrocera philippinensis (Drew and Hancock) are also paraphyletic with respect to each other and probably represent a single genetically indistinguishable, phenotypically plastic, pest species that has spread throughout the world. (author)

  15. Finite element analysis of car hood for impact test by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finite element analysis of car hood for impact test by using solidworks software ... high safety and at the same time can be built according to market demands. ... Keywords: finite element analysis; impact test; Solidworks; automation, car hood.

  16. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  17. Hood River production program monitoring and evaluation. Report A: Hood River and Pelton Ladder evaluation studies. Annual report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, E.A.; French, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, the Northwest Power Planning Council approved the Hood River and Pelton Ladder master plans within the framework of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The master plans define an approach for implementing a hatchery supplementation program in the Hood River subbasin. The hatchery program, as defined in the master plans, is called the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP will be implemented at a reduced hatchery production level until (1) the construction of all proposed hatchery facilities has been completed and (2) numbers of returning wild jack and adult fish are sufficient to meet broodstock collection goals. It is anticipated that construction on the hatchery production facilities will be completed by the spring of 1998. The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation

  18. Commensal Bacteria Aid Mate-selection in the Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala; Ayyasamy, Arthikirubha; Kempraj, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    Commensal bacteria influence many aspects of an organism's behaviour. However, studies on the influence of commensal bacteria in insect mate-selection are scarce. Here, we present empirical evidence that commensal bacteria mediate mate-selection in the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. Male flies were attracted to female flies, but this attraction was abolished when female flies were fed with antibiotics, suggesting the role of the fly's microbiota in mediating mate-selection. We show that male flies were attracted to and ejaculated more sperm into females harbouring the microbiota. Using culturing and 16S rDNA sequencing, we isolated and identified different commensal bacteria, with Klebsiella oxytoca being the most abundant bacterial species. This preliminary study will enhance our understanding of the influence of commensal bacteria on mate-selection behaviour of B. dorsalis and may find use in devising control operations against this devastating pest.

  19. Mark-release-recapture studies with Aedes dorsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in coastal northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, V L; Carper, E R; Beesley, C; Reisen, W K

    1995-05-01

    Two mark-release-recapture studies were conducted along the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in northern California to describe the population ecology and dispersal pattern of Aedes dorsalis (Meigen). Immature Ae. dorsalis were collected from saline tidal marshes, reared to adults, marked, and released. Recapture grids during the July and September studies were within 8.0 and 2.4 km of the release sites, and recapture rates were 0.1 and 1.2%, respectively. The longest recorded flight was 5.8 km, and mosquitoes were recaptured up to 15 d after release. In September, 84% of the marked mosquitoes were recaptured within 2.0 km of the release site, and the mean dispersal distance was 1.9 km. Marked mosquitoes flew predominantly downwind to the east. There was no evidence that Ae. dorsalis traversed the 1.6-km-wide river from Contra Costa to Solano County. Temporal and spatial recapture patterns indicated a possible short-range migration pattern from oviposition sites to upland host-seeking areas. Changes in the recapture rate with cohort age delineated a 7-d gonotrophic cycle during September.

  20. ALARA review for the 202-S plutonium loadout hood stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patch, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposures, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting stabilization of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility plutonium loadout hood and associated piping, and the isolation of the ER-8 ventilation system

  1. Pedestrian protection integrated in the motor hood; Fussgaengerschutz bei Motorhauben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilfrich, E.; Roettger, R.; Zoernack, M.; Patberg, L. [Vertrieb/Engineering, Fahrzeugtechnik, ThyssenKrupp Steel, Duisburg (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    New legislation provides for better pedestrian protection in case of collision with motor cars. This is a great challenge in car design. ThyssenKrupp Steel are working on concepts for motor hoods that meet these requirements. Steel is the material of choice as it combines effective energy absorption with an excellent cost-benefit ration. (orig.)

  2. The decline of an urban Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Likely causes are (1) exponential urbanisation resulting in loss of feeding sites and reduced food availability, (2) increased poisoning of feral dogs with strychnine sulphate due to an upsurge of rabies and (3) increased disappearance of suitable trees for nesting and roosting. Keywords: cutting of trees, Hooded Vulture, ...

  3. 77 FR 12514 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... operating regulation for the Hood Canal floating drawbridge near Port Gamble. This modification would relieve heavy rush hour road traffic on State Routes 3 and 104, by allowing the draws of the bridge to not.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this rule, call or email the Bridge...

  4. 76 FR 40322 - Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort Parking Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... fleet. Also, the location of the current maintenance shop impedes traffic flow and removes potential... new Sunrise Vehicle Maintenance Shop on the north side of the Sunrise parking lot. DATES: Comments... increasing parking capacity and improving traffic flow in at Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort. Parking capacity...

  5. First glimpse of the functional benefits of clitoral hood piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Vaughn S; Eichold, Bernard H; Sharpe, Thomasina H; Lynn, Sherwood C

    2005-09-01

    In this exploratory study, we identify a positive relationship between vertical clitoral hood piercing and desire, frequency of intercourse and arousal. There were no dramatic differences in orgasmic functioning. Clinicians can play key roles in educating patients about potential outcomes and risks of genital piercing.

  6. Black on Black Crime: Hollywood's Construction of the Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Eric

    Most of what the world envisions of the period of westward expansion in America has been crafted through Hollywood cinema. The myths of the West are so ingrained in America's culture that they have taken on a truth all their own. In a series of recent films, which began with the release of "Boyz N the Hood," Hollywood is at it again, presenting…

  7. Impact of straw mulch on populations of onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larentzaki, E; Plate, J; Nault, B A; Shelton, A M

    2008-08-01

    Development of insecticide resistance in onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), populations in onion (Allium spp.) fields and the incidence of the T. tabaci transmitted Iris yellow spot virus have stimulated interest in evaluating alternative management tactics. Effects of straw mulch applied in commercial onion fields in muck areas of western New York were assessed in 2006 and 2007 as a possible onion thrips management strategy. In trials in which no insecticides were applied for thrips control, straw mulch-treated plots supported significantly lower T. tabaci populations compared with control plots. In both years, the action thresholds of one or three larvae per leaf were reached in straw mulch treatments between 7 and 14 d later than in the control. Ground predatory fauna, as evaluated by pitfall trapping, was not increased by straw mulch in 2006; however, populations of the common predatory thrips Aeolothrips fasciatus (L.) (Thysanoptera: Aeolothripidae) were significantly lower in straw mulch plots in both years. Interference of straw mulch in the pupation and emergence of T. tabaci was investigated in the lab and their emergence was reduced by 54% compared with bare soil. In the field the overall yield of onions was not affected by the straw mulch treatment; however, the presence of jumbo grade onions (>77 mm) was increased in 2006, but not in 2007. These results indicate that populations of T. tabaci adults and larvae can be significantly reduced by the use of straw mulch without compromising overall onion yield. The use of this cultural practice in an onion integrated pest management program seems promising.

  8. Improving flow patterns and spillage characteristics of a box-type commercial kitchen hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Han, Meng-Ji; Priyambodo, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    A conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood and its improved version (termed the "IQV commercial kitchen hood") were studied using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique and tracer-gas (sulfur hexafluoride) detection methods. The laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique qualitatively revealed the flow field of the hood and the areas apt for leakages of hood containment. The tracer-gas concentration detection method measured the quantitative leakage levels of the hood containment. The oil mists that were generated in the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood leaked significantly into the environment from the areas near the front edges of ceiling and side walls. Around these areas, the boundary-layer separation occurred, inducing highly unsteady and turbulent recirculating flow, and leading to spillages of hood containment due to inappropriate aerodynamic design at the front edges of the ceiling and side walls. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood showed that the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face attained very large values on an order of magnitude about 10(3)-10(4) ppb. By combining the backward-offset narrow suction slot, deflection plates, and quarter-circular arcs at the hood entrance, the IQV commercial kitchen hood presented a flow field containing four backward-inclined cyclone flow structures. The oil mists generated by cooking were coherently confined in these upward-rising cyclone flow structures and finally exhausted through the narrow suction slot. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the IQV commercial kitchen hood showed that the order of magnitude of the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face is negligibly small--only about 10(0) ppb across the whole hood face.

  9. The Nearctic-Caribbean species Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius, 1801): Larval descriptions with a diagnosis of immature Ctenodactylini and natural history notes on the genus and tribe (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults and larvae of Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius), live in association with grasses, the larvae in the appressed leaf axils. Both adult and larval L. dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius), and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf shea...

  10. Salicylic Acid Induces Changes in Mango Fruit that Affect Oviposition Behavior and Development of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available The Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel is an important quarantine pest around the globe. Although measures for its control are implemented worldwide through IPM and male annihilation, there is little effect on their population. Hence, there is a need for new strategies to control this minacious pest. A strategy that has received negligible attention is the induction of 'natural plant defenses' by phytohormones. In this study, we investigated the effect of salicylic acid (SA treatment of mango fruit (cv. Totapuri on oviposition and larval development of B. dorsalis. In oviposition choice assays, gravid females laid significantly less eggs in SA treated compared to untreated fruit. Headspace volatiles collected from SA treated fruit were less attractive to gravid females compared to volatiles from untreated fruit. GC-MS analysis of the headspace volatiles from SA treated and untreated fruit showed noticeable changes in their chemical compositions. Cis-ocimene and 3-carene (attractants to B. dorsalis were reduced in the headspace volatiles of treated fruit. Further, reduced pupae formation and adult emergence was observed in treated fruit compared to control. Increased phenol and flavonoid content was recorded in treated fruit. We also observed differential expression of anti-oxidative enzymes namely catalase (CAT, polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD. In summary, the results indicate that SA treatment reduced oviposition, larval development and adult emergence of B. dorsalis and suggest a role of SA in enhancing mango tolerance to B. dorsalis.

  11. Interspecific Mating between Wild and Sterile Fruit Flies of Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) with Guava Fruit Fly, Bactrocera correcta (Bezzi) in Cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pransopon, Prapon; Sutantawong, Manon

    2003-06-01

    Copulation and sperm transfer were observed between wild flies and sterile flies of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and Bactrocera correcta (Bezzi) in cages. 8-day old pupae of B. dorsalis and B. correcta were irradiated with gamma rays at 90 and 80 gray respectively. Wild flies from infested fruits and sterile flies from artificial diet in the labolatory were used for testing. The experiments were conducted 3 treatments and 3 replications. The ratio of sterile male : wild male: wild female were 3:1:1 by using sterile male of B. dorsalis: wild male of B. correcta : wild female of B. correcta and sterile male of B. correcta: wild male of B. dorsalis: wild female of B. dorsalis as 60:20:20 flies respectively. The experiment found 69 pairs of copulation consisting of 3 mating pairs(4.3%) of wild male with wild female of B. dorsalis, 22 mating pairs (31.9%) of wild male with wild female of B. correcta, 2 mating pairs(2.9%) of sterile male of B dorsalis with wild female of B. correcta, 42 mating pairs(60.9%) of sterile male of B. correcta with wild female of B. dorsalis. The cages which ratio 1:1 consisted of wild B. dorsalis and wild B. correcta (male and female = 50:50 flies) were observed and found that 43 pairs of copulation such as 2 mating pairs (4.6%) of wild male with wild female of B. dorsalis, 26 mating pairs (60.5%) of wild male with wild female of B. correcta, 2 mating pairs(2.9%) of sterile male of B. dorsalis with wild female of B. correcta and 15 mating pairs(34.9%) of wild male of B. correcta with wild female of B. dorsalis. Mated female flies were separated from male flies. Egg hatch and sperm were checked. The hatchability of normal copulation of B. dorsalis and B. correcta were 81 and 90%. The average sperm level in spermathecae of normal copulation of B. dorsalis and B. correcta were 2.2 and 2.3 respectively but had no sperm in their spemathecae of females of interspecific copulations Mating behavior of both species began in the evening before sunset at

  12. Phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expression changes accompanying a sugar-only diet in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-08-17

    Diet composition (yeast:carbohydrate ratio) is an important determinant of growth, development, and reproduction. Recent studies have shown that decreased yeast intake elicits numerous transcriptomic changes and enhances somatic maintenance and lifespan, which in turn reduces reproduction in various insects. However, our understanding of the responses leading to a decrease in yeast ratio to 0% is limited. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a sugar-only diet (SD) on the gene expression patterns of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae. RNA sequencing analyses showed that flies reared on an SD induced significant changes in the expression levels of genes associated with specific metabolic as well as cell growth and death pathways. Moreover, the observed upregulated genes in energy production and downregulated genes associated with reproduction suggested that SD affects somatic maintenance and reproduction in B. dorsalis. As expected, we observed that SD altered B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress (starvation and desiccation) resistance, decreasing reproduction, but did not extend lifespan compared to those that received a normal diet (ND) regime. In addition, administration of an SD resulted in a reduction in antioxidant enzyme activities and an increase in MDA concentrations, thereby suggesting that antioxidants cannot keep up with the increase in oxidative damage induced by SD regime. The application of an SD diet induces changes in phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expressions in B. dorsalis. Previous studies have associated extended lifespan with reduced fecundity. The current study did not observe a prolongation of lifespan in B. dorsalis, which instead incurred oxidative damage. The findings of the present study improve our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and phenotypic response of B. dorsalis to an SD diet.

  13. Effect of Vapor Heat Treatment on the Mortality of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae and the Quality of Mango cv. Arumanis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wulan Widya Lestari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arumanis is a superior export variety mango from Indonesia. One inhibiting factor on the production of this fruit variety is the infestation of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae fruit fly. Vapor heat treatment was recommended by ISPM No. 28 of 2007 as an effective treatment in eradicating fruit flies. This research was aimed to find out the optimum temperature and the duration of vapor heat treatment on the mortality of egg and larvae of B. dorsalis. The experiment was conducted in the Laboratory of Vapor Heat Treatment, BBPOPT, Jatisari, from October 2016 to January 2017. The observed parameters were temperature, duration of treatment, mortality of egg and larvae of fruit fly, and fruit quality. The results showed that vapor heat treatment at 47°C for 40 minutes (min was effective to reduce the number of eggs and larvae of B. dorsalis and had no negative impact on the fruit quality.   Intisari Buah mangga varietas Arumanis merupakan varietas mangga ekspor unggulan Indonesia. Salah satu faktor pembatas produksi buah mangga varietas Arumanis adalah lalat buah B. dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae. Perlakuan uap panas direkomendasikan oleh ISPM Nomor 28 tahun 2007 sebagai tindakan perlakuan yang efektif dalam mengeradikasi lalat buah. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui suhu dan waktu optimum perlakuan uap panas terhadap mortalitas telur dan larva B. dorsalis pada buah mangga varietas Arumanis tanpa merusak kualitas buah. Penelitian dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Vapor Heat Treatment, BBPOPT, Jatisari, pada Oktober 2016 sampai dengan Januari 2017. Parameter yang diamati adalah suhu, lamanya waktu perlakuan, mortalitas telur dan larva lalat buah, dan kualitas buah. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan uap panas pada suhu 47°C selama 40 menit terbukti efektif membunuh telur dan larva B. dorsalis dan tidak berdampak negatif terhadap kualitas buah.

  14. Hooded mergansers swim in the waters of KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A male and two female hooded mergansers swim in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male displays its distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  15. A female hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A female hooded merganser swims solo in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is distinguished by a fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  16. A male hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast identify this hooded merganser, swimming in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  17. Sexual aggression by intruders in hooded crow Corvus cornix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zduniak, Piotr; Kosicki, Jakub Z; Yosef, Reuven

    The hooded crow Corvus cornix is a west Palaearctic, solitary nesting, monogamous corvid. In the breeding season, populations are characterized by a social organization wherein breeding pairs are territorial and non-breeding individuals, called floaters, live in flocks. During a study of the breeding ecology of the hooded crow, conducted in a protected flooded area, we monitored nests with video cameras. We recorded two separate incidents when intruders attacked a female at the nest. We believe that she remained in the nest in order to prevent the strangers cannibalizing the nestlings by mantling over the brood. The spatio-temporal occurrence of these attacks suggests that the observed behaviour is intraspecific sexual aggression wherein non-breeding males mounted an immobilized female.

  18. Interbreeding and DNA analysis of sibling species within the Bactrocera dorsalis complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Keng-Hong

    2003-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis and B. papayae interbreed readily and produce viable offspring under laboratory conditions. Under laboratory observation of B. carambolae and B. papayae interbreeding, the average number of eggs laid by hybrid females was lower than that of B. papayae females but higher than that of B. carambolae females of intra-specific crosses. For inter- and intra-specific mating, the copulatory period is dependent on the female species involved - female B. carambolae copulates significantly longer than that of B. papayae female. Aedeagal and aculeus length of hybrids are intermediate between those of their respective parental species. Hybrid males have one to four sex pheromonal components after consumption of methyl eugenol; 2-6% of them possess a combination of endogenous pheromonal components specific to B. carambolae and components derived from methyl eugenol typical of B. papayae. Based on the latter, four wild males captured from different parts of Peninsular Malaysia possessed combination of the sex pheromonal components. DNA analysis using PCR techniques was very useful in differentiating pest species. Using AFLP polymorphism of amplified DNA fragment plus calculated Nei's genetic distance showed that natural hybrid of B. carambolae and B. papayae was closer to B. dorsalis than to the parental species. Using exon primed, intron crossing PCR, one of the three alleles of actin gene intron of B. dorsalis has identical DNA sequence to one of three allelic introns of the same gene in B. papayae which suggests that the two species are not distinct genetic species. A Hobo-like transposon element was detected in a population from Penang Island, while in a population from the mainland of Peninsular Malaysia, a mariner-like transposon element was detected. (author)

  19. Effect of internal elements of the steam turbine exhaust hood on losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajč Ladislav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The document deals with the flow in the exhaust hood of a single flow steam turbine. The effect of the shape of the external case of the hood and the position and dimensions of the internal reinforcements on the energy loss coefficient is evaluated. Using this coefficient, it is possible to determine the gained or lost output in the diffuser and the entire exhaust hood at a known flow and efficiency of the last stage. Flow research in the exhaust hood was performed especially using numeric simulations; some variants were verified experimentally in the aerodynamic wind tunnel.

  20. Larval x-ray irradiation influences protein expression in pupae of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera Dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Third instar larvae were exposed to X-ray treatment of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. Irradiated pupae were collected daily. Biological performance parameters of pupae and adults of larvae treated with X-ray irradiation were evaluated. Standard proteomics procedures such as densitometr...

  1. Field estimates of attraction of Ceratitis capitata to Trimedlure and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to methyl eugenol in varying environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measuring and modeling the attractiveness of semiochemical-baited traps is of significant importance to detection, delimitation and control of invasive pests. Here we describe the results of field mark-release-recapture experiments with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)...

  2. History of Neurology and Psychiatry: Sewing Machine, Tabes Dorsalis, and Ovarian Hysteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlef Claus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hysteria was the Sphinx of nervous disorders. In ancient times the cause of hysteria was supposed to be sited in the womb. However the French Neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot favoured the ovaries as the site of the origin of hysteria, and he recommended the therapeutic compression of the ovaries in order to terminate hysterical fits. To this end, the treatment of hysteria in women was carried out by the surgical removal of one ovary. This surgical intervention was not without risk in the 19th century, but more to the point it did not help the patients. Most German Neurologists doubted this “hysteric ovary” theory, but it was not until after 1901 that Steinhausen was able to prove by statistical analysis, that the “hysteric” ovary did not exist at all. Statistical data analysis also helped to support the connection between Syphilis and Tabes dorsalis, which usually became clinically manifest several years after infection. In those days neither cerebrospinal fluid analysis nor serology were available. Apart from several nonspecific suspected causes of Tabes - it was the use of the newly invented sewing machine that came under suspicion as the trigger of Tabes dorsalis.

  3. The Divergence in Bacterial Components Associated with Bactrocera dorsalis across Developmental Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eco-evolutionary dynamics of microbiotas at the macroscale level are largely driven by ecological variables. The diet and living environment of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, diversify during development, providing a natural system to explore convergence, divergence, and repeatability in patterns of microbiota dynamics as a function of the host diet, phylogeny, and environment. Here, we characterized the microbiotas of 47 B. dorsalis individuals from three distinct populations by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. A significant deviation was found within the larvae, pupae, and adults of each population. Pupae were characterized by an increased bacterial taxonomic and functional diversity. Principal components analysis showed that the microbiotas of larvae, pupae, and adults clearly separated into three clusters. Acetobacteraceae, Lactobacillaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae were the predominant families in larval and adult samples, and PICRUSt analysis indicated that phosphoglycerate mutases and transketolases were significantly enriched in larvae, while phosphoglycerate mutases, transketolases, and proteases were significantly enriched in adults, which may support the digestive function of the microbiotas in larvae and adults. The abundances of Intrasporangiaceae, Dermabacteraceae (mainly Brachybacterium and Brevibacteriaceae (mainly Brevibacterium were significantly higher in pupae, and the antibiotic transport system ATP-binding protein and antibiotic transport system permease protein pathways were significantly enriched there as well, indicating the defensive function of microbiotas in pupae. Overall, differences in the microbiotas of the larvae, pupae, and adults are likely to contribute to differences in nutrient assimilation and living environments.

  4. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  5. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K., E-mail: avergis@iihr.ernet.i [Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2006-07-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  6. Sampling Plans for the Thrips Frankliniella schultzei (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Three Lettuce Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alisson R; Rodrigues-Silva, Nilson; Pereira, Poliana S; Sarmento, Renato A; Costa, Thiago L; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Picanço, Marcelo C

    2017-12-05

    The common blossom thrips, Frankliniella schultzei Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important lettuce pest worldwide. Conventional sampling plans are the first step in implementing decision-making systems into integrated pest management programs. However, this tool is not available for F. schultzei infesting lettuce crops. Thus, the objective of this work was to develop a conventional sampling plan for F. schultzei in lettuce crops. Two sampling techniques (direct counting and leaf beating on a white plastic tray) were compared in crisphead, looseleaf, and Boston lettuce varieties before and during head formation. The frequency distributions of F. schultzei densities in lettuce crops were assessed, and the number of samples required to compose the sampling plan was determined. Leaf beating on a white plastic tray was the best sampling technique. F. schultzei densities obtained with this technique were fitted to the negative binomial distribution with a common aggregation parameter (common K = 0.3143). The developed sampling plan is composed of 91 samples per field and presents low errors in its estimates (up to 20%), fast execution time (up to 47 min), and low cost (up to US $1.67 per sampling area). This sampling plan can be used as a tool for integrated pest management in lettuce crops, assisting with reliable decision making in different lettuce varieties before and during head formation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Postharvest Irradiation Treatment for Quarantine Control of Western Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Adrian H; Follett, Peter A

    2018-04-05

    The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important pest of fresh horticultural produce and as such is considered a biosecurity risk in many countries from which it is absent. Information is needed on the radiation tolerance of important surface pests of quarantine importance such as F. occidentalis so that phytosanitary irradiation treatments for exported fresh commodities can be lowered to below the 400 Gy generic treatment currently approved for most insects in the United States and Australia. Lowering the dose will help minimize any product quality problems, reduce costs, and shorten treatment time. In large-scale confirmatory trials conducted in two independent laboratories in Hawaii and Australia, a dose of 250 Gy (measured doses 222-279 Gy) applied to adult F. occidentalis on green beans resulted in no reproduction in 5,050 treated individuals. At 250 Gy, the effective dose is significantly below the 400 Gy generic dose, demonstrating that irradiation at this lowered level is an effective method for the disinfestation of F. occidentalis from fresh horticultural produce.

  8. Accuracy, precision, and economic efficiency for three methods of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) population density assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Andrew M; Parrella, Michael P

    2011-08-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a major horticultural pest and an important vector of plant viruses in many parts of the world. Methods for assessing thrips population density for pest management decision support are often inaccurate or imprecise due to thrips' positive thigmotaxis, small size, and naturally aggregated populations. Two established methods, flower tapping and an alcohol wash, were compared with a novel method, plant desiccation coupled with passive trapping, using accuracy, precision and economic efficiency as comparative variables. Observed accuracy was statistically similar and low (37.8-53.6%) for all three methods. Flower tapping was the least expensive method, in terms of person-hours, whereas the alcohol wash method was the most expensive. Precision, expressed by relative variation, depended on location within the greenhouse, location on greenhouse benches, and the sampling week, but it was generally highest for the flower tapping and desiccation methods. Economic efficiency, expressed by relative net precision, was highest for the flower tapping method and lowest for the alcohol wash method. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed for all three methods used. If relative density assessment methods such as these can all be assumed to accurately estimate a constant proportion of absolute density, then high precision becomes the methodological goal in terms of measuring insect population density, decision making for pest management, and pesticide efficacy assessments.

  9. Botanical insecticides in controlling Kelly's citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on organic grapefruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V A

    2011-12-01

    Kelly's citrus thrips, Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was first recorded in Cyprus in 1996 and became an economic citrus pest. In Cyprus, Kelly's citrus thrips larvae cause feeding damage mainly on immature lemon and grapefruit fruits. Use of botanical insecticides is considered an alternative tool compared with synthetic chemicals, in offering solutions for healthy and sustainable citrus production. During 2008-2010, the efficacy of the botanical insecticides azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W and Oikos 10 EC), garlic extract (Alsa), and pyrethrins (Vioryl 5%SC) was evaluated in field trials against Kelly's citrus thrips larval stage I and II aiming at controlling the pest's population and damage to organic grapefruit fruits. In each of the trial years treatments with pyrethrins and azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W) were the most effective against Kelly's citrus thrips compared with the untreated control (for 2008: P extract showed the lowest effect from all the botanicals used compared with the untreated control.

  10. Plant quality and conspecific density effects on Anaphothrips obscurus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) wing diphenism and population ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisig, Dominic D; Godfrey, Larry D; Marcum, Daniel B

    2010-04-01

    Factors that influence thysanopteran wing diphenism are not well known. In these studies, the impact of food quality, mediated through nitrogen addition, and conspecific density was explored on the wing diphenism of an herbivorous thrips species (Anaphothrips obscurus Müller) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). In the first study, nitrogen was added to timothy grass (Phleum pretense L.) (Poales: Poaceae) transplants, and naturally occurring thrips populations were caged on the plants. Thrips abundance and foliar nutrients were assessed every 2 wk. A separate factorial experiment in growth chambers explored the impact of both plant nitrogen addition and thrips abundance on wing diphenism. Thrips density was manipulated by adding either 3 or 40 thrips to potted and caged timothy. Thrips abundance and foliar nutrients were measured 58 d after treatment placement. Plant quality directly affected thrips wing diphenism independent of thrips density in both experiments. Near the end of the field cage experiment, density may have indirectly impacted wing diphenism. In both experiments, plant quality and thrips density interacted to affect thrips population abundance. Plant quality alone can affect thrips wing diphenism, but it remains unclear whether density alone can affect thrips wing diphenism. This is a unique and understudied system that will be useful to examine generalized theories on the negative interaction between reproduction and dispersal.

  11. The impact of a parasitic nematode Thripinema fuscum (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) on the feeding behavior and vector competence of Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is the predominant thrips species found inhabiting and reproducing in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and is one of at least seven thrips species reported to transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). The entomogenous nematode Thripinema fuscum Tipp...

  12. Isolation and identification of host cues from mango, Mangifera indica, that attract gravid female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Pagadala D Kamala; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A

    2012-04-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an economically damaging, polyphagous pest of fruit crops in South-East Asia and Hawaii, and a quarantine pest in other parts of the world. The objective of our study was to identify new attractants for B. dorsalis from overripe mango fruits. Headspace samples of volatiles were collected from two cultivars of mango, 'Alphonso' and 'Chausa', and a strong positive behavioral response was observed when female B. dorsalis were exposed to these volatiles in olfactometer bioassays. Coupled GC-EAG with female B. dorsalis revealed 7 compounds from 'Alphonso' headspace and 15 compounds from 'Chausa' headspace that elicited an EAG response. The EAG-active compounds, from 'Alphonso', were identified, using GC-MS, as heptane, myrcene, (Z)-ocimene, (E)-ocimene, allo-ocimene, (Z)-myroxide, and γ-octalactone, with the two ocimene isomers being the dominant compounds. The EAG-active compounds from 'Chausa' were 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl butanoate, ethyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate, ethyl tiglate, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-carene, p-cymene, ethyl sorbate, α-terpinolene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and benzothiazole. Individual compounds were significantly attractive when a standard dose (1 μg on filter paper) was tested in the olfactometer. Furthermore, synthetic blends with the same concentration and ratio of compounds as in the natural headspace samples were highly attractive (P < 0.001), and in a choice test, fruit flies did not show any preference for the natural samples over the synthetic blends. Results are discussed in relation to developing a lure for female B. dorsalis to bait traps with.

  13. Archeological Testing Fort Hood: 1994-1995. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    ASSOCI TES, INC. (662-22) Archeological Testing at Fort Hood. 1994-199.5 569 -48-1941.1080-134 1935 -058 Figure 7.17 Selected Perforator Types: Awl and...Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas. Huskey, V. 1935 An Archeological Survey of the Nueces Canyon of Texas, Bulletin of the Texas... epr 064lL.Tan I lms expected 08-FH1 Yellow 4 expected expedctd cd .9 15.Q W n• I less M 0 ~ *~Tax~on Total Total Inmr 53 nac na Vertebra.es 1. FcAuifnm

  14. Carbon epoxy front hood for an electrical city vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bere Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP had a very impressive development. Due to its physical and mechanical properties, this material is used in many high-end domains such as: aerospace, aviation, automotive, medical, engineering or building constructions. In the last period FRP are being intensely used in the automotive industry especially for the chassis manufacturing and other vehicle structural components. In this paper, the authors present the model of a carbon epoxy front hood of a two-passenger electrical car which is specially designed in urban area and which makes use of advanced FRP manufacturing.

  15. Fort Hood Building and Landscape Inventory with WWII and Cold War Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    barracks, 1970s (NARA)........................................................... 112 Figure 37. Palmer Movie Theater (NARA...revised 1953) showing layout of Hood Village and trailer park (Fort Hood...arms ammunition storage building #92012 (ERDC-CERL, 2004). ......... 260 Figure 163: Radio reception building #92063 (ERDC-CERL, 2004

  16. Ethanol intake and 3H-serotonin uptake I: A study in Fawn-Hooded rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoust, M.; Compagnon, P.; Legrand, E.; Boucly, P.

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol intake and synaptosomal 3 H-serotonin uptake were studied in male Fawn-Hooded and Sprague-Dawley rats. Fawn-Hooded rats consumed more alcohol and more water than Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma alcohol levels of Sprague-Dawley rats were not detectable but were about 5 mg/dl in Fawn-Hooded rats. Ethanol intake increased the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex, but not in thalamus. In Fawn-Hooded rats, serotonin uptake (Vmax) was higher than in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex. Ethanol intake reduced the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex. In cortex, the carrier affinity for serotonin was increased in alcoholized Fawn-Hooded rats. These results indicate that synaptosomal 3 H-serotonin uptake is affected by ethanol intake. In Fawn-Hooded rats, high ethanol consumption is associated with high serotonin uptake. In rats presenting high serotonin uptake, alcoholization reduces 3 H-serotonin internalization in synaptosomes, indicating a specific sensitivity to alcohol intake of serotonin uptake system

  17. Characterizing the developmental transcriptome of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) through comparative genomic analysis with Drosophila melanogaster utilizing modENCODE datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Scott M; Calla, Bernarda; Hall, Brian; Hou, Shaobin; Manoukis, Nicholas C

    2014-10-28

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest of fruit and vegetable crops throughout Asia, and is considered a high risk pest for establishment in the mainland United States. It is a member of the family Tephritidae, which are the most agriculturally important family of flies, and can be considered an out-group to well-studied members of the family Drosophilidae. Despite their importance as pests and their relatedness to Drosophila, little information is present on B. dorsalis transcripts and proteins. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively characterize the transcripts present throughout the life history of B. dorsalis and functionally annotate and analyse these transcripts relative to the presence, expression, and function of orthologous sequences present in Drosophila melanogaster. We present a detailed transcriptome assembly of B. dorsalis from egg through adult stages containing 20,666 transcripts across 10,799 unigene components. Utilizing data available through Flybase and the modENCODE project, we compared expression patterns of these transcripts to putative orthologs in D. melanogaster in terms of timing, abundance, and function. In addition, temporal expression patterns in B. dorsalis were characterized between stages, to establish the constitutive or stage-specific expression patterns of particular transcripts. A fully annotated transcriptome assembly is made available through NCBI, in addition to corresponding expression data. Through characterizing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis through its life history and comparing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis to the model organism D. melanogaster, a database has been developed that can be used as the foundation to functional genomic research in Bactrocera flies and help identify orthologous genes between B. dorsalis and D. melanogaster. This data provides the foundation for future functional genomic research that will focus on improving our understanding of the physiology and

  18. Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Su-Jung; Ada, Earl; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Manual handling of nanoparticles is a fundamental task of most nanomaterial research; such handling may expose workers to ultrafine or nanoparticles. Recent studies confirm that exposures to ultrafine or nanoparticles produce adverse inflammatory responses in rodent lungs and such particles may translocate to other areas of the body, including the brain. An important method for protecting workers handling nanoparticles from exposure to airborne nanoparticles is the laboratory fume hood. Such hoods rely on the proper face velocity for optimum performance. In addition, several other hood design and operating factors can affect worker exposure. Handling experiments were performed to measure airborne particle concentration while handling nanoparticles in three fume hoods located in different buildings under a range of operating conditions. Nanoalumina and nanosilver were selected to perform handling experiments in the fume hoods. Air samples were also collected on polycarbonate membrane filters and particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Handling tasks included transferring particles from beaker to beaker by spatula and by pouring. Measurement locations were the room background, the researcher's breathing zone and upstream and downstream from the handling location. Variable factors studied included hood design, transfer method, face velocity/sash location and material types. Airborne particle concentrations measured at breathing zone locations were analyzed to characterize exposure level. Statistics were used to test the correlation between data. The test results found that the handling of dry powders consisting of nano-sized particles inside laboratory fume hoods can result in a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the fume hood into the laboratory environment and the researcher's breathing zone. Many variables were found to affect the extent of particle release including hood design, hood operation (sash height, face velocity

  19. Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Su-Jung, E-mail: candace.umass@gmail.com; Ada, Earl [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); Isaacs, Jacqueline A. [Northeastern University, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); Ellenbecker, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Manual handling of nanoparticles is a fundamental task of most nanomaterial research; such handling may expose workers to ultrafine or nanoparticles. Recent studies confirm that exposures to ultrafine or nanoparticles produce adverse inflammatory responses in rodent lungs and such particles may translocate to other areas of the body, including the brain. An important method for protecting workers handling nanoparticles from exposure to airborne nanoparticles is the laboratory fume hood. Such hoods rely on the proper face velocity for optimum performance. In addition, several other hood design and operating factors can affect worker exposure. Handling experiments were performed to measure airborne particle concentration while handling nanoparticles in three fume hoods located in different buildings under a range of operating conditions. Nanoalumina and nanosilver were selected to perform handling experiments in the fume hoods. Air samples were also collected on polycarbonate membrane filters and particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Handling tasks included transferring particles from beaker to beaker by spatula and by pouring. Measurement locations were the room background, the researcher's breathing zone and upstream and downstream from the handling location. Variable factors studied included hood design, transfer method, face velocity/sash location and material types. Airborne particle concentrations measured at breathing zone locations were analyzed to characterize exposure level. Statistics were used to test the correlation between data. The test results found that the handling of dry powders consisting of nano-sized particles inside laboratory fume hoods can result in a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the fume hood into the laboratory environment and the researcher's breathing zone. Many variables were found to affect the extent of particle release including hood design, hood operation (sash height, face

  20. Feeding habits of harp and hooded seals in Greenland waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn O Kapel

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of stomach contents analyses of harp and hooded seals collected in West Greenland waters in the period 1986-1993 are reviewed, and compared with published data and circumstantial information from local hunters.  The diet of harp seals in this region is variable but consists mainly of pelagic crustaceans (Thysanoessa spp. and Parathemisto libellula and small fish species like capelin (Mallotus villosus, sandeel (Ammodytes spp., polar cod (Boreogadus saida and Arctic cod (Arctogadus glacialis. Species of importance for commercial fisheries in Greenland, such as Northern prawn (Pandalus borealis, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, and Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides play a minor role in the diet of harp seals in this area. Variation in the diet of hooded seals is less well documented, but in addition to the species also taken by harp seals, larger demersal fishes like Greenland halibut, redfish (Sebastes spp., cod, and wolffish (Anarhichas minor are apparently important prey items.

  1. Sublethal Effects of Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) on Life Table Parameters of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Reitz, Stuart R; Wang, Haihong; Lei, Zhongren

    2015-06-01

    We assessed effects of parental exposure to Beauveria bassiana on life history traits of subsequent generations of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Progeny from individuals that survived fungal exposure as second instars had significantly shorter egg stages, but longer prepupal development times than corresponding untreated controls. However, survivorship to adulthood of these progeny groups did not differ. Although fecundities of the parental types did not differ, the sex ratio of progeny from fungal-treated parents was male-biased, whereas sex ratio of progeny from untreated control parents was even. We calculated life table parameters for the progeny and found that all parameters, except for generation time, were significantly less for the progeny of fungal-treated parents than for progeny of untreated parents. The intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase, net reproductive rate, mean generation time, and gross reproductive rate were 0.199 d(-1), 1.229 d(-1), 21.84, 15.48 d, and 27.273, respectively, for progeny of treated thrips, and 0.266 d(-1), 1.316 d(-1), 52.540, 14.92 d, and 70.64, respectively, for progeny of control thrips. Consequently, population projections demonstrated that offspring of parents exposed to B. bassiana would increase their population more slowly than those from untreated parents. These results demonstrate that B. bassiana has sublethal effects that reduce the reproductive success of F. occidentalis and these effects should be taken into account when evaluating its use in management programs for F. occidentalis. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Physiological ecology of desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) eggs: temperature and water relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, A.

    1980-12-01

    The soil environment imposes constraints on the timing of oviposition and the location of suitable sites for egg burrows of the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis). The effects of temperature and water potential on the developmental period and hatching success of eggs were determined. Eggs hatch normally between 28/sup 0/ and 38/sup 0/C at environmental water potentials between -50 and -1500 kPa. Predictions were derived for the timing and placement of egg clutches based on soil water potential and temperature profiles measured in the field and on the results of laboratory incubation experiments. The results suggest that egg burrows should be located at depths >22 cm in washes or possibly in sparsely vegetated areas away from creosote bushes. The biogeography of desert iguanas within the United States is discussed in relation to soil environments and tolerances of eggs. The physical factors affecting incubation may limit the geographical range of desert iguanas.

  3. Studies on mating competitiveness of sterile oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limohpasmanee, W.; Segsarnviriya, S.

    1998-01-01

    An essential prerequisite for insect control by the sterile insect technique releasing method is mass rearing and sterilizing that do not have adverse effects on longevity and mating behavior of the released males. But many laboratory studies have shown that males irradiated at the completely sterility dose often could not compete with untreated males in mating. This paper studies the effects of gamma radiation at the sterile dose on mating, sexual and sperm competitiveness of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) under the laboratory condition. It is found that irradiation at the completely sterility dose (90 Gy) had reduced the mating and sperm competition ability of the males. Though the sexual competition was not

  4. Quality of the oriental fruit fly, bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) after sifting pupae by mechanical sifter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutantawong, M.; Uthaisarn, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quality of fruit fly, bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in mass production is important for controlling pest populations by means of the sterile insect technique. The experiment was to study the quality of fruit fly after sifting pupae by mechanical sifter. Laboratory-reared pupae, held at 26 ± 1 degree C were sifted at intensity of 18 rpm in a rotary sifting device at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of age. The quality of fruit flies were determined on adult eclosion and flight capability. The results showed that there were no significantly different (P < 0.05) in adult eclosion between control with sifted pupae at 1 to 8 days of age. However, there were significantly different (P < 0.05) in flight capability between control and sifted pupae at 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 days of age with sifted pupae at 2, 3, 4 days of age

  5. Variant Branching Pattern of Dorsalis Pedis Artery Accompanied with Anomalous Presence of Extensor Hallucis Brevis Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Aithal Padur

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During routine dissection, we came across multiple variations in the dorsum of the right foot. Dorsalis pedis artery (DPA presented with an unusual branching pattern. The arcuate artery was completely absent, and hence three tarsal branches arose from lateral side of DPA. The first branch continued as first dorsal metatarsal artery, the second branch continued as the second dorsal metatarsal artery, and the third branch continued as third dorsal metatarsal artery which also provided a small twig to the fourth intermetatarsal space as the fourth dorsal metatarsal artery. We also observed the unique presence of extensor hallucis brevis muscle with the origin from the medial part of superior surface of the calcaneus and inserted to proximal phalanx of great toe. Since the DPA was just beneath this muscle, anomalous presence of the muscle may lead to compression of DPA. Awareness regarding such variations is critical for angiographers, vascular surgeons, reconstructive and plastic surgeons.

  6. Effects of boundary-layer separation controllers on a desktop fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Hsu, Ching Min; Hung, Shuo-Fu

    2016-10-02

    A desktop fume hood installed with an innovative design of flow boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, work surface, and corners was developed and characterized for its flow and containment leakage characteristics. The geometric features of the developed desktop fume hood included a rearward offset suction slot, two side plates, two side-plate boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, a slanted surface on the leading edge of the work surface, and two small triangular plates on the upper left and right corners of the hood face. The flow characteristics were examined using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique. The containment leakages were measured by the tracer gas (sulphur hexafluoride) detection method on the hood face plane with a mannequin installed in front of the hood. The results of flow visualization showed that the smoke dispersions induced by the boundary-layer separations on the leading edges of the side plates and work surface, as well as the three-dimensional complex flows on the upper-left and -right corners of the hood face, were effectively alleviated by the boundary-layer separation controllers. The results of the tracer gas detection method with a mannequin standing in front of the hood showed that the leakage levels were negligibly small (≤0.003 ppm) at low face velocities (≥0.19 m/s).

  7. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180°C and 210°C, a 5°C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 × 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260°C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods

  8. Hood of the truck statistics for food animal practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenning, Barrett D

    2006-03-01

    This article offers some tips on working with statistics and develops four relatively simple procedures to deal with most kinds of data with which veterinarians work. The criterion for a procedure to be a "Hood of the Truck Statistics" (HOT Stats) technique is that it must be simple enough to be done with pencil, paper, and a calculator. The goal of HOT Stats is to have the tools available to run quick analyses in only a few minutes so that decisions can be made in a timely fashion. The discipline allows us to move away from the all-too-common guess work about effects and differences we perceive following a change in treatment or management. The techniques allow us to move toward making more defensible, credible, and more quantifiably "risk-aware" real-time recommendations to our clients.

  9. Vent hood concept for safely unloading TRUPACT-IIs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Receipt of transuranic (TRU) waste in the TRUPACT-2 shipping package, implies a potential of receiving waste packages contaminated with only alpha emitters or emitting hazardous gases. Due to the difficulty of rapidly detecting low-level alpha contamination, a strict contamination control system has been developed to check incoming waste packages in a controlled environment. A part of this control is the use of a vent hood system for the TRUPACT-2 shipping container unloading process. A clear final shroud with a monitored/filtered exhaust system has been designed and fabricated to permit direct surveillance of TRU waste packages prior to exposing personnel or facilities to possible radioactive contamination or hazardous gases. This concept has also been adapted to similar evolutions in which packages are exposed that hold TRU or hazardous materials but cannot be directly monitored prior to opening

  10. Tabes dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locomotor ataxia; Syphilitic myelopathy; Syphilitic myeloneuropathy; Myelopathy - syphilitic; Tabetic neurosyphilis ... the nervous system. If syphilis infection is suspected, tests may include the following: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination ...

  11. Oviposition site-selection by Bactrocera dorsalis is mediated through an innate recognition template tuned to γ-octalactone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available Innate recognition templates (IRTs in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest.

  12. Impact of introduction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) and classical biological control releases of Fopius arisanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on economically important fruit flies in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Leblanc, Luc; Putoa, Rudolph; Eitam, Avi

    2007-06-01

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), was discovered on Tahiti Island in July 1996. Eradication programs were conducted from 1997 to 2001, but failed. From 1998 to 2006, B. dorsalis was recovered from 29 different host fruit from the five Society Islands: Tahiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, and Huahine. Analysis of coinfestation patterns by B. dorsalis, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), and Bactrocera kirki (Froggatt) suggested B. dorsalis had displaced these two species and become the most abundant fruit fly in coastal areas. To suppress B. dorsalis populations, a classical biological control program was initiated to introduce the natural enemy Fopius arisanus (Sonan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) into French Polynesia from Hawaii. Wasps were released and established on Tahiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, and Huahine Islands. In guava, Psidium guajava L., collections for Tahiti, F. arisanus parasitism of fruit flies was 2.1, 31.8, 37.5, and 51.9% for fruit collected for 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively. Based on guava collections in 2002 (before releases) and 2006 (after releases), there was a subsequent decrease in numbers of B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, and B. kirki fruit flies emerging (per kilogram of fruit) by 75.6, 79.3, and 97.9%, respectively. These increases in F. arisanus parasitism and decreases in infestation were similar for other host fruit. Establishment of F. arisanus is the most successful example of classical biological control of fruit flies in the Pacific area outside of Hawaii and serves as a model for introduction into South America, Africa, and China where species of the B. dorsalis complex are established.

  13. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H.

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated

  14. Preferencia de los Trips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae Hacia Trampas de colores en un Invernadero de Flores de la Sabana de Bogotá Color preference of Trhips (Thysanoptera: tripidae in crysanthemum crops at the Bogotá plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardenas Estrella

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Se trabajó con un total de 36 trampas, 6 colores y 6 replicaciones por color, se les adicionó un pegante y se distribuyeron completamente al azar dentro de un invernadero comercial ubicado en Chía Cundinamarca. Los colores probados fueron: blanco, morado, amarillo, rojo, naranja y verde, Los colores blanco y morado mostraron la más alta eficiencia en la captura de adultos de Frsnkliniette oeeidentalis (Pegande
    mientras que el color verde capturó el menor número de esta especie. Se capturaron además adultos de F. panamensis Hood,
    F. minuta (Moulton, F. auripes Hood y Thrips tabaei Lindeman pero en menor cantidad.White, violet, yellow, red, orange and green colors with six replicates were tried. This study was done in a green house
    grown chrysantemum crop. White and violet showed the highest efficiency by capturing the greatest number of adults of Frankliniella oeeidentalis, the most abundant species during the experimento Green color captured the lowest number of F. oeeidentalis. Other species captured were F. panamensis Hood,
    F. minuta (Moulton, F. auripes Hood and Tbrips tabaei Lindeman.

  15. Identification and pest status of Holopothrips fulvus (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae on dwarf-cashew crops in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G.A. Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract Cashew, Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae, is one of the most important sources of agricultural income in northeastern Brazil, but many of the arthropods associated with the crop have yet to be identified. We describe here for the first time the damage caused by Holopothrips fulvus (Morgan (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae to dwarf-cashew trees cultivated in the municipality of Pacajús, Ceará, Brazil. Leaf tissue injuries were caused by the sucking mouthparts of the insect and were characterized by dark necrotic spots on the epidermis that resulted in yellowing, wilting and, ultimately, abscission of the leaves. H. fulvus also fed on developing kernels and pseudofruits producing injuries that manifested in the form of chlorotic specks. Additional information is given on the pest status and important aspects of the morphology of the insect, including sexual dimorphism, redescription of the adults and description of the second instar larvae.

  16. Origins of albino and hooded rats: implications from molecular genetic analysis across modern laboratory rat strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kuramoto

    Full Text Available Albino and hooded (or piebald rats are one of the most frequently used laboratory animals for the past 150 years. Despite this fact, the origin of the albino mutation as well as the genetic basis of the hooded phenotype remained unclear. Recently, the albino mutation has been identified as the Arg299His missense mutation in the Tyrosinase gene and the hooded (H locus has been mapped to the ∼460-kb region in which only the Kit gene exists. Here, we surveyed 172 laboratory rat strains for the albino mutation and the hooded (h mutation that we identified by positional cloning approach to investigate possible genetic roots and relationships of albino and hooded rats. All of 117 existing laboratory albino rats shared the same albino missense mutation, indicating they had only one single ancestor. Genetic fine mapping followed by de novo sequencing of BAC inserts covering the H locus revealed that an endogenous retrovirus (ERV element was inserted into the first intron of the Kit gene where the hooded allele maps. A solitary long terminal repeat (LTR was found at the same position to the ERV insertion in another allele of the H locus, which causes the so called Irish (h(i phenotype. The ERV and the solitary LTR insertions were completely associated with the hooded and Irish coat patterns, respectively, across all colored rat strains examined. Interestingly, all 117 albino rat strains shared the ERV insertion without any exception, which strongly suggests that the albino mutation had originally occurred in hooded rats.

  17. The Effect of Condensing Steam Turbine Exhaust Hood Body Geometry on Exhaust Performance Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribin, V. G.; Paramonov, A. N.; Mitrokhova, O. M.

    2018-06-01

    The article presents data from combined numerical and experimental investigations of the effect that the overall dimensions of the exhaust hood of a steam turbine with an underslung condenser has on the aerodynamic losses in the hood. Owing to the properly selected minimum permissible overall dimensions of the exhaust hood, more efficient operation of this turbine component is achieved, better vibration stability of the turbine set shaft line is obtained, and lower costs are required for arranging the steam turbine plant in the turbine building. Experiments have shown that the main overall dimensions of the hood body have a determining effect on the exhaust hood flow path profile and on its aerodynamic performance. Owing to properly selected ratios between the exhaust hood body main sizes without a diffuser, a total loss coefficient equal to approximately unity has been obtained. By using an axial-radial diffuser, the energy loss can be decreased by 30-40% depending on the geometrical parameters and level of velocities in the inlet section of a hood having the optimal overall dimensions. By using the obtained results, it becomes possible to evaluate the overall dimensions necessary for achieving the maximal aerodynamic hood efficiency and, as a consequence, to obtain better technical and economic indicators of the turbine plant as a whole already at the initial stage of its designing. If a need arises to select overall dimensions smaller than their optimal values, the increase of energy loss can be estimated using the presented dependences. The cycle of investigations was carried out on the experimental setups available in the fundamental research laboratory of the Moscow Power Engineering Institute National University's Department of Steam and Gas Turbines with due regard to the operating parameters and similarity criteria.

  18. Field-trip guide to Mount Hood, Oregon, highlighting eruptive history and hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, William E.; Gardner, Cynthia A.

    2017-06-22

    This guidebook describes stops of interest for a geological field trip around Mount Hood volcano. It was developed for the 2017 International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly in Portland, Oregon. The intent of this guidebook and accompanying contributions is to provide an overview of Mount Hood, including its chief geologic processes, magmatic system, eruptive history, local tectonics, and hazards, by visiting a variety of readily accessible localities. We also describe coeval, largely monogenetic, volcanoes in the region. Accompanying the field-trip guidebook are separately authored contributions that discuss in detail the Mount Hood magmatic system and its products and behavior (Kent and Koleszar, this volume); Mount Hood earthquakes and their relation to regional tectonics and the volcanic system (Thelen and Moran, this volume); and young surface faults cutting the broader Mount Hood area whose extent has come to light after acquisition of regional light detection and ranging coverage (Madin and others, this volume).The trip makes an approximately 175-mile (280-kilometer) clockwise loop around Mount Hood, starting and ending in Portland. The route heads east on Interstate 84 through the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. The guidebook points out only a few conspicuous features of note in the gorge, but many other guides to the gorge are available. The route continues south on the Mount Hood National Scenic Byway on Oregon Route 35 following Hood River, and returns to Portland on U.S. Highway 26 following Sandy River. The route traverses rocks as old as the early Miocene Eagle Creek Formation and overlying Columbia River Basalt Group of middle Miocene age, but chiefly lava flows and clastic products of arc volcanism of late Miocene to Holocene age.

  19. Interspecific cross of the Bactrocera dorsalis Complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): How did it happen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2000-01-01

    The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, which taxonomically resembles the Oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel), comprises at least 52 species. Two closely related members of the complex, namely B. papayae Drew and Hancock and B. carambolae Drew and Hancock, were recently reclassified as new species (Drew and Hancock 1994). Under this taxonomic revision, B. papayae is now regarded as a distinct species from B. carambolae based on the differences of: 1) wing pattern of the costal band at apex R4+5, 2) the presence of a dark spot on the fore femora and, 3) the pattern of the transverse black band on terga III-V. Chemical examination of the volatile components produced by the males of both species also revealed pronounced differences in the chemistry of their rectal gland secretions (Perkins et al. 1990). In Malaysia, B. papayae has a wider distribution and a larger host range compared with B. carambolae. Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) and various species of wax apple (Syzygium spp.) are the preferred hosts of B. carambolae whilst B. papayae attacks over 150 species but preferentially 'attacks' banana (Musa spp.), starfruit, mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.) and guava (Psidium guajava L.) in decreasing order (Tan 1997). Recently, data from field trapping studies using methyl eugenol (ME) in Penang Island, Malaysia, showed the presence of male flies with intermediate morphological characteristics between B. papayae and B. carambolae. Laboratory testing showed that these two species are able to interbreed and produce viable offspring. The hybrids also possess a variety of intermediate characteristics between the two species (Wee and Tan, unpublished data). Therefore, the question arises as to whether B. papayae and B. carambolae should be categorised as different species, subspecies or even as different strains. And before a satisfactory conclusion can be achieved, there are some key issues that need to be addressed. Firstly, after ME

  20. Detection method for irradiated oriental fruit fly (Dacus Dorsalis) for quarantine purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulo-Nazarea, M.T.; Nato, A.Q.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation is one of the techniques used to effectively rid fresh produce of insect pests and efficacy of radiation dose on food is measured by a probit 9 (99.9968% mortality) quarantine security. Present of suitable biochemical markers for irreversible radiation injury in insect pests could be used as convincing proofs of the efficacy of radiation dose. A biochemical marker (designated Gs-protein) for radiation injury in Oriental fruit fly, Dacus dorsalis, was detected in the SDS-PAGE profile of two-day old pupae and adult insect stage. Gs-protein is not observed in larvae and eggs. An apparent molecular weight of 109 kDa was calculated. A tyrosinase enzyme activity was observed in the soluble fraction of pupal total homogenate and SDS-PAGE-isolated Gs-protein; however, no tyrosinase activity was measured in irradiated sample. The optical absorbance of the soluble fraction from unirradiated pupal total homogenate measured at 360 nm was found to increase with time. From the results of the studies, the apparent loss of Gs-protein in irradiated larvae is likely the result of loss of melanization capability in irradiated larvae which is linked to the absence of tyrosinase enzyme. The data presented seems to establish the role of Gs-protein as a biomarker for gamma-irradiation induced deactivation of pupal development and as a convenient indicator of the effectiveness of gamma radiation as a quarantine treatment. (author). 3 refs.; 3 figs

  1. An overview of the 2009 Fort Hood Robotics Rodeo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth

    2010-04-01

    The Robotics Rodeo held from 31 August to 3 September 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas, had three stated goals: educate key decision makers and align the robotics industry; educate Soldiers and developers; and perform a live market survey of the current state of technologies to encourage the development of robotic systems to support operational needs. Both events that comprised the Robotics Rodeo, the Extravaganza and the robotic technology observation, demonstration and discussion (RTOD2) addressed these stated goals. The Extravaganza was designed to foster interaction between the vendors and the visitors who included the media, Soldiers, others in the robotics industry and key decision makers. The RTOD2 allowed the vendors a more private and focused interaction with the subject matter experts teams, this was the forum for the vendors to demonstrate their robotic systems that supported the III Corps operational needs statements that are focused on route clearance, convoy operations, persistent stare, and robotic wingman. While the goals of the Rodeo were achieved, the underlying success from the event is the development of a new business model that is focused on collapsing the current model to get technologies into the hands of our warfighters quicker. This new model takes the real time data collection from the Rodeo, the Warfighter Needs from TRADOC, the emerging requirements from our current engagements, and assistance from industry partners to develop a future Army strategy for the rapid fielding of unmanned systems technologies.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Bactrocera dorsalis and Thaumatotibia leucotreta in Smallholder Avocado Orchards along Altitudinal Gradient of Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Odanga

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Avocado (Persea americana fruits are an important source of income and a nutritious food for small-scale growers and other stakeholders involved in farming along the Afrotropical highlands of Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro in Kenya and Tanzania, respectively. Avocado fruits are infested by several insect pests, namely the Asian invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae, and the false codling moth, Thaumatotibia leucotreta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae. However, there is inadequate information on the distribution patterns of these pests in small-scale avocado cropping systems in the East African highlands. This study was initiated to generate a spatial distribution map of B. dorsalis and T. leucotreta in avocado orchards at Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro in Kenya and Tanzania, respectively. The two pests were monitored by using their respective parapheromone lures for two years between August 2012 and July 2014. Fruit damage was assessed by computing the proportion of infested fruits for B. dorsalis, whereas the damage score was used for T. leucotreta. Our results indicated that the mean number of B. dorsalis per trap per day differed significantly across elevation, being highest in lowland zone for both Taita Hills (15.90 and Mount Kilimanjaro (24.45. Similarly, the percentage infestation of ground collected fruits by B. dorsalis varied with altitude, being lowest at highlands above 1500 m.a.s.l. (0.66% and 0.83% for Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro, respectively. Conversely, the mean number of T. leucotreta did not vary with altitude in either study area. However, the damage score for T. leucotreta infestation was significantly lower in the highlands of both transects (7.0% and11.1% for Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro, respectively. These findings describe spatial trends that are important in formulating strategies aimed at suppressing the populations of B. dorsalis and T. leucotreta in East African

  3. The Influence of the Bed with a Semiopen Hood on Bacteria Removal in a Negative-Pressure Isolation Room

    OpenAIRE

    Jeng-Min Huang; Hsiang-Tai Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study numerically investigates the influence of a sickbed with a semiopened hood on bacteria removal in a negative-pressure isolation room. The parameters include air change rate, lying style, the length and height of hood, flow rate allotments, and the positions of outlets. The results show that the hood has excellent effect on the removal of contaminated air, which is much better than the case without hood. The flow field of patient's face up cough is very different from face side coug...

  4. The Influence of the Bed with a Semiopen Hood on Bacteria Removal in a Negative-Pressure Isolation Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Min Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates the influence of a sickbed with a semiopened hood on bacteria removal in a negative-pressure isolation room. The parameters include air change rate, lying style, the length and height of hood, flow rate allotments, and the positions of outlets. The results show that the hood has excellent effect on the removal of contaminated air, which is much better than the case without hood. The flow field of patient's face up cough is very different from face side cough, and the contaminated air cannot be removed properly through one air outlet. There are three outlets on the hood, set straight above the patient's face and at both sides. The allotment of the exhaust flow rate of the upper outlet to that of side outlets is suggested to be 4: 6. When the total air change rate is above 6 ACH, the hood length has slight influence on pollutant removal. The increase of hood height has a negative impact when the patient coughs lying on back. When the side exhaust flow rate is high, the hood height has a slight impact for face side cough. The recommended air change rate for the negative-pressure ward with sickbed hood is above 5 ACH.

  5. Hood River and Pelton Ladder monitoring and evaluation project and Hood River fish habitat project : annual progress report 1999-2000.; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    2001-01-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin. This annual report summarizes work for two consecutive contract periods: the fiscal year (FY) 1999 contract period was 1 October, 1998 through 30 September, 1999 and 1 October, 1999 through 30 September, 2000 for FY 2000. Work implemented during FY 1999 and FY 2000 included (1) acclimation of hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts, (2) spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys on the West Fork Hood River (3) genetic analysis of steelhead and cutthroat[contractual service with the ODFW], (4) Hood River water temperature studies, (5) Oak Springs Hatchery (OSH) and Round Butte Hatchery (RBH) coded-wire tagging and clipping evaluation, (6) preparation of the Hood River Watershed Assessment (Coccoli et al., December 1999) and the Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan (Coccoli et al., February 2000), (7) project implementation of early action habitat protection and restoration projects, (8) Pelton Ladder evaluation studies, (9) management oversight and guidance to BPA and ODFW engineering on HRPP facilities, and (10) preparation of an annual report summarizing project objectives for FY 1999 and FY 2000

  6. Discovery of genes related to insecticide resistance in Bactrocera dorsalis by functional genomic analysis of a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ju-Chun; Chien, Ting-Ying; Hu, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Mei-Ju May; Wu, Wen-Jer; Feng, Hai-Tung; Haymer, David S; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Insecticide resistance has recently become a critical concern for control of many insect pest species. Genome sequencing and global quantization of gene expression through analysis of the transcriptome can provide useful information relevant to this challenging problem. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is one of the world's most destructive agricultural pests, and recently it has been used as a target for studies of genetic mechanisms related to insecticide resistance. However, prior to this study, the molecular data available for this species was largely limited to genes identified through homology. To provide a broader pool of gene sequences of potential interest with regard to insecticide resistance, this study uses whole transcriptome analysis developed through de novo assembly of short reads generated by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The transcriptome of B. dorsalis was initially constructed using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology. Qualified reads were assembled into contigs and potential splicing variants (isotigs). A total of 29,067 isotigs have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr) protein database from NCBI, and 11,073 of these correspond to distinct D. melanogaster proteins in the RefSeq database. Approximately 5,546 isotigs contain coding sequences that are at least 80% complete and appear to represent B. dorsalis genes. We observed a strong correlation between the completeness of the assembled sequences and the expression intensity of the transcripts. The assembled sequences were also used to identify large numbers of genes potentially belonging to families related to insecticide resistance. A total of 90 P450-, 42 GST-and 37 COE-related genes, representing three major enzyme families involved in insecticide metabolism and resistance, were identified. In addition, 36 isotigs were discovered to contain target site sequences related to four classes of resistance genes. Identified sequence motifs were also analyzed to

  7. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 2008 Annual Report : October 2007 - September 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Robert E.; Olsen, Erik A. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-09-28

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 2008. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on seventeen complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on fifteen complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) subbasin wild summer and winter steelhead smolt production, (4) numbers of hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts leaving the subbasin; (5) smolt migration timing past Bonneville Dam, (6) wild and hatchery steelhead smolt-to-adult survival rates; (7) wild summer and winter steelhead egg to smolt survival rates; and (8) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP relative to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids (see Ardren Draft), (2) evaluate the HRPP's progress towards achieving the biological fish objectives defined in the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) and the Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program (HDR|FishPro, ODFW, and CTWSRO 2008), (3) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (4) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity.

  8. Radiosensitivity of different immature stages and ages of oriental fruitfly, Dacus Dorsalis Hendel, to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoto, E.C.; Blanco, L.R.; Resilva, S.S.; Baturi, E.S.

    1980-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the sensitivity of different ages of eggs, larvae and pupae of the oriental fruitfly to varying doses of gamma radiation. The most sensitive stage was the egg followed by the pupa and then the larva. Radiosensitivity of the eggs decreased as age increased from 2-3 to 28 hours during treatment. The LD 50 for younger eggs (2-13 hours) was less than 0.5 krad and for nearly mature eggs (18-28 hours) from 2.3 to 14.9 krad. Similarly with the larval stage, the LD 50 values increased with age of fruit flies at treatment. For 1-day-old larvae, the LD 50 was observed at 2.5 krad while for 7-day-old larvae, the LD 50 increased to 50 krad. Dosage required for 50% mortality in 1-day-old pupae was 1.4 krad and 32.1 krad for older pupae. Pupation was reduced to zero when 4-day-old larvae were exposed at 50 krad and 1-day-old larvae at 10 krad. More than 50 krad was required to prevent emergence of mature (7-day-old) pupae. The sex ratio of the emerging adults of D. dorsalis from the irradiated pupae assumed a 1:1 ratio. However, some adults had abnormally-developed wings upon emergence. Abnormality rates were greater when the pupae were treated young. Results indicate the feasibility of gamma radiation in the range of 40-50 krad for commodity treatments of fruits. (author)

  9. Determination of the internal exposure hazard from plutonium work in an open front hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cheryl Lynn

    Work with hazardous substances, such as radioactive material, can be done safely when engineered controls are used to maintain the worker effective dose below the International Commission on Radiological Protection ICRP 60 recommendation of 0.02 Sv/year and reduce the worker exposure to material to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A primary engineered control used at a Los Alamos National Laboratory facility is the open-front hood. An open-front hood, also known as an open-front box, is a laboratory containment box that is fully enclosed except for a 15-cm opening along the front of the box. This research involved collection of the aerosol escaping an open-front hood while PuO2 sample digestion was simulated. Sodium chloride was used as a surrogate to mimic the behavior of PuO2. The NaCl aerosol was binned as a function of median aerodynamic diameter using a Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI, MSP Corporation, Shoreview, MN) cascade impactor. Using neutron activation analysis (NAA) to measure the mass of material in each of the nine bins of the MOUDI, the mass median diameter of the escaping aerosol was determined. Using the mass median diameter and the total mass of the particle distribution, dose was calculated using ICRP 60 methodology. Experimental conditions mimicked a stationary worker and a worker moving her hands in and out of the open front hood. Measurements were also done in the hood for comparison. The effect of the hands moving in and out of the box was modeled. Information necessary for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling is given, such as volumetric flow rates out of the open front hood and into the experimental room, detailed sketches of the experimental set-up, and energy provided by the hot plate and worker. This research is unique as it measures particle size distribution from routine working conditions. Current research uses tracer gases or describes non-routine conditions. It is important to have results that mimic

  10. Reaching for 100% participation in a utility conservation programme: the Hood River project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, Eric

    1989-04-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) was a major residential retrofit demonstration project. The project was intended to install as many cost-effective retrofit measures in all electrically heated homes in Hood River, OR, USA. To achieve 100% participation, HRCP offered a package of 'super' retrofit measures and paid for installation of these measures. Almost all (91%) of the eligible households participated, in stark contrast to the much lower participation levels achieved in other residential conservation programmes. Also, unlike other programmes, HRCP attracted larger fractions of traditionally hard-to-reach groups: low-income households; occupants of multifamily units; and renters. The key factors leading to this phenomenal success include: the offer of free retrofits; determination on the part of staff to enlist every eligible household; the use of community-based marketing approaches; and reliance on extensive word-of-mouth among Hood River residents. (author).

  11. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces...

  12. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall...

  13. 42 CFR 84.175 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods....175 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be designed and constructed to fit persons with...

  14. Orthogonal design on range hood with air curtain and its effects on kitchen environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xing; Xi, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Conventional range hoods cannot effectively prevent the oil fumes containing cooking-induced harmful material from escaping into the kitchen Air curtains and guide plates have been used in range hoods to reduce the escape of airborne emissions and heat, thereby improving the kitchen environment and the cook's degree of comfort. In this article, numerical simulations are used to study the effects of the jet velocity of an air curtain, the jet angle of the air curtain, the width of the jet slot, the area of the guide plate, and the exhaust rate of the range hood on the perceived temperature, the perceived concentration of oil fumes, the release temperature of oil fumes, and the concentration of escaped oil fumes in a kitchen. The orthogonal experiment results show that the exhaust rate of the range hood is the main factor influencing the fumes concentration and the temperature distribution in the kitchen. For the range hood examined in the present study, the optimum values of the exhaust rate, the jet velocity of the air curtain, the jet angle of the air curtain, the width of the jet slot, and the area of the guide plate are 10.5 m(3)/min, 1.5 m/s, -5°, 4 mm, and 0.22 m(2), respectively, based on the results of the parametric study. In addition, the velocity field, temperature field, and oil fumes concentration field in the kitchen using the proposed range hood with the air curtain and guide plate are analyzed for those parameters. The study's results provide significant information needed for improving the kitchen environment.

  15. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  16. De novo cloning and annotation of genes associated with immunity, detoxification and energy metabolism from the fat body of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jia Yang

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive pest in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, we performed transcriptome-wide analysis of the fat body of B. dorsalis and obtained more than 59 million sequencing reads, which were assembled into 27,787 unigenes with an average length of 591 bp. Among them, 17,442 (62.8% unigenes matched known proteins in the NCBI database. The assembled sequences were further annotated with gene ontology, cluster of orthologous group terms, and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. In depth analysis was performed to identify genes putatively involved in immunity, detoxification, and energy metabolism. Many new genes were identified including serpins, peptidoglycan recognition proteins and defensins, which were potentially linked to immune defense. Many detoxification genes were identified, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. Many new transcripts possibly involved in energy metabolism, including fatty acid desaturases, lipases, alpha amylases, and trehalose-6-phosphate synthases, were identified. Moreover, we randomly selected some genes to examine their expression patterns in different tissues by quantitative real-time PCR, which indicated that some genes exhibited fat body-specific expression in B. dorsalis. The identification of a numerous transcripts in the fat body of B. dorsalis laid the foundation for future studies on the functions of these genes.

  17. A review of recorded host plants of Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera (Bactrocera)dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera (Bactrocera) dorsalis (Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the Oriental fruit fly, is regulated through the Plant Protection Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7701-7772) and relevant Parts and Subparts of the Code of Federal Regulations (7 CFR – Agriculture). Presented herein is a compre...

  18. Characterizing the developmental transcriptome of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) through comparative genomic analysis with Drosophila melanogaster utilizing modENCODE datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest of fruit and vegetable crops throughout Asia, and is considered a high risk pest for establishment in the mainland United States. It is a member of the family Tephritidae, which are the most agriculturally important family ...

  19. The role of the transformer gene in sex determination and reproduction in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Zheng, Wenping; Handler, Alfred M; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    Transformer (tra) is a switch gene in the somatic sex-determination hierarchy that regulates sexual dimorphism based on RNA splicing in many insects. In tephritids, a Y-linked male determining gene (M) controls sex in the sex-determination pathway. Here, homologues of Drosophila tra and transformer-2 (tra-2) genes were isolated and characterized in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most destructive agricultural insect pests in many Asian countries. Two male-specific and one female-specific isoforms of B. dorsalis transformer (Bdtra) were identified. The presence of multiple TRA/TRA-2 binding sites in Bdtra suggests that the TRA/TRA-2 proteins are splicing regulators promoting and maintaining, epigenetically, female sex determination by a tra positive feedback loop in XX individuals during development. The expression patterns of female-specific Bdtra transcripts during early embryogenesis shows that a peak appears at 15 h after egg laying. Using dsRNA to knock-down Bdtra expression in the embryo and adult stages, we showed that sexual formation is determined early in the embryo stage and that parental RNAi does not lead to the production of all male progeny as in Tribolium castaneum. RNAi results from adult abdominal dsRNA injections show that Bdtra has a positive influence on female yolk protein gene (Bdyp1) expression and fecundity.

  20. Corazonin Signaling Is Required in the Male for Sperm Transfer in the Oriental Fruit Fly Bactrocera dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Li Hou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Corazonin (Crz is a widely distributed neuropeptide (or neurohormone in insects with diverse physiological functions. The present study aimed to reveal the functions of Crz and its receptor (CrzR in the regulation of sexual behavior and fertility in male Bactrocera dorsalis. Tissue-specific expression analyses showed that the BdCrz transcript was most abundant in the central nervous system (CNS, and the BdCrzR transcript was most abundant in both the fat body and CNS. Immunochemical localization confirmed that three pairs of Crz-immunoreactive neurons are located in the dorsolateral protocerebrum region of male adult brain. Importantly, RNAi-mediated Crz knockdown lengthened mating duration in males, and knockdown of Crz or CrzR strongly decreased male fertility in the following 3 days, while the courtship behavior and mating efficiency were not affected. The reduced number of sperm in the reproductive organs of mated females indicated that Crz knockdown in males reduced sperm transfer. The findings of this study indicate that Crz contributes to the reproductive physiology of the oriental fruit fly B. dorsalis by regulating sperm transfer in male adults.

  1. Genetic Variation among the White-striped Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in Comparison with a Trok Nong-derived Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Segsarnviriya, Suchada; Limohpasmanee, Wanitch; Kongratarpon, Titima; Thannarin, Thodsapol; Sungsinleart; Kwanpisut

    2011-06-01

    Full text: A white-striped strain of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) had been developed for the fruit fly population control using the radiation-induced sterile insect technique (SIT). This report aimed at elucidating the inheritance of the white-striped phenotype and the genetic differences between the white-striped strain and the strain derived from Trok Nong sub district, Khlung district, Chantaburi. The white-striped phenotype appeared recessive to the wild type. Meanwhile, twelve ISSR primers yielded DNA bands with significantly different frequencies between the two populations. The analysis indicated four DNA bands which were absent from the white-striped population but apparent at frequencies 0.4 to 0.9 among the Trok Nong-derived population. Another four DNA bands were found absent from the Trok Nong-derived population but existed at frequencies 0.3 to 0.5 among the white-striped population. These data may benefit the monitoring of gene flow from the white-striped fruit flies to the natural population when released in a SIT program. Keywords: Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), SIT, genetic

  2. Feeding ecology of immature Lithodoras dorsalis (Valenciennes, 1840 (Siluriformes: Doradidae in a tidal environment, estuary of the rio Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Augusto Pedroso Barbosa

    Full Text Available Studies of feeding ecology are important for the evaluation of interactive processes in fish communities. This study evaluated the feeding ecology of Lithodoras dorsalis (Doradidae from streams within the Amazon estuary delta (Brazil, a macro-tidal area, on different pluviometric periods. A total of 371 young specimens was collected during 12 months of sampling (July 2010 to June 2011. The species diet was composed of 28 food items analyzed by Repletion Index, Alimentary Index and Niche Breadth. Young L. dorsalis was classified as herbivore with a frugivory tendency due to the high importance of fruit and seeds in its diet. Food intake varied among sampled months, with the lowest intake being recorded during the rainy-dry season transition period, and the highest at the beginning of the dry season. The importance of food items and the composition of the diet were different throughout the year, probably due to the daily tides that allow fish to access new environments and the pluviometric periods. These results provide important data on the feeding ecology of Amazonian doradids. The study also emphasized the importance of allochthonous resources, derived from the riparian forest, which reinforces the importance of this habitat for the conservation of Neotropical freshwater fishes.

  3. Transfer hood for handling fuel assemblies in nuclear reactors and especially fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Merland, D.; Renaux, C.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a hood for transferring fuel assemblies between two or more separate guide ramps inclined to the vertical at the same angle of slope and extending respectively through a first passage into the reactor vessel and through a second passage into a fuel-assembly storage chamber. The hood comprises at least one shielded duct joined to a flanged rotating portion which is so arranged that the open lower end of the shielded duct is positioned in the line of extension of one guide ramp and then the other as a result of displacement of the rotating portion

  4. The Influence of Inlet Asymmetry on Steam Turbine Exhaust Hood Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Zoe; Hogg, Simon; Ingram, Grant L

    2014-04-01

    It has been widely recognized for some decades that it is essential to accurately represent the strong coupling between the last stage blades (LSB) and the diffuser inlet, in order to correctly capture the flow through the exhaust hoods of steam turbine low pressure cylinders. This applies to any form of simulation of the flow, i.e., numerical or experimental. The exhaust hood flow structure is highly three-dimensional and appropriate coupling will enable the important influence of this asymmetry to be transferred to the rotor. This, however, presents challenges as the calculation size grows rapidly when the full annulus is calculated. The size of the simulation means researchers are constantly searching for methods to reduce the computational effort without compromising solution accuracy. However, this can result in excessive computational demands in numerical simulations. Unsteady full-annulus CFD calculation will remain infeasible for routine design calculations for the foreseeable future. More computationally efficient methods for coupling the unsteady rotor flow to the hood flow are required that bring computational expense within realizable limits while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for meaningful design calculations. Research activity in this area is focused on developing new methods and techniques to improve accuracy and reduce computational expense. A novel approach for coupling the turbine last stage to the exhaust hood employing the nonlinear harmonic (NLH) method is presented in this paper. The generic, IP free, exhaust hood and last stage blade geometries from Burton et al. (2012. "A Generic Low Pressure Exhaust Diffuser for Steam Turbine Research,"Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo, Copenhagen, Denmark, Paper No. GT2012-68485) that are representative of modern designs, are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This is achieved by comparing results obtained with the NLH to those obtained with a more conventional mixing

  5. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition and health benefits: The Robin Hood effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jain, Arpit; Ved, Jignesh; Unnikrishnan, A G

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses two distinct, yet related, mechanisms of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition: Calorie restriction mimicry (CRM) and pro-ketogenic effect, which may explain their cardiovascular benefits. We term these adaptive CRM and pro-ketogenic effects of SGLT2 inhibition, the Robin Hood hypothesis. In English history, Robin Hood was a "good person," who stole from the rich and helped the poor. He supported redistribution of resources as he deemed fit for the common good. In a similar fashion, SGLT2 inhibition provides respite to the overloaded glucose metabolism while utilizing lipid stores for energy production.

  6. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition and health benefits: The Robin Hood effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses two distinct, yet related, mechanisms of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibition: Calorie restriction mimicry (CRM and pro-ketogenic effect, which may explain their cardiovascular benefits. We term these adaptive CRM and pro-ketogenic effects of SGLT2 inhibition, the Robin Hood hypothesis. In English history, Robin Hood was a "good person," who stole from the rich and helped the poor. He supported redistribution of resources as he deemed fit for the common good. In a similar fashion, SGLT2 inhibition provides respite to the overloaded glucose metabolism while utilizing lipid stores for energy production.

  7. Temporal dynamics of iris yellow spot virus and its vector, Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), in seeded and transplanted onion fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cynthia L; Hoepting, Christine A; Fuchs, Marc; Shelton, Anthony M; Nault, Brian A

    2010-04-01

    Onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), can reduce onion bulb yield and transmit iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) (Bunyaviridae: Tospovirus), which can cause additional yield losses. In New York, onions are planted using seeds and imported transplants. IYSV is not seed transmitted, but infected transplants have been found in other U.S. states. Transplants are also larger than seeded onions early in the season, and thrips, some of which may be viruliferous, may preferentially colonize larger plants. Limited information is available on the temporal dynamics of IYSV and its vector in onion fields. In 2007 and 2008, T. tabaci and IYSV levels were monitored in six seeded and six transplanted fields. We found significantly more thrips in transplanted fields early in the season, but by the end of the season seeded fields had higher levels of IYSV. The percentage of sample sites with IYSV-infected plants remained low (fields. The densities of adult and larval thrips in August and September were better predictors of final IYSV levels than early season thrips densities. For 2007 and 2008, the time onions were harvested may have been more important in determining IYSV levels than whether the onions were seeded or transplanted. Viruliferous thrips emigrating from harvested onion fields into nonharvested ones may be increasing the primary spread of IYSV in late-harvested onions. Managing T. tabaci populations before harvest, and manipulating the spatial arrangement of fields based on harvest date could mitigate the spread of IYSV.

  8. Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)) in cabbage on Prince Edward Island: observations on planting date and variety choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Suzanne; Ryan, Andrew; Adams, Shelley; Driscoll, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Onion thrips (Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)) can be a pest in organic onion production on Prince Edward Island. This study was to examine the effect of planting time and variety on infestation levels and damage by onion thrips on cabbage (Brassicae oleracea capitala (L.)). A field site was planted with 2 main and 8 lesser varieties of cabbage over 4 planting dates. Some varieties were short season and harvested on July 31 with longer season varieties harvested on September 2. Blue sticky traps were used to capture thrips migrating into the field site from July 22-September 2. Traps were counted weekly and cabbage heads within the field site were visually surveyed for thrips. At harvest, heads were weighed and measured, thrips damage was assessed then the head was dissected and thrips counted on the first four layers of the head. Thrips exhibited a preference for Lennox over Bronco throughout the season although thrips populations were not high enough to effect economic damage in 2014. Planting date influenced cabbage head weight and size with later plantings yielding the largest heads. Use of planting date and variety to avoid thrips populations is discussed.

  9. Some Important Observations on the Populations of Hooded Vultures Necrosyrtes monachus in Urban Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Gbogbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major declines in the population of vultures around the world, noticeable increases were reported in the populations of Hooded Vultures Necrosyrtes monachus over the past decade in Accra—an important vulture habitat in Ghana. In recent times, however, there is a growing concern that the vulture numbers are decreasing even though scientific data to support this is nonexisting. As a vital zoogeographical and conservation tool, it is important to keep an up-to-date knowledge about urban bird populations amidst rapid urbanization and associated changes. Using a combination of field data, literature review, and stakeholder consultations, it was indicative that severe decline might have indeed occurred in the populations of Hooded Vultures in Accra. Evidence suggests the killing of vultures for consumption, traditional medicine, and black magic in an undercover trade with possible transboundary connections as important underlying factor. Additional factors suspected to underlie the declines include changes in management of urban facilities and destruction of roosting and nesting trees. The implications of interspecific competition with Pied Crows Corvus albus on Hooded Vultures however remain unclear. There is an urgent need for conservation campaign and education to save the Hooded Vulture in Ghana.

  10. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise...

  11. Mount Hood volcano: phase zero study. Final report, January 1, 1977--June 30 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, D.A.

    1977-08-04

    A base of earth science data was developed for an area centered on Mt. Hood Volcano as the first step in a systematic geothermal resource assessment. A comprehensive technical plan for the assessment was developed and is also described. A preliminary bibliography is included.

  12. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  13. Experimental study on centerline velocities of a rectangular capture hood under realistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjian; Lewis, Braxton V; Guffey, Steven E

    2018-02-01

    Capture hoods are an important component of a local ventilation system designed to reduce exposures to airborne contaminants. The velocity at any point along the centerline of the hood (V x ) is currently estimated using one of many predictive equations developed since the 1930s. It is unproven that those predictive equations for V x are accurate, despite the prodigious number of studies concerning them. Among other issues, almost all experimental verifications were conducted for conditions that were either unrealistically ideal without competing air currents (e.g., zero cross draft) or were not described. This study measured values of V x along the midline using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) at distances of 1-14 inches in front of a rectangular capture hood. The experiments were conducted in a large wind tunnel (9' × 12' × 40', H × W × L) using a heated, breathing, anthropomorphically sized manikin. Three 0 degree draft velocities (V draft = 4, 14, and 50 ft/min) were tested, all directed toward the hood face and the back of the manikin (if present). For each value of V draft , the velocity fields were measured in a factorial design with and without the manikin, and with and without a worktable underneath the hood. An ideal condition was represented by a freestanding hood at the 4 fpm draft. Nonideal conditions included the presence of a worktable or manikin, and the combination of table and manikin. Each condition was tested at the three levels of V draft . The experimental results found significant effects (p < 0.001) for V draft , the presence of the manikin, the presence of the worktable, and all combinations of those factors. The effects of the independent variables were most pronounced at distances greater than 10 in (25.4 cm) from the hood face. It is concluded that none of the previously published models accurately predicted V x under the realistic conditions tested in this study. A satisfactory model will have to include terms for V draft and the

  14. Reduced-scale experimental investigation on ventilation performance of a local exhaust hood in an industrial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yanqiu; Wang, Yi; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    stratification in the working areas of industrial plants. Investigated factors were confined airflow boundaries, flow rates of the exhaust hoods, source strengths, airflow obstacles and distances between sources and exhaust hoods. Reduced-scale experiments were conducted with a geometric scale of 1...... efficiency. Hood performance was also evaluated by thermal stratification heights in the plants. This study could help improve the capture efficiency of local ventilation systems used in industrial plants. Safe operation heights are recommended in the upper space of industrial plants based on the thermal...

  15. Asociación Thysanoptera (Insecta-Vicia faba (Fabaceae en la Prepuna y Puna de Jujuy, Argentina Thysanoptera (Insecta-Vicia faba (Fabaceae association in Prepuna and Puna in Jujuy, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inés Zamar

    2012-03-01

    . occidentalis utilizan la planta en forma temporal y oportunista en Prepuna, mientras que la presencia de F. gemina en Puna es esporádica. Se amplía el número de especies de tisanópteros asociadas al cultivo de haba en ArgentinaThysanoptera (Insecta-Vicia faba (Fabaceae association in Prepuna and Puna in Jujuy, Argentina. The different phenological stages of Vicia faba provide food resources and substrates for the development of a significant diversity of insects. This study aimed to identify the complex of anthophyllous thrips, analyze the species population fluctuations, to obtain some bioecological aspects and the role they play in this association. The study and sampling was conducted during the flowering-fruiting bean crop stages in two phytogeographical regions of Jujuy: Prepuna (2 479m asl on a weekly basis, from October-December 1995-1996 and Puna (3 367m asl every two weeks, from December 2007-March 2008. Each sample consisted of 25 flowers taken at random; only at Prepuna a complementary sampling of three hits per plant (n=10 plants was conducted. Observations were made on oviposition sites, admission to the flower, pupation sites, feeding behavior and injuries caused. In Prepuna, the Thysanoptera complex consisted of Frankliniella australis, F. occidentalis, F. gemina, F. schultzei and Thrips tabaci; in Puna, the specific diversity was restricted to F. australis and F. gemina. Although the planting-harvest period in both areas did not match, the fluctuations in populations showed the same pattern: as flowering progressed, the number of thrips coincided with the availability of food resources. In both areas, F. australis was the dominant species and maintained successive populations; it layed eggs in flower buds, and larvae hatched when flowers opened; feeding larvae and adults brought about silvery stains with black spots. In Prepuna, F. australis went through the mobile immature stages on flowers, while quiescent stages were on the ground; in the Puna, all

  16. Natural Field Infestation of Mangifera casturi and Mangifera lalijiwa by Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T; Sylva, Charmaine D; Liquido, Nicanor J

    2017-01-01

    Mango, Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae), is a crop cultivated pantropically. There are, however, many other Mangifera spp (“mango relatives”) which have much more restricted distributions and are poorly known but have potential to produce mango-like fruits in areas where mangoes do not grow well or could be tapped in mango breeding programs. Because of the restricted distribution of many of the Mangifera spp, there has also been limited data collected on susceptibility of their fruits to infestation by tephritid fruit flies which is important to know for concerns both for quality of production and for quarantine security of fruit exports. Here, we report on natural field infestation by the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), of two mango relatives native to Indonesia: Mangifera casturi and Mangifera lalijiwa. Rates of infestation of fruits of these two Mangifera spp by tephritid fruit flies have not previously been reported. PMID:28890657

  17. Wind-powered wheel locomotion, initiated by leaping somersaults, in larvae of the southeastern beach tiger beetle (Cicindela dorsalis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Harvey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid movement is challenging for elongate, soft-bodied animals with short or no legs. Leaping is known for only a few animals with this "worm-like" morphology. Wheel locomotion, in which the animal's entire body rolls forward along a central axis, has been reported for only a handful of animals worldwide. Here we present the first documented case of wind-powered wheel locomotion, in larvae of the coastal tiger beetle Cicindela dorsalis media. When removed from their shallow burrows, larvae easily can be induced to enter a behavioral sequence that starts with leaping; while airborne, larvae loop their body into a rotating wheel and usually either "hit the ground rolling" or leap again. The direction larvae wheel is closely related to the direction in which winds are blowing; thus, all our larvae wheeled up-slope, as winds at our study site consistently blew from sea to land. Stronger winds increased both the proportion of larvae wheeling, and the distance traveled, exceeding 60 m in some cases. In addition, the proportion of larvae that wheel and the distance traveled by wheeling larvae are significantly greater on smooth sandy beaches than on beach surfaces made rough and irregular by pedestrian, equestrian, and vehicular traffic. Like other coastal species of tiger beetles, C. dorsalis media has suffered major declines in recent years that are clearly correlated with increased human impacts. The present study suggests that the negative effects of beach traffic may be indirect, preventing larvae from escaping from predators using wheel locomotion by disrupting the flat, hard surface necessary for efficient wheeling.

  18. Rearing larvae of the oriental fruit fly, Dacus Dorsalis Hendel on media containing banana or rice bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poramarcom, R.; Mitchell, S.

    1983-12-01

    Materials available in Thailand were substituted for some of those in the standard medium currently used in rearing larvae of Dacus dorsalis Hendel at the Tropical Fruit and Vegetable Research Laboratory, Honolulu, Hawaii. The purpose of this study is to decrease rearing costs through medium modification in Thailand. Larvae were reared in different media: three media containing banana and the other three containing rice bran, as the main ingredient. Wheat germ flakes and torula yeast were added to at: (1) 7.2 and 3.6% (2) 7.2 and 7.2% and (3) 10.8 and 7.2% by weight respectively. The standard medium comprised the seventh medium. The results showed that higher mean pupal recovery, higher mean pupal weight, and higher mean percentage of adult eclosion were obtained from media containing banana compared to media without banana. Media containing banana, (3) and (1), resulted in a significantly (P=0.05) higher mean pupal recovery, 57.49 and 56.88% respectively. Media containing banana, (2) and (3), resulted in the highest mean pupal weight, 12 and 11.68 mg. respectively. Media containing banana produced pupae with highest percentage of adult eclosion. No significant difference was observed in fecundity and fertility of flies reared in all media. Torula yeast and/or wheat germ flakes did not increase the number or weight of pupae. This study showed that media containing banana was the most suitable media for rearing D. dorsalis larvae. All three media containing rice bran were unsuitable for rearing this insect

  19. Characterization of a β-Adrenergic-Like Octopamine Receptor in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The biogenic amine octopamine plays a critical role in the regulation of many physiological processes in insects. Octopamine transmits its action through a set of specific G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely octopamine receptors. Here, we report on a β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor gene (BdOctβR1 from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, a destructive agricultural pest that occurs in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. As indicated by RT-qPCR, BdOctβR1 was highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and Malpighian tubules (MT in the adult flies, suggesting it may undertake important roles in neural signaling in the CNS as well as physiological functions in the MT of this fly. Furthermore, its ligand specificities were tested in a heterologous expression system where BdOctβR1 was expressed in HEK-293 cells. Based on cyclic AMP response assays, we found that BdOctβR1 could be activated by octopamine in a concentration-dependent manner, confirming that this receptor was functional, while tyramine and dopamine had much less potency than octopamine. Naphazoline possessed the highest agonistic activity among the tested agonists. In antagonistic assays, mianserin had the strongest activity and was followed by phentolamine and chlorpromazine. Furthermore, when the flies were kept under starvation, there was a corresponding increase in the transcript level of BdOctβR1, while high or low temperature stress could not induce significant expression changes. The above results suggest that BdOctβR1 may be involved in the regulation of feeding processes in Bactrocera dorsalis and may provide new potential insecticide leads targeting octopamine receptors.

  20. Factors affecting herbivory of Thrips palmi (Thysanoptera: Thripidae and Aphis gossypii (Homoptera: Aphididae on the eggplant (Solanum melongena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano Leão Demolin Leite

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of total rainfall, mean temperature, natural enemies, chemical composition of leaves, levels of nitrogen and potassium on leaves and density of leaf trichomes on attack intensity of Thrips palmi Karny (Thysanoptera: Thripidae and Aphis gossypii (Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae on plantations of the eggplant (Solanum melongena in two regions of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Higher numbers of A. gossypii/leaf and T. palmi/leaf were observed in plantations of this eggplant in the Municipalities of Viçosa and Guidoval, respectively. Guidoval had a rainy and hotter weather than Viçosa. T. palmi was almost positivelly correlated with rainfall (r= 0.49, P= 0.0538 while A. gossypii seemed to be more affected by mean temperature (r= -0.31; P= 0.1134. Higher number of aphids in eggplants in Viçosa than in Guidoval could be explained by the higher number of natural enemies such as Adialytus spp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Cycloneda sanguinea (L. and Exochomus bimaculosus Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae and Chrysoperla spp. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae in this municipality. However, only Adialytus spp. was significativelly correlated with aphid populations. Higher number of T. palmi in eggplant plantations of Guidoval than in Viçosa could be due to the absence of its possible Eulophidae parasitoid in the first municipality. The spiders were significativelly correlated with this pest in both municipalities.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de pluviosidade total, temperatura média, inimigos naturais, composição química foliar, níveis de nitrogênio e potássio foliar e densidade de tricomas na intensidade de ataque de Thrips palmi Karny (Thysanoptera: Thripidae e Aphis gossypii (Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae em plantações de berinjela (Solanum melongena em dois municípios de Minas Gerais, Brasil. Observou-se maiores números de A. gossypii e T. palmi por folha em plantações de berinjela nos

  1. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood

  2. Análise de convergência espacial dos repasses da Lei Robin Hood Spatial convergence analysis of tax transfers from the Robin Hood Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Gonçalves Maranduba Júnior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alega-se que a Lei Robin Hood tem permitido uma melhor distribuição dos valores do ICMS devidos aos municípios do estado de Minas Gerais. O objetivo deste artigo é investigar se essa lei, entre os anos de 2001 e 2005, realmente foi eficaz, isto é, se, em termos relativos, municípios pobres receberam mais dessas transferências do que os municípios ricos. Para fazer isso metodologicamente, implementa-se uma análise exploratória de dados espaciais e uma análise de convergência, para verificar se as disparidades nos repasses diminuíram com o passar do tempo. Os resultados mostraram que os efeitos espaciais importaram nas análises e que não houve um efeito redistributivo dos repasses, considerando-se que o coeficiente indicador de convergência não foi significativo.One alleges that the Robin Hood Act has allowed one better distribution of the values of ICMS to municipalities of the state of Minas Gerais. The paper is aimed at verifying if the Robin Hood Act has actually revealed a redistributive effect in tax transfers to municipalities in the state over the period 2001-2005, that is, if, in relative terms, poor municipalities have received more these transfers than rich ones. In doing methodologically so, an exploratory spatial data analysis and a convergence analysis are implemented to verify if the disparities of tax redistribution have diminished over the time. The findings showed that the spatial effects were important in the analysis as well as there was no redistributive effect in the period because the convergence coefficient was not significant.

  3. Agriculture and Rural Development on Fort Hood Lands, 1849-1942: National Register Assessments of 710 Historic Archeological Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Martha

    2001-01-01

    In 1999, historians consulting with Prewitt & Associates, Inc., conducted archival research for the purpose of developing historic contexts relevant to the Fort Hood lands taken during the 1940s acquisition...

  4. REDESIGN OF OUTER HOOD PANEL OF ESEMKA R2 CAR TO IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN PROTECTION USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binyamin Binyamin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents are terrible scourge that occur in many countries, specially for developing countries where transportation affairs like tangled yarn. Besides functioning as an engine compartment cover, the hood of modern compact SUV can also help to manage the impact energy of a pedestrian’s head in a vehicle-pedestrian impact. This paper presents outer hood design of Esemka R2 that has a potential to improve hood’s ability and also to absorb the impact energy of a pedestrian’s head. The developed method for the design of an outer hood configuration aims to provide a robust design and homogeneous of Head Injury Criterion (HIC for impact position at WAD 1000 and three different thicknesses (1.25 mm, 1.35 mm & 1.50 mm of outer hood panel of Esemka R2 compact SUV, taking into consideration the limited space available for deformation. The non-linear Finite Element Analysis (FEA software (Explicit Dynamics was used in this research to simulate the testing procedurs of head impact for child pedestrian. The results show that the average of comparison dimensional of outer hood panel of Esemka R2 was 4.89 mm. The minimum of deformation space meet the requirement for HIC value which required obtaining robust and homogeneous head impact performance. Outer hood thickness and materials were identified as the factors to influence the stress and HIC value of the hood. By comparing all outer hood panels, aluminium alloy as the best selected material which has the lowest value is 32.78% for the pedestrian protection.

  5. A floating bridge disrupts seaward migration and increases mortality of steelhead smolts in Hood Canal, Washington state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Moore

    Full Text Available Habitat modifications resulting from human transportation and power-generation infrastructure (e.g., roads, dams, bridges can impede movement and alter natural migration patterns of aquatic animal populations, which may negatively affect survival and population viability. Full or partial barriers are especially problematic for migratory species whose life histories hinge on habitat connectivity.The Hood Canal Bridge, a floating structure spanning the northern outlet of Hood Canal in Puget Sound, Washington, extends 3.6 meters underwater and forms a partial barrier for steelhead migrating from Hood Canal to the Pacific Ocean. We used acoustic telemetry to monitor migration behavior and mortality of steelhead smolts passing four receiver arrays and several single receivers within the Hood Canal, Puget Sound, and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Twenty-seven mortality events were detected within the vicinity of the Hood Canal Bridge, while only one mortality was recorded on the other 325 receivers deployed throughout the study area. Migrating steelhead smolts were detected at the Hood Canal Bridge array with greater frequency, on more receivers, and for longer durations than smolts migrating past three comparably configured arrays. Longer migration times and paths are likely to result in a higher density of smolts near the bridge in relation to other sites along the migration route, possibly inducing an aggregative predator response to steelhead smolts.This study provides strong evidence of substantial migration interference and increased mortality risk associated with the Hood Canal Bridge, and may partially explain low early marine survival rates observed in Hood Canal steelhead populations. Understanding where habitat modifications indirectly increase predation pressures on threatened populations helps inform potential approaches to mitigation.

  6. A floating bridge disrupts seaward migration and increases mortality of steelhead smolts in Hood Canal, Washington state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Berejikian, Barry A; Tezak, Eugene P

    2013-01-01

    Habitat modifications resulting from human transportation and power-generation infrastructure (e.g., roads, dams, bridges) can impede movement and alter natural migration patterns of aquatic animal populations, which may negatively affect survival and population viability. Full or partial barriers are especially problematic for migratory species whose life histories hinge on habitat connectivity. The Hood Canal Bridge, a floating structure spanning the northern outlet of Hood Canal in Puget Sound, Washington, extends 3.6 meters underwater and forms a partial barrier for steelhead migrating from Hood Canal to the Pacific Ocean. We used acoustic telemetry to monitor migration behavior and mortality of steelhead smolts passing four receiver arrays and several single receivers within the Hood Canal, Puget Sound, and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Twenty-seven mortality events were detected within the vicinity of the Hood Canal Bridge, while only one mortality was recorded on the other 325 receivers deployed throughout the study area. Migrating steelhead smolts were detected at the Hood Canal Bridge array with greater frequency, on more receivers, and for longer durations than smolts migrating past three comparably configured arrays. Longer migration times and paths are likely to result in a higher density of smolts near the bridge in relation to other sites along the migration route, possibly inducing an aggregative predator response to steelhead smolts. This study provides strong evidence of substantial migration interference and increased mortality risk associated with the Hood Canal Bridge, and may partially explain low early marine survival rates observed in Hood Canal steelhead populations. Understanding where habitat modifications indirectly increase predation pressures on threatened populations helps inform potential approaches to mitigation.

  7. Area-Wide Suppression of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis capitata, and the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in Kamuela, Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Roger I.; Pi?ero, Jaime C.; Mau, Ronald F. L.; Jang, Eric B.; Klungness, Lester M.; McInnis, Donald O.; Harris, Ernest B.; McQuate, Grant T.; Bautista, Renato C.; Wong, Lyle

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service initiated an area-wide fruit fly management program in Hawaii in 2000. The first demonstration site was established in Kamuela, Hawaii, USA. This paper documents suppression of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), in a 40 km2 area containing urban, rural and agricultural zones during a 6 year period. The suppressio...

  8. Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

  9. BdorCSP2 is important for antifeed and oviposition-deterring activities induced by Rhodojaponin-III against Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Rhodojaponin-III is a nonvolatile botanical grayanoid diterpene compound, which has antifeedant and oviposition deterrence effects against many kinds of insects. However, the molecular mechanism of the chemoreception process remains unknown. In this study, the important role of BdorCSP2 in the recognition of Rhodojaponin-III was identified. The full length cDNA encoding BdorCSP2 was cloned from legs of Bactrocera dorsalis. The results of expression pattern revealed that BdorCSP2 was abundantly expressed in the legs of adult B. dorsalis. Moreover, the expression of BdorCSP2 could be up-regulated by Rhodojaponin-III. In order to gain comprehensive understanding of the recognition process, the binding affinity between BdorCSP2 and Rhodojaponin-III was measured by fluorescence binding assay. Silencing the expression of BdorCSP2 through the ingestion of dsRNA could weaken the effect of oviposition deterrence and antifeedant of Rhodojaponin-III. These results suggested that BdorCSP2 of B. dorsalis could be involved in chemoreception of Rhodojaponin-III and played a critical role in antifeedant and oviposition behaviors induced by Rhodojaponin-III.

  10. Reconstruction of severe anophthalmic orbits and atresic eye sockets after enucleation and irradiation of retinoblastoma by vascular anastomosed free dorsalis pedis flaps' transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoping; Fan, Xianqun; Zhou, Huifang; Shi, Wodong; Xiao, Caiwen; Lin, Min; Li, Zhenkang

    2011-05-01

    Retinoblastoma is a common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood, and most patients require enucleation or exenteration even with irradiation. Severe anophthalmic orbits and atresic eye sockets are not rare. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the results of surgical management of reconstruction of severe anophthalmic orbits and atresic eye sockets with vascular anastomosed free dorsalis pedis flap transplantation. There were 5 patients (5 eyes) who underwent reconstructive surgery of severe anophthalmic orbits and atresic eye sockets after enucleation and irradiation of retinoblastoma in our hospital during the 3 years. All patients had enucleation and irradiation immediately after the retinoblastoma was diagnosed and had never worn artificial eyes because of the atresic eye sockets. Vascular anastomosed free dorsalis pedis flaps, whose dimensions were typically 6.5 × 5.5 cm(2), were transplanted to reconstruct the severe anophthalmic orbits and atresic eye sockets. The donor sites were covered by free abdominal skin flaps. All the vascular anastomosed free dorsalis pedis flaps were valid after more than 6 months of follow-up. And then all the 5 patients underwent secondary autogenous dermal fat implantation to augment the supraorbital area depression. After the 2-stage reconstruction surgery, the dimensions of the eye sockets were adequate, and all patients were able to wear their prosthesis and had a satisfactory cosmetic result. Implantation of alloplastic materials is not recommended because of insufficient blood supply of the irradiated orbital area.

  11. Synonymization of key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): taxonomic changes based on a review of 20 years of integrative morphological, molecular, cytogenetic, behavioural and chemoecological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutze, Mark K.

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White are four horticultural pest tephritid fruit fly species that are highly similar, morphologically and genetically, to the destructive pest, the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). This similarity has rendered the discovery of reliable diagnostic characters problematic, which, in view of the economic importance of these taxa and the international trade implications, has resulted in ongoing difficulties for many areas of plant protection and food security. Consequently, a major international collaborative and integrated multidisciplinary research effort was initiated in 2009 to build upon existing literature with the specific aim of resolving biological species limits among B. papayae, B. philippinensis, B. carambolae, B. invadens and B. dorsalis to overcome constraints to pest management and international trade. Bactrocera philippinensis has recently been synonymized with B. papayae as a result of this initiative and this review corroborates that finding; however, the other names remain in use. While consistent characters have been found to reliably distinguish B. carambolae from B. dorsalis, B. invadens and B. papayae, no such characters have been found to differentiate the latter three putative species. We conclude that B. carambolae is a valid species and that the remaining taxa, B. dorsalis, B. invadens and B. papayae, represent the same species. Thus, we consider B. dorsalis (Hendel) as the senior synonym of B. papayae Drew and Hancock syn.n. and B. invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White syn.n. A redescription of B. dorsalis is provided. Given the agricultural importance of B. dorsalis, this taxonomic decision will have significant global plant biosecurity implications, affecting pest management, quarantine, international trade, postharvest treatment and basic research

  12. A support approach for the conceptual design of energy-efficient cooker hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicconi, Paolo; Landi, Daniele; Germani, Michele; Russo, Anna Costanza

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •An eco-innovation approach to support the design of household appliances. •The research is focused on the energy labelling for kitchen hoods. •A software platform provides tools to configure and optimize new solutions. •A tool can calculate the energy efficiency indexes of a product configuration. -- Abstract: In Europe, kitchen hoods currently come with an energy label showing their energy efficiency class and other information regarding the energy consumption and noise level, as established by the European Energy Labelling Directive. Because of recent regulations, designs of cooker hoods must consider new issues, such as the evaluation of the energy efficiency, analysis of the energy consumption, and product lifecycle impact. Therefore, the development of eco-driven products requires Ecodesign tools to support eco-innovation and related sustainability improvements. The scope of the proposed research is to define a method and an agile and affordable platform tool that can support designers in the early estimation of product energy performance, including the calculation of energy efficiency indexes. The approach also considers the use of genetic algorithm methods to optimize the product configuration in terms of energy efficiency. The research context concerns large and small productions of kitchen hoods. The paper describes the methodological approach within the developed tool. The results show a good correlation between real efficiency values and calculated ones. A validation activity has been described, and a test case shows how to apply the proposed approach for the design of a new efficient product with an A-class Energy Efficiency Index.

  13. Biological Assessment of the Effects of Military Associated Activities on Endangered Species at Fort Hood, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    monographing the genus Croton. Dr. Joe Allen Farmer published a dissertation on the species in 1962. Studies on the Fort Hood population have begun under...Woodhouse, S.W., "Descriptions of New Species of the Genus Vireo, VieilL, and Zonorrichia, Swains," Proceeding of the Academy of Natural Sciences of...sinuata Skunkbush Saumac Rhus aroma tica Texas Oak Quercus texazza Texas Persimmon, Diospyros texana Texas Ashe Fraxinus texensis Virginia Creeper Paz

  14. Potential inhalation exposure and containment efficiency when using hoods for handling nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Candace Su-Jung, E-mail: tsai51@purdue.edu [Purdue University, School of Health Science (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Inhalation exposure to airborne nanoparticles (NPs) has been reported during manual activities using typical fume hoods. This research studied potential inhalation exposure associated with the manual handling of NPs using two new nanoparticle-handling enclosures and two biological safety cabinets, and discussed the ability to contain NPs in the hoods to reduce environmental release and exposure. Airborne concentrations of 5 nm to 20 {mu}m diameter particles were measured while handling nanoalumina particles in various ventilated enclosures. Tests were conducted using two handling conditions and concentrations were measured using real-time particle counters, and particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids to determine particle morphology and elemental composition. Airflow patterns were characterized visually using a laser-light sheet and fog. The average number concentration increase at breathing zone outside the enclosure was less than 1,400 particle/cm{sup 3} for each particle size at all tested conditions and the estimated overall mass concentration was about 83 {mu}g/m{sup 3} which was less than the dosage of typical nanoparticle inhalation exposure studies. The typical front-to-back airflow was used in the studied hoods, which could potentially induce reverse turbulence in the wake region. However, containment of NPs using studied hoods was demonstrated with excellent performance. Smoke tests showed that worker's hand motion could potentially cause nanoparticle escape. The challenge of front-to-back airflow can be partially overcome by gentle motion, low face velocity, and front exhaust to reduce nanoparticle escape.

  15. Factors influencing success of metal to plastic conversion programs for under-hood applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Male, L.J. [Amoco Chemicals Polymers Business Group, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Desai, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper compares high performance engineering polymers available today for under-hood applications. It includes an example of an end cap showing value-added capabilities such as design for machining and assembly (DFMA), team approach and computer aided engineering being used for a most cost-effective custom molding solution. These techniques should be part of standard design procedure for conversion programs to cope with the challenges of today and tomorrow. (orig./HW)

  16. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  17. Dynamics of participation and supply of services in the Hood River Conservation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

    1986-07-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) is a major residential retrofit demonstration project. HRCP is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and run by Pacific Power and Light Company. The project was conducted in the community of Hood River, Oregon, will cost $21 million, and will last for three years (mid-1983 through 1986). Installation of applicable retrofit measures was completed by the end of 1985; data collection, analysis, and report writing will continue through 1986. This report documents the extent to which households participated in HRCP. Differences between participants and eligible nonparticipants are examined. Similarly, differences among participants as a function of when they signed up for HRCP are analyzed. The report also examines the dynamics of program services (i.e., times between audit requests and audit, and between audit and installation of measures). These analyses are based on data from the roughly 3500 Hood River homes eligible for HRCP, 3189 of which received free home energy audits and 2988 of which received HRCP-financed retrofit measures.

  18. Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Frans, Lonna M.; Noble, Marlene; Kendall, Carol; Josberger, Edward G.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Hood Canal is a long (110 kilometers), deep (175 meters) and narrow (2 to 4 kilometers wide) fjord of Puget Sound in western Washington. The stratification of a less dense, fresh upper layer of the water column causes the cold, saltier lower layer of the water column to be isolated from the atmosphere in the late summer and autumn, which limits reaeration of the lower layer. In the upper layer of Hood Canal, the production of organic matter that settles and consumes dissolved oxygen in the lower layer appears to be limited by the load of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia. Freshwater and saline loads of DIN to Hood Canal were estimated from available historical data. The freshwater load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal, which could be taken up by phytoplankton, came mostly from surface and ground water from subbasins, which accounts for 92 percent of total load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal. Although DIN in rain falling on land surfaces amounts to about one-half of the DIN entering Hood Canal from subbasins, rain falling directly on the surface of marine waters contributed only 4 percent of the load to the upper layer. Point-source discharges and subsurface flow from shallow shoreline septic systems contributed less than 4 percent of the DIN load to the upper layer. DIN in saline water flowing over the sill into Hood Canal from Admiralty Inlet was at least 17 times the total load to the upper layer of Hood Canal. In September and October 2004, field data were collected to estimate DIN loads to Lynch Cove - the most inland marine waters of Hood Canal that routinely contain low dissolved-oxygen waters. Based on measured streamflow and DIN concentrations, surface discharge was estimated to have contributed about one-fourth of DIN loads to the upper layer of Lynch Cove. Ground-water flow from subbasins was estimated to have contributed about one-half of total DIN loads to the upper layer. In autumn 2004, the relative

  19. Capture efficiency of cooking-related fine and ultrafine particles by residential exhaust hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunden, M M; Delp, W W; Singer, B C

    2015-02-01

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking-generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80%. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38% for low (51-68 l/s) and 54-72% for high (109-138 l/s) settings. CEs for 0.3-2.0 μm particles during front burner stir-frying were 3-11% on low and 16-70% on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80% both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Don Quixote, Machiavelli, and Robin Hood: public health practice, past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, F

    2000-05-01

    Since the mid-19th century, when the first formal health departments were established in the United States, commissioners, directors, and secretaries of public health have functioned as senior members of the staffs of public executives, mayors, governors, and presidents. They have provided important political, managerial, and scientific leadership to agencies of government that have played increasingly important roles in national life, from the sanitary revolution of the 19th century to the prevention of HIV/AIDS and the control of tobacco use today. Although public health officials come from a variety of backgrounds and oversee agencies of varied size and composition, there are philosophical themes that describe and define the commonality of their work. These themes are captured metaphorically by 3 celebrated figures: Don Quixote, Machiavelli, and Robin Hood. By turns, the public health official functions as a determined idealist (Don Quixote), a cunning political strategist (Machiavelli), and an agent who redistributes resources from the wealthier sectors of society to the less well off (Robin Hood.) All 3 personae are important, but, it is argued, Robin Hood is the most endangered.

  1. Gene flow and genetic structure of Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera, Tephritidae) among geographical differences and sister species, B. dorsalis, inferred from microsatellite DNA data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Isasawin, Siriwan; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2015-01-01

    The Carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae, is an invasive pest in Southeast Asia. It has been introduced into areas in South America such as Suriname and Brazil. Bactrocera carambolae belongs to the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, and seems to be separated from Bactrocera dorsalis based on morphological and multilocus phylogenetic studies. Even though the Carambola fruit fly is an important quarantine species and has an impact on international trade, knowledge of the molecular ecology of Bactrocera carambolae, concerning species status and pest management aspects, is lacking. Seven populations sampled from the known geographical areas of Bactrocera carambolae including Southeast Asia (i.e., Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand) and South America (i.e., Suriname), were genotyped using eight microsatellite DNA markers. Genetic variation, genetic structure, and genetic network among populations illustrated that the Suriname samples were genetically differentiated from Southeast Asian populations. The genetic network revealed that samples from West Sumatra (Pekanbaru, PK) and Java (Jakarta, JK) were presumably the source populations of Bactrocera carambolae in Suriname, which was congruent with human migration records between the two continents. Additionally, three populations of Bactrocera dorsalis were included to better understand the species boundary. The genetic structure between the two species was significantly separated and approximately 11% of total individuals were detected as admixed (0.100 ≤ Q ≤ 0.900). The genetic network showed connections between Bactrocera carambolae and Bactrocera dorsalis groups throughout Depok (DP), JK, and Nakhon Sri Thammarat (NT) populations. These data supported the hypothesis that the reproductive isolation between the two species may be leaky. Although the morphology and monophyly of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences in previous studies showed discrete entities, the hypothesis of semipermeable boundaries may not

  2. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP

  3. Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blouin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via

  4. Genetic diversity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on the Hawaiian islands: Implications for an introduction pathway into California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, Norman B.; Ledezma, Lisa A.; Bartels, David W.; Garza, Daniel; Leblanc, Luc; Jose, Michael San; Rubinoff, Daniel; Geib, Scott M.; Fujita, Brian; Kerr, Peter; Hauser, Martin; Gaimari, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Population genetic diversity of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii (the Big Island) was estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. In total, 932 flies representing 36 sampled sites across the four islands were sequenced for a 1,500-bp fragment of the gene named the C1500 marker. Genetic variation was low on the Hawaiian Islands with >96% of flies having just two haplotypes: C1500- Haplotype 1 (63.2%) or C1500-Haplotype 2 (33.3%). The other 33 flies (3.5%) had haplotypes similar to the two dominant haplotypes. No population structure was detected among the islands or within islands. The two haplotypes were present at similar frequencies at each sample site, suggesting that flies on the various islands can be considered one population. Comparison of the Hawaiian data set to DNA sequences of 165 flies from outbreaks in California between 2006 and 2012 indicates that a single-source introduction pathway of Hawaiian origin cannot explain many of the flies in California. Hawaii, however, could not be excluded as a maternal source for 69 flies. There was no clear geographic association for Hawaiian or non-Hawaiian haplotypes in the Bay Area or Los Angeles Basin over time. This suggests that California experienced multiple, independent introductions from different sources. (author)

  5. The energetic savings of sleep versus temperature in the Desert Iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) at three ecologically relevant temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Timothy K; Dunbar, Stephen G

    2007-10-01

    One of the proposed ecological functions of sleep is to conserve energy. The majority of studies that support this theory have been done on endothermic animals whose body temperatures drop during sleep due to the reduced neurological control of thermoregulation. In the present study, we examined typical temperatures to which the Desert Iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, is exposed to in the field and found that mean high temperatures ranged from 24-58 degrees C throughout the active portion of the year. We also examined the ecological savings that sleep could provide for this ectothermic iguana using a closed system respirometer. We found that laboratory-acclimated iguanas are able to save significantly more (27.6%) energy by sleeping than by being awake and that field iguanas also had significant savings of energy (69.1%) while asleep. However, iguanas could save more energy by remaining awake at cooler temperatures than by sleeping at warmer temperatures. In addition, we found no correlation for time of night with metabolic rate. Our study supports the hypothesis that one potential function of sleep is to conserve energy.

  6. Phylogeography and Ecological Niche Modeling of the Desert Iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Baird & Girard 1852) in the Baja California Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Carrillo, Tania; García-De León, Francisco J; Blázquez, Ma Carmen; Gutiérrez-Flores, Carina; González Zamorano, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the factors that explain the patterns of genetic structure or phylogeographic breaks at an intraspecific level is key to inferring the mechanisms of population differentiation in its early stages. These topics have been well studied in the Baja California region, with vicariance and the dispersal ability of individuals being the prevailing hypothesis for phylogeographic breaks. In this study, we evaluated the phylogeographic patterns in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), a species with a recent history in the region and spatial variation in life history traits. We analyzed a total of 307 individuals collected throughout 19 localities across the Baja California Peninsula with 15 microsatellite DNA markers. Our data reveal the existence of 3 geographically discrete genetic populations with moderate gene flow and an isolation-by-distance pattern presumably produced by the occurrence of a refugium in the Cape region during the Pleistocene Last Glacial Maximum. Bayesian methods and ecological niche modeling were used to assess the relationship between population genetic structure and present and past climatic preferences of the desert iguana. We found that the present climatic heterogeneity of the Baja California Peninsula has a marked influence on the population genetic structure of the species, suggesting that there are alternative explanations besides vicariance. The information obtained in this study provides data allowing a better understanding of how historical population processes in the Baja California Peninsula can be understood from an ecological perspective. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in China: origin and gradual inland range expansion associated with population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuanwu; Nardi, Francesco; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yinghong

    2011-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, expanded throughout mainland China in the last century to become one of the most serious pests in the area, yet information on this process are fragmentary. Three mitochondrial genes (nad1, cytb and nad5) were used to infer the genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history of the oriental fruit fly from its entire distribution range in China. High levels of genetic diversity, as well as a significant correspondence between genetic and geographic distances, suggest that the invasion process might have been gradual, with no associated genetic bottlenecks. Three population groups could be identified, nevertheless the overall genetic structure was weak. The effective number of migrants between populations, estimated using the coalescent method, suggested asymmetric gene flow from the costal region of Guangdong to most inland regions. The demographic analysis indicates the oriental fruit fly underwent a recent population expansion in the Central China. We suggest the species originated in the costal region facing the South China Sea and gradually expanded to colonize mainland China, expanding here to high population numbers.

  8. Inferences on the population structure and colonization process of the invasive oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, N; Bonizzoni, M; Thanaphum, S; Gomulski, L M; Gasperi, G; Malacrida, A R; Gugliemino, C R

    2007-09-01

    The phytophagous insects of the Tephritidae family offer different case histories of successful invasions. An example is Bactrocera dorsalis sensu stricto, the oriental fruit fly which has been recognized as a key pest of Asia and the Pacific. It is known to have the potential to establish adventive populations in various tropical and subtropical areas. Despite the economic risk associated with a putative stable presence of this fly, the genetic aspects of its invasion process have remained relatively unexplored. Using microsatellite markers we have investigated the population structure and genetic variability in 14 geographical populations across the four areas of the actual species range: Far East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Area. Results of clustering and admixture, associated with phylogenetic and migration analyses, were used to evaluate the changes in population genetic structure that this species underwent during its invasion process and establishment in the different areas. The colonization process of this fly is associated with a relatively stable population demographic structure, especially in an unfragmented habitat, rich in intensive cultivation such as in Southeast Asia. In this area, the results suggest a lively demographic history, characterized by evolutionary recent demographic expansions and no recent bottlenecks. Cases of genetic isolation attributable to geographical factors, fragmented habitats and/or fruit trade restrictions were observed in Bangladesh, Myanmar and Hawaii. Regarding the pattern of invasion, the overall genetic profile of the considered populations suggests a western orientated migration route from China to the West.

  9. Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) strain in the mouse model with concurrent exposure to PCB 153.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; das Neves, Carlos G; Tryland, Morten; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Santos, Renato Lima; Turchetti, Andreia Pereira; Janczak, Andrew M; Djønne, Berit; Lie, Elisabeth; Berg, Vidar; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis, is linked to reproductive problems in primary hosts. A high proportion of Brucella-positive hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) have been detected in the declined Northeast Atlantic stock. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have also been discovered in top predators in the Arctic, including the hooded seal, PCB 153 being most abundant. The aim of this study was to assess the pathogenicity of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in the mouse model and to evaluate the outcome of Brucella spp. infection after exposure of mice to PCB 153. BALB/c mice were infected with B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain or Brucella suis 1330, and half from each group was exposed to PCB 153 through the diet. B. pinnipedialis showed a reduced pathogenicity in the mouse model as compared to B. suis 1330. Exposure to PCB 153 affected neither the immunological parameters, nor the outcome of the infection. Altogether this indicates that it is unlikely that B. pinnipedialis contribute to the decline of hooded seals in the Northeast Atlantic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mathematical modeling of thermal stresses in basic oxygen furnace hood tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasekera, I. V.

    1985-06-01

    The stress-strain history of Basic Oxygen Furnace hood tubes during thermal cycling has been computed using heat flow and stress analyses. The steady-state temperature distribution in a transverse section of the tube was computed at a location where gas temperature in the hood could be expected to be a maximum. Calculations were performed for peak gas temperatures in the range 1950 to 2480 °C (3500 to 4500 °F). The stress-strain history of an element of material located at the center of the tube hot face was traced for three consecutive cycles using elasto-plastic finite-element analysis. It has been shown that the state of stress in the element alternates between compression and tension as the tube successively heats and cools. Yielding and plastic flow occurs at the end of each half of a given cycle. It was postulated that owing to repctitive yielding, plastic strain energy accumulates causing failure of the tubes by fatigue in the low cycle region. Using fatigue theory a conservative estimate for tube life was arrived at. In-plant observations support this mechanism of failure, and the number of cycles within which tube cracking was observed compares reasonably with model predictions. Utilizing the heat flow and stress models it was recommended that tube life could be enhanced by changing the tube material to ARMCO 17-4 pH or AISI 405 steel or alternatively reconstructing hoods with AISI 316L tubes of reduced thickness. These recommendations were based on the criterion that low-cycle fatigue failure could be averted if the magnitude of the cyclic strain could be reduced or if macroscopic plastic flow could be prevented.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Exposure Resulting From Hood Protective Equipment Used in Joint Arthroplasty Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Suhani; Fine, Janelle M; Lim, Michael J; Copp, Steven N; Rosen, Adam S; West, John B; Prisk, G Kim

    2017-08-01

    To protect both the surgeon and patient during procedures, hooded protection shields are used during joint arthroplasty procedures. Headache, malaise, and dizziness, consistent with increased carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) exposure, have been anecdotally reported by surgeons using hoods. We hypothesized that increased CO 2 concentrations were causing reported symptoms. Six healthy subjects (4 men) donned hooded protection, fan at the highest setting. Arm cycle ergometry at workloads of 12 and 25 watts (W) simulated workloads encountered during arthroplasty. Inspired O 2 and CO 2 concentrations at the nares were continuously measured at rest, 12 W, and 25 W. At each activity level, the fan was deactivated and the times for CO 2 to reach 0.5% and 1.0% were measured. At rest, inspired CO 2 was 0.14% ± 0.04%. Exercise had significant effect on CO 2 compared with rest (0.26% ± 0.08% at 12 W, P = .04; 0.31% ± 0.05% at 25 W, P = .003). Inspired CO 2 concentration increased rapidly with fan deactivation, with the time for CO 2 to increase to 0.5% and 1.0% after fan deactivation being rapid but variable (0.5%, 12 ± 9 seconds; 1%, 26 ± 15 seconds). Time for CO 2 to return below 0.5% after fan reactivation was 20 ± 37 seconds. During simulated joint arthroplasty, CO 2 remained within Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards with the fan at the highest setting. With fan deactivation, CO 2 concentration rapidly exceeds OSHA standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbiological and serological monitoring in hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix in the Region Lombardia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Grilli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The health status of 276 hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix from various provinces of Lombardy was monitored for three years. Bacteriological examination detected E. coli (76%, Campylobacter jejuni (17%, Salmonella typhimurium (11.6%, Yersinia spp. (6.5%, Clamydophila abortus and C. psittaci (2.6%; from six birds showing severe prostration Pasteurella multocida was isolated. Virological and serological tests were negative for Avian Influenza virus (AIV, West Nile virus (WNV and only three samples were positive for Newcastle disease virus (NDV but only at serology (titre 1:16.

  13. Beyond 2001: a silvicultural odyssey to sustaining terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? Proceedings of the 2001 national silviculture workshop, May 6-10, Hood River, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon Parker; Susan Stevens. Hummel

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 National Silviculture Workshop was held in Hood River, Oregon, and hosted by the Mt. Hood National Forest, the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The Washington Office Vegetation Management and Protection Research and Forest and Grassland staffs are ongoing sponsors of the biennial workshop, which began in 1973 in...

  14. Digital data for preliminary geologic map of the Mount Hood 30- by 60-minute quadrangle, northern Cascade Range, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina Ma,; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The Mount Hood 30- by 60-minute quadrangle covers the axis and east flank of the Cascade Range in northern Oregon. Its namesake, Mount Hood volcano, dominates the view in the northwest quarter of the quadrangle, but the entire area is underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Cascade Range. Since the time of the Columbia River Basalt Group about 15 million years (m.y.) ago, the locus and composition of Cascade Range volcanism have shifted sporadically across the map area. Andesitic eruptions were predominant in the western part from about 14 to 10 m.y. ago (Salmon and Sandy Rivers area), producing the Rhododendron Formation and overlying lava flows. From about 8 to 6.5 m.y. ago, lithic pyroclastic debris of the Dalles Formation was shed by chiefly andesitic volcanoes in the north-central part of the map area (Hood River valley escarpment). Andesitic to dacitic volcanism was again predominant about 5 to 3 m.y. ago, with known eruptive centers located from Lookout Mountain westward to Lolo Pass, probably including the area now occupied by Mount Hood. A major episode of mafic volcanism-basalt and basaltic andesite-began about 3-4 m.y. ago and lasted until about 2 m.y. ago. Volcanism since about 2 m.y. ago has been concentrated along the axis of the High Cascades. North and south of Mount Hood these youngest rocks are predominantly basaltic andesite lava flows; whereas at Mount Hood itself, andesite is predominant, forming pyroclastic and debris-flow deposits and lava flows.

  15. Trans-jugular catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis of the lower limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiesheng; Li Zhengran; Jiang Zaibo; Zhu Kangshun; Guan Shouhai; Zhou Bing; Xu Changmou; He Keke; Shang Hong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of trans-jugular catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) together with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs. Methods: Jugular vein puncture, indwelling catheter and placement of IVC filter were performed in 18 patients with DVT (study group) followed by continuous trans-jugular CDT together with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis. During the corresponding period, 16 patients with DVT (control group) received trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis only. Results: The thrombolytic time and total dose of urokinase in study group and control group were (6.6 ± 2.3) days, (5.52 ± 2.24) x 106 units and (8.2 ± 1.4) days, (7.00 ± 1.66) x 106 units respectively. The thrombolytic time and total dose of urokinase in study group were significantly lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). After the treatment the thigh circumference and calf circumference in study group showed a reduction of (4.6 ± 2.1) cm and (4.0 ± 2.1) cm respectively, which were (3.2 ± 1.7) cm and (2.7 ± 1.5) cm respectively in control group, the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The complete patent of the veins was 66.7% in study group and 31.3% in control group, the difference between two groups was significant (P < 0.05). In four cases of the study group, the filters were withdrawn through the original puncture site after the thrombus was completely dissolved. Conclusion: Trans-jugular CDT combined with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, moreover, the filter can be taken back via the original puncture site when the thrombus is completely dissolved. (authors)

  16. Pola Aktivitas Harian dan Dinamika Populasi Lalat Buah Bactrocera Dorsalis Complex pada Pertanaman Jeruk di Dataran Tinggi Kabupaten Karo Provinsi Sumatera Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Manurung, Binari; Prastowo, Puji; Tarigan, Emmi Ebrina

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis complex is important pest on citrus plantation at highland Karo district North Sumatera Province. The studies with the aim to find out its daily activity pattern and population dynamic on citrus plantation have been done. Fruit flies were collected by water bottle trap with methyl eugenol attractant. Sampling for daily activity pattern was done per two hours for two months (April to May 2011) from 06.00 a.m until 18.00 p.m. Meanwhile, population dynamic study...

  17. POLA AKTIVITAS HARIAN DAN DINAMIKA POPULASI LALAT BUAH BACTROCERA DORSALIS COMPLEX PADA PERTANAMAN JERUK DI DATARAN TINGGI KABUPATEN KARO PROVINSI SUMATERA UTARA

    OpenAIRE

    Binari Manurung; Puji Prastowo; Emmi Ebrina Tarigan

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis complex is important pest on citrus plantation at highland Karo district North Sumatera Province. The studies with the aim to find out its daily activity pattern and population dynamic on citrus plantation have been done. Fruit flies were collected by water bottle trap with methyl eugenol attractant. Sampling for daily activity pattern was done per two hours for two months (April to May 2011) from 06.00 a.m until 18.00 p.m. Meanwhile, population dynamic study...

  18. Locating inputs of freshwater to Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, Washington, using aerial infrared photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Josberger, Edward G.; Chickadel, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The input of freshwater and associated nutrients into Lynch Cove and lower Hood Canal (fig. 1) from sources such as groundwater seeps, small streams, and ephemeral creeks may play a major role in the nutrient loading and hydrodynamics of this low dissolved-oxygen (hypoxic) system. These disbursed sources exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. However, few in-situ measurements of groundwater seepage rates and nutrient concentrations are available and thus may not represent adequately the large spatial variability of groundwater discharge in the area. As a result, our understanding of these processes and their effect on hypoxic conditions in Hood Canal is limited. To determine the spatial variability and relative intensity of these sources, the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center collaborated with the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory to obtain thermal infrared (TIR) images of the nearshore and intertidal regions of Lynch Cove at or near low tide. In the summer, cool freshwater discharges from seeps and streams, flows across the exposed, sun-warmed beach, and out on the warm surface of the marine water. These temperature differences are readily apparent in aerial thermal infrared imagery that we acquired during the summers of 2008 and 2009. When combined with co-incident video camera images, these temperature differences allow identification of the location, the type, and the relative intensity of the sources.

  19. The gut microbiome of hooded cranes (Grus monacha) wintering at Shengjin Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanghong; Zhou, Lizhi; Dong, Yuanqiu; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Song, Yunwei

    2017-06-01

    Gut microbes of animals play critical roles in processes such as digestion and immunity. Therefore, identifying gut microbes will shed light on understanding the annual life of animal species, particularly those that are threatened or endangered. In the present study, we conducted nucleotide sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of gut microbiome of the hooded cranes (Grus monacha) wintering at Shengjin Lake, China, by Illumina high-throughput sequencing technology. We acquired 503,398 high-quality sequences and 785 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 15 fecal samples from different cranes, representing 22 phyla that were dominated by Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. A total of 305 genera were identified that were dominated by Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, and Enterobacter. The core gut microbiome comprised 26 genera, including many probiotic species such as Clostridium, Bacillus, Cellulosilyticum, and Cellulomonas that could catabolize cellulose. The findings reported here contribute to our knowledge of the microbiology of hooded cranes and will likely advance efforts to protect waterbirds that inhabit Shengjin Lake Reserve during winter. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV [In Situ Vitrification] confinement hood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.W.; Paik, S.

    1990-09-01

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Genetic structure and inferences on potential source areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel based on mitochondrial and microsatellite markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    Full Text Available Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan.

  2. Among-Individual Variation in Desert Iguanas (Squamata: Dipsosaurus dorsalis): Endurance Capacity Is Positively Related to Home Range Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jennifer M; Garland, Theodore

    Among species of lizards, endurance capacity measured on a motorized treadmill is positively related to daily movement distance and time spent moving, but few studies have addressed such relationships at the level of individual variation within a sex and age category in a single population. Both endurance capacity and home range size show substantial individual variation in lizards, rendering them suitable for such studies. We predicted that these traits would be positively related because endurance capacity is one of the factors that has the potential to limit home range size. We measured the endurance capacity and home range size of adult male desert iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis). Lizards were field captured for measurements of endurance, and home range data were gathered using visual identification of previously marked individuals. Endurance was significantly repeatable between replicate trials, conducted 1-17 d apart ([Formula: see text] for log-transformed values, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). The log of the higher of two endurance trials was positively but not significantly related to log body mass. The log of home range area was positively but not significantly related to log body mass, the number of sightings, or the time span from first to last sighting. As predicted, log endurance was positively correlated with log home range area ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]; for body-mass residual endurance values: [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]). These results suggest that endurance capacity may have a permissive effect on home range size. Alternatively, individuals with larger home ranges may experience training effects (phenotypic plasticity) that increase their endurance.

  3. The effect of methyl eugenol exposure on subsequent mating performance of sterile males of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Qing'e; Guo Qingliang; Chen Jiahua

    2011-01-01

    The effect of methyl eugenol (ME) on the total times of mating, consecutive mating, mating competitiveness, multiple mating, and the incidence of wild female remating were studied in sterile males from a genetic sexing strain of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Male pupae were irradiated at dose of 100 Gy by 137 Cs at 2 d before emergence and the dose rate was 1.00 Gy/min. Sexually mature 10 day old sterile males were fed ME, while Non-ME-fed sterile males and normal wild males were used as control, and wild females as mating partners. The results showed that some ME-fed sterile males could mate continuously up to nine times, but the total times of consecutive mating and the mean value of continuous mating times were not significant (P > 0.05) compared with the control. The total mating times of ME-fed sterile males was 344.33 ± 12.55 and the mean value was 6.88 ± 0.25, but both have no significant difference compared with the control. The mating success rate of ME-fed and non-ME-fed sterile males mated with wild females were 44.67 ± 2.40% and 22.00 ± 2.31% separately. There were significant differences between them (t = -6.8, P = 0.002). The outcomes were that feeding on ME did not increase the frequency of multiple mating by sterile males, but significantly increased the mating competitiveness of sterile males against wild males. At the same time, sterile males fed ME did not significantly affect the remating of wild females 5 days after the initial mating, but increased the remating frequency of females 10 and 15 days after the initial mating. (authors)

  4. The effect of methyl eugenol exposure on subsequent mating performance of sterile males of the oriental fruit fly, bactrocera dorsalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Qing'e; Guo Qingliang; Chen Jiaye

    2012-01-01

    The effect of methyl eugenol (ME) on the total times of mating, consecutive mating, mating competitiveness, multiple mating, and the incidence of wild female remating were studied in sterile males from a genetic sexing strain of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Male pupae were irradiated at dose of 100 Gy by 137 Cs at 2 d before emergence and the dose rate was 1.00 Gy/min. Sexually mature 10 day old sterile males were fed ME, while Non-ME-fed sterile males and normal wild males were used as control, and wild females as mating partners. The results showed that some ME-fed sterile males could mate continuously up to nine times, but the total times of consecutive mating and the mean value of continuous mating times were not significant (P> 0.05) compared with the control. The total mating times of ME-fed sterile males was 344.33±12.55 and the mean value was 6.88±0.25, but both have no significant difference compared with the control. The mating success rate of ME-fed and non- ME-fed sterile males mated with wild females were (44.67±2.40)% and (22.00±2.31)% separately. There were significant differences between them (t = -6.8, P = 0.002). The outcomes were that feeding on ME did not increase the frequency of multiple mating by sterile males, but significantly increased the mating competitiveness of sterile males against wild males. At the same time, sterile males fed ME did not significantly affect the remating of wild females 5 days after the initial mating, but increased the remating frequency of females 10 and 15 days after the initial mating. (authors)

  5. Dorsalis pedis arterial pressure is lower than noninvasive arm blood pressure in normotensive patients under sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Enqin; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Yongshuai; Lu, Kaizhi

    2016-02-01

    It is widely known that blood pressure (BP) in the lower extremity is higher than in the upper extremity. However, whether this phenomenon remains the same during general anesthesia is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the difference between invasive dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) pressure and the most commonly used noninvasive arm pressure during sevoflurane anesthesia. A total of 50 normotensive Chinese patients were enrolled in this observational study. Invasive DPA pressure, noninvasive arm pressure, and systemic vascular resistance index were assessed simultaneously. BP data during the entire surgery were analyzed through a Bland-Altman plot for repeated measures. The concordance of BP variation in the DPA and the arm was analyzed using four-quadrant plots and linear regression. The time-dependent changes in BP and the systemic vascular resistance index were also evaluated. Data from 46 effective cases were analyzed. Bias (95% limits of agreement) was -7.40 mmHg (-20.36 to +5.57 mmHg) for mean blood pressure, +3.54 mmHg (-20.32 to +27.41 mmHg) for systolic blood pressure, and -10.20 mmHg (-23.66 to +3.26 mmHg) for diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The concordance of BP variation at the two measurement sites was clinically acceptable. DPA pressure and vascular resistance in the lower limb decreased gradually during surgery. DPA pressure tends to be lower than arm pressure under sevoflurane anesthesia, especially the mean blood pressure and the diastolic blood pressure. Hence, noninvasive arm BP monitoring is recommend to be retained when invasive BP is measured at the DPA, so as to allow clinicians to comprehensively evaluate the BP condition of the patients and make appropriate therapeutic decisions.

  6. [Functional morphology of the vagus nerve nuclei changes in the medulla oblongata (N. Ambiguus, N. Dorsalis), induced by influenza a (H(3)N(I)) in experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogiashvili, L; Abashidze, T; Tsagareli, Z; Dgebuadze, M; Kvachadze, T

    2012-12-01

    Morphological changes of the brain cortex IV-V layers, the structures of n. ambiguus, n. dorsalis and n. vagus ganglia on the model of influenza virus A strains (H3NI) MLD50 in number 50 microns intranasal inoculation in mice aged 6-8 weeks were studied. For assessment of virus-induced pathology 2 series of experiments were carried out. Electron microscopy, morphometric and histological methods, including by Nissl stain were used. LD dose, daily loss of body weight with access to the so-called "endpoint" determined previously. Experimental period from 48 hours to 12 days. It is shown that in n.vagus stem structures in the medulla oblongata (n. dorsalis, n. ambiguus) have the mosaic and the polymorphic nature of the changes - signs of influenza virus cytotropic effect, such as swelling, vacuolation, chromatolysis, less pyknosis and hyperchromatosis. In the period of the greatest weight loss and expressed «endpoint» irreversible changes in the stem structures associated with n. vagus - apoptotic nuclei and neurons massive edema, lipofuscin accumulation have taken place. Results of the study suggest that the parasympathetic nervous system (n. vagus) may be one of the possible route of influenza A virus (H3NI) genomic structures transnerval invasion in the central nervous system during experimental infection.

  7. POLA AKTIVITAS HARIAN DAN DINAMIKA POPULASI LALAT BUAH BACTROCERA DORSALIS COMPLEX PADA PERTANAMAN JERUK DI DATARAN TINGGI KABUPATEN KARO PROVINSI SUMATERA UTARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binari Manurung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis complex is important pest on citrus plantation at highland Karo district North Sumatera Province. The studies with the aim to find out its daily activity pattern and population dynamic on citrus plantation have been done. Fruit flies were collected by water bottle trap with methyl eugenol attractant. Sampling for daily activity pattern was done per two hours for two months (April to May 2011 from 06.00 a.m until 18.00 p.m. Meanwhile, population dynamic study was conducted on two citrus plantations per four days for nine months (March to November 2011 in the first and third week of each month. The research result showed that B.dorsalis complex was more active during morning at 10.00 to 12.00 a.m. The peak abundance of fruit fly occurred at the end of June until beginning of July. The peak population coincided with the ripening period of fruits, low number of rainy (d and rainfall (mm in June and July periods. There was a significant correlation between number of rainy day and rainfall with fruit flies caught per month (R = 0.79; Y = 289.34+14.23X1-15.93X2; R2 = 0.62; P < 0.05. The pattern of fruit fly fluctuation in two citrus plantations was similar (rs = 0.47; P < 0.05.

  8. 76 FR 42502 - Substantial Product Hazard List: Children's Upper Outerwear in Sizes 2T to 12 With Neck or Hood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... because children of those ages are most at risk. 4. Adult Apparel and Marketing Concerns (Comment 4)--Two... smaller adult sizes and larger children's sizes. Further, children at the pre-teen and teen stages often... channel, and the commenters raised concerns about the 2009 recall of children's hooded sweatshirts with...

  9. Nocturnal feeding under artificial light conditions by Brown-hooded Gull (Larus maculipennis) in Puerto Madryn harbour (Chubut Province, Argentina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, M.F.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Yorio, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes nocturnal, marine feeding behaviour in the Brown-hooded Gull (Larus maculipennis) in November 2009. The gulls assembled at night at the end of a long pier, running 800 m offshore into the Golfo Nuevo, at Puerto Madryn, Chubut Province, Argentina. Powerful lights predictably

  10. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF TECHNOLOGY OF MANUFACTURING A ZINC-COATED TUB WIRE FOR MUZZLE (BOTTLE’ HOOD WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Zuev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main technical specifications of galvanized low carbon wire for muzzles (bottle’hood wire, consistent with the exploitation requirements to the wire in the manufacture and use of muzzles. The main criteria when selecting the steel grade and upon selection of the technological processes are given. 

  11. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.198 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces...

  12. Harvest-related edge effects on prey availability and foraging of hooded warblers in a bottomland hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of harvest-created canopy gaps in bottomland hardwood forests on arthropod abundance and, hence, the foraging ecology of birds are poorly understood. I predicted that arthropod abundance would be high near edges of group-selection harvest gaps and lower in the surrounding forest, and that male Hooded Warblers (Wilsonia citrina) foraging...

  13. Study the velocity and pressure exerted in front of the filter surface in the kitchen hood system by using ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuin, Norzelawati; Pairan, M. Rasidi; Isa, Norasikin Mat; Sies, Farid

    2017-04-01

    Commercial kitchen hood ventilation system is a device used to capture and filtered the plumes from cooking activities in the kitchen area. Nowadays, it is very popular in the industrial sector such as restaurant and hotel to provide hygiene food. This study focused at the KSA filter part which installed in the kitchen hood system, the purpose of this study is to identify the critical region which indicated by observing the velocity and pressure of plumes exerted at of KSA filter. It is important to know the critical location of the KSA filter in order to install the nozzle which will helps increase the filtration effectiveness. The ANSYS 16.1 (FLUENT) software as a tool used to simulate the kitchen hood systems which consist of KSA filter. The commercial kitchen hood system model has a dimension 700 mm width, 1600 mm length and 555 mm height. The system has two inlets and one outlet. The velocity of the plumes is set to be 0.235m/s and the velocity of the inlet capture jet is set to be 1.078m/s. The KSA filter is placed 45 degree from the y axis. The result shows the plumes has more tendency flowing pass through at the bottom part of KSA filter.

  14. Contrast fluoroscopic evaluation of gastrointestinal transit times with and without the use of falconry hoods in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Grayson A; Williams, Jackie M; Mans, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate gastrointestinal transit times in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) by use of contrast fluoroscopic imaging and investigate the effect of falconry hooding in these hawks on gastrointestinal transit time. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, blinded, complete crossover study. ANIMALS 9 healthy red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES Hawks were gavage-fed a 30% weight-by-volume barium suspension (25 mL/kg [11.3 mL/lb]) into the crop. Fluoroscopic images were obtained at multiple time points after barium administration. Time to filling and emptying of various gastrointestinal tract organs and overall transit time were measured. The effect of hooding (hooded vs nonhooded) on these variables was assessed in a randomized complete crossover design. RESULTS In nonhooded birds, overall gastrointestinal transit time ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (mean ± SD, 100 ± 52 min). Time to complete crop emptying ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (83 ± 49 min). Contrast medium was present in the ventriculus in all birds within 5 minutes of administration and in the small intestines within 5 to 15 minutes (median, 5 min). Hooding of red-tailed hawks resulted in a significant delay of complete crop emptying (no hood, 83 ± 49 minutes; hood, 133 ± 48 minutes), but no significant effects of hooding were found on other measured variables. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These results indicated that overall gastrointestinal transit times are faster in red-tailed hawks than has been reported for psittacines and that the use of a falconry hood in red-tailed hawks may result in delayed crop emptying. Hooding did not exert significant effects on overall gastrointestinal transit time in this raptorial species.

  15. "Robin Hood" of techno-Turkey or organ trafficking in the state of ethical beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Aslihan

    2004-09-01

    Dr S. is a famous transplant surgeon in the Middle East. He operates "underground" on wealthy patients in different countries, from Israel to Turkey to Russia. The media refer to him as the "Organ Mafia doctor," and patients diagnosed with renal failure speak of him sardonically as "Robin Hood," acknowledging that he takes organs from the poor to give to the rich. But ethical issues of organ trafficking are not limited to marginal private clinics and "Mafia" doctors. All-living related organ transplants in Turkey involve similar ethical dilemmas: many related or nonrelated organ recipients pay their donors, and demand continues to rise. This paper explores practices in state and university hospitals and the ethical dilemmas doctors encounter to understand where and how judicial, cultural, and social categories of "human rights" and "crime" are constructed in our high-tech world.

  16. Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasawin, Siriwan; Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2014-01-01

    The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization. Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions. Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae

  17. Influence of impact speed on head and brain injury outcome in vulnerable road user impacts to the car hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Rikard; Zhang, Liying; Boström, Ola; Yang, King

    2007-10-01

    EuroNCAP and regulations in Europe and Japan evaluate the pedestrian protection performance of cars. The test methods are similar and they all have requirements for the passive protection of the hood area at a pedestrian to car impact speed of 40 km/h. In Europe, a proposal for a second phase of the regulation mandates a brake-assist system along with passive requirements. The system assists the driver in optimizing the braking performance during panic braking, resulting in activation only when the driver brakes sufficiently. In a European study this was estimated to occur in about 50% of pedestrian accidents. A future system for brake assistance will likely include automatic braking, in response to a pre-crash sensor, to avoid or mitigate injuries of vulnerable road users. An important question is whether these systems will provide sufficient protection, or if a parallel, passive pedestrian protection system will be necessary. This study investigated the influence of impact speed on head and brain injury risk, in impacts to the carhood. One car model was chosen and a rigid adjustable plate was mounted under the hood. Free-flying headform impacts were carried out at 20 and 30 km/h head impact velocities at different under-hood distances, 20 to 100 mm; and were compared to earlier tests at 40 km/h. The EEVC WG17 adult pedestrian headform was used for non-rotating tests and a Hybrid III adult 50th percentile head was used for rotational tests where linear and rotational acceleration was measured. Data from the rotational tests was used as input to a validated finite element model of the human head, the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM). The model was utilized to assess brain injury risk and potential injury mechanism in a pedestrian-hood impact. Although this study showed that it was not necessarily true that a lower HIC value reduced the risk for brain injury, it appeared, for the tested car model, under-hood distances of 60 mm in 20 km/h and 80 mm

  18. Addendum 4 to CSAR 81-001, Installation of an Official Critical Drain on the Plexiglass Contamination Barrier in HC-227T Hood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiao, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report defines the maximum space allowed between the floor surface and the lower edge of an official criticality drain which is to be installed on the plexiglas contamination barrier in HC-227T Hood

  19. Data from moored current meters, temperature and salinity from a historical mooring placed in Hood Canal, Puget Sound, February - April 1980 (NODC Accession 0000680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, current, and other data were collected from moored buoys in Hood Canal and the Puget Sound from 08 February 1980 to 10 April 1980. Data were collected by...

  20. Viability of the miss-sexed female pupae in the process of application of sterile insect technique of male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Qing'e; Du Yinggang; Hou Weirong; Chen Jiahua

    2008-01-01

    Female pupae came from the genetic sexing strain (GSS) of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) were irradiated by 60 Co at 1d, 2d and 3d separately before emergence and the dosage were 90, 100 and 105Gy. The emergence percentage, flight ability and survival percentage under stress were tested. The irradiated female adults mated with unirradiated males and irradiated males came from GSS after emergence, the number of eggs and egg hatch rates were scored for each treatment at 10d and 17d separately. The results showed that the quality control trend of irradiated female were the same as the irradiated male. The irradiated female did not lay egg when mated with irradiated male. The number of eggs decreased sharp when the irradiated females mated with unirradiated males, and the number of eggs would decrease with the increase of irradiation dosage and decrease of pupae age. (authors)

  1. Contamination Status of Seven Elements in Hooded Cranes Wintering in South-West Kyushu, Japan: Comparison with Red-Crowned Cranes in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Miyagi, Hasumi; Haraguchi, Yuko; Takase, Kozo; Kitazawa, Takio; Noda, Jun

    2018-05-31

    The hooded crane is designated as an endangered species. The cranes breed primarily in wetlands in southeast Russia and China in summer. Most of the hooded crane population winters in the Izumi plain in Japan. It is difficult to know the contamination status of their habitat because of their vast breeding area. We determined the levels of Cd, Pb, As, (total) Hg, Se, Zn, and Cu in the liver, kidney, and muscle of hooded cranes that were found dead in Izumi in the periods 2003-2006 and 2014-2015 compared with the levels in red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido, Japan, as the only cranes in which these elements had been studied extensively. There were no notable differences between levels of the seven elements in the two periods. Overall, tissue levels of the elements examined in hooded cranes were comparable to those in red-crowned cranes except for Hg and Se. Tissue levels of Hg and Se were clearly lower in hooded cranes than in red-crowned cranes that were found dead from 2000. One lead poisoning case was confirmed. The results suggest that Hooded cranes wintering in Izumi are not extensively contaminated with the seven elements examined.

  2. Reduction of exposure to ultrafine particles by kitchen exhaust hoods: the effects of exhaust flow rates, particle size, and burner position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Donghyun; Wallace, Lance; Nabinger, Steven; Persily, Andrew

    2012-08-15

    Cooking stoves, both gas and electric, are one of the strongest and most common sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes. UFP have been shown to be associated with adverse health effects such as DNA damage and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This study investigates the effectiveness of kitchen exhaust hoods in reducing indoor levels of UFP emitted from a gas stove and oven. Measurements in an unoccupied manufactured house monitored size-resolved UFP (2 nm to 100 nm) concentrations from the gas stove and oven while varying range hood flow rate and burner position. The air change rate in the building was measured continuously based on the decay of a tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride, SF(6)). The results show that range hood flow rate and burner position (front vs. rear) can have strong effects on the reduction of indoor levels of UFP released from the stove and oven, subsequently reducing occupant exposure to UFP. Higher range hood flow rates are generally more effective for UFP reduction, though the reduction varies with particle diameter. The influence of the range hood exhaust is larger for the back burner than for the front burner. The number-weighted particle reductions for range hood flow rates varying between 100 m(3)/h and 680 m(3)/h range from 31% to 94% for the front burner, from 54% to 98% for the back burner, and from 39% to 96% for the oven. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The neuropeptides and protein hormones of the agricultural pest fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis: What do we learn from the genome sequencing and tissue-specific transcriptomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shun-Hua; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are very important signaling molecules, and are involved in the regulation and coordination of various physiological processes in invertebrates and vertebrates. Using a bioinformatics approach, we screened the recently sequenced genome and six tissue-specific transcriptome databases (central nervous system, fat body, ovary, testes, male accessory glands, antennae) of the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) that is economically one of the most important pest insects of tropical and subtropical fruit. Thirty-nine candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or protein hormones. These include most of the known insect neuropeptides and protein hormones, with the exception of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-related peptide, allatropin, diuretic hormone 34, diuretic hormone 45, IMFamide, inotocin, and sex peptide. Our results showed the neuropeptides and protein hormones of Diptera insects appear to have a reduced repertoire compared to some other insects. Moreover, there are also differences between B. dorsalis and the super-model of Drosophila melanogaster. Interesting features of the oriental fruit fly are the absence of genes coding for sex peptide and the presence of neuroparsin and two genes coding neuropeptide F. The majority of the identified neuropeptides and protein hormones is present in the central nervous system, with only a limited number of these in the other tissues. Moreover, we predicted their physiological functions via comparing with data of FlyBase and FlyAtlas. Taken together, owing to the large number of identified peptides, this study can be used as a reference about structure, tissue distribution and physiological functions for comparative studies in other model and important pest insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental Assessment for Ongoing and Future Operations at U.S. Navy Dabob Bay and Hood Canal Military Operating Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    well as being cultivated in aquaculture operations in Puget Sound, including Hood Canal and Dabob Bay (Figure 3.4-2). Pacific oysters (Crassostrea...gigas) are widely cultivated in aquaculture operations in Puget Sound. Commercial oyster beds exist in Dabob Bay, mostly at the north end. Dabob Bay... Ecotoxicology of metals in aquatic sediments: binding and release, bioavailability, risk assessment, and remediation. Canadian Journal of

  5. Seismicity Induced by Groundwater Recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon, and its Implications for Hydrogeologic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, M. O.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    seismicity at Mt. Hood, Oregon. We can use the time lag of about 120 days between the two records to estimate the regional hydraulic diffusivity (1 m2/s) and other hydrogeologic parameters (permeability ≈ 10-13 m2, vertical matrix compressibility ≈ 10-10 m2/N). These values are comparable with our results from coupled heat and groundwater flow studies that are based on bore hole temperature data at Mt. Hood.

  6. A review of Brucella infection in marine mammals, with special emphasis on Brucella pinnipedialis in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Brucella spp. were isolated from marine mammals for the first time in 1994. Two novel species were later included in the genus; Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis, with cetaceans and seals as their preferred hosts, respectively. Brucella spp. have since been isolated from a variety of marine mammals. Pathological changes, including lesions of the reproductive organs and associated abortions, have only been registered in cetaceans. The zoonotic potential differs among the marine mammal Brucella strains. Many techniques, both classical typing and molecular microbiology, have been utilised for characterisation of the marine mammal Brucella spp. and the change from the band-based approaches to the sequence-based approaches has greatly increased our knowledge about these strains. Several clusters have been identified within the B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis species, and multiple studies have shown that the hooded seal isolates differ from other pinniped isolates. We describe how different molecular methods have contributed to species identification and differentiation of B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis, with special emphasis on the hooded seal isolates. We further discuss the potential role of B. pinnipedialis for the declining Northwest Atlantic hooded seal population. PMID:21819589

  7. A review of Brucella infection in marine mammals, with special emphasis on Brucella pinnipedialis in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nymo Ingebjørg H

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brucella spp. were isolated from marine mammals for the first time in 1994. Two novel species were later included in the genus; Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis, with cetaceans and seals as their preferred hosts, respectively. Brucella spp. have since been isolated from a variety of marine mammals. Pathological changes, including lesions of the reproductive organs and associated abortions, have only been registered in cetaceans. The zoonotic potential differs among the marine mammal Brucella strains. Many techniques, both classical typing and molecular microbiology, have been utilised for characterisation of the marine mammal Brucella spp. and the change from the band-based approaches to the sequence-based approaches has greatly increased our knowledge about these strains. Several clusters have been identified within the B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis species, and multiple studies have shown that the hooded seal isolates differ from other pinniped isolates. We describe how different molecular methods have contributed to species identification and differentiation of B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis, with special emphasis on the hooded seal isolates. We further discuss the potential role of B. pinnipedialis for the declining Northwest Atlantic hooded seal population.

  8. Construction and Operation of a Ventilated Hood System for Measuring Greenhouse Gas and Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjing Zhao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in greenhouse gas emissions from ruminants, such as cattle, has spawned a need for affordable, precise, and accurate methods for the measurement of gaseous emissions arising from enteric fermentation. A new head hood system for cattle designed to capture and quantify emissions was recently developed at the University of California, Davis. The system consists of two head hoods, two vacuum pumps, and an instrumentation cabinet housing the required data collection equipment. This system has the capability of measuring carbon dioxide, methane, ethanol, methanol, water vapor, nitrous oxide, acetic acid emissions and oxygen consumption in real-time. A unique aspect of the hoods is the front, back, and sides are made of clear polycarbonate sheeting allowing the cattle a full range of vision during gas sampling. Recovery rates for these slightly negative pressure chambers were measured ranging from 97.6 to 99.3 percent. This system can capture high quality data for use in improving emission inventories and evaluating gaseous emission mitigation strategies.

  9. Harvest-related edge effects on prey availability and foraging of hooded warblers in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Kilgo

    2005-04-20

    The effects of harvest-created canopy gaps in bottomland hardwood forests on arthropod abundance and, hence, the foraging ecology of birds are poorly understood. I predicted that arthropod abundance would be high near edges of group-selection harvest gaps and lower in the surrounding forest, and that male Hooded Warblers (Wilsonia citrina) foraging near gaps would find more prey per unit time than those foraging in the surrounding forest. In fact, arthropod abundance was greater >100 m from a gap edge than at 0-30 m or 30-100 m from an edge, due to their abundance on switchcane (Arundinaria gigantea); arthropods did not differ in abundance among distances from gaps on oaks (Quercus spp.) or red maple (Acer rubrum). Similarly, Hooded Warbler foraging attack rates were not higher near gap edges: when foraging for fledglings, attack rate did not differ among distances from gaps, but when foraging for themselves, attack rates actually were lower 0-30 m from gap edges than 30-100 m or >100 m from a gap edge. Foraging attack rate was positively associated with arthropod abundance. Hooded Warblers apparently encountered fewer prey and presumably foraged less efficiently where arthropods were least abundant, i.e., near gaps. That attack rates among birds foraging for fledglings were not affected by distance from gap (and hence arthropod abundance) suggests that prey availability may not be limiting at any location across the forest, despite the depressing effects of gaps on arthropod abundance.

  10. Diurnal activity of four species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and efficiencies of three nondestructive sampling techniques for thrips in mango inflorescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, H; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2010-06-01

    Thrips cause considerable economic loss to mango, Mangifera indica L., in Penang, Malaysia. Three nondestructive sampling techniques--shaking mango panicles over a moist plastic tray, washing the panicles with ethanol, and immobilization of thrips by using CO2--were evaluated for their precision to determine the most effective technique to capture mango flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in an orchard located at Balik Pulau, Penang, Malaysia, during two flowering seasons from December 2008 to February 2009 and from August to September 2009. The efficiency of each of the three sampling techniques was compared with absolute population counts on whole panicles as a reference. Diurnal flight activity of thrips species was assessed using yellow sticky traps. All three sampling methods and sticky traps were used at two hourly intervals from 0800 to 1800 hours to get insight into diurnal periodicity of thrips abundance in the orchard. Based on pooled data for the two seasons, the CO2 method was the most efficient procedure extracting 80.7% adults and 74.5% larvae. The CO2 method had the lowest relative variation and was the most accurate procedure compared with the absolute method as shown by regression analysis. All collection techniques showed that the numbers of all thrips species in mango panicles increased after 0800 hours, reaching a peak between 1200 and 1400 hours. Adults thrips captured on the sticky traps were the most abundant between 0800-1000 and 1400-1600 hours. According to results of this study, the CO2 method is recommended for sampling of thrips in the field. It is a nondestructive sampling procedure that neither damages flowers nor diminishes fruit production. Management of thrips populations in mango orchards with insecticides would be more effectively carried out during their peak population abundance on the flower panicles at midday to 1400 hours.

  11. Natural ventilation of a generic cask under a transport hood - CFD and analytical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.; Davies, G.; Tso, C.F. [Arup, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In comparison with finite element simulation for structural and thermal behaviour, the use of computational fluid dynamics technique (hereafter CFD) to analyse, predict and design air and heat flow in package design is relatively novel. Arup has been using CFD techniques to investigate fluid and heat flow, and to use it as a tool to design fluid and heat flow across a broad spectrum of industries for over fifteen years. In order demonstrate the power of the technique and its benefits, the airflow and heat flow characteristics around a transport package during transit under a transport hood has been evaluated using the CFD technique. This paper presents the scenario, the model, the analysis technique and the results of this analysis. Comparison with test results is probably the best way to validate a CFD analysis. In the absence of test results, the analysis was verified by comparison with hand calculation solutions. The scenario as it stands is too complex and hand calculation solution cannot describe the scenario sufficiently. However, hand calculation solutions could be derived for simplified version of the scenario against which CFD analysis of the simplified scenario can be compared. The second half of this paper describes the verification out.

  12. Metabolic activity in striate and extrastriate cortex in the hooded rat: contralateral and ipsilateral eye input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurlow, G.A.; Cooper, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of changes in glucose metabolism resulting from ipsilateral and contralateral eye activity in the posterior cortex of the hooded rat was demonstrated by means of the C-14 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic technique. By stimulating one eye with square wave gratings and eliminating efferent activation from the other by means of enucleation or intraocular TTX injection, differences between ipsilaterally and contralaterally based visual activity in the two hemispheres were maximized. Carbon-14 levels in layer IV of autoradiographs of coronal sections were measured and combined across sections to form right and left matrices of posterior cortex metabolic activity. A difference matrix, formed by subtracting the metabolic activity matrix of cortex contralateral to the stimulated eye from the ipsilateral depressed matrix, emphasized those parts of the visual cortex that received monocular visual input. The demarcation of striate cortex by means of cholinesterase stain and the examination of autoradiographs from sections cut tangential to the cortical surface aided in the interpretation of the difference matrices. In striate cortex, differences were maximal in the medial monocular portion, and the lateral or binocular portion was shown to be divided metabolically into a far lateral contralaterally dominant strip along the cortical representation of the vertical meridian, and a more medial region of patches of more or less contralaterally dominant binocular input. Lateral peristriate differences were less than those of striate cortex, and regions of greater and lesser monocular input could be distinguished. We did not detect differences between the two hemispheres in either anterior or medial peristriate areas

  13. University of Missouri research reactor exhaust ventilation/laboratory fume hood upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; McCracken, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) facility is located in Research Park, 1 mile south of the Columbia campus. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-and-graphite-reflected core, serviced by six radial beam tubes for research, and has sample irradiation facilities in both a flux trap and in the graphite region. The reactor operates at full power 150 h/week, 52 week/yr, making it one of the best operating schedules and the most extensively used of any university research reactor. This extensive utilization includes many programs, such as radioisotope applications, neutron activation analysis, etc., that depend heavily on fume hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells that put a tremendous demand on the exhaust system. The exhaust system is required to be operable whenever the reactor is operating and must have the capability of being operated from an emergency electrical generator on loss of site electrical power. The originally installed exhaust ventilation system was below needed capacity and, with increased program requirements and system age, the necessity to upgrade the system was paramount. The challenge was to complete the upgrade construction while continuing to operate the reactor and maintain all the other ongoing programs, rather than take the easy way of an extended shutdown. This paper discusses how MURR met this challenge and solved these problems, problems that are similarly experienced by almost all research reactors to some degree when major work is required on critical systems

  14. Natural ventilation of a generic cask under a transport hood - CFD and analytical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, D.; Davies, G.; Tso, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    In comparison with finite element simulation for structural and thermal behaviour, the use of computational fluid dynamics technique (hereafter CFD) to analyse, predict and design air and heat flow in package design is relatively novel. Arup has been using CFD techniques to investigate fluid and heat flow, and to use it as a tool to design fluid and heat flow across a broad spectrum of industries for over fifteen years. In order demonstrate the power of the technique and its benefits, the airflow and heat flow characteristics around a transport package during transit under a transport hood has been evaluated using the CFD technique. This paper presents the scenario, the model, the analysis technique and the results of this analysis. Comparison with test results is probably the best way to validate a CFD analysis. In the absence of test results, the analysis was verified by comparison with hand calculation solutions. The scenario as it stands is too complex and hand calculation solution cannot describe the scenario sufficiently. However, hand calculation solutions could be derived for simplified version of the scenario against which CFD analysis of the simplified scenario can be compared. The second half of this paper describes the verification out

  15. Low Diversity Bacterial Community and the Trapping Activity of Metabolites from Cultivable Bacteria Species in the Female Reproductive System of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to identify the bacteria inhabiting the reproductive system of the female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, and evaluate the chemotaxis of B. dorsalis to the metabolites produced by the bacteria. Based on 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE, 18 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were assigned to the five bacterial classes Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Nine OTUs were assigned to Gammaproteobacteria, which was the most highly represented class. Enterobacteriaceae constituted the dominant family, and within this family, three genera and five species were identified, including Enterobacter sakazakii, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter amnigenus. In this set, the first two species were the dominant components, and the latter three species were the minor ones. Finally, we found that the metabolites produced by R. terrigena, K. oxytoca and K. pneumoniae were attractive to the B. dorsalis adults, and in field studies, B. dorsalis adults were most attracted to K. oxytoca. Collectively, our results suggest that the female reproductive system plays an important role in the transfer of enterobacteria from the gut to fruit. Our data may prompt the development of a female-targeted population control strategy for this fly.

  16. Control of fruit flies by sterile insect technique. I. Population fluctuation studies of oriental fruit fly (Dacus dorsalis Hendel and Dacus zonatus Saunders) and micro climates at Royal Ang Khang Highland Research Station Chiang Mai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiravathanapong, S.

    1984-12-01

    The studies of population fluctuation of male oriental fruit fly, (Dacus dorsalis Hendel) and [Dacus zontanus (Saunders)] and micro climate at Royal Ang Khang Highland Research Station Chiang Mai in 1983 were conducted. It was found that population of Dacus zonatus was rather high and almost seemed equal to that of Dacus dorsalis. Population of these two species increased at the beginning of February. Population of Dacus zonatus increased rapidly and reached the peak in the middle of May and of June. The number at peaks were 103 males and 87 males/trap/day respectively. However, the population of Dacus dorsalis increased slowly and followed the pattern of Dacus zonatus until the beginning of June, after that, the population increased rapidly and reached the peak in the middle of July. The number at peak was 240 males/trap/day. Later on they dropped rapidly in the middle of August, then the population of the two species fluctuated together. Finally they decreased down to near zero in November, December and January of the following year. In summary, population density of the said two species adult flies were rather high from the end of winter (the beginning of February) to the middle of raining season (July) and this period coincided with the time of fruit development in many introduced varieties (peach, persimmon, apple, pear and plum)

  17. Mass transfer inside a flux hood for the sampling of gaseous emissions from liquid surfaces - Experimental assessment and emission rate rescaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ademir A.; Lucernoni, Federico; Santos, Jane M.; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Le-Minh, Nhat; Stuetz, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the mass transfer of compounds inside the US EPA flux hood, one of the enclosure devices most commonly employed for the direct measurement of atmospheric emissions from liquid surfaces in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Experiments comprised the evaporation of water and the volatilisation of a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Special attention was given to the evaluation of the mass transfer coefficients in the microenvironment created by the flux hood and the effects of concentration build up in the hood's headspace. The VOCs emission rates and the water evaporation rates generally increased with the sweep air flow rate, as did the mass transfer coefficients for all compounds. The emission of compounds whose volatilisation is significantly influenced by the gas phase was greatly affected by concentration build up, whereas this effect was not significant for liquid phase-controlled compounds. The gas-film mass transfer coefficient (kG) estimated inside the US EPA flux hood was of the same order as the respective kG reported in the literature for wind tunnel-type devices, but the emission rates measured by the flux hood can be expected to be lower, due to the concentration build-up. Compared against an emission model for the passive surfaces in WWTPs, the mass transfer of acetic acid (representing a gas phase-dominated compound) inside the US EPA flux hood was equivalent to conditions of wind speeds at 10 m height (U10) of 0.27, 0.51 and 0.99 m s-1, respectively, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1. On the other hand, for higher wind speeds, the emission rates of gas phase-controlled compounds obtained with the flux hood can be considerably underestimated: for instance, at U10 = 5 m s-1, the emission rates of acetic acid inside the flux hood would be approximately 23, 12 and 6 times lower than the emission rates in the field, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1, respectively. A procedure is presented in

  18. Particle release and control of worker exposure during laboratory-scale synthesis, handling and simulated spills of manufactured nanomaterials in fume hoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana S.; Kuijpers, Eelco; Kling, Kirsten I.; Levin, Marcus; Koivisto, Antti J.; Nielsen, Signe H.; Fransman, W.; Fedutik, Yijri; Jensen, Keld A.; Koponen, Ismo K.

    2018-02-01

    Fume hoods are one of the most common types of equipment applied to reduce the potential of particle exposure in laboratory environments. A number of previous studies have shown particle release during work with nanomaterials under fume hoods. Here, we assessed laboratory workers' inhalation exposure during synthesis and handling of CuO, TiO2 and ZnO in a fume hood. In addition, we tested the capacity of a fume hood to prevent particle release to laboratory air during simulated spillage of different powders (silica fume, zirconia TZ-3Y and TiO2). Airborne particle concentrations were measured in near field, far field, and in the breathing zone of the worker. Handling CuO nanoparticles increased the concentration of small particles (control during synthesis and handling of nanomaterials. An appropriate fume hood with adequate sash height and face velocity prevents 98.3% of particles release into the surrounding environment. Care should still be made to consider spills and high cleanliness to prevent exposure via resuspension and inadvertent exposure by secondary routes.

  19. Lidar-enhanced geologic mapping, examples from the Medford and Hood River areas, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, T. J.; McClaughry, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lidar-based 3-foot digital elevation models (DEMs) and derivatives (slopeshade, hillshade, contours) were used to help map geology across 1700 km2 (650 mi2) near Hood River and Medford, Oregon. Techniques classically applied to interpret coarse DEMs and small-scale topographic maps were adapted to take advantage of lidar's high resolution. Penetration and discrimination of plant cover by the laser system allowed recognition of fine patterns and textures related to underlying geologic units and associated soils. Surficial geologic maps were improved by the ability to examine tiny variations in elevation and slope. Recognition of low-relief features of all sizes was enhanced where pixel elevation ranges of centimeters to meters, established by knowledge of the site or by trial, were displayed using thousands of sequential colors. Features can also be depicted relative to stream level by preparing a DEM that compensates for gradient. Near Medford, lidar-derived contour maps with 1- to 3-foot intervals revealed incised bajada with young, distal lobes defined by concentric contour lines. Bedrock geologic maps were improved by recognizing geologic features associated with surface textures and patterns or topographic anomalies. In sedimentary and volcanic terrain, structure was revealed by outcrops or horizons lying at one stratigraphic level. Creating a triangulated irregular network (TIN) facet from positions of three or more such points gives strike and dip. Each map area benefited from hundreds of these measurements. A more extensive DEM in the plane of the TIN facet can be subtracted from surface elevation (lidar DEM) to make a DEM with elevation zero where the stratigraphic horizon lies at the surface. The distribution of higher and lower stratigraphic horizons can be shown by highlighting areas similarly higher or lower on the same DEM. Poor fit of contacts or faults projected between field traverses suggest the nature and amount of intervening geologic structure

  20. Haul-out behavior of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina in Hood Canal, Washington.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh M London

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to model haul-out behavior of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina in the Hood Canal region of Washington State with respect to changes in physiological, environmental, and temporal covariates. Previous research has provided a solid understanding of seal haul-out behavior. Here, we expand on that work using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM with temporal autocorrelation and a large dataset. Our dataset included behavioral haul-out records from archival and VHF radio tag deployments on 25 individual seals representing 61,430 seal hours. A novel application for increased computational efficiency allowed us to examine this large dataset with a GLMM that appropriately accounts for temporal autocorellation. We found significant relationships with the covariates hour of day, day of year, minutes from high tide and year. Additionally, there was a significant effect of the interaction term hour of day : day of year. This interaction term demonstrated that seals are more likely to haul out during nighttime hours in August and September, but then switch to predominantly daylight haul-out patterns in October and November. We attribute this change in behavior to an effect of human disturbance levels. This study also examined a unique ecological event to determine the role of increased killer whale (Orcinus orca predation on haul-out behavior. In 2003 and 2005 these harbor seals were exposed to unprecedented levels of killer whale predation and results show an overall increase in haul-out probability after exposure to killer whales. The outcome of this study will be integral to understanding any changes in population abundance as a result of increased killer whale predation.

  1. Pre-Release Consumption of Methyl Eugenol Increases the Mating Competitiveness of Sterile Males of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in Large Field Enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Todd E.; Edu, James; McInnis, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The sterile insect technique may be implemented to control populations of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), when environmental concerns preclude widespread use of chemical attractants or toxicants. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the mating competitiveness of sterile B. dorsalis males could be increased via pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol. Males of the oriental fruit fly are strongly attracted to this plant-borne compound, which they ingest and use in the synthesis of the sex pheromone. Previous studies conducted in the laboratory and small field-cages have shown that males given methyl eugenol produce a more attractive pheromone for females and have a higher mating success rate than males denied methyl eugenol. Here, levels of egg sterility were compared following the release of wild-like flies and either methyl eugenol-fed (treated) or methyl eugenol-deprived (control) sterile males in large field enclosures at four over flooding ratios ranging from 5:1 to 60:1 (sterile: wild-like males). Treated sterile males were fed methyl eugenol for 1–4 h (depending on the over flooding ratio tested) 3 d prior to release. Eggs were dissected from introduced fruits (apples), incubated in the laboratory, and scored for hatch rate. The effect of methyl eugenol was most pronounced at lower over flooding ratios. At the 5:1 and 10:1 over flooding ratios, the level of egg sterility observed for treated, sterile males was significantly greater than that observed for control, sterile males. In addition, the incidence of egg sterility reported for treated sterile males at these lower over flooding ratios was similar to that noted for treated or control sterile males at the 30:1 or 60:1 over flooding ratios. This latter result, in particular, suggests that pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol allows for a reduction in the number of sterile flies that are produced and released, thus increasing the cost

  2. Characteristics of six small heat shock protein genes from Bactrocera dorsalis: Diverse expression under conditions of thermal stress and normal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wei; Tian, Yi; Liu, Hong; Shi, Yan; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-11-01

    To explore the functions of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in relation to thermal stress and development in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pest species attacking a wide range of fruits and vegetables, six full-length cDNAs of sHsp genes (BdHsp17.7, 18.4, 20.4, 20.6, 21.6 and 23.8) were cloned, and the expression patterns in different developmental stages and tissues, as well as in response to both thermal and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) exposures, were examined using real time quantitative PCR. The open reading frames (ORFs) of six sHsps are 453, 489, 537, 543, 567 and 630bp in length, encoding proteins with molecular weights of 17.7, 18.4, 20.4, 20.6, 21.6 and 23.8kDa, respectively. BdHsp18.4 and BdHsp20.4 maintained lower expression levels in both eggs and larvae, whereas remarkably up-regulated after the larval-pupal transformation, suggesting that these two sHsps may be involved in metamorphosis. Significant tissue specificity exists among sHsps: the highest expression of BdHsp20.6 and BdHsp23.8 in the Malpighian tubules and ovary, respectively, versus a peak in the fat body for others. BdHsp20.4 and BdHsp20.6 were significantly up-regulated by thermal stress. In contrast, BdHsp18.4 and BdHsp23.8 reacted only to heat stress. BdHsp17.7 and BdHsp21.6 were insensitive to both heat and cold stresses. The degree of sHsps response depends on intensity of 20E treatment, i.e., dose and time. These results strongly suggest functional differentiation within the sHsp subfamily in B. dorsalis. The physiological function of sHsp members under thermal stress and normal growth remains the subjects of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of a Major Locus Contributing to Erythrocyte 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Variability in Hooded (Long-Evans) Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, N. A.; Brewer, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    The erythrocyte glycolytic intermediate 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) play an important role in oxygen transport and delivery by binding to hemoglobin (Hb) and reducing its affinity for oxygen. Considerable quantitative variability in the levels of DPG and ATP exists in human populations and in a population of hooded (Long-Evans) rats we have studied. This paper presents the results of studies on the genetic component of DPG-level variation in an outbred population of hooded rats. Beginning with about 100 rats, a two-way selection experiment was initiated. Pairs of rats with the highest DPG levels were mated to produce a High-DPG rat strain and animals with the lowest DPG levels were mated to produce a Low-DPG strain. Mean DPG levels responded rapidly to selection and, from generation 3 on, the differences between strain means were highly significant. Ten High-DPG strain rats were intercrossed with 10 Low-DPG strain rats of generation 10 to produce an F1 generation in which the DPG levels were almost as high as those of High-DPG animals. This indicates partial dominance of High-DPG alleles. The F2 DPG-level distribution showed two distinct subpopulations. The high DPG subpopulation contained three times as many animals as the low DPG subpopulation. From these results and the statistical analyses performed, it was concluded that the DPG differences between strains were due to an allelic difference at one major locus, the allele carried by the High-DPG strain showing partial dominance over the allele carried by the Low-DPG strain. It appears that this locus may also effect ATP levels to a large extent and is polymorphic in hooded rat populations. Identification of this locus gives us a useful tool for studies of the physiological effects of DPG variability, as well as providing an example of a major gene effect in a quantitatively varying trait. PMID:863239

  4. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  5. How the Cobra Got Its Flesh-Eating Venom: Cytotoxicity as a Defensive Innovation and Its Co-Evolution with Hooding, Aposematic Marking, and Spitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagides, Nadya; Jackson, Timothy N W; Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Arbuckle, Kevin; Pretzler, Rudolf; Yang, Daryl C; Ali, Syed A; Koludarov, Ivan; Dobson, James; Sanker, Brittany; Asselin, Angelique; Santana, Renan C; Hendrikx, Iwan; van der Ploeg, Harold; Tai-A-Pin, Jeremie; van den Bergh, Romilly; Kerkkamp, Harald M I; Vonk, Freek J; Naude, Arno; Strydom, Morné A; Jacobsz, Louis; Dunstan, Nathan; Jaeger, Marc; Hodgson, Wayne C; Miles, John; Fry, Bryan G

    2017-03-13

    The cytotoxicity of the venom of 25 species of Old World elapid snake was tested and compared with the morphological and behavioural adaptations of hooding and spitting. We determined that, contrary to previous assumptions, the venoms of spitting species are not consistently more cytotoxic than those of closely related non-spitting species. While this correlation between spitting and non-spitting was found among African cobras, it was not present among Asian cobras. On the other hand, a consistent positive correlation was observed between cytotoxicity and utilisation of the defensive hooding display that cobras are famous for. Hooding and spitting are widely regarded as defensive adaptations, but it has hitherto been uncertain whether cytotoxicity serves a defensive purpose or is somehow useful in prey subjugation. The results of this study suggest that cytotoxicity evolved primarily as a defensive innovation and that it has co-evolved twice alongside hooding behavior: once in the Hemachatus + Naja and again independently in the king cobras ( Ophiophagus ). There was a significant increase of cytotoxicity in the Asian Naja linked to the evolution of bold aposematic hood markings, reinforcing the link between hooding and the evolution of defensive cytotoxic venoms. In parallel, lineages with increased cytotoxicity but lacking bold hood patterns evolved aposematic markers in the form of high contrast body banding. The results also indicate that, secondary to the evolution of venom rich in cytotoxins, spitting has evolved three times independently: once within the African Naja , once within the Asian Naja , and once in the Hemachatus genus. The evolution of cytotoxic venom thus appears to facilitate the evolution of defensive spitting behaviour. In contrast, a secondary loss of cytotoxicity and reduction of the hood occurred in the water cobra Naja annulata , which possesses streamlined neurotoxic venom similar to that of other aquatic elapid snakes (e.g., hydrophiine

  6. How the Cobra Got Its Flesh-Eating Venom: Cytotoxicity as a Defensive Innovation and Its Co-Evolution with Hooding, Aposematic Marking, and Spitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Panagides

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of the venom of 25 species of Old World elapid snake was tested and compared with the morphological and behavioural adaptations of hooding and spitting. We determined that, contrary to previous assumptions, the venoms of spitting species are not consistently more cytotoxic than those of closely related non-spitting species. While this correlation between spitting and non-spitting was found among African cobras, it was not present among Asian cobras. On the other hand, a consistent positive correlation was observed between cytotoxicity and utilisation of the defensive hooding display that cobras are famous for. Hooding and spitting are widely regarded as defensive adaptations, but it has hitherto been uncertain whether cytotoxicity serves a defensive purpose or is somehow useful in prey subjugation. The results of this study suggest that cytotoxicity evolved primarily as a defensive innovation and that it has co-evolved twice alongside hooding behavior: once in the Hemachatus + Naja and again independently in the king cobras (Ophiophagus. There was a significant increase of cytotoxicity in the Asian Naja linked to the evolution of bold aposematic hood markings, reinforcing the link between hooding and the evolution of defensive cytotoxic venoms. In parallel, lineages with increased cytotoxicity but lacking bold hood patterns evolved aposematic markers in the form of high contrast body banding. The results also indicate that, secondary to the evolution of venom rich in cytotoxins, spitting has evolved three times independently: once within the African Naja, once within the Asian Naja, and once in the Hemachatus genus. The evolution of cytotoxic venom thus appears to facilitate the evolution of defensive spitting behaviour. In contrast, a secondary loss of cytotoxicity and reduction of the hood occurred in the water cobra Naja annulata, which possesses streamlined neurotoxic venom similar to that of other aquatic elapid snakes (e

  7. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of transformer and transformer 2 to Generate Male-Only Progeny in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guiqing; Wu, Qiang; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Guifen; Wan, Fanghao

    2015-01-01

    The transformer (tra) gene appears to act as the genetic switch that promotes female development by interaction with the transformer2 (tra-2) gene in several dipteran species including the Medfly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we describe the isolation, expression and function of tra and tra-2 in the economically important agricultural pest, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Bdtra and Bdtra-2 are similar to their homologs from other tephritid species. Bdtra demonstrated sex-specific transcripts: one transcript in females and two transcripts in males. In contrast, Bdtra-2 only had one transcript that was common to males and females, which was transcribed continuously in different adult tissues and developmental stages. Bdtra-2 and the female form of Bdtra were maternally inherited in eggs, whereas the male form of Bdtra was not detectable until embryos of 1 and 2 h after egg laying. Function analyses of Bdtra and Bdtra-2 indicated that both were indispensable for female development, as nearly 100% males were obtained with embryonic RNAi against either Bdtra or Bdtra-2. The fertility of these RNAi-generated males was subsequently tested. More than 80% of RNAi-generated males could mate and the mated females could lay eggs, but only 40-48.6% males gave rise to progeny. In XX-reversed males and intersex individuals, no clear female gonadal morphology was observed after dissection. These results shed light on the development of a genetic sexing system with male-only release for this agricultural pest.

  8. Recent trends on sterile insect technique and area-wide integrated pest management. Economic feasibility, control projects, farmer organization and Bactrocera dorsalis complex control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    We have invited professional papers from over the world, including Okinawa, for compilation of recent trends on Sterile Insect Techniques and Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management to further pursue environment friendly pest insects control measures in agricultural production in the Asia-Pacific region. Pest insects such as the tephritid fruit flies have long been and are still today causing serious damage to agricultural products in the Asia-Pacific region and farmers in the region apply such insecticides that are no longer allowed or being subjected to strict usage control in Japan. This, in return, may endanger the health of the very farmers, food safety and the ecosystem itself. The purpose of this report is, therefore, to clarify keys for technology transfer of so called SIT/AWIPM to potential recipients engaged in agricultural production in the region. This report focused on several topics, which make up important parts for the effective Sterile Insect Technique and Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management: economic feasibility; pest insects control projects; farmers' education; research progress in Bactrocera dorsalis complex issues specific to the Asia-Pacific region. The 12 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Female-biased attraction of Oriental fruit fly, bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), to a blend of host fruit volatiles from Terminalia catappa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderhurst, Matthew S; Jang, Eric B

    2006-11-01

    Coupled gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) analysis of volatiles from tropical almond fruit, Terminalia catappa L., revealed 22 compounds that were detected by antennae of oriental fruit fly females, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Both solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and Porapak Q were used for sampling odors in fruit headspace, with SPME collections producing larger EAD responses from a greater number of compounds. Geranyl acetate and methyl eugenol elicited the largest EAD responses. A synthetic blend containing SPME collected, EAD stimulatory compounds showed female-biased attraction in laboratory wind tunnel bioassays, but heavily male-biased trap captures in a larger olfactometer arena. A nine-component subset of compounds eliciting relatively small EAD responses (EAD minor) and consisting of equal parts ethanol, ethyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, linalyl acetate, ethyl nonanate, nonyl acetate, ethyl cinnamate, and (E)-beta-farnesene, attracted mainly females. This EAD minor blend was as attractive to females and much less attractive to males when compared to torula yeast in field cage experiments using glass McPhail traps. Similar results were obtained with outdoor rotating olfactometer tests in which the EAD minor blend was almost completely inactive for males.

  10. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Knapp

    Full Text Available In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  11. Vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments of wintering hooded cranes, Grus monacha, in human-dominated foraging habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlin; Zhou, Lizhi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Niannian; Beauchamp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Due to loss and degradation of natural wetlands, waterbirds increasingly rely on surrounding human-dominated habitats to obtain food. Quantifying vigilance patterns, investigating the trade-off among various activities, and examining the underlying mechanisms will help us understand how waterbirds adapt to human-caused disturbances. During two successive winters (November-February of 2012-13 and 2013-14), we studied the hooded crane, Grus monacha, in the Shengjin Lake National Nature Reserve (NNR), China, to investigate how the species responds to human disturbances through vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments. Our results showed striking differences in the behavior of the cranes when foraging in the highly disturbed rice paddy fields found in the buffer zone compared with the degraded natural wetlands in the core area of the NNR. Time spent vigilant decreased with flock size and cranes spent more time vigilant in the human-dominated buffer zone. In the rice paddy fields, the birds were more vigilant but also fed more at the expense of locomotion and maintenance activities. Adult cranes spent more time vigilant and foraged less than juveniles. We recommend habitat recovery in natural wetlands and community co-management in the surrounding human-dominated landscape for conservation of the hooded crane and, generally, for the vast numbers of migratory waterbirds wintering in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplain.

  12. Utilisation of polyurethane composit with 50% composition of roystonea regia fiber as noise reduction panel on car hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhwansyah; Mulia; Gunawan, S.; Lubis, R. D. W.

    2018-02-01

    The objective is to get the characteristics of noise reduction, noise reduction level, variety of measurement spaces, and knowing the process in making acoustic material of natural fiber becomes noise reduction on a car hood. The process of making noise reduction material used casting method and pressed by using molded press. The composition of noise reduction material consist of 50% roystonea regia by 32 mesh and 50% combined by gypsum and polyurethane. The result shows that the average result of noise reduction at X1- side is 5,7% and X2- side is 3,9%, X1+ side is 0,9% and X2+ side is 6,2%, Z1- side is 8,9% and Z2- side is 10,1%, Z1+ side is 9,7% and Z2+ side is 10,01%. The main conclusion of the study shows that a noise reduction which made of roystonea regia with 32 mesh mixed by matrix of polyurethane and gypsum is appropriate for noise reduction on car hood.

  13. The Robin Hood method - A novel numerical method for electrostatic problems based on a non-local charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazic, Predrag; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Abraham, Hrvoje

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel numerical method, named the Robin Hood method, of solving electrostatic problems. The approach of the method is closest to the boundary element methods, although significant conceptual differences exist with respect to this class of methods. The method achieves equipotentiality of conducting surfaces by iterative non-local charge transfer. For each of the conducting surfaces, non-local charge transfers are performed between surface elements, which differ the most from the targeted equipotentiality of the surface. The method is tested against analytical solutions and its wide range of application is demonstrated. The method has appealing technical characteristics. For the problem with N surface elements, the computational complexity of the method essentially scales with N α , where α < 2, the required computer memory scales with N, while the error of the potential decreases exponentially with the number of iterations for many orders of magnitude of the error, without the presence of the Critical Slowing Down. The Robin Hood method could prove useful in other classical or even quantum problems. Some future development ideas for possible applications outside electrostatics are addressed

  14. Estimates of Nutrient Loading by Ground-Water Discharge into the Lynch Cove Area of Hood Canal, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, F. William; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Reich, Christopher D.; Paulson, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the waters of Hood Canal threaten marine life in late summer and early autumn. Oxygen depletion in the deep layers and landward reaches of the canal is caused by decomposition of excess phytoplankton biomass, which feeds on nutrients (primarily nitrogen compounds) that enter the canal from various sources, along with stratification of the water column that prevents mixing and replenishment of oxygen. Although seawater entering the canal is the largest source of nitrogen, ground-water discharge to the canal also contributes significant quantities, particularly during summer months when phytoplankton growth is most sensitive to nutrient availability. Quantifying ground-water derived nutrient loads entering an ecologically sensitive system such as Hood Canal is a critical component of constraining the total nutrient budget and ultimately implementing effective management strategies to reduce impacts of eutrophication. The amount of nutrients entering Hood Canal from ground water was estimated using traditional and indirect measurements of ground-water discharge, and analysis of nutrient concentrations. Ground-water discharge to Hood Canal is variable in space and time because of local geology, variable hydraulic gradients in the ground-water system adjacent to the shoreline, and a large tidal range of 3 to 5 meters. Intensive studies of ground-water seepage and hydraulic-head gradients in the shallow, nearshore areas were used to quantify the freshwater component of submarine ground-water discharge (SGD), whereas indirect methods using radon and radium geochemical tracers helped quantify total SGD and recirculated seawater. In areas with confirmed ground-water discharge, shore-perpendicular electrical resistivity profiles, continuous electromagnetic seepage-meter measurements, and continuous radon measurements were used to visualize temporal variations in ground-water discharge over several tidal cycles. The results of these

  15. Owning the Journey: Using Collaborative Revisions of Little Red Riding Hood in Teaching Introduction to Literature at a Historically Black University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of a collaborative course project, using Little Red Riding Hood (LRRH) to teach and discuss the concepts of orality, cultural legacy, archetypes, adaptation/appropriation, and social criticism in an Introduction to Literature course at Historically Black Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama. The student groups…

  16. Evidence of weak genetic structure and recent gene flow between Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. and B. papayae, across Southern Thailand and West Malaysia, supporting a single target pest for SIT applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Isasawin, Siriwan; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2014-06-14

    Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. (Hendel) and B. papayae Drew & Hancock, are invasive pests belonging to the B. dorsalis complex. Their species status, based on morphology, is sometimes arguable. Consequently, the existence of cryptic species and/or population isolation may decrease the effectiveness of the sterile insect technique (SIT) due to an unknown degree of sexual isolation between released sterile flies and wild counterparts. To evaluate the genetic relationship and current demography in wild populations for guiding the application of area-wide integrated pest management using SIT, seven microsatellite-derived markers from B. dorsalis s.s. and another five from B. papayae were used for surveying intra- and inter-specific variation, population structure, and recent migration among sympatric and allopatric populations of the two morphological forms across Southern Thailand and West Malaysia. Basic genetic variations were not significantly different among forms, populations, and geographical areas (P > 0.05). Nonetheless, two sets of microsatellite markers showed significantly different levels of polymorphisms. Genetic differentiation between intra- and inter-specific differences was significant, but low. Seventeen populations revealed three hypothetical genetic clusters (K = 3) regardless of forms and geographical areas. The genetic structure of sympatric populations slightly changed during the different years of collection. Recent gene flow (m ≥ 0.10) was frequently detected whether samples were sympatric or allopatric. Ninety-five of 379 individuals distributed across the given area were designated as recent migrants or of admixed ancestry. As a consequence of substantial migration, no significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances was detected (R2 = 0.056, P = 0.650). According to the 12 microsatellite variations, weak population structure and recent gene flow suggest that there is no status for cryptic species between B. dorsalis s.s. and B

  17. End-use energy characterization and conservation potentials at DoD Facilities: An analysis of electricity use at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Konopacki, S.

    1995-05-01

    This report discusses the application of the LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA) to a DoD installation and presents hourly reconciled end-use data for all major building types and end uses. The project initially focused on achieving these objectives and pilot-testing the methodology at Fort Hood, Texas. Fort Hood, with over 5000 buildings was determined to have representative samples of nearly all of the major building types in use on DoD installations. These building types at Fort Hood include: office, administration, vehicle maintenance, shop, hospital, grocery store, retail store, car wash, church, restaurant, single-family detached housing, two and four-plex housings, and apartment building. Up to 11 end uses were developed for each prototype, consisting of 9 electric and 2 gas; however, only electric end uses were reconciled against known data and weather conditions. The electric end uses are space cooling, ventilation, cooking, miscellaneous/plugs, refrigeration, exterior lighting, interior lighting, process loads, and street lighting. The gas end uses are space heating and hot water heating. Space heating energy-use intensities were simulated only. The EDA was applied to 10 separate feeders from the three substations at Fort Hood. The results from the analyses of these ten feeders were extrapolated to estimate energy use by end use for the entire installation. The results show that administration, residential, and the bar-rack buildings are the largest consumers of electricity for a total of 250GWh per year (74% of annual consumption). By end use, cooling, ventilation, miscellaneous, and indoor lighting consume almost 84% of total electricity use. The contribution to the peak power demand is highest by residential sector (35%, 24 MW), followed by administration buildings (30%), and barrack (14%). For the entire Fort Hood installation, cooling is 54% of the peak demand (38 MW), followed by interior lighting at 18%, and miscellaneous end uses by 12%.

  18. Agonistic-like responses from the torus semicircularis dorsalis elicited by GABA A blockade in the weakly electric fish Gymnotus carapo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.T. Duarte

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Findings by our group have shown that the dorsolateral telencephalon of Gymnotus carapo sends efferents to the mesencephalic torus semicircularis dorsalis (TSd and that presumably this connection is involved in the changes in electric organ discharge (EOD and in skeletomotor responses observed following microinjections of GABA A antagonist bicuculline into this telencephalic region. Other studies have implicated the TSd or its mammalian homologue, the inferior colliculus, in defensive responses. In the present study, we explore the possible involvement of the TSd and of the GABA-ergic system in the modulation of the electric and skeletomotor displays. For this purpose, different doses of bicuculline (0.98, 0.49, 0.245, and 0.015 mM and muscimol (15.35 mM were microinjected (0.1 µL in the TSd of the awake G. carapo. Microinjection of bicuculline induced dose-dependent interruptions of EOD and increased skeletomotor activity resembling defense displays. The effects of the two highest doses showed maximum values at 5 min (4.3 ± 2.7 and 3.8 ± 2.0 Hz, P < 0.05 and persisted until 10 min (11 ± 5.7 and 8.7 ± 5.2 Hz, P < 0.05. Microinjections of muscimol were ineffective. During the interruptions of EOD, the novelty response (increased frequency in response to sensory novelties induced by an electric stimulus delivered by a pair of electrodes placed in the water of the experimental cuvette was reduced or abolished. These data suggest that the GABA-ergic mechanisms of the TSd inhibit the neural substrate of the defense reaction at this midbrain level.

  19. Defining the Collateral Flow of Posterior Tibial Artery and Dorsalis Pedis Artery in Ischemic Foot Disease: Is It a Preventing Factor for Ischemia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutar, Onur; Yildirim, Duzgun; Samanci, Cesur; Rafiee, Babak; Inan, Kaan; Dikici, Suleyman; Ustabasioglu, Fethi Emre; Kuyumcu, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, a worldwide prevalent morbidity cause, is mostly secondary to vascular insufficiency due to atherosclerosis. The disease presents with intermittent claudication, which can progress to critical limb ischemia requiring amputation. Research has emphasized that the quality or existence of the pedal arch have a direct effect on wound healing and, therefore, on limb salvage, through the mechanism of collateral vascularization to the ischemic regions. This study aimed to determine the existence and, if present, grade of retrograde blood flow from plantar arch to dorsal foot artery (dorsalis pedis artery, DPA). The correlation between clinical symptoms and presence of collateral flow were also investigated. Study group consisted of 34 cases, which included patient group (n = 17, all male, mean age: 68 years) and control group (n = 17, all male, mean age: 66 years). After physical examination and lower extremity Doppler examination, spectral morphology of DPA flow was recorded, before and during manual compression of posterior tibial artery (PTA), for a period of 5 seconds. At the end, findings of Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography and, physical examination finding and symptomatology were gathered and analyzed. In the patient group, 31 lower limb arteries, of total of 17 cases, were included. After compression maneuver, DPA in 11 cases (six right, five left) showed retrograde filling from plantar arch. This retrograde flow support was triphasic in three cases, biphasic in five cases, and monophasic in three cases. In other DPAs of these 20 limbs, PTA based retrograde collateral flow was not determined. In nine of these 20 limbs, with no or diminished retrograde filling, symptoms were worse than in other cases. Contrarily, only two of 11 limbs, with retrograde collaterals, have claudication during walking. In cases with critical atherosclerotic disease of anterior tibial artery, PTA-based biphasic or

  20. The Study of Compound Quality of various Siam Weed (Eupatorium odoratum) Extracts and Toxicity Detoxification mechanisms Against 3rd Instar Larvae of Fruit Fly (Dacus dorsalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee; Visetson, Suraphon; Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote; Patharakorn, Thipamon; Patharakorn, Surapol; Piadang, Patharakorn

    2006-09-01

    The 1H-NMR spectroscopy showed signals of DeltaH tild0.71.6 from hexane-leaf extracts from Siam weed (Eupatorium odoratum) These signals derive from protons of non-polar compounds which include fatty acid residues and terpinoids. In addition, the amplification of the signals indicated of some minor DeltaH tild6.2-7.7. This revealed protons from aromatic rings possibly involving in flavonoids from 1H-NMR spectrum. This is a believe that is a believe that these compounds could be varied from slightly polar compounds to moderately polar compounds. Furthermore, the Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of hexane, chloroform and methanol fractions showed the extracts composed of majority of less polar. It is and indication of the method of separation is quite food for separation of polarity basis from these extracts. Finally, the TLC of hexane fraction distinctively produced 7-8 compounds from the extracts. Toxicity testing using topical spray method showed that methnoloc extracts gave highest toxicity against 3rd instar larvae of fruit fly (Darcus dorsalis). The root extracts produced ca. 5 fold mohile GSH-S-transferase ws elevated 2-3 fold. The addition of dimethyl maleate into the extraccts increased their toxicity. The persistent experiment of eupathal from the extracts showed that the extracts can be stabilixed under aqueous solution upto 1 month with losing the compound. Finally, the Siam weed extracts prosuced non toxic to non-target organisms such as gabbies, bee, and mouse. The results of LC50 showed 15,000-26,000 mg/L 6,000-15,000 mg/L and 3,000-10,000 mg/L from hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts, respectively.

  1. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

  2. Association in Long-Evans hooded rats of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels with hemoglobin types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G; Gilman, J; Noble, N; Crews, V

    1978-08-01

    Two sublines of commercially available Long-Evans hooded rats have been developed by genetic selection. These sublines have widely differing levels of erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) due to different alleles at a single genetic locus. In the present work, it is shown that rats from the commercial population are also polymorphic at a hemoglobin locus, probably involving two alleles of the IIIbeta-globin chain locus. Particular hemoglobin types have been found to be strongly associated with certain DPG types, not only in the high-DPG and low-DPG lines but also in the commercial population. Two explanations for this association are considered. One is a single-locus hypothesis, with hemoglobin allelic variation causing DPG variation, and the other is a two-locus hypothesis, with marked linkage disequilibrium.

  3. Hooded seal Cystophora cristata foraging areas in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean-Investigated using three complementary methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Vacquie-Garcia

    Full Text Available Identifying environmental characteristics that define the ecological niche of a species is essential to understanding how changes in physical conditions might affect its distribution and other aspects of its ecology. The present study used satellite relay data loggers (SRDLs to study habitat use by Northeast Atlantic hooded seals (N = 20; 9 adult females, 3 adult males, and 8 juveniles. Three different methods were used in combination to achieve maximum insight regarding key foraging areas for hooded seals in this region, which have decline by 85% in recent decades: 1 first passage time (FPT; 2 vertical transit rate and; 3 change in dive drift rate. Generalized additive mixed models (GAMM were applied to each method to determine whether specific habitat characteristics were associated with foraging. Separate models were run for the post-molting and the post-breeding seasons; sex and age classes were included in the GAMMs. All three methods highlighted a few common geographic areas as being important foraging zones; however, there were also some different areas identified by the different methods, which highlights the importance of using multiple indexes when analyzing tracking and diving data to study foraging behavior. Foraging occurred most commonly in relatively shallow areas with high Sea Surface Temperatures (SST, corresponding to continental shelf areas with Atlantic Water masses. All age and sex classes overlapped spatially to some extent, but the different age and sex groups showed differences in the bathymetry of their foraging areas as well as in their vertical use of the water column. When foraging, pups dove in the upper part of the water column in relatively deep areas. Adult females foraged relatively shallowly in deep water areas too, though in shallower areas than pups. Adult males foraged close to the bottom in shallower areas.

  4. The role of glycogen, glucose and lactate in neuronal activity during hypoxia in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, N U; Geiseler, S J; Hoff, M L M; Schliep, R; Ramirez, J-M; Folkow, L P; Burmester, T

    2014-09-05

    The brains of diving mammals are repeatedly exposed to hypoxic conditions during diving. Brain neurons of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) have been shown to be more hypoxia tolerant than those of mice, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Here we investigated the roles of different metabolic substrates for maintenance of neuronal activity and integrity, by comparing the in vitro spontaneous neuronal activity of brain slices from layer V of the visual cortex of hooded seals with those in mice (Mus musculus). Studies were conducted by manipulating the composition of the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), containing either 10 mM glucose, or 20 mM lactate, or no external carbohydrate supply (aglycemia). Normoxic, hypoxic and ischemic conditions were applied. The lack of glucose or the application of lactate in the aCSF containing no glucose had little effect on the neuronal activity of seal neurons in either normoxia or hypoxia, while neurons from mice survived in hypoxia only few minutes regardless of the composition of the aCSF. We propose that seal neurons have higher intrinsic energy stores. Indeed, we found about three times higher glycogen stores in the seal brain (∼4.1 ng per μg total protein in the seal cerebrum) than in the mouse brain. Notably, in aCSF containing no glucose, seal neurons can tolerate 20 mM lactate while in mouse neuronal activity vanished after few minutes even in normoxia. This can be considered as an adaptation to long dives, during which lactate accumulates in the blood. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cassini ISS Observations Of The Early Stages Of The Formation Of Titan's South Polar Hood And Vortex In 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert A.; Del Genio, A.; Perry, J.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Turtle, E. P.; Porco, C.; Ovanessian, A.

    2012-10-01

    Northern spring equinox on Titan occurred on August 11, 2009. In March of 2012 the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on the Cassini spacecraft saw the first evidence for the formation of a polar hood in the atmosphere above Titan’s south pole. Views of the limb showed an optical thickening primarily at about 360 km altitude across a few degrees of latitude centered on the pole. Images of Titan in front of Saturn provide a nearly direct measure of the line-of-sight optical depth as a function of latitude and altitude from about 250 km and higher. Two or more distinct layers are seen, both near the pole and at other latitudes. The highest of these, near 360 km altitude, hosts the embryonic polar hood. On June 27, 2012 ISS observed the pole from high latitude. These images show a distinct and unusual cloudy patch, elongated and not centered on the pole and with an elevated perimeter. The morphology and color indicate an unfamiliar (for Titan) composition and dynamical regime. The interior of the feature consists of concentrations of cloud/haze organized on spatial scales of tens of kilometers. Its morphology is reminiscent of the open cellular convection sometimes seen in the atmospheric boundary layer over Earth’s oceans under conditions of large-scale subsidence. Unlike Earth, where such convection is forced by large surface heat fluxes or the onset of drizzle, convection at 360 km on Titan is more likely to be driven from above by radiative cooling. During the 9 hours we observed Titan, this feature completed a little over one rotation around the pole, providing direct evidence for a polar vortex rotating at a rate roughly consistent with angular-momentum-conserving flow for air displaced from the equator. Part of this work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Key Metabolic Changes in the Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata Brain in Response to Hypoxia and Reoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Leivas Müller Hoff

    Full Text Available The brain of diving mammals tolerates low oxygen conditions better than the brain of most terrestrial mammals. Previously, it has been demonstrated that the neurons in brain slices of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata withstand hypoxia longer than those of mouse, and also tolerate reduced glucose supply and high lactate concentrations. This tolerance appears to be accompanied by a shift in the oxidative energy metabolism to the astrocytes in the seal while in terrestrial mammals the aerobic energy production mainly takes place in neurons. Here, we used RNA-Seq to compare the effect of hypoxia and reoxygenation in vitro on brain slices from the visual cortex of hooded seals. We saw no general reduction of gene expression, suggesting that the response to hypoxia and reoxygenation is an actively regulated process. The treatments caused the preferential upregulation of genes related to inflammation, as found before e.g. in stroke studies using mammalian models. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses showed a downregulation of genes involved in ion transport and other neuronal processes, indicative for a neuronal shutdown in response to a shortage of O2 supply. These differences may be interpreted in terms of an energy saving strategy in the seal's brain. We specifically analyzed the regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism. Hypoxia and reoxygenation caused a similar response, with upregulation of genes involved in glucose metabolism and downregulation of the components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. We also observed upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporter Mct4, suggesting increased lactate efflux. Together, these data indicate that the seal brain responds to the hypoxic challenge by a relative increase in the anaerobic energy metabolism.

  7. Thysanoptera biodiversity in the Neotropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence A. Mound

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that descriptive taxonomy of thrips must be integrated into biological studies if we are to understand patterns of evolutionary and ecological diversity. Collecting and describing new taxa is easy, but understanding their position in ecosystems and how they have contributed to the origin and maintenance of biological diversity is more important yet more difficult. Many authors fail to appreciate that individual thrips species are commonly highly polymorphic, both within and between sexes, with the result that 20% of species names and 30% of generic names are currently placed into synonymy. The biological significance of such polymorphism has been little studied, but the presence of large and small males in a species is presumed to indicate some form of male/male competition for resources; this is particularly common in fungus feeding species. Amongst phytophagous species, the recognition of the host plants on which thrips actually breed is a prerequisite to understanding patterns of diversity, some thrips lineages being associated with particular groups of plants whereas others exploit a diverse range of plants. Attempts to understand the diversity of thrips, including the application of cladistic methods, are severely limited by the lack of studies on the biology of individual species, although thrips exhibit a wide range of interesting biological phenomena, including various levels of sociality, gallinduction, specific pollination associations, virus transmission, and ectoparasitismSe ha sugerido que la taxonomía descriptiva de los tisanopteros (trips debe integrarse dentro de los estudios biológicos si queremos ser capaces de entender los patrones de diversidad evolutiva y ecológica. Recolectar y describir nuevos datos es fácil, pero entender su posición en los ecosistemas y como ellos contribuyen al origen y mantenimiento de la diversidad biológica es más importante y aún más difícil. Muchos autores han fallado al apreciar que es común que las especies individuales de trips son altamente polimórficas, tanto dentro como entre sexos, con el resultado de que el 20% de los nombres específicos y el 30% de los genéricos son actualmente considerados como sinonimias. El significado biológico de tal polimorfimo ha sido poco estudiado, pero se presume que la presencia de machos grandes y pequeños en una especie indica alguna forma de competencia entre machos por los recursos; lo cual es muy común en las especies que se alimentan de hongos. Dentro de las especies fitófagas, el reconocimiento de la planta hospedera sobre la cual los trips realmente se crían es un prerrequisito para entender los patrones de diversidad, algunos linajes de tisanopteros están asociados con grupos particulares de plantas mientras que otros utilizan un diverso ámbito de plantas. Los intentos de entender la diversidad de los trips, incluyendo la aplicación de métodos cladistas, están limitados severamente por la carencia de estudios sobre la biología de especies individuales, aunque los trips exhiben un amplio ámbito de fenómenos interesantes biológicos, que incluye varios niveles de comportamiento social, inducción de irritación, asociaciones específicas de polinización, transmisión de virus y ectoparasitismo

  8. Residential and service-population exposure to multiple natural hazards in the Mount Hood region of Clackamas County, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Amy M.; Wood, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to document residential and service-population exposure to natural hazards in the rural communities of Clackamas County, Oregon, near Mount Hood. The Mount Hood region of Clackamas County has a long history of natural events that have impacted its small, tourism-based communities. To support preparedness and emergency-management planning in the region, a geospatial analysis of population exposure was used to determine the number and type of residents and service populations in flood-, wildfire-, and volcano-related hazard zones. Service populations are a mix of residents and tourists temporarily benefitting from local services, such as retail, education, or recreation. In this study, service population includes day-use visitors at recreational sites, overnight visitors at hotels and resorts, children at schools, and community-center visitors. Although the heavily-forested, rural landscape suggests few people are in the area, there are seasonal peaks of thousands of visitors to the region. “Intelligent” dasymetric mapping efforts using 30-meter resolution land-cover imagery and U.S. Census Bureau data proved ineffective at adequately capturing either the spatial distribution or magnitude of population at risk. Consequently, an address-point-based hybrid dasymetric methodology of assigning population to the physical location of buildings mapped with a global positioning system was employed. The resulting maps of the population (1) provide more precise spatial distributions for hazard-vulnerability assessments, (2) depict appropriate clustering due to higher density structures, such as apartment complexes and multi-unit commercial buildings, and (3) provide new information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of people utilizing services within the study area. Estimates of population exposure to flooding, wildfire, and volcanic hazards were determined by using overlay analysis in a geographic information system

  9. ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Military Large-Scale Experiment (LSE-1): system design and support activities. Final report, November 23, 1976-November 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy System will include a concentrating solar collector field of several acres. During periods of direct insolation, a heat-transfer fluid will be circulated through the collector field and thus heated to 500 to 600/sup 0/F. Some of the fluid will be circulated through a steam generator to drive a turbine-generator set; additional fluid will be stored in insulated tanks for use when solar energy is not available. The electrical output will satisfy a portion of the electrical load at Fort Hood's 87,000 Troop Housing Complex. Heat extracted from the turbine exhaust in the form of hot water will be used for space heating, absorption air conditioning, and domestic water heating at the 87,000 Complex. Storage tanks for the hot water are also included. The systems analysis and program support activities include studies of solar availability and energy requirements at Fort Hood, investigation of interfacing LSE-1 with existing energy systems at the 87,000 Complex, and preliminary studies of environmental, health, and safety considerations. An extensive survey of available concentrating solar collectors and modifications to a computerized system simulation model for LSE-1 use are also reported. Important program support activities are military liaison and information dissemination. The engineering test program reported involved completion of the Solar Engineering Test Module (SETM) and extensive performance testing of a single module of the linear-focusing collector.

  10. Population structure of Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis (Diptera: Tephri- tidae) in southeast Asia: evidence for a single spe- cies hypothesis using mitochondrial DNA and wing-shape data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutze, Mark K; Krosch, Matthew N; Clarke, Anthony R [CRC for National Plant Biosecurity (Australia); School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Armstrong, Karen F; Chapman, Toni A; Englezou, Anna; Hailstones, Deborah [CRC for National Plant Biosecurity (Australia); Cameron, Stephen L [School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Chomic, Anastasija

    2013-01-15

    Background: Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. is a pestiferous tephritid fruit fly distributed from Pakistan to the Pacific, with the Thai/Malay peninsula its southern limit. Sister pest taxa, B. papayae and B. philippinensis, occur in the southeast Asian archipelago and the Philippines, respectively. The relationship among these species is unclear due to their high molecular and morphological similarity. This study analysed population structure of these three species within a southeast Asian biogeographical context to assess potential dispersal patterns and the validity of their current taxonomic status. Results: Geometric morphometric results generated from 15 landmarks for wings of 169 flies revealed significant differences in wing shape between almost all sites following canonical variate analysis. For the combined data set there was a greater isolation-by-distance (IBD) effect under a 'non-Euclidean' scenario which used geographical distances within a biogeographical 'Sundaland context' (r{sup 2} = 0.772, P < 0.0001) as compared to a 'Euclidean' scenario for which direct geographic distances between sample sites was used (r{sup 2} = 0.217, P < 0.01). COI sequence data were obtained for 156 individuals and yielded 83 unique haplotypes with no correlation to current taxonomic designations via a minimum spanning network. BEAST analysis provided a root age and location of 540kya in northern Thailand, with migration of B. dorsalis s.l. into Malaysia 470kya and Sumatra 270kya. Two migration events into the Philippines are inferred. Sequence data revealed a weak but significant IBD effect under the 'non-Euclidean' scenario (r{sup 2} = 0.110, P < 0.05), with no historical migration evident between Taiwan and the Philippines. Results are consistent with those expected at the intra-specific level. Conclusions: Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis likely represent one species structured around the South China Sea, having migrated from northern Thailand into

  11. Studies on the localization of Trypanosoma brucei in the female reproductive tract of bka mice and hooded lister rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipepa, J.A.S.; Brown, H.; Holmes, P.

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish whether Trypanosoma brucei migrated preferentially to the reproductive tracts of female BKA mice, or Hooded Lister rats and lodged there as the site of choice compared to other organs. Blood flow to the reproductive tracts, the liver and spleen was measured using red blood cells labelled with chromium- 51. The distribution of trypanosomes labelled with 75 Se-methionine. The average percentage of the blood flow to the reproductive tract was 0.21Plus or minus0.08 in mice, while the mean concentration of trypanosomes there was 0.30% in both mice and rats. Blood flow to the liver was lower than the percentage distribution of Se-labelled T.Brucei(5.17Plus or minus1.34 versus 8.1Plus or Minus1.2). There were, on the contrary, less labelled trypanosomes as compared to the mean blood flow to the spleen (0.54% plus or minus0.18 versus 2.10%pPlus or minus0.88). After 24 hours there were adequate numbers of T. brucei in the reproductive tract to cause parasitaemia in recipient mice. From these preliminary data it was concluded that T. brucei did not lodge in the reproductive organ system a site of choice. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs

  12. Robin Hood Gardens: una interpretación desde el pensamiento topográfico de los Limites Romani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available El estrecho vínculo con el territorio que poseían los Limites Romani demostraba, según Alison Smithson, un profundo “pensamiento topográfico”: un compromiso con el lugar basado en un posicionamiento estratégico en el paisaje, una constante adaptación a las condiciones cambiantes del terreno y un intenso modelado de la superficie del suelo. Aspectos fundamentales de estas fortificaciones fronterizas romanas cuya esencia podemos identificar en algunos proyectos clave de Alison y Peter Smithson. Proyectos enraizados que centraban su atención en el plano del suelo, en articular el contacto de los edificios con el terreno y en configurar sus espacios exteriores. Entre estos, los Robin Hood Gardens mostraban de un modo elocuente la fascinación que sentían los Smithson por la condición topográfica de aquellas obras de ingeniería romana. Un interés que les llevaría a explorar conceptos como “límite” y “protección”, así como a recuperar el conjunto de alteraciones topográficas defensivas convirtiéndolas —despojadas de su naturaleza militar— en operaciones clave para radicar en el lugar (del latín radicare: echar raíces, enraizar: una sofisticada apropiación que gravitó “de la defensa al enraizamiento”

  13. The regeneration of a multi-ethnic mixed-use area: The case of Robin Hood Chase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Bentley

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban designers show increasing interest in promoting community participation in urban regeneration and especially housing regeneration. However, effective participation has proved difficult in multi-ethnic mixed-use areas, with their wide range of different (and often conflicting interest groups. This paper, presented in case-study form, analyses a project in one such area: the Robin Hood Chase local centre in St. Ann’s area of Nottingham. It pays particular attention to the identification of different interest groups and their associated institutions, the use of local media and social events to involve these groups in the urban design process, the use of rearrangeable models in a process of “enquiry by design”, and the production of a widely acceptable urban design strategy for the area. Analysis of feedback from participants indicates a high level of satisfaction both with the final physical design proposal and with the process itself; and also identifies directions for further development in the approach and techniques employed.

  14. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

  15. Modeling the impact of watershed management policies on marine ecosystem services with application to Hood Canal, WA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Kim, C.; Marsik, M.; Spiridonov, G.; Toft, J.; Ruckelshaus, M.; Guerry, A.; Plummer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Humans obtain numerous benefits from marine ecosystems, including fish to eat; mitigation of storm damage; nutrient and water cycling and primary production; and cultural, aesthetic and recreational values. However, managing these benefits, or ecosystem services, in the marine world relies on an integrated approach that accounts for both marine and watershed activities. Here we present the results of a set of simple, physically-based, and spatially-explicit models that quantify the effects of terrestrial activities on marine ecosystem services. Specifically, we model the circulation and water quality of Hood Canal, WA, USA, a fjord system in Puget Sound where multiple human uses of the nearshore ecosystem (e.g., shellfish aquaculture, recreational Dungeness crab and shellfish harvest) can be compromised when water quality is poor (e.g., hypoxia, excessive non-point source pollution). Linked to the estuarine water quality model is a terrestrial hydrology model that simulates streamflow and nutrient loading, so land cover and climate changes in watersheds can be reflected in the marine environment. In addition, a shellfish aquaculture model is linked to the water quality model to test the sensitivity of the ecosystem service and its value to both terrestrial and marine activities. The modeling framework is general and will be publicly available, allowing easy comparisons of watershed impacts on marine ecosystem services across multiple scales and regions.

  16. Influência de sistemas de plantio e armadilha adesiva na incidência de Frankliniella williamsi Hood na cultura do milho = Influence of planting systems and adhesive trap on the incidence of Frankliniella williamsi Hood in crop maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alves de Albuquerque

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa objetivou avaliar a influência de diferentes sistemas de plantio de milho e o efeito de armadilha adesiva na incidência de Frankliniella williamsi Hood. Os tratamentos consistiram no plantio direto do milho sobre aveia dessecada com glyphosate, aveia tombada, aveia roçada e plantas daninhas, aveia incorporada e plantio convencional. Alguns tratamentos foram associados a armadilha adesiva de coloração azul, colocada horizontalmente no centro da parcela. Verificou-se que tanto a presença de armadilha quanto os diferentes sistemas de plantio influíram significativamente na infestação das plantas de milho pelo tripes, sendo que os tratamentos “aveia dessecada” e “aveia roçada e plantas daninhas” apresentaram menor incidência do inseto, com esse efeito diminuindo com o desenvolvimento das plantas.This research aimed to evaluate the influence of different systems of corn planting and the effect of adhesive trap on the incidence ofFrankliniella williamsi. The treatments consisted of sowing the corn seed directly on oats dried by glyphosate, tilt oats, cut oats and weeds, incorporated oats, and also conventional planting. Some treatments were associated with adhesive trap of blue coloration, puthorizontally in the center of the plot. Results showed that the presence of traps, as well as the different planting systems influenced significantly on the thrips infestation, and the treatmentswith "dry oats" and "cut oats and weeds" presented smaller incidence of the insect with a decreasing effect along the plants growth.

  17. Age-specific survival of male Golden-cheeked Warblers on the Fort Hood Military Reservation, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Duarte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Population models are essential components of large-scale conservation and management plans for the federally endangered Golden-cheeked Warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter GCWA. However, existing models are based on vital rate estimates calculated using relatively small data sets that are now more than a decade old. We estimated more current, precise adult and juvenile apparent survival (Φ probabilities and their associated variances for male GCWAs. In addition to providing estimates for use in population modeling, we tested hypotheses about spatial and temporal variation in Φ. We assessed whether a linear trend in Φ or a change in the overall mean Φ corresponded to an observed increase in GCWA abundance during 1992-2000 and if Φ varied among study plots. To accomplish these objectives, we analyzed long-term GCWA capture-resight data from 1992 through 2011, collected across seven study plots on the Fort Hood Military Reservation using a Cormack-Jolly-Seber model structure within program MARK. We also estimated Φ process and sampling variances using a variance-components approach. Our results did not provide evidence of site-specific variation in adult Φ on the installation. Because of a lack of data, we could not assess whether juvenile Φ varied spatially. We did not detect a strong temporal association between GCWA abundance and Φ. Mean estimates of Φ for adult and juvenile male GCWAs for all years analyzed were 0.47 with a process variance of 0.0120 and a sampling variance of 0.0113 and 0.28 with a process variance of 0.0076 and a sampling variance of 0.0149, respectively. Although juvenile Φ did not differ greatly from previous estimates, our adult Φ estimate suggests previous GCWA population models were overly optimistic with respect to adult survival. These updated Φ probabilities and their associated variances will be incorporated into new population models to assist with GCWA conservation decision making.

  18. Age-specific survival of male golden-cheeked warblers on the Fort Hood Military Reservation, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Adam; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Hatfield, Jeffrey S.; Weckerly, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    Population models are essential components of large-scale conservation and management plans for the federally endangered Golden-cheeked Warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter GCWA). However, existing models are based on vital rate estimates calculated using relatively small data sets that are now more than a decade old. We estimated more current, precise adult and juvenile apparent survival (Φ) probabilities and their associated variances for male GCWAs. In addition to providing estimates for use in population modeling, we tested hypotheses about spatial and temporal variation in Φ. We assessed whether a linear trend in Φ or a change in the overall mean Φ corresponded to an observed increase in GCWA abundance during 1992-2000 and if Φ varied among study plots. To accomplish these objectives, we analyzed long-term GCWA capture-resight data from 1992 through 2011, collected across seven study plots on the Fort Hood Military Reservation using a Cormack-Jolly-Seber model structure within program MARK. We also estimated Φ process and sampling variances using a variance-components approach. Our results did not provide evidence of site-specific variation in adult Φ on the installation. Because of a lack of data, we could not assess whether juvenile Φ varied spatially. We did not detect a strong temporal association between GCWA abundance and Φ. Mean estimates of Φ for adult and juvenile male GCWAs for all years analyzed were 0.47 with a process variance of 0.0120 and a sampling variance of 0.0113 and 0.28 with a process variance of 0.0076 and a sampling variance of 0.0149, respectively. Although juvenile Φ did not differ greatly from previous estimates, our adult Φ estimate suggests previous GCWA population models were overly optimistic with respect to adult survival. These updated Φ probabilities and their associated variances will be incorporated into new population models to assist with GCWA conservation decision making.

  19. Histopathological effect and stress response of mantle proteome following TBT exposure in the Hooded oyster Saccostrea cucullata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondee, Phattirapa; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Svasti, Jisnuson; Simpson, Richard J; Kingtong, Sutin

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), an environmental pollutant in marine ecosystems, is toxic to organisms. Although contamination by and bioaccumulation and toxicity of this compound have been widely reported, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we exposed the Hooded oyster Saccostrea cucullata to TBT to investigate histopathological effects and proteome stress response. Animals were exposed to three TBT sub-lethal concentrations, 10, 50 and 150 μg/l for 48 h. TBT produced stress leading to histopathological changes in oyster tissues including mantle, gill, stomach and digestive diverticula. TBT induced mucocyte production in epithelia and hemocyte aggregation in connective tissue. Cell necrosis occurred when exposure dosages were high. Comparative proteome analyses of mantle protein of oysters exposed to 10 μg/l and control animals were analyzed by a 2-DE based proteomic approach. In total, 32 protein spots were found to differ (p TBT induced the expression of proteins involved in defensive mechanisms (HSP-78, HSP-70, aldehyde dehydrogenase and catalase), calcium homeostasis (VDAC-3), cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-associated proteins, energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Our study revealed that TBT disturbs calcium homeostasis via VDAC-3 protein in mantle and this probably is the key molecular mechanism of TBT acting to distort shell calcification. Moreover, proteins involved in cell structure (tubulin-alpha and tubulin-beta) and protein synthesis were reduced after TBT exposure. Additionally, differential proteins obtained from this work will be useful as potential TBT biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Socioeconomic inequalities in informal payments for health care: An assessment of the 'Robin Hood' hypothesis in 33 African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankeu, Hyacinthe Tchewonpi; Ventelou, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    In almost all African countries, informal payments are frequently made when accessing health care. Some literature suggests that the informal payment system could lead to quasi-redistribution among patients, with physicians playing a 'Robin Hood' role, subsidizing the poor at the expense of the rich. We empirically tested this assumption with data from the rounds 3 and 5 of the Afrobarometer surveys conducted in 18 and 33 African countries respectively, from 2005 to 2006 for round 3 and from 2011 to 2013 for round 5. In these surveys, nationally representative samples of people aged 18 years or more were randomly selected in each country, with sizes varying between 1048 and 2400 for round 3 and between 1190 and 2407 for round 5. We used the 'normalized' concentration index, the poor/rich gap and the odds ratio to assess the level of inequality in the payment of bribes to access care at the local public health facility and implemented two decomposition techniques to identify the contributors to the observed inequalities. We obtained that: i) the socioeconomic gradient in informal payments is in favor of the rich in almost all countries, indicating a rather regressive system; ii) this is mainly due to the socioeconomic disadvantage itself, to poor/rich differences in supply side factors like lack of medicines, absence of doctors and long waiting times, as well as regional disparities. Although essentially empirical, the paper highlights the need for African health systems to undergo substantial country-specific reforms in order to better protect the worse-off from financial risk when they seek care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Challenges for health care providers, parents and patients who face a child hood cancer diagnosis in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walubita, Mulima; Sikateyo, Bornwell; Zulu, Joseph M

    2018-05-02

    Zambia is experiencing high prevalence of childhood cancer. However, very few children access and complete treatment for cancer. This study aimed to document the challenges for health care providers, parents and patients who face a child hood cancer diagnosis in Zambia, and their coping strategies. This was an exploratory health facility-based qualitative study that was conducted at a Paediatric oncology ward at referral hospital in Zambia. In-depth individual interviews conducted with fifteen (15) caregivers and seven (7) key informants were analysed using thematic analysis. Several challenges related to managing the childhood cancer diagnosis were recorded. Individual and family challenges were inadequate knowledge on childhood cancer, lack of finances to meet treatment and transport costs as well as long period of hospitalisation that affected women's ability to perform multiple responsibilities. Whereas challenges at community level were inadequate support to address emotional and physical distress and social stigmatisation experienced by caregivers. Health systems issues included inadequate specialised health workers, poor communication among health workers, limited space and beds as well as insufficient supplies such as blood. Cultural related factors were the belief that cancer is a product of witchcraft as well as religious beliefs regarding the role of faith healing in childhood cancer treatment. Coping strategies used by parents/ caregivers included praying to God, material support from organisations and church as well as delaying having another child. Addressing the challenges for health care providers, parents and patients who face a childhood cancer diagnosis may require adopting a systems or an ecological approach that allows developing strategies that simultaneously address challenges related to the individual, family, community, health system and cultural aspects.

  2. A Comparative Morphometric Analysis of Three Cranial Nerves in Two Phocids: The Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) and the Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlert, Dennis; Kröger, Jürgen; Witt, Martin; Schmitt, Oliver; Wree, Andreas; Czech-Damal, Nicole; Siebert, Ursula; Folkow, Lars; Hanke, Frederike D

    2016-03-01

    While our knowledge about the senses of pinnipeds has increased over the last decades almost nothing is known about the organization of the neuroanatomical pathways. In a first approach to this field of research, we assessed the total number of myelinated axons of three cranial nerves (CNs) in the harbor (Phoca vitulina, Pv) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata, Cc). Axons were counted in semithin sections of the nerves embedded in Epon and stained with toluidine blue. In both species, the highest axon number was found within the optic nerve (Pv 187,000 ± 8,000 axons, Cc 481,600 ± 1,300 axons). Generally, considering absolute axon numbers, far more axons were counted within the optic and trigmenial nerve (Pv 136,700 ± 2,500 axons, Cc 179,300 ± 6,900 axons) in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. The axon counts of the vestibulocochlear nerve are nearly identical for both species (Pv 87,100 ± 8,100 axons, Cc 86,600 ± 2,700 axons). However, when comparing cell density, the cell density is almost equal for all nerves for both species except for the optic nerve in which cell density was particularly higher than in the other nerves and higher in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. We here present the first comparative analysis of three CNs in two phocid seals. While the CNs of these closely related species share some general characteristics, pronounced differences in axon numbers/densities are apparent. These differences seem to reflect differences in e.g. size, habitat, and/or functional significance of the innervated sensory systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reproducción y alimentación del tiburón enano Mustelus dorsalis (Pisces: Triakidae en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica: Elementos para un manejo sostenible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigo Rojas M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Se determinaron aspectos reproductivos y alimentarios del tiburón enano Mustelus dorsalis, a partir de 311 ejemplares capturados con línea y anzuelo en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica, durante marzo de 1999 y mayo de 2000. Se reconocieron 250 hembras y 61 machos. Las hembras son más grandes (550 a 660 mm vs. (500-585 mm y más pesadas (400-1 000 g vs. (200-300 g que los machos. Todos los ejemplares estaban maduros, la talla mínima de especimenes maduros fue de 500 y 541 mm para hembras y machos respectivamente. Entre septiembre y marzo todas las hembras y machos estaban maduras, e inmaduras entre abril y agosto. Se estudiaron 1 259 embriones, con una variación entre dos y seis embriones por litera. La longitud total de los embriones es entre 130 y 205 mm y el peso entre 6 y 35 g. Este tiburón es carnívoro polífago oportunista que consume crustáceos (Squilla hancocki, S. parva, Farfantepenaeus sp., peces (Anchoa sp. Caranx, sp, Lujanus sp., Engraulis y Ophistonema sp., y moluscos (Loligo sp. y Octopus sp.. Squilla hancocki es el ítem alimentario mas importante. La presencia de tiburones maduros de ambos sexos a lo largo del año en aguas poco profundas, y el consumo de presas bentónicas que viven en fondos rocosos costeros, sugiere la posibilidad de que este sector del Golfo de Nicoya esté funcionando como una zona de crianza y hábitat esencial. Con base en estos resultados se propone el establecimiento de un plan de manejo integral.Reproduction and feeding habits of Mustelus dorsalis (Pisces: Triakidae in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica: Elements for a sustainable management. A total of 311 sharptooth smooth-hound Mustelus dorsalis were collected in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica from March 1999 to May 2000 to determine reproduction and feeding habits. The fishes were collected using hook and line. 250 females and 61 males were identified. The females are bigger (550-660 mm and heavier (400-1 000 g than males (500-585 mm and 200-300 g

  4. Occurrence and distribution of pesticides in surface waters of the Hood River basin, Oregon, 1999-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Whitney B.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey analyzed pesticide and trace-element concentration data from the Hood River basin collected by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) from 1999 through 2009 to determine the distribution and concentrations of pesticides in the basin's surface waters. Instream concentrations were compared to (1) national and State water-quality standards established to protect aquatic organisms and (2) concentrations that cause sublethal or lethal effects in order to assess their potential to adversely affect the health of salmonids and their prey organisms. Three salmonid species native to the basin are listed as "threatened" under the U.S. Endangered Species Act: bull trout, steelhead, and Chinook salmon. A subset of 16 sites was sampled every year by the ODEQ for pesticides, with sample collection targeted to months of peak pesticide use in orchards (March-June and September). Ten pesticides and four pesticide degradation products were analyzed from 1999 through 2008; 100 were analyzed in 2009. Nineteen pesticides were detected: 11 insecticides, 6 herbicides, and 2 fungicides. Two of four insecticide degradation products were detected. All five detected organophosphate insecticides and the one detected organochlorine insecticide were present at concentrations exceeding water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values in one or more samples. The frequency of organophosphate detection in the basin decreased during the period of record; however, changes in sampling schedule and laboratory reporting limits hindered clear analysis of detection frequency trends. Detected herbicide and fungicide concentrations were less than water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values. Simazine, the most frequently detected pesticide, was the only herbicide detected at concentrations within an order of magnitude (factor of 10) of concentrations that impact salmonid olfaction. Some detected

  5. Tiny Bird, Huge Mystery-The Possibly Extinct Hooded Seedeater (Sporophila melanops Is a Capuchino with a Melanistic Cap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Areta

    Full Text Available Known with certainty solely from a unique male specimen collected in central Brazil in the first quarter of the 19th century, the Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct Hooded Seedeater Sporophila melanops has been one of the great enigmas of Neotropical ornithology, arguably the only one of a host of long-lost species from Brazil to remain obstinately undiscovered. We reanalysed the morphology of the type specimen, as well as a female specimen postulated to represent the same taxon, and sequenced mitochondrial DNA (COI and Cyt-b from both individuals. Furthermore, we visited the type locality, at the border between Goiás and Mato Grosso, and its environs on multiple occasions at different seasons, searching for birds with similar morphology to the type, without success. Novel genetic and morphological evidence clearly demonstrates that the type of S. melanops is not closely related to Yellow-bellied Seedeater S. nigricollis, as has been frequently postulated in the literature, but is in fact a representative of one of the so-called capuchinos, a clade of attractively plumaged seedeaters that breed mostly in the Southern Cone of South America. Our morphological analysis indicates that S. melanops has a hitherto unreported dark-coffee throat and that it is probably a Dark-throated Seedeater S. ruficollis collected within its wintering range, acquiring breeding plumage and showing melanism on the cap feathers. Alternatively, it may be a melanistic-capped individual of a local population of seedeaters known to breed in the Esteros del Iberá, Corrientes, Argentina, to which the name S. ruficollis might be applicable, whilst the name S. plumbeiceps might be available for what is currently known as S. ruficollis. A hybrid origin for S. melanops cannot be ruled out from the available data, but seems unlikely. The purported female specimen of S. melanops pertains either to S. nigricollis or to Double-collared Seedeater S. caerulescens based on

  6. Detection of TRPV4 channel current-like activity in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH rat cerebral arterial muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debebe Gebremedhin

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential vallinoid type 4 (TRPV4 is a calcium entry channel known to modulate vascular function by mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The present study investigated if isolated cerebral arterial myocytes of the Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH rat, known to display exaggerated KCa channel current activity and impaired myogenic tone, express TRPV4 channels at the transcript and protein level and exhibit TRPV4-like single-channel cationic current activity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunostaining analysis detected the expression of mRNA transcript and translated protein of TRPV4 channel in FHH rat cerebral arterial myocytes. Patch clamp recording of single-channel current activity identified the presence of a single-channel cationic current with unitary conductance of ~85 pS and ~96 pS at hyperpolarizing and depolarizing potentials, respectively, that was inhibited by the TRPV4 channel antagonist RN 1734 or HC 067074 and activated by the potent TRPV4 channel agonist GSK1016790A. Application of negative pressure via the interior of the patch pipette increased the NPo of the TRPV4-like single-channel cationic current recorded in cell-attached patches at a patch potential of 60 mV that was inhibited by prior application of the TRPV4 channel antagonist RN 1734 or HC 067047. Treatment with the TRPV4 channel agonist GSK1016790A caused concentration-dependent increase in the NPo of KCa single-channel current recorded in cell-attached patches of cerebral arterial myocytes at a patch potential of 40 mV, which was not influenced by pretreatment with the voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine or the T-type Ca2+ channel blocker Ni2+. These findings demonstrate that FHH rat cerebral arterial myocytes express mRNA transcript and translated protein for TRPV4 channel and display TRPV4-like single-channel cationic current activity that was stretch-sensitive and

  7. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  8. Robin Hood in reverse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Cathrine Ulla; Panduro, Toke Emil; Lundhede, Thomas

    of nature. Preference parameters are identified locally through restrictions on household utility-functions. First, we assess the relation between demographic factors and household WTP for nature. Households with higher incomes and wealth have a 0.9% higher WTP per 1.000 EUR and this figure is slightly...

  9. Statement on hooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alempijevic, D.; Beriashvili, J.; Beynon, J.

    2011-01-01

    and/or CIDT, forensic experts base their opinions on the extent to which the sum total of physical and/or psychological evidence corroborates an individual’s allegations of abuseand on evidence of physical and mental pain and disabilities associated with the alleged abuse. In our opinion...

  10. XML under the Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses XML (extensible markup language), particularly as it relates to libraries. Topics include organizing information; cataloging; metadata; similarities to HTML; organizations dealing with XML; making XML useful; a history of XML; the semantic Web; related technologies; XML at the Library of Congress; and its role in improving the…

  11. Telemedicine in the 'Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgrably, Jordan

    1998-01-01

    Telemedicine, the ability to examine patients while physically removed from them by using high-tech virtual treatment, is used increasingly to diagnose and prescribe treatment for patients in nontraditional settings. In Los Angeles (California), Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and King-Drew Medical Center communicate in real time with…

  12. Levels of non-essential elements in muscle from harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the Greenland Sea area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunborg, Linn Anne; Graff, Ingvild Eide; Froyland, Livar; Julshamn, Kare

    2006-01-01

    The non-essential elements, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead, inevitably accumulate in marine top predators such as seals. The concentration of these elements and the essential element selenium, due to its proposed protective properties against mercury toxicity in marine mammals, were measured in muscle, liver and kidney from reproductive active females of harp seal (Phagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) caught in the drift ice between Iceland and East Greenland. Arsenic levels were below 1 μg/g w.w. in all analysed samples, and were therefore low compared to other seafood products. The concentrations of arsenic found in the present study were comparable to the results reported in a similar study from 1985. Mean concentrations of total mercury in muscle from the present study were higher than levels in other seafood products. The levels of total mercury from the present study showed a tendency of lower levels in all tissue samples compared to the study from 1985. Methyl mercury displayed a trend of a lower ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury as the concentration of total mercury increased, indicating a demethylation of methyl mercury at high total mercury concentrations (e.g. mercury in liver of hooded seal). The concentration ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury in muscle samples was more than 75%, with total mercury concentration less than 0.5 μg/g w.w., whereas the ratio for liver was as low as 0.2% with a total mercury concentration of 128 μg/g w.w. The molar concentration ratios of selenium to mercury showed that selenium was present in a molar surplus to mercury in all tissues with low mercury concentration. However, there seemed to be a general mobilisation of selenium in liver and kidney tissues of harp seal and hooded seal, whereas an extraordinary mobilisation seemed to take place at hepatic mercury concentrations exceeding 50 μg/g w.w. The mean concentrations of lead in muscles in the present study were higher

  13. Multiple [3H]imipramine binding sites in brains of male and female Fawn-Hooded and Long-Evans rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieni, J.R.; Zukin, S.R.; Praag, H.M. van; Tobach, E.; Barr, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of high- and low-affinity [ 3 H]imipramine binding to whole brain homogenates from adult male and female rats of the Fawn-Hooded and Long-Evans strains were performed. Most strikingly, no significant differences were observed between the two strains in any of the binding parameters, indicating that brain [ 3 H]imipramine binding sites, which may be related to the serotonergic uptake process, appear normal in a strain of rats with serotonin platelet storage pool disease. However, a significant sex difference in high- but not low-affinity whole brain [ 3 H]imipramine Bsub(max) values was observed, with females of both strains having higher densities than males. (Auth.)

  14. Using stochastic gradient boosting to infer stopover habitat selection and distribution of Hooded Cranes Grus monacha during spring migration in Lindian, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianlong; Huettmann, Falk; Guo, Yumin

    2014-01-01

    The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) is a globally vulnerable species, and habitat loss is the primary cause of its decline. To date, little is known regarding the specific habitat needs, and stopover habitat selection in particular, of the Hooded Crane. In this study we used stochastic gradient boosting (TreeNet) to develop three specific habitat selection models for roosting, daytime resting, and feeding site selection. In addition, we used a geographic information system (GIS) combined with TreeNet to develop a species distribution model. We also generated a digital map of the relative occurrence index (ROI) of this species at daytime resting sites in the study area. Our study indicated that the water depth, distance to village, coverage of deciduous leaves, open water area, and density of plants were the major predictors of roosting site selection. For daytime resting site selection, the distance to wetland, distance to farmland, and distance to road were the primary predictors. For feeding site selection, the distance to road, quantity of food, plant coverage, distance to village, plant density, distance to wetland, and distance to river were contributing factors, and the distance to road and quantity of food were the most important predictors. The predictive map showed that there were two consistent multi-year daytime resting sites in our study area. Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally. Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

  15. Using stochastic gradient boosting to infer stopover habitat selection and distribution of Hooded Cranes Grus monacha during spring migration in Lindian, Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlong Cai

    Full Text Available The Hooded Crane (Grus monacha is a globally vulnerable species, and habitat loss is the primary cause of its decline. To date, little is known regarding the specific habitat needs, and stopover habitat selection in particular, of the Hooded Crane. In this study we used stochastic gradient boosting (TreeNet to develop three specific habitat selection models for roosting, daytime resting, and feeding site selection. In addition, we used a geographic information system (GIS combined with TreeNet to develop a species distribution model. We also generated a digital map of the relative occurrence index (ROI of this species at daytime resting sites in the study area. Our study indicated that the water depth, distance to village, coverage of deciduous leaves, open water area, and density of plants were the major predictors of roosting site selection. For daytime resting site selection, the distance to wetland, distance to farmland, and distance to road were the primary predictors. For feeding site selection, the distance to road, quantity of food, plant coverage, distance to village, plant density, distance to wetland, and distance to river were contributing factors, and the distance to road and quantity of food were the most important predictors. The predictive map showed that there were two consistent multi-year daytime resting sites in our study area. Our field work in 2013 using systematic ground-truthing confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Based on this study, we suggest that Lindian plays an important role for migratory birds and that cultivation practices should be adjusted locally. Furthermore, public education programs to promote the concept of the harmonious coexistence of humans and cranes can help successfully protect this species in the long term and eventually lead to its delisting by the IUCN.

  16. Pre-migratory congregations of Red-crowned (Grus japonensis, White-naped (G. vipio and Hooded (G. monacha cranes in the Muraviovka Park for Sustainable Land Use in 1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Gorlov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The autumn pre-migratory concentrations of Red-crowned, White-naped and Hooded Cranes were studied in the Muraviovka Park for Sustainable Land Use and Environmentla Education (Tambov District, Amur Region, Russian Federation during 23.08–29.09.1992. We counted 292 Hooded Cranes, 34 White-naped Cranes, and 17 Red-crowned Cranes during the study period. We also marked specific differences in the behaviour of the birds connected with their readiness for migration. The Hooded Cranes showed the greatest readiness for migration. We observed mutual flights, overnight stays, and feeding of adult birds and family groups in their flocks. This was not the same in the flocks of White-naped Cranes. However, the average number of birds in the flocks of White-naped Cranes had increased by the end of our observations due to new families joining the general flock. The family parties of the Red-crowned Crane and adult birds without young individuals stayed apart from each other and from other crane species during the whole observation period. We registered the autumn departure of Hooded Cranes in late September, the migratory departure of White-naped Cranes in the middle of October, and the Red-crowned Cranes left the area in the first half of November. The breeding period for all crane species starts at the same time: the third decade of April – the beginning of May. The young of the studied crane species differ significantly in the period of time before fledging: Hooded Cranes – 55–60 days, White-naped Cranes – 65–70 days, and Red-crowned Cranes – 70–75 days because of their specific differences in the ratio of size to weight (1 : 1.3 : 1.7. Thus, the time difference between the Hooded and Red-crowned Cranes is about 2–3 weeks. We suggest that this is the main reason that determines the differences between these species in the timing of the the start of autumn migration.

  17. The utility of microsatellite DNA markers for the evaluation of area-wide integrated pest management using SIT for the fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), control programs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Chinvinijkul, Suksom; Orankanok, Watchreeporn; Guglielmino, Carmela Rosalba; Franz, Gerald; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2011-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a key pest that causes reduction of the crop yield within the international fruit market. Fruit flies have been suppressed by two Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management programs in Thailand using Sterile Insect Technique (AW-IPM-SIT) since the late 1980s and the early 2000s. The projects' planning and evaluation usually rely on information from pest status, distribution, and fruit infestation. However, the collected data sometimes does not provide enough detail to answer management queries and public concerns, such as the long term sterilization efficacy of the released fruit fly, skepticism about insect migration or gene flow across the buffer zone, and the re-colonisation possibility of the fruit fly population within the core area. Established microsatellite DNA markers were used to generate population genetic data for the analysis of the fruit fly sampling from several control areas, and non-target areas, as well as the mass-rearing facility. The results suggested limited gene flow (m flies in the control areas and flies captured outside. In addition, no genetic admixture was revealed from the mass-reared colony flies from the flies within the control area, which supports the effectiveness of SIT. The control pests were suppressed to low density and showed weak bottleneck footprints although they still acquired a high degree of genetic variation. Potential pest resurgence from fragmented micro-habitats in mixed fruit orchards rather than pest incursion across the buffer zone has been proposed. Therefore, a suitable pest control effort, such as the SIT program, should concentrate on the hidden refuges within the target area.

  18. A Dose–Response Analysis of the Reproductive Effects of a Single Gestational Dose of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in Male Long Evans Hooded Rat Offspring,

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, L. E.; Ostby, J. S.; Kelce, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Male rats exposedin uteroto 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) display reduced fertility as a consequence of the direct action of TCDD on the epididymides, as well as delayed puberty and altered reproductive organ weights. The current study provides dose–response data for the reproductive effects of TCDD, administered during pregnancy, with an emphasis on the effects of TCDD on testicular, epididymal, and ejaculated sperm numbers. Long Evans Hooded rats were dosed by gavage with 0, 0....

  19. Reductions in dead space ventilation with nasal high flow depend on physiological dead space volume: metabolic hood measurements during sleep in patients with COPD and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biselli, Paolo; Fricke, Kathrin; Grote, Ludger; Braun, Andrew T; Kirkness, Jason; Smith, Philip; Schwartz, Alan; Schneider, Hartmut

    2018-05-01

    Nasal high flow (NHF) reduces minute ventilation and ventilatory loads during sleep but the mechanisms are not clear. We hypothesised NHF reduces ventilation in proportion to physiological but not anatomical dead space.11 subjects (five controls and six chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients) underwent polysomnography with transcutaneous carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) monitoring under a metabolic hood. During stable non-rapid eye movement stage 2 sleep, subjects received NHF (20 L·min -1 ) intermittently for periods of 5-10 min. We measured CO 2 production and calculated dead space ventilation.Controls and COPD patients responded similarly to NHF. NHF reduced minute ventilation (from 5.6±0.4 to 4.8±0.4 L·min -1 ; pspace ventilation (from 2.5±0.4 to 1.6±0.4 L·min -1 ; pspace ventilation correlated with baseline physiological dead space fraction (r 2 =0.36; pspace volume.During sleep, NHF decreases minute ventilation due to an overall reduction in dead space ventilation in proportion to the extent of baseline physiological dead space fraction. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  20. Agroecological niches and thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Irwin

    1991-01-01

    In 1975, Illinois experienced an exceptionally mild winter, followed by a warm spring. This sequence of climatic events resulted in a massive outbreak of the soybean thrips, Sericothrips variabilis (Beach), along with large numbers of the flower thrips, Frankliniella tritici (Fitch). The outbreak covered an area of over 600...

  1. About the Little Red Riding Hood, Durex and anger: production, meaning and reception of one fairy tale and one commercial ad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By applying the semiological analysis, this paper considers planned and unplanned readings of a provocative domestic commercial, which, in order to convey its message, transposed the Little Red Riding Hood’s character in accordance with the advertised product – Durex condoms. This commercial caused furious reactions of parents who took legal action for breaching the Law on public advertising and, especially, "harming children’s sensibility and integrity". Provocative billboards also caused numerous comments in the daily newspapers, in the Internet chat rooms, with some considering the commercial vulgar and offensive and others having no problem with it, adding that the ones who took offence belonged to those puritan and conservative layers of the society. In order to discover the reasons to this kind of reactions, I started with researching how the commercial was made and what kind of message it offered. Next, I reconsidered the meaning of the very fairy tale "The Red Riding Hood". Its original version, which contains open sexual allusions, is quite different to the changed versions offered by Charles Perrault and the Grimm brothers. Their versions can be seen as fakelore, since they outrageously intervened on the plot and the meaning of the original fairy tale. However, since the Grimm brothers’ version is the most popular, it is a fact that our public reacted with such anger led by the meaning of their version, which accentuates overeating and cannibalism, and not sexual development of girls, which is the basic message of the original version. This is where the "communicational noise" that led to those negative reactions came from. By discovering the true meaning of the tale, the answer is given to the question whether the advertising agency made a slip up, or it had actually found the right way to communicate the hidden message of the tale, and at the same time ruin the advertising campaign for which it was used. In the end, range and

  2. Year-Round Monitoring of Contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and Assessment of Risks to Salmonids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney B Hapke

    Full Text Available Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs, were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011-Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs. The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin's streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July-Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1. Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion were detected at concentrations near or

  3. The use of paleo-imaging and microbiological testing in the analysis of antique cultural material: multislice tomography, and microbial analysis of the Trogir Cathedral cope hood depicting St. Martin and a beggar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Mislav; Petaros, Anja; Kavur, Lovro; Skrlin, Jasenka; Mlinaric Missoni, Emilija; Jankovic, Ivor; Brkljacic, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Paleoradiology is the study of biological and other materials from archeological settings through the use of various medical imaging techniques. Although it is most often used in the scientific study of ancient human remains, it can also be used to study metals, ceramics, paper, and clothes. The aim of this study was to test two paleoimaging techniques (MSCT and mammography) in the analysis of an important Croatian liturgical vestment: the hood of a bishop's cope from St. Lawrence's Treasury in Trogir depicting St. Martin and a beggar. To ensure a safe environment for scientists participating in the analysis, a preliminary microbiological analysis was performed, which contributed to the database of microbiological flora found on Croatian archeological remains and relics studied to date. Due to a great amount of metal filaments, the paleoradiological analysis did not produce satisfactory results. However, a digitally enhanced image clearly showed fine metal embroidery of the hood that was not so easily perceived by naked eye. This article argues in favor of expanding paleoradiological studies on materials other than human remains and also of publishing unsatisfactory results, as important lessons for future development of techniques and methods to analyze ancient remains and seek answers about human historical and cultural heritage.

  4. Range Hood Test Facility (IAQ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Indoor Environment Group has a unique laboratory, plus associated protocols and instrumentation systems designed to characterize the performance of residential...

  5. Assessment in hygiene and radiation protection in use of shielded laminar flow hoods; Bilan en matiere d'hygiene et de radioprotection de l'utilisation de hottes blindees a flux laminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquey, C.; Roudaut, M.; Pommier, M.; Lortal, B. [Institut Bergonie, Service de pharmacie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Cazaux, A.L. [Institut Bergonie, Service de medecine nucleaire, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-01

    Radiopharmacy Bergonie institute has grown in 2008, on this occasion, shielded enclosures have been changed. The choice fell on new technologies taking into account the problems of radiation protection and bacterial contamination. We chose laminar flow hoods for achieving the prescription of radiopharmaceuticals in an aseptic environment and full automation of samples of the dose of F.D.G.. we have undertaken a review of performance of this material in sterility, radiation protection and reliability. conclusions: we reconcile our need to optimize radiation protection of manipulators while respecting the constraints of health described in the good practices of preparation (G.P.P.). However, a new problem arises, how do manage electronic and computer quickly without service organization be not perturbed. (N.C.)

  6. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  7. Structure of the mouthparts of Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl C. Childers; Diann S. Achor

    1991-01-01

    Thrips are increasingly recognized as potentially serious pests in a number of different agricultural, ornamental and sylvan commodities worldwide as indicated by the papers presented at this conference. The small size of thrips, their large numbers, capacity for flight and wind dispersal, wide host ranges, poorly understood life histories and probable potential for...

  8. Protecting the Force: Lessons from Fort Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    violence, gang -related activities) rather than on perceptions of potential security threats. To account for possible emerging internal threats, we...terrorism, school violence, sexual crimes, stalking , cyber crimes, domestic violence, arson, sabotage, communicated threats, and 38 Department of...focus on the common indicators leading up to a wide range of destructive events, such as terrorism, school violence, sexual crimes, stalking , cyber

  9. VINTE ANOS DA LEI ROBIN HOOD: UM BALANÇO DA PROTEÇÃO DO PATRIMÔNIO CULTURAL EM MINAS GERAIS (Dossiê: Gestão, Educação e Patrimônio Cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helaine Nolasco Queiroz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O presente texto busca discutir o impacto causado na preservação do patrimônio cultural mineiro pela lei Robin Hood ou Lei do ICMS que, em 2015, completa vinte anos de vigência. Ele partiu das reflexões apresentadas no XIX Simpósio Regional da ANPUH, realizado em Juiz de Fora em 2014, cujo tema foi Profissão historiador: formação e mercado de trabalho, e mostrou-se digno de maior divulgação e publicaçao pela atualidade e relevância do tema. O objetivo é conjecturar sobre as mudanças trazidas pela lei na preservação do patrimônio de Minas Gerais tanto no órgão fiscalizador da preservação no estado quanto nos municípios que aderiram à lei e, ainda, na atuação profissional dos que se dedicam à área. Palavras-chave: Patrimônio cultural, ICMS cultural, Lei Robin Hood, Minas Gerais, IEPHA/MG   Abstract: This text intends to discuss the impact caused in the Cultural Heritage of Minas Gerais (Brazil by the Robin Wood Law, or Low of the ICMS, that completes 20 years of existence in 2015. The idea received an explanation in the XIX Regional Simposion of ANPUH that took place in Juiz de Fora (Minas Gerais, Brazil in 2014. The theme of the simposium was The profession of historian: superior education and work marketing and it showed the actuality and the relevance of deeper discusstions about the subject. The purpose of the article is to reflect about the changes brought by the law in the cultural heritage preservation in Minas Gerais, in the organ that inspects the aplication of the law, in the cities that gain the ressourcers of the law and in the actuation of the professionals of the area.Keywords: Cultural Heritage, ICMS Law, Robin Hood Law, Minas Gerais (Brazil, IEPHARecebido em: 20/05/2015 – Aceito em 23/06/2015

  10. A potential field suppression system for Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel

    Science.gov (United States)

    We first observed attraction by oriental fruit flies to a basil plant in a yard and confirmed the attractiveness to basil oil (BO) in the laboratory. We subsequently identified the insecticidal compounds from BO that could kill three species of tephritid fruit flies in the laboratory, and discovered...

  11. Ocorrência de Frankliniella schultzei (trybom (thysanoptera: thripidae em plantas daninhas Ocurrence of Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom (Thysanoptera:Thripidae at weed species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. A. Lima

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizaram-se levantamentos de plantas daninhas, no Campus da UNESP em Jaboticabal/SP, com o objetivo de identificar espécies de plantas daninhas hospedeiras do tripes Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom. As plantas foram coletadas semanalmente utilizando-se o método de ensacamento. A separação dos tripes foi feita mediante emprego do funil de Berlese. Entre as 43 espécies de plantas daninhas encontradas nas áreas amostradas, 19 são hospedeiras do tripes. Rabanete (Raphanus sativus L., nabiça (R. raphanistrum L. e mostarda (Sinapsis arvensis L. foram as que apresentaram as maiores porcentagens de F. schultzei, 45, 27 e 17% do total de fêmeas coletadas respectivamente.A monitoring of weeds was carried out on the UNESP Campus in Jaboticabal, SP, with the objective of indentifying host weed species of Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom. The plants were collected weekly and transported to the laboratory inside paper bags. The Berlese funnel method was used to separate the insects from the plants. Thrips were found in 19 of the 43 weed species studied: Raphanus sativus L., R. raphanistrum L., and Sinapsis arvensis L. presented the highest percentage of thrips, consisting of 45, 27, and 17% respectively of the total females that were collected.

  12. Caracterização e tratabilidade biológica dos efluentes líquidos gerados em cabines de pintura de uma indústria moveleira Characterization and treatability of wastewater from a dying hood of a furniture industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo R. Lage Santos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar os efluentes gerados em cabines de pintura de uma indústria moveleira e avaliar a eficiência de sistemas biológicos (anaeróbio e aeróbio para o seu tratamento. O efluente industrial apresentou elevado teor de matéria orgânica (DQO total de 634 a 2.790 mg.L-1; DBO5 total de 360 a 972 mg.L-1 e baixos teores de macronutrientes (NTK de 1,9 mg.L-1 e Ptotal de 0,5 mg.L- e metais tóxicos. Os ensaios de tratabilidade em reator UASB (~25ºC e tempo de detenção hidráulica - TDH = 10 horas, indicaram uma eficiência máxima de remoção de matéria orgânica de 90% na composição volumétrica 70:30 (efluente industrial:esgoto sanitário. A alimentação do reator UASB só com efluente industrial resultou em acúmulo de ácidos graxos voláteis e inibição microbiana, mas o uso de pós-tratamento aeróbio (TDH = 96h garantiu elevada eficiência global (~88% de remoção de matéria orgânica.The main objective of this work was to characterize the wastewater from the dying hood of a woven furniture industry, and to assess the efficiency of biological processes (anaerobic and aerobic for its treatment. The physical-chemical characterization of the industrial wastewater showed a high organic matter content (total COD from 634 to 2,790 mg.L-1; total BOD5 from 360 to 972 mg.L-1, low content of macronutrients (NTK of 1.9 mg.L-1 and P of 0.5 mg.L-1 and toxic metals. The anaerobic degradation tests in a bench-scale UASB reactor (25ºC and hydraulic retention time - HRT = 10 hours showed that a maximum removal efficiency of 90% was obtained when the reactor was fed with 30% raw sewage and 70% industrial wastewater. The feeding of UASB reactor with only industrial wastewater resulted in volatile fatty acids accumulation and microbial inhibition; however, the use of aerobic post-treatment (HRT = 96 hours granted a high (~88% organic matter removal efficiency.

  13. Defense.gov - Special Report - Tragedy at Fort Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    . 6, 2015 – Army Secretary John M. McHugh approved awarding the Purple Heart and its civilian base. U.S. Army photo by Daniel Cernero High-Res >> Army Secretary John M. McHugh presents the Purple Heart to retired Army Staff Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford Jr. Army Secretary John M. McHugh presents the

  14. Archeological Testing Fort Hood: 1994-1995. Volume 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trierweiler, W

    1996-01-01

    .... These excavations discovered 88 prehistoric features including 44 burned rock middens, 24 hearths, five burned rock mounds, eight burned rock concentrations, three burials, two ash lens, and two occupation zones...

  15. Archeological Testing Fort Hood: 1994-1995, Volume 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trierweiler, W

    1996-01-01

    .... These excavations discovered 88 prehistoric features including 44 burned rock middens, 24 hearths, five burned rock mounds, eight burned rock concentrations, three burials, two ash lens, and two occupation zones...

  16. Looking Under the Hood of the Cadillac Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry; Striar, Adam

    2016-06-01

    One effect of the Affordable Care Act's "Cadillac tax" (now delayed until 2020) is to undo part of the existing federal tax preference for employer-sponsored insurance. The specific features of this tax on high-cost health plans--notably, the inclusion of tax-favored savings vehicles such as health savings accounts (HSAs) in the formula for determining who is subject to the tax--are designed primarily to maximize revenue and minimize coverage disruptions, not to reduce health spending. Thus, at least initially, these savings accounts, rather than enrollee cost-sharing or other plan features, are likely to be affected most by the tax as employers act to limit their HSA contributions. Because high earners are the ones benefiting most from tax-preferred accounts, the high-cost plan tax will probably be more progressive than prior analyses have suggested, while having only a modest impact on total health spending.

  17. Archeological Testing Fort Hood: 1994-1995, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    oak (Quercus fisiformis), Texas red oak (Q. texana), Texas ash (Fraxinus texana), Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana), and cedar elm (Uimus crassifolia...limited (Olive 3.2 CULTURAL-HISTORICAL 1993). Faunal analysis identified 15 edible genus - FRAMEWORK 0 or species-level taxa at the rockshelters...Only 593 specimens (11%) (e.g., seeds) were not an important part of the diet were identified to genus and/or species, with Seeds are fairly rare in

  18. Experiments on an Exhaust Hood for the Paint Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Madsen, Ulla; Tveit, David J.

    There is a great variation of production machinery and pollution sources in the paint industry. This paper shows the examination of a process where wood preservation is filled into cans in a process which releases organic solvents to the surrounding air.......There is a great variation of production machinery and pollution sources in the paint industry. This paper shows the examination of a process where wood preservation is filled into cans in a process which releases organic solvents to the surrounding air....

  19. Fort Hood Army Internal Review Team: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    lead to or re- sult in violent acts. 2. Finding 2.3 - DoD standards for denying requests for recognition as an ecclesiastical endorser of chaplains may...review and pos- sible revision to ensure the supporting architecture and capabilities exist to support the mission. No cost estimate is necessary to...enterprise architecture . The goal is to field interoperable installation physi- cal access control systems that can access the Defense Manpower Data

  20. Coprophagy of African Wild Dog faeces by Hooded Vultures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Campbell Murn

    Coprophagy by vertebrates is rare, especially among birds and species that consume the faeces of other species (Soave & Brand 1991,. Hirakawa 2001, Shimada 2012). While New World Vultures practice coprophagy (Del Hoyo et al. 1994,. Buckley 1999, Blanco et al. 2013), the only Old World vulture we could find that ...

  1. Virgin esitleb : Robin Hood ja sir Branson / Mart Raudsaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raudsaar, Mart, 1973-

    2003-01-01

    Ettevõtja Richard Branson'i elust, karjäärist, juhtimisprintsiipidest ning tegevusest kaubamärgi Virgin loomisel, mis ühendab endas kaht lennufirmat, reisibürood, margiviina, koolat, muusikakaubamajasid, pensionifonde jne. Lisa: Branson - koolist väljalangenud miljardär

  2. What's under the hood? Improving SCADA security with process awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Chromik, Justyna Joanna; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    SCADA networks are an essential part of monitoring and controlling physical infrastructures, such as the power grid. Recent news item show that tampering with the data exchanged in a SCADA network occurs and has severe consequences. A possible way of improving the security of SCADA networks is to use intrusion detection systems. By monitoring and analysing the traffic, it is possible to detect whether information has a legitimate source or was tampered with. However, in many cases the knowled...

  3. What's under the hood? Improving SCADA security with process awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chromik, Justyna Joanna; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    SCADA networks are an essential part of monitoring and controlling physical infrastructures, such as the power grid. Recent news item show that tampering with the data exchanged in a SCADA network occurs and has severe consequences. A possible way of improving the security of SCADA networks is to

  4. 76 FR 26182 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... ``Search'', and then click on the balloon shape in the ``Actions'' column. If you submit your comments by... horizontally for three hundred feet unless the maximum opening of 600 feet is requested. The current...

  5. Teachers in the 'Hood: Hollywood's Middle-Class Fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the urban-high-school film genre (in which a classroom of socially troubled, low-achieving students is transformed by the singular efforts of an outside middle class teacher or principal) reinforces the "culture of poverty" thesis, representing the fantasies that suburban middle class America has about life in urban high…

  6. Robin Hood tuleb / Taavi Veskimägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veskimägi, Taavi, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Põhjarannik, Severnoje Poberezhje 24. august lk. 2, Estonija 25. august lk. 2, Nädaline 24. august lk. 4, Valgamaalane 24. august lk. 2, Hiiumaa 24. august lk. 3, Lääne-Harju Ekspress 31. august lk. 4, Järva Teataja 3. september lk. 2, Vooremaa 3. september lk. 7, Virumaa Teataja 6. september lk. 7, Koit 5. september lk. 6. Autori arvates võiks üksikisiku tulumaksust 100% jääda kohalikele omavalitsustele. Autor: Res Publica

  7. Relevance and Phrase Searching in Summon: looking under the hood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hodge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly examines the mechanisms behind seemingly counter-intuitive phrase search results in Serials Solutions’ discovery platform Summon. The authors use the platform’s search API to explain why users sometimes encounter greater numbers of results when typically they would expect fewer. The article explores the reasons behind the search results and the implications for library instruction.

  8. A Robin Hood for the digital age | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This nonprofit organization, based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been working ... in this by disseminating a free weekly "webzine" RETS (Revista do terceiro setor), ... a Web-based reference centre covering public policies on digital inclusion.

  9. Under the hood of IRIS's Distributed REU Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Taber, J.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1998 the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program has provided research experiences for up to 15 students each summer. Through this 9 to 11 week internship program, students take part in an intensive week-long preparatory course, and work with leaders in seismological research, in both lab-base and field-based settings, to produce research products worthy of presentation and recognition at large professional conferences. The IRIS internship program employs a distributed REU model that has been demonstrated to bond students into a cohort, and maintain group cohesion despite students conducting their research at geographically distributed sites. Over the past 16 years the program has encountered numerous anticipated and unanticipated challenges. The primary challenges have involved exploring how to modify the REU-system to produce outcomes that are better aligned with our programmatic goals. For example, some questions we have attempted to address include: How can the success of an REU site be measured? How do you find, interest, and recruit under-represented minorities into a geophysics program? Can the program increase the probability of interns receiving some minimal level of mentoring across the program? While it is likely that no single answer to these questions exists, we have developed and piloted a number of strategies. These approaches have been developed through a process of identifying relevant research results from other REUs and combing this information with data from our own programmatic evaluations. This data informs the development of specific changes within our program which are then measured as a feedback. We will present our current strategies to address each questions along with measures of their effectiveness. In addition to broad scale systematic issues, we have also placed significant effort into responding to smaller, process challenges that all REU sites face. These range from simple logistical issues (e.g. liability), to educational issues (e.g. what "assignments" are meaningful but not so overwhelming as to take away from research time), to longer term issues such as building an effective alumni network, tracking participants, and maintaining funding. While each REU is unique, we will share our approaches to dealing with these issues, as such topics may be of use to other REUs.

  10. Lifting the Hood on Alberta’s Royalty Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Shaffer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available After some delay and significant trepidation in the energy sector, the Government of Alberta has released the panel report on the structure of a new royalty regime. While panel members, government officials and energy sector analysts understand the intricacies of the changes that have been made, there is need for an analysis that makes the changes understandable to Albertans. This report attempts to do that. At first glance it would seem that the report calls for very little change to Alberta’s royalty structure. The oil sands framework remains virtually unchanged. Existing crude oil and natural gas wells are grandfathered under the current system for 10 years. And the “modernized royalty framework” (MRF for new wells will initially provide the same industry returns and same government take as the current system would achieve. These similarities, however, fail to reflect important underlying changes that greatly improve the structure of Alberta’s royalty framework. Albertans will be pleased to learn that the new structure better represents the costs and revenues from oil and gas extraction. Why does this matter? Albertans, as owners of the resource, can lay claim to the resource rent: the revenue from the sale of oil and gas less all the costs to develop and produce it. By poorly reflecting costs, the old system led to distorted outcomes. It both discouraged investment in otherwise profitable projects, and overly encouraged bad ones. The new framework better targets the rent while reducing distortions and inefficient behaviour. This leads to greater value for resource owners and industry alike. The most important feature of the MRF is its new drilling and completion cost allowance (DCCA. The DCCA essentially creates a cost formula used for every well in the province. Rather than a plethora of drilling incentive programs, the MRF offers a low royalty rate until cumulative revenues equal the DCCA. In essence, the new framework aligns with what economists view as the most efficient form of resource taxation: a revenue-minus-costs model. Importantly, the formula is based on depth and length – key drivers of costs – not the actual costs themselves. This benchmarking creates an innovation incentive for companies to affect more efficient production. Over time, lower costs mean larger resource rents. This gets returned to Albertans as the DCCA for future wells is adjusted annually based on a cost index of all wells recently drilled in the province. Using a calculated benchmark as opposed to actual costs also eases the administrative burden that would otherwise be required for complex and costly monitoring. For oil sands, transparency is the focus. The rates and structure of royalties remain the same, as the royalty framework already uses the efficient revenue-minus-costs model. To ensure Albertans have the confidence in the process, the panel proposed that all oil sands projects annually publish information on bitumen production, revenues, operating and capital costs, and royalties paid. The report also includes a recommendation for streamlining cost-dispute resolutions. By focusing on the structure, as opposed to the split, the panel’s report takes seriously the economic theory of efficient resource taxation. The panel’s recommendations are focused on increasing the size of the pie, not haggling over how a small pie gets divided.

  11. 77 FR 28767 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... bridge openings, thereby reducing traffic queues and delays due to bridge openings. DATES: This rule is... the Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor... provide some relief to road traffic on State Routes 3 and 104. Traffic queues south of the eastern end of...

  12. New generic synonyms in the Palaeotropical genus Urothrips (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripinae) with one new species from Seychelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulitzka, Manfred R; Mound, Laurence A

    2014-01-28

    Urothrips kobroi sp. n. is described from Seychelles, and reasons are given for considering Biconothrips Stannard and Coxothrips Bournier as new synonyms of Urothrips Bagnall. This genus now includes nine species, distributed between Africa and Australia, and a key to these species is provided.

  13. DNA Barcode Analysis of Thrips (Thysanoptera) Diversity in Pakistan Reveals Cryptic Species Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Romana; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Rasool, Akhtar; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Although thrips are globally important crop pests and vectors of viral disease, species identifications are difficult because of their small size and inconspicuous morphological differences. Sequence variation in the mitochondrial COI-5' (DNA barcode) region has proven effective for the identification of species in many groups of insect pests. We analyzed barcode sequence variation among 471 thrips from various plant hosts in north-central Pakistan. The Barcode Index Number (BIN) system assigned these sequences to 55 BINs, while the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery detected 56 partitions, a count that coincided with the number of monophyletic lineages recognized by Neighbor-Joining analysis and Bayesian inference. Congeneric species showed an average of 19% sequence divergence (range = 5.6% - 27%) at COI, while intraspecific distances averaged 0.6% (range = 0.0% - 7.6%). BIN analysis suggested that all intraspecific divergence >3.0% actually involved a species complex. In fact, sequences for three major pest species (Haplothrips reuteri, Thrips palmi, Thrips tabaci), and one predatory thrips (Aeolothrips intermedius) showed deep intraspecific divergences, providing evidence that each is a cryptic species complex. The study compiles the first barcode reference library for the thrips of Pakistan, and examines global haplotype diversity in four important pest thrips.

  14. THRIPS SPECIES (INSECTA: THYSANOPTERA OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS FROM THE PARKS AND GREENHOUSES OF ADP PITESTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bărbuceanu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The observations carried-out in 2008/2010 to ornamental plants from parks and greenhouses of ADP Pitesti relieve 12 species of thrips. One species of them, Frankliniella occidentalis was identified in greenhouses on Rosa sp., Dianthus sp. and Zantedeschia sp. In parks, the thrips species belong to 12 species, dominated by Frankliniella intonsa. All of them are polypfagous and divided in two throphic levels: primary and secondary consumers. The thrips species are mentioned for the first time in Romania on this host plant. In greenhouses are necessary intensive chemical treatments and methods of cultural hygiene to limit the F. occidentalis populations.

  15. RECONOCIMIENTO E IDENTIFICACION DE TRIPS FITOFAGOS (THYSANOPTERA: THRIPIDAE Y DEPREDADORES (THYSANOPTERA: PHLAEOTHRIPIDAE ASOCIADOS A CULTIVOS COMERCIALES DE AGUACATE Persea spp. EN LOS DEPARTAMENTOS DE CALDAS Y RISARALDA (COLOMBIA RECOGNITION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PHYTOPHAGOUS THRIPS (THYSANOPTERA: THRIPIDAE AND PREDATORS (THYSANOPTERA: PHLAEOTHRIPIDAE ASSOCIATED WITH COMMERCIAL CULTIVATIONS OF AVOCADO Persea spp. IN THE DEPARTMENTS OF CALDAS AND RISARALDA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Echeverri Florez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Se consideraron tres cultivos comerciales de aguacate (Persea sp. en los municipios de Palestina (Caldas y Pereira y Marsella (Risaralda evaluando árboles en producción entre cinco y ocho años de edad, incluyendo para los tres lugares las variedades: Santana, Choquette, Booth 8, Trinidad y Trapp; además en el huerto de Pereira se incluyó la variedad Fucsia, en las que se constataron los daños y distorsiones atribuidas a la acción de los trips. Para los materiales considerados se efectuaron diez muestreos por localidad con una frecuencia quincenal, escogiendo en cada muestreo un árbol por variedad. En cada árbol seleccionado se tomaron 36 muestras así: tres por estrato (alto, medio y bajo cuatro por punto cardinal (oriente occidente, norte y sur y tres estructuras de la planta (hojas tiernas, flores y frutos en desarrollo, para un total de 360 muestras por cada variedad de aguacate, por cada una de las tres localidades consideradas. A cada muestra se le extrajeron los trips, separando los morfos de acuerdo con la colección de referencia previamente establecida; se cuantificaron y se efectuó el proceso de identificación. En total se determinaron cuatro morfos asociados al cultivo de aguacate, dos de hábito fitófago: Selenothrips rubrocinctus Giard y Frankliniella gardeniae Moulton, según Mound, (1993 nuevo reporte como especie fitófaga asociada al aguacate y los géneros Leptothrips y Karnyothrips de hábito depredador. Se encontró para las tres localidades un amplio predominio de F. gardeniae con relación a los otros tres morfos, hospedándose principalmente en las estructuras florales, y en menor proporción en brotes tiernos y frutos en desarrollo. No se encontró preferencia de los trips por un punto específico con relación a la distribución vertical y horizontal en el dosel del árbol Se constataron los daños atribuidos a los trips en aguacate, encontrando en las plantaciones: En fruto: Pericarpio deforme, partenocarpia, halos blanquecinos. En flores: Abundante caída y flores necrosadas. En hojas lamina foliar deforme y manchas rojizas y en ramas: Deformaciones, reducción de la longitud de entrenudos, hiperplasia y la llamada "rama látigo”. Con relación a la susceptibilidad de los diferentes materiales a la acción del daño, la variedad Santana fue en la que más se perciben los síntomas de afección atribuidos a los trips, y las variedades Choquette y Fucsia las que presentaron menores síntomas de afección.Three commercial avocado (Persea sp. cultivars were studied in the municipalities of Palestine (Caldas and Pereira and Marseilles (Risaralda, evaluating trees in production of ages of five to eight years, including for the three places the varieties Santana, Choquette, Booth 8, Trinidad and Trapp. Also, in the orchard of Pereira the variety Fuchsia was included. In all, the damage and distortions attributed to the action of thrips was verified. For the material considered, ten samples were made in each locality with a biweekly frequency, choosing in each sample one tree per variety. In each tree selected, 36 samples were taken as follows: three per stratum (high, intermediate and low, four per cardinal point (north, south, east and west, and from three structures of the plant (tender leaves, flowers, and developing fruits, for a total of 360 samples for each avocado variety in each of the three sampling localities. Thrips were extracted from each sample, separating the morphs according to a reference collection previously established; morphs were quantified and the identification process was undertaken. In total, four morphs associated with avocado cultivation were identified; including two phytophagous species: Selenothrips rubrocinctus Giard and Frankliniella gardeniae Moulton, the latter a new report for a phytophagous species associated with avocado, according to Mound (1998, and the genera Leptothrips and Karnyothrips with predatory habits. A widespread prevalence of F. gardeniae was found for the three localities, as compared to the other three morphs, occurring mainly in the floral structures and, to a lesser degree, in tender buds and developing fruits. Thrips did not exhibit a preference for specific locations in terms of their vertical and horizontal distribution in the tree canopy. Damage to avocado attributable to thrips was verified, demonstrating in the plantations: In fruit: Deformed pericarp, parthenocarpus, whitish halos. In flowers: Abundant flower dropping and necrosis. In leaves: Leaf blade and rust stains, and in branches: Deformations, internode length reductions, hyperplasia and the so called "branch whip". With relationship to the susceptibility of the different materials to damage, the Santana variety was the one that showed the greatest symptoms attributable to thrips, and the Choquette and Fuchsia varieties were those that showed fewer symptoms.

  16. Reestablecimiento de los géneros Frankliniella, Exophtalmothrips y Bolbothrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel P. Retana Salazar

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Four new species are described in Frankliniella genus Frankliniella marinae sp. n., moundi sp. n., sandovalensis sp. n. and orlandoi sp. n. The later synonyms of Frankliniella (Exophtalmothrips and Bolbothrips are discussed upon phylogenetical criteria, these criteria support the redescription of these genera because they are independent evolutionary lineages. The three genera are redescribed and resurrected Exophtalmothrips and Bolbothrips following the actual phylogenetics of the generic group. The genus Exophtalmothrips was a little genus with only three species, some studies on Mexico fauna, and the analysis of the species of Frankliniella from Costa Rica described in the last years increase the number of species for this genus. Bolbothrips is considered a monospecific genus with the single species aztecus misidentified as Frankliniella aztecus by some writers.

  17. Evaluation of yellow sticky traps for monitoring the population of thrips (Thysanoptera) in a mango orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, Hamaseh; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2011-08-01

    Populations of several thrips species were estimated using yellow sticky traps in an orchard planted with mango, Mangifera indica L. during the dry and wet seasons beginning in late 2008-2009 on Penang Island, Malaysia. To determine the efficacy of using sticky traps to monitor thrips populations, we compared weekly population estimates on yellow sticky traps with thrips population sizes that were determined (using a CO(2) method) directly from mango panicles. Dispersal distance and direction of thrips movement out of the orchard also were studied using yellow sticky traps placed at three distances from the edge of the orchard in four cardinal directions facing into the orchard. The number of thrips associated with the mango panicles was found to be correlated with the number of thrips collected using the sticky trap method. The number of thrips captured by the traps decreased with increasing distance from the mango orchard in all directions. Density of thrips leaving the orchard was related to the surrounding vegetation. Our results demonstrate that sticky traps have the potential to satisfactorily estimate thrips populations in mango orchards and thus they can be effectively employed as a useful tactic for sampling thrips.

  18. Minute pollinators: The role of thrips (Thysanoptera) as pollinators of pointleaf manzanita, Arctostaphylos pungens (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyahu, Dorit; McCall, Andrew C; Lauck, Marina; Trakhtenbrot, Ana; Bronstein, Judith L

    The feeding habits of thrips on plant tissue, and their ability to transmit viral diseases to their host plants, have usually placed these insects in the general category of pests. However, the characteristics that make them economically important, their high abundance and short- and long-distance movement capability, may also make them effective pollinators. We investigated this lesser-known role of thrips in pointleaf manzanita ( Arctostaphylos pungens ), a Southwestern US shrub. We measured the abundance of three species of thrips ( Orothrips kelloggii, Oligothrips oreios , and Frankliniella occidentalis ), examined their pollen-carrying capability, and conducted an exclusion experiment in order to determine whether thrips are able to pollinate this species, and if they do, whether they actually contribute to the reproductive success of the plant. Our data suggest that indeed thrips pollinate and do contribute significantly to reproductive success. Flowers exposed to thrips only produced significantly more fruit than did flowers from which all visitors were excluded. The roles of thrips as antagonists/mutualists are examined in the context of the numerous other floral visitors to the plant.

  19. Minute pollinators: The role of thrips (Thysanoptera) as pollinators of pointleaf manzanita, Arctostaphylos pungens (Ericaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Eliyahu, Dorit; McCall, Andrew C.; Lauck, Marina; Trakhtenbrot, Ana; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    The feeding habits of thrips on plant tissue, and their ability to transmit viral diseases to their host plants, have usually placed these insects in the general category of pests. However, the characteristics that make them economically important, their high abundance and short- and long-distance movement capability, may also make them effective pollinators. We investigated this lesser-known role of thrips in pointleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens), a Southwestern US shrub. We measured ...

  20. Use of gamma irradiation as a quarantine control method for Frankliniella australis (Morgan) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, J.E.; Curkovic, T.; Cayo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The black flower thrips, Frankliniella australis (Morgan), a Chilean species, causes quarantine rejections of fresh fruits for export. Today, fumigation with CH3Br is efficient to avoid these rejections, but is questioned because it affects the ozone layer, irradiation of foods being an alternative. The effect of gamma irradiation was studied in the laboratory on F. australis adults, at dosages of 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy, followed by storage at 0-5 deg C to simulate shipping conditions. Mortality immediately after irradiation was low (1.5 to 22.3% at 250 and 1000 Gy, respectively), but increased an hour later (15.8, 33.4, 44.5, and 51.7% with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy, respectively). In this evaluation, mortality with the greatest dosage was significantly larger than with 500 and 250 Gy, while results with 750 and 500 Gy were not different between them but different with the smallest dosage. At 24 hours, mortality with all dosages surpassed 91%, although only that at 1000 Gy was significantly greater than at 250 Gy. At day 4th (96 hours) there was at least 98.8% mortality for the irradiation treatments, with significant differences with the control, which then presented only 12.8% mortality. Using logit regression with results up to day 4, a probit 9 (LD99.9968) for adults was estimated at 188 Gy. This dosage is slightly less to those indicated in the literature for control of other thrips, which may be explained because of the combined use of cold storage, although more studies are necessary of this technology under commercial conditions to verify its applicability for quarantine control of F. australis. (author) [es

  1. Consequences of co-applying insecticides and fungicides for managing Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Brian A; Hsu, Cynthia L; Hoepting, Christine A

    2013-07-01

    Insecticides and fungicides are commonly co-applied in a tank mix to protect onions from onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, and foliar pathogens. Co-applications reduce production costs, but past research shows that an insecticide's performance can be reduced when co-applied with a fungicide. An evaluation was made of the effects of co-applying spinetoram, abamectin and spirotetramat with commonly used fungicides, with and without the addition of a penetrating surfactant, on onion thrips control in onion fields. Co-applications of insecticides with chlorothalonil fungicides reduced thrips control by 25-48% compared with control levels provided by the insecticides alone in three of five trials. Inclusion of a penetrating surfactant at recommended rates with the insecticide and chlorothalonil fungicide did not consistently overcome this problem. Co-applications of insecticides with other fungicides did not interfere with thrips control. Co-applications of pesticides targeting multiple organisms should be examined closely to ensure that control of each organism is not compromised. To manage onion thrips in onion most effectively, insecticides should be applied with a penetrating surfactant, and should be applied separately from chlorothalonil fungicides. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Attraction of thrips (Thysanoptera) to colored sticky traps in a Florida olive grove

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in four plots within a newly established olive grove in Florida to compare efficacy of colored sticky traps for surveillance of pests and to compare with other direct sampling methods. Over 99% of thrips collected were Frankliniella bispinosa with occasional collections of pred...

  3. Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) mitigation in seedling cotton using strip tillage and winter cover crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Michael D; Tubbs, R Scott; Wann, Dylan Q; Sullivan, Dana

    2010-10-01

    Thrips are the most consistent insect pests of seedling cotton in the southeastern United States, where symptoms can range from leaf curling to stand loss. In a 2 year study, thrips adults and immatures were sampled at 14, 21 and 28 days after planting on cotton planted with a thiamethoxam seed treatment in concert with crimson clover, wheat or rye winter cover crops and conventional or strip tillage to investigate potential differences in thrips infestations. Densities of adult thrips, primarily Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), peaked on the first sampling date, whereas immature densities peaked on the second sampling date. Regardless of winter cover crop, plots that received strip tillage experienced significantly fewer thrips at each sampling interval. In addition, assessment of percentage ground cover 42 days after planting showed that there was more than twice as much ground cover in the strip-tilled plots compared with conventionally tilled plots. Correlation analyses showed that increased ground cover was inversely related to thrips densities that occurred on all three sampling dates in 2008 and the final sampling date in 2009. Growers who utilize strip tillage and a winter cover crop can utilize seed treatments for mitigation of early-season thrips infestation.

  4. Development of sampling methods for the slash pine flower thrips Gnophothrips fuscus (Morgan), (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl W. Fatzinger; Wayne N. Dixen

    1991-01-01

    Slash pine flower thrips typically destroy about 24% of the flowers (cones) present in slash pine seed orchards. The seasonal distribution and abundance of slash pine flower thrips are being investigated and methods for sampling field populations of the insect are being evaluated for potential use in integrated pest management strategies. The efficacies of several...

  5. Soil sampling and extraction methods with possible application to pear thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Bater

    1991-01-01

    Techniques are described for the sampling and extraction of microarthropods from soil and the potential of these methods to extract the larval stages of the pear thrips, Taeniothrips inconsequens (Uzel), from soil cores taken in sugar maple stands. Also described is a design for an emergence trap that could be used to estimate adult thrips...

  6. The Scirtothrips perseae species-group (Thysanoptera), with one new species from avocado, Persea americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mound, Laurence A; Hoddle, Mark S

    2016-02-12

    Following recent molecular studies on avocado thrips, a new species is described from Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Colombia from the young leaves of avocado, Persea americana. Scirtothrips hansoni sp.n. is closely related to the Californian pest, S. perseae, and also to S. astrictus from Costa Rica that remains known from a single female. An illustrated key to these three species is provided.

  7. Repellency of Plant Extracts against the Legume Flower Thrips Megalurothrips sjostedti (Thysanoptera: Thripidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andnet Abtew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom is an important pest of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. in Africa. To propose an alternative to chemical control, the repellency of 24 plant extracts was evaluated against adult female thrips of M. sjostedti in the laboratory. Plant extracts in ethanol were separately applied on a filter paper disk in a still air visual cue olfactometer. The results showed highly significant differences in repellency among extract type, concentration and their interactions. We classified the level of repellency into four categories as strong, good, moderate and weak or non- repellent based on hierarchical ascendant classification. We identified Piper nigrum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cinnamomum cassia as strong repellents. Five extracts were classified as good, eight as moderate and the remaining eight extracts were weak or non-repellent. Repellency of the extracts increased with the concentration suggesting that the behavioral response of M. sjostedti was dose-dependent. Mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbon compounds from seven highly repellent extracts were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The use of repellent extracts could be useful in developing integrated pest management strategies for thrips on legume crops. In this regard, the specific modes of action of the identified compounds need to be investigated to incorporate them into the existing crop protection strategies.

  8. Space, time and thrips: biogeographic issues in the evolutionary ecology of Thysanoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Grehan

    1991-01-01

    Most participants of this symposium will be concerned with understanding thrips ecology primarily in order to develop practical and effective control strategies. Questions dealing with historical aspects (evolution) may seem of only isolated "theoretical" interest with little significance for everyday pragmatic concerns. Evolutionary theory is widely...

  9. Clinical implications of a close vicinity of nervus dorsalis penis/clitoridis and os pubis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Naňka, O.; Špačková, J.; Jarolím, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 7 (2008), s. 1572-1581 ISSN 1743-6095 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Dorsal Nerve of Penis * Dorsal Nerve of Clitoris * Pubis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.393, year: 2008

  10. Étude comparative du développement de Bactrocera dorsalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Son développement a été étudié en condition de choix et de non choix sur la banane rose, Musa sp. et la pomme africaine, Irvingia gabonensis. Il ressort que ... Its development has been studied in both choice and no choice condition on the pink banana, Musa sp. and the bush mango, Irvingia gabonensis. It appears that ...

  11. Édouard Manet's Tabes Dorsalis: From Painful Ataxia to Phantom Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Édouard Manet (1832-1883) is considered the 'father' of Impressionism and even of XXth century modern art. Manet's genius involved getting away from the classical narrative or historical topics and replacing them by the banality of daily life. Technically, he erased volumes into flat two-dimensional coloured planes, and distorted conventional perspective with often gross brushstrokes intentionally giving an 'unfinished' aspect to the work. It is little known that Manet had a very painful second part of his life, due to excruciating limb and chest pains, which developed in parallel with proprioceptive ataxia and gait imbalance. Manet always remained discreet about his private life, and we mainly know that his future wife was his family piano teacher, with whom he had a liaison already at age 17. Later, the great but platonic passion of his life was the painter Berthe Morisot (1841-1895), who got married to Manet's brother Eugène. In fact, we do not know whether he had any mistress at all, although he had several elegant 'flirts' in the mundane and artistic milieu. Thus, while Manet's progressive painful ataxia from age 40 yields little doubt on its tabetic origin, how he contracted syphilis at least 15-20 years before will probably remain a mystery. It is fascinating that Manet's daily struggle against pain and poor coordination may have led his art to become one of the most significant of modern times, opening the way to XXth century avant-gardes, along with another victim of syphilis, Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). Manet never showed any sign of General Paresis, and like his contemporary the writer Alphonse Daudet, his clinical picture remained dominated by paroxysmal pain and walking impairment. Difficult hand coordination made him quit watercolor painting, and during the last 2 years of his life, he had to focus on small format oil works, whose subject was nearly limited to modest bunches of fresh flowers, now often considered to be his maturity masterpieces. Having become bedridden, he had to be amputated of one leg, which was developing gangrene probably associated with ergot overuse. While he died shortly thereafter, we have some witness anecdotes suggesting that he experienced a phantom limb: when Claude Monet (1840-1926) visited him and sat down on his bed, Manet violently shouted at him that he was just sitting on his (absent) leg, which provoked terrible pains. With its facts and mysteries, the subtle interaction between Manet's illness and his work output remains one of the most intriguing stories in neurology of art. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Epicuticular chemistry reinforces the new taxonomic classification of the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae, Dacinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaníčková, L.; Nagy, Radka; Pompeiano, A.; Kalinová, Blanka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 9 (2017), č. článku e0184102. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cuticular hydrocarbons * fruit fly * Drosophila melanogaster Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Entomology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184102

  13. TRIPS (THYSANOPTERA ASOCIADOS A AGALLAS DE Ficus benjamina (LINNAEUS, 1767 (MORACEAE EN LA REGIÓN CENTRAL DE COLOMBIA GALL THRIPS (THYSANOPTERA OF Ficus benjamina (LINNAEUS, 1767 (MORACEAE IN CENTRAL REGION OF COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sepúlveda Cano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia han sido utilizados ampliamente árboles de Ficus benjamina como ornamentales en zonas verdes urbanas. En los últimos años, se ha observado en estas plantas un incremento en los síntomas de ataque de trips (hojas plegadas y necrosadas; pero a pesar de ello, es poco lo que se conoce sobre las especies que se encuentran presentes. Por esta razón, se realizó un reconocimiento de la entomofauna en varias ciudades del país, encontrando las especies de trips Gynaikothrips garitacambroneroi Retana, 2006 (fitófago y Androthrips ramachandrai Karny, 1896 (depredador, ambas reportadas por primera vez para Colombia. Adicionalmente, se recolectó el chinche depredador Montandoniola moraguesi (Puton asociado a estas agallas. Se presentan las diagnosis de las dos especies de trips apoyadas en fotografías de microscopía electrónica, con el ánimo de mostrar en detalle la morfología de estos insectosThe ficus tree Ficus benjamina has been introduced in Colombia as an ornamental in urban settings. In the last years an increment on symptoms of thrips attack (rolled and necrotic leaves have been more evident; however, little is known about the species of thrips causing such damage. This work is a preliminary survey in several cities of Colombia. The species of thrips resgistered were: Gynaikothrips garitacambroneroi Retana, 2006 (phytophagous and Androthrips ramachandrai Karny, 1896 (predator. Also was found a predatory true bug Montandoniola moraguesi (Puton associated with the galls produced by thrips. Some SEM photographs are present to show morphology details of two species of thrips associated with this tree.

  14. EFICIÊNCIA AGRONÔMICA DE INSETICIDAS NO CONTROLE DO Thrips tabaci LIND., 1888 (THYSANOPTERA, THRIPIDAE NA CULTURA DO ALHO AGRONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF INSECTICIDES IN THE CONTROL OF Thrips tabaci LIND., 1888 (THYSANOPTERA, THRIPIDAE ON GARLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Caetano Braz

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    O trabalho foi conduzido em Goiânia, Goiás, Brasil, entre maio e agosto de 2000, com o objetivo de determinar a eficiência agronômica dos inseticidas thiacloprid 480 SC, methiocarb 500 SC, imidacloprid 200 SC, betacyflutrin 50 EC, thiametoxan 25 WG e chlorpirifos 450 EC no controle de tripés (Thrips tabaci, na cultura do alho. Os produtos foram aplicados três vezes consecutivas a partir do surgimento do inseto, com intervalos de dez dias. As avaliações foram realizadas aos dois, sete e quinze dias após a terceira pulverização. Concluiu-se que, com exceção do chlorpirifos 450 EC, todos os demais inseticidas foram eficientes no controle do tripes, até quinze dias após a última aplicação. Destacaram-se o methiocarb nas duas dosagens avaliadas, 250 e 375 g.ha-1 do ingrediente ativo, que apresentaram, em média, 95% e 97,3% de eficiência, respectivamente, e o betacyflutrin 50 EC, com 95,7% de eficiência média.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Insecta; tripes; controle químico.

    A trial was carried out in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, to test the efficiency of insecticides in controlling onion thrips (Thrips tabaci on garlic. The treatments applied were thiacloprid 480 SC; methiocarb 500 SC; imidacloprid 200 SC; betacyfluthrin 50 EC; thiametoxan 25 WG; chlorpiriphos 450 EC, plus an untreated check. The insecticides were sprayed three times at ten-day intervals. Data showed that thiacloprid, methiocarb, imidacloprid, betacyfluthrin and thiametoxan were efficient in controlling the T. tabaci up to 15 days after treatment application. Chlorpiriphos with the tested dosage did not control the T. tabaci efficiently.

    KEY-WORDS: Insecta; thrips; chemical control.

  15. Thermal requirements and estimate of the annual number of generations of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on strawberry crop; Exigencias termicas e estimativa do numero de geracoes anuais de Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) em morangueiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nondillo, Aline; Redaelli, Luiza R.; Pinent, Silvia M.J.; Gitz, Rogerio [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Fitotecnica. Dept. de Fitossanidade]. E-mails: RS; alinondillo@yahoo.com.br, luredael@ufrgs.br; silviapi@portoweb.com.br; rogitz29@yahoo.com.br; Botton, Marcos [Embrapa Uva e Vinho, Bento Goncalves, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcos@cnpuv.embrapa.br

    2008-11-15

    Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is one of the major strawberry pests in southern Brazil. The insect causes russeting and wither in flowers and fruits reducing commercial value. In this work, the thermal requirements of the eggs, larvae and pupae of F. occidentalis were estimated. Thrips development was studied in folioles of strawberry plants at six constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 deg C) in controlled conditions (70 +- 10% R.H. and 12:12 L:D). The number of annual generations of F. occidentalis was estimated for six strawberry production regions of Rio Grande do Sul State based on its thermal requirements. Developmental time of each F. occidentalis stages was proportional to the temperature increase. The best development rate was obtained when insects were reared at 25 deg C and 28 deg C. The lower threshold and the thermal requirements for the egg to adult stage were 9.9 deg C and 211.9 degree-days, respectively. Considering the thermal requirements of F. occidentalis, 10.7, 12.6, 13.1, 13.6, 16.5 and 17.9 generations/year were estimated, respectively, for Vacaria, Caxias do Sul, Farroupilha, Pelotas, Porto Alegre and Taquari producing regions located in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. (author)

  16. Adubação mineral e orgânica e a densidade populacional de Thrips tabaci Lind. (Thysanoptera: Thripidae em cebola Mineral and organic fertilization and onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lind. (Thysanoptera: Thripidae population density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio de Souza Gonçalves

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O efeito da adubação mineral e orgânica sobre a densidade populacional de Thrips tabaci Lind. em cebola, Allium cepa L., foi avaliado na Estação Experimental de Ituporanga, SC (Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária e Extensão Rural de Santa Catarina, entre agosto e dezembro de 1998. Os tratamentos foram níveis de adubação mineral com N, P2O5 e K2O em dose recomendada e três vezes a recomendada, adubação orgânica e a testemunha foi a ausência de adubação. Os tratamentos foram as seguintes doses de nutrientes: 1 30 + 120 + 60kg ha-1 de NPK; 2 90 + 360 + 180kg ha-1 de NPK; 3 75kg ha-1 de N; 4 225kg ha-1 de N; 5 80kg ha-1 de P2O5; 6 240kg ha-1 de P2O5; 7 60kg ha-1 de K2O; 8 180kg ha-1 de K2O; 9 75kg ha-1 de N + 80kg ha-1 de P2O5 (esterco de suíno + fosfato natural; 10 225kg ha-1 de N + 240kg ha-1 de P2O5 (esterco de suíno + fosfato natural; 11 37,5kg ha-1 de N + 40kg ha-1 de P2O5 (esterco de suíno + fosfato natural; testemunha sem adubação. Nenhuma das fontes e níveis de adubação apresentaram nível populacional de T. tabaci superior à testemunha sem adubo.The effect of the mineral and organic fertilization on onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lind., population density was evaluated at Ituporanga Experiment Station, EPAGRI, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, between August and December 1998. The treatments were different levels of mineral fertilization with N, P2O5 and K2O at recommended rate and three times recommended rate, the organic fertilization and without fertilization was check. The treatments in nutrient rate were: 30 + 120 + 60kg NPK ha-1; 90 + 360 + 180kg NPK ha-1; 75kg N ha-1; 225kg N ha-1; 80kg P2O5 ha-1; 240kg P2O5 ha-1; 60kg K2O ha-1; 180kg K2O ha-1; 75kg N ha-1 + 80kg P2O5 ha-1 (swine manure + phosphate rock; 225kg N + 240kg P2O5 ha-1 (swine manure + phosphate rock; 37,5kg N + 40kg P2O5 ha-1 (swine manure + phosphate rock; check without fertilizer. The onion thrips population density was similar among treatments with fertilizer and the check without fertilization. The mineral fertilization didn’t increase significantly onion thrips incidence.

  17. Biología del Trips Frankliniella Occidentalis (Pegande (Thysanoptera: thripidae sobre Crisantemo Chrysanthemum morifolium l. bajo condiciones de laboratorio Developmentaland reproductive biology of Frankliniella Occidentslis (Pegande (Thysanoptera: thripidae on Chrysanthemum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardenas Estrella

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available La especie Frankliniella occidentalis (Pegande se encontró causando daño a flores de crisantemo en una empresa de la
    Sabana de Bogotá. Se estudió su biología bajo condiciones de laboratorio (24,31 ± 2,50C y 66,36 ± 12% H.R.. El rango de
    duración en días de su ciclo de vida fue: huevo 4-5, ninfa de primer instar 3-4, ninfa de segundo instar 5-8, prepupa 4-6, pupa 3-5 y los adultos alcanzaron una longevidad entre 60 y 121 días. Esta especie presentó partenogénesis de tipo arrenotoquia; de las hembras fecundadas se obtuvo una generación
    de 87,5% hembras y 12% machos. La fecundidad por partenogénesis fue de 325,7 huevos por hembra y la sexual de
    303,1 huevos por hembra.F. occidentelis (Pegande was found to be an important pest in chrysanthemum green houses at the Bogotá Plateau.
    We studied its biology under lab conditions (24 ± 2.50C and 66 ± 12% R.H.. Its life cycle was egg 4-5 days, first instar nymph 3-4 days, second instar nymph 5-3 day prepupa 4-6 days, pupa 3-5 days and the adults had a longevity between 60 and 121
    days. Females reproduce by parthenogenesis (Arrhenotoky in the absence of males. Fertilized females produced 87.5% females and 12% males. Fecundity of parthenogenetic females was 325.7 eggs per female. Fecundity of sexually reproduced females was 303.1 eggs per female.

  18. Thrips Species (Thysanoptera thripidae more common in cut flower greenhouse in Bogotá plateau Especies de trips (Thysanoptera:Thripidae mas comunes en invernaderos de flores de la sabana de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corredor Dario

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available We report sorne species found in and around greenhouses at the Bogotá plateau, whith keys and drawings to make an easier identification. Three genera were found: Taeniothrips, Thrips and
    FrankDniella; this last genus has the highest number of species found inthe greenhouses. A key to identify F. occidentalis, F. auripes, F.panamensís, F. minuta, F. colombiana, Taeniothrips simplex and thrips tabaci, and a list of hosts for each species in and out of the greenhouses are presented.Se registran algunas especies de trips hallados dentro y alrededor de invernaderos en la sabana de Bogotá, se proponen claves y esquemas para facilitar su determinación. Se encontraron tres géneros a saber: Taeniothrips, Thrips y Frank#niella; este último género presenta el mayor número de especies en los invernaderos de la Sabana de Bogotá. Se propone una clave para las especies de F. occidentaKs, F.
    auripes, F. panamensis, F. minuta, F. colombiana, Taeniothrips simplex y Thrips tabaci. También, se presenta una lista de plantas hospedantes para cada especie de trips, dentro y fuera de invernaderos.

  19. The mitochondrial genome of Frankliniella intonsa: insights into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes at lower taxonomic levels in Thysanoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dankan; Tang, Yunxia; Hu, Min; Liu, Fengquan; Zhang, Dongfang; Fan, Jiaqin

    2014-10-01

    Thrips is an ideal group for studying the evolution of mitochondrial (mt) genomes in the genus and family due to independent rearrangements within this order. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the flower thrips Frankliniella intonsa has been completed and annotated in this study. The circular genome is 15,215bp in length with an A+T content of 75.9% and contains the typical 37 genes and it has triplicate putative control regions. Nucleotide composition is A+T biased, and the majority of the protein-coding genes present opposite CG skew which is reflected by the nucleotide composition, codon and amino acid usage. Although the known thrips have massive gene rearrangements, it showed no reversal of strand asymmetry. Gene rearrangements have been found in the lower taxonomic levels of thrips. Three tRNA genes were translocated in the genus Frankliniella and eight tRNA genes in the family Thripidae. Although the gene arrangements of mt genomes of all three thrips species differ massively from the ancestral insect, they are all very similar to each other, indicating that there was a large rearrangement somewhere before the most recent common ancestor of these three species and very little genomic evolution or rearrangements after then. The extremely similar sequences among the CRs suggest that they are ongoing concerted evolution. Analyses of the up and downstream sequence of CRs reveal that the CR2 is actually the ancestral CR. The three CRs are in the same spot in each of the three thrips mt genomes which have the identical inverted genes. These characteristics might be obtained from the most recent common ancestor of this three thrips. Above observations suggest that the mt genomes of the three thrips keep a single massive rearrangement from the common ancestor and have low evolutionary rates among them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Insecticide Rotation Programs with Entomopathogenic Organisms for Suppression of Western Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) Adult Populations under Greenhouse Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivett, Jessica M; Cloyd, Raymond A; Bello, Nora M

    2015-08-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is one of the most destructive insect pests of greenhouse production systems with the ability to develop resistance to a wide variety of insecticides. A common resistance management strategy is rotating insecticides with different modes of action. By incorporating entomopathogenic organisms (fungi and bacteria), which have discrete modes of action compared to standard insecticides, greenhouse producers may preserve the effectiveness of insecticides used for suppression of western flower thrips populations. The objective of this study was to determine how different rotation programs that include entomopathogenic organisms (Beauveria bassiana, Isaria fumosoroseus, Metarhizium anisopliae, and Chromobacterium subtsugae) and commonly used standard insecticides (spinosad, chlorfenapyr, abamectin, and pyridalyl) may impact the population dynamics of western flower thrips adult populations by means of suppression. Eight-week rotation programs were applied to chrysanthemum, Dendranthema x morifolium plants and weekly counts of western flower thrips adults captured on yellow sticky cards were recorded as a means to evaluate the impact of the rotation programs. A final quality assessment of damage caused by western flower thrips feeding on foliage and flowers was also recorded. Furthermore, a cost comparison of each rotation program was conducted. Overall, insecticide rotation programs that incorporated entomopathogenic organisms were not significantly different than the standard insecticide rotation programs without entomopathogenic organisms in suppressing western flower thrips adult populations. However, there were no significant differences among any of the rotation programs compared to the water control. Moreover, there was no differential effect of the rotation programs on foliage and flower quality. Cost savings of up to 34% (in US dollars) are possible when including entomopathogenic organisms in the rotation program. Therefore, by incorporating entomopathogenic organisms into insecticide rotation programs, greenhouse producers can decrease costs without affecting suppression, as well as diminish selection pressure on western flower thrips adult populations, which may avoid or delay resistance development. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Thermal requirements and estimate of the annual number of generations of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on strawberry crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondillo, Aline; Redaelli, Luiza R.; Pinent, Silvia M.J.; Gitz, Rogerio

    2008-01-01

    Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is one of the major strawberry pests in southern Brazil. The insect causes russeting and wither in flowers and fruits reducing commercial value. In this work, the thermal requirements of the eggs, larvae and pupae of F. occidentalis were estimated. Thrips development was studied in folioles of strawberry plants at six constant temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 deg C) in controlled conditions (70 +- 10% R.H. and 12:12 L:D). The number of annual generations of F. occidentalis was estimated for six strawberry production regions of Rio Grande do Sul State based on its thermal requirements. Developmental time of each F. occidentalis stages was proportional to the temperature increase. The best development rate was obtained when insects were reared at 25 deg C and 28 deg C. The lower threshold and the thermal requirements for the egg to adult stage were 9.9 deg C and 211.9 degree-days, respectively. Considering the thermal requirements of F. occidentalis, 10.7, 12.6, 13.1, 13.6, 16.5 and 17.9 generations/year were estimated, respectively, for Vacaria, Caxias do Sul, Farroupilha, Pelotas, Porto Alegre and Taquari producing regions located in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. (author)

  2. The role of weeds in the spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus by thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in tobacco crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzivassiliou, E.K.; Peters, D.; Katis, N.I.

    2007-01-01

    Oviposition of Thrips tabaci, larval development and their potential to acquire Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) from infected Amaranthus retroflexus, Datura stramonium, Lactuca serriola, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus plants and the ability of the adults to transmit this virus to these weeds

  3. Laboratory Study of The Effect of Lemongrass Leaves Cymbopogon citratus on An Onion Thrips Insect Thrips tabaci (Thripidae: Thysanoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ather A. Mohsin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study was carried out to test the effect of the extracts of ethanol, chloroform, volatile oil and emulsifier of Cymbopogon citratus in killing the adults of the thrips tabaci. The concentrations 250, 500 and 1000 ppm. The results showed that the highest percentage of killed in Volatile oil with a concentration of 1000 ppm at 60.00, 63.33, 66.66, 70 and 76.66% for the first, second, third, fifth and seventh days of control and the lowest percentage was for the emulsifier at 30.00, 36.66, 46.66, 53.33 and 63.33% for the first and second, third, fifth and seventh days of the control, respectively, and we noticed that the higher the concentrations, the higher the percentage of killings and the increase in the percentage of killings cumulatively, as it was the highest percentage of killing on the seventh day.

  4. Field population studies of the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) for the SIT programme in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keawchoung, P.; Limohpasmanee, V.; Dokmaihom, R.; AImyim, A.; Meecheepsom, S.

    2000-01-01

    Pakchong district is a large area in the Nakornrajchasima province in Thailand which produces many kinds of tropical fruits. As fruit flies are serious pests in fruit plantations in the area, the Department of Agriculture Extension has tried to control them by using the sterile insect technique (SIT) with complementary technology from the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP). In order to obtain data required to plan the SIT programme to eradicate the fruit flies, subsequent field population studies were conducted

  5. Natural field infestation of Mangifera casturi and M.lalijiwa by oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Mangifera indica, is a crop cultivated pantropically. There are, however, many other Mangifera spp. (“mango relatives”) which have much more restricted distributions and are poorly known, but have potential to produce mango-like fruits in areas where mangoes do not grow well or could be tapp...

  6. Effects of gamma radiation on mortality of oriental fruit fly Dacus Dorsalis Hendel when innoculated in Manila super mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoto, E.C.; Resilva, S.S.; Rosario, M.S.E. del; Casubha, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of radiation treatment showed that fruitfly eggs inoculated into export grade mature green mangoes were severely damaged with radiation dose of 350 and 400 Gy and no larvae survived the treatments. At 300 Gy, an average of 0.08 larvae was recovered when the insect was treated either as young or mature larvae. On the other hand, the young and mature larvae were more resistant to radiation effects than the eggs, although the differences observed were not significant between the young and older larvae. When the adult emergence was used as the criterion for survival, no adult fly was recovered at 100 Gy and above from approximately 2400 insects tested per treatment. Large scale irradiation for confirmation of the results using about 6000 test insects inoculated in mangoes showed 100% mortality of zero adult emergence after treatment with 100Gy. (Author). 1 fig.; 2 tabs.; 10 refs

  7. Population cardiovascular health and urban environments: the Heart Healthy Hoods exploratory study in Madrid, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Bilal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim is to conduct an exploratory study to provide an in-depth characterization of a neighborhood’s social and physical environment in relation to cardiovascular health. A mixed-methods approach was used to better understand the food, alcohol, tobacco and physical activity domains of the urban environment. Methods We conducted this study in an area of 16,000 residents in Madrid (Spain. We obtained cardiovascular health and risk factors data from all residents aged 45 and above using Electronic Health Records from the Madrid Primary Health Care System. We used several quantitative audit tools to assess: the type and location of food outlets and healthy food availability; tobacco and alcohol points of sale; walkability of all streets and use of parks and public spaces. We also conducted 11 qualitative interviews with key informants to help understanding the relationships between urban environment and cardiovascular behaviors. We integrated quantitative and qualitative data following a mixed-methods merging approach. Results Electronic Health Records of the entire population of the area showed similar prevalence of risk factors compared to the rest of Madrid/Spain (prevalence of diabetes: 12 %, hypertension: 34 %, dyslipidemia: 32 %, smoking: 10 %, obesity: 20 %. The food environment was very dense, with many small stores (n = 44 and a large food market with 112 stalls. Residents highlighted the importance of these small stores for buying healthy foods. Alcohol and tobacco environments were also very dense (n = 91 and 64, respectively, dominated by bars and restaurants (n = 53 that also acted as food services. Neighbors emphasized the importance of drinking as a socialization mechanism. Public open spaces were mostly used by seniors that remarked the importance of accessibility to these spaces and the availability of destinations to walk to. Conclusion This experience allowed testing and refining measurement tools, drawn from epidemiology, geography, sociology and anthropology, to better understand the urban environment in relation to cardiovascular health.

  8. Taking Boys out of the Hood: Exile as a Parenting Strategy for African American Male Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joseph B., Jr.; Van Brakle, Mischelle; St. Vil, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that inner-city neighborhood effects are correlated with school dropout, substance abuse, crime, violence, homicide, HIV risk related behaviors, and incarceration for adolescent African American males. Parents of adolescent African American males face many challenges as they try to keep their children safe in high-risk…

  9. Fort Hood Land Management System (LMS) Military Field Application Site FY99 In-progress Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Alan

    1999-01-01

    .... LMS demonstration efforts provide opportunities to test, evaluate, modify, and document how LMS capabilities help to address specific user problems and how LMS capabilities fit into decision processes at user sites...

  10. Installation dismantling system, working process and hood utilizable in this system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.C.; Mulcey, P.; Morel, P.; Vavasseur, C.

    1989-01-01

    The system for dismantling an installation under a controlled atmosphere is made by a tool polluting the atmosphere, a gas blanket creating a continement zone around the tool, an extractor removing polluted gas from the zone, a purifier for the extracted gas and a controller regulating the flow of gas in the blanket and keeping the installation at constant pressure [fr

  11. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Stage of Construction on or After or Which Undergo a Major Conversion Completed on or After September 15... pre-engineered dry or wet chemical fire extinguishing system meeting the applicable sections of NFPA...

  12. Addendum 6 to CSAR 79-038 out-of-hood plutonium storage (burial box)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiao, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Addendum considered an increase in the limit of fissile material in a stacked container array to 500 grams. In other words, the sum of fissile material in an array of containers is limited to 500 grams, regardless of whether the containers are stacked or not. The results of this evaluation indicates that with the modification of the fissile limits described, the system of a container array will stay sub-critical

  13. 77 FR 26699 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... maritime public and vessels participating in the exercise by preventing collisions between exercising... and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of that Order. The Office of Management and Budget has not reviewed...

  14. Air Force Follow-On Review. Protecting The Force: Lessons From Fort Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Demorah Hayes Mrs. Sherry Terrell Ms. Jeanne Shamburger Mr. Andrew Thayer Graphic Designers Mr. Daniel Armstrong Ms. Susan Fair Printing Specialists Ms. Ann Bailey Mrs. Nedra Looney Mrs. Vivian O’Neal

  15. ALARA Review of 233-S Process Hood D and D and Related Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review of design packages for planned work at the 233-S Facility. The ALARA review was initiated in accordance with the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) Integrated Environmental, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS) workflow process

  16. Robin Hood vs. King John Redistribution: How Do Local Judges Decide Cases In Brazil?

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Ivan Cesar

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses two opposed hypotheses to predict the behavior of judges when they have to decide a claim between parties with asymmetrical eco- nomic and political power. The .rst, which has broad acceptance among policy makers in Brazil, is the jurisdictional uncertainty hypothesis (Arida et al, 2005) that suggests that Brazilian judges tend to favor the weak party in the claim as a form of social justice and redistribution of income in favor of the poor. Glaeser et al (2003) stated ...

  17. History, Hollywood, and the Hood: Challenging Racial Assumptions in Rural Central Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, John

    2007-01-01

    In light of research on diversity learning and teaching, this article describes how an introductory course on cinematic depictions of African Americans taught at a predominately white, rural university campus leads students to see the impact of history and Hollywood on their own local and statewide communities. Like others who teach courses on…

  18. Media Education in the United States: A Check under the "Gestalt" Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Melissa

    1998-01-01

    Examines four commonalities of media education in the United States. Outlines the four ideological perspectives that in fact guide media education in the United States: celebration, protectionism, cultural criticism, and educated consumerism. Suggests what all of this means for the future of media education in the United States and what will be…

  19. Bulk Fuel Storage Requirements for Maintenance, Repair, and Environmental Projects at Fort Hood, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carros, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    This report is one in a series that addresses the accuracy and reliability of maintenance, repair, environmental, and construction requirements for bulk fuel storage and delivery systems infrastructure...

  20. Game programmer's guide to Torque under the hood of the Torque game engine

    CERN Document Server

    Maurina , Edward F

    2006-01-01

    game programmer working with the Torque game engine must have ""The Game Programmer's Guide To Torque"": it teaches everything needed to design your own game, using experiences of game makers and industry veterans well versed in Torque technology. A Torque Game engine demo is included on an accompanying cd while step-by-step examples tell how to use it. Its focus on all the basics makes for an exceptional coverage for all levels of game programmer. -Bookwatch, August 2006

  1. Robin Hood effects on motivation in math: Family interest moderates the effects of relevance interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Isabelle; Flunger, Barbara; Dicke, Anna-Lena; Gaspard, Hanna; Brisson, Brigitte M; Nagengast, Benjamin; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    Using a cluster randomized field trial, the present study tested whether 2 relevance interventions affected students' value beliefs, self-concept, and effort in math differently depending on family background (socioeconomic status, family interest (FI), and parental utility value). Eighty-two classrooms were randomly assigned to either 1 of 2 intervention conditions or a control group. Data from 1,916 students (M age = 14.62, SD age = 0.47) and their predominantly Caucasian middle-class parents were obtained via separate questionnaires. Multilevel regression analyses with cross-level interactions were used to investigate differential intervention effects on students' motivational beliefs 6 weeks and 5 months after the intervention. Socioeconomic status, FI, and parental utility values were investigated as moderators of the intervention effects. The intervention conditions were especially effective in promoting students' utility, attainment, intrinsic value beliefs, and effort 5 months after the intervention for students whose parents reported lower levels of math interest. Furthermore, students whose parents reported low math utility values especially profited in terms of their utility and attainment math values 5 months after the intervention. No systematic differential intervention effects were found for socioeconomic status. These results highlight the effectiveness of relevance interventions in decreasing motivational gaps between students from families with fewer or more motivational resources. Findings point to the substantial importance of motivational family resources, which have been neglected in previous research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. National Register Testing of 19 Prehistoric Archeological Sites on Fort Hood, Texas: The 1995 Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    arboreal species include ash (Fraxinus sp.), redbud (Cercis canadensis), hack- berry (Celtis sp.), Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana), and Mexican...from flotation of hearth fill were identified as Celtis sp. nutlets, woody legume, Rosaceae wood, and Diospyros virginiana wood, the latter...early 1990s. For consistency, all of their studies have focused on a single genus , Rabdotus sp., that is abundant in the archeological deposits at

  3. National Register Testing of 42 Prehistoric Archeological Sites on Fort Hood, Texas: The 1996 Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    the mussel shells belong to the family Unionidae, but no attempt to identify genus or species was made. At least nine different genera of mussels...ornaments or tools. Four of the modified shells are identifiable to genus : two are cf. Lampsilis sp. (one from 41CV578 and one from 41CV1250), one is... Diospyros texana Eragrostis intermedia Eragrostis trichodes Erigeron tenuis Erioneuron pilosum Erodium texanum Euphorbia roemeriana Evax

  4. 75 FR 30364 - Mt. Hood and Willamette National Forests, Oregon; Cascade Crossing Transmission Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... stations associated with the ``smart'' grid communication system, and permanent roads which would be used.... Wednesday, June 23 4-7 p.m Oregon City, Oregon City High School, 19761 S. Beavercreek Rd. Thursday, June 24 4-7 p.m Salem, McKay High School, 2440 Lancaster Dr., NE. Tuesday, June 29 4-7 p.m Mill City, Mill...

  5. Tales from the "hood:" placing reproductive health communication between African American fathers and children in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohalete, Nnenna; Georges, Jane; Doswell, Willa

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate reproductive health communication between African American fathers and their children. In this qualitative ethnographic study, data were collected through tape-recorded individual interviews about the content and timing of reproductive health communication, the reproductive health values fathers intended to impart to their children, and their comfort level in doing so. A total sample of 19 African-American fathers participated. Data were coded according to the qualitative analytic principles established by Miles and Huberman (1994), and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis approaches. Although 10 fathers reported feeling uncomfortable having these conversations, 18 reported having reproductive health communication with their children, and most encouraged their sons and daughters to delay sex until adulthood. These conversations were primarily driven by the fear of HIV/AIDS and the negative consequences of sex; however, some conversations were inappropriate for developmental age. African-American fathers may benefit from education to help them have age appropriate reproductive health communication with their children. Registered Nurses and Nurse Practitioners are well positioned to educate African American adolescents and their fathers on reproductive health. Future dyadic African American father-child studies are needed to explore more fully African-American children's perceptions of reproductive health communication and the effect on delaying sex.

  6. Looking Under the Hood of Third-Party Punishment Reveals Design for Personal Benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Max M; Delton, Andrew W; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2016-03-01

    Third-party intervention, such as when a crowd stops a mugger, is common. Yet it seems irrational because it has real costs but may provide no personal benefits. In a laboratory analogue, the third-party-punishment game, third parties ("punishers") will often spend real money to anonymously punish bad behavior directed at other people. A common explanation is that third-party punishment exists to maintain a cooperative society. We tested a different explanation: Third-party punishment results from a deterrence psychology for defending personal interests. Because humans evolved in small-scale, face-to-face social worlds, the mind infers that mistreatment of a third party predicts later mistreatment of oneself. We showed that when punishers do not have information about how they personally will be treated, they infer that mistreatment of other people predicts mistreatment of themselves, and these inferences predict punishment. But when information about personal mistreatment is available, it drives punishment. This suggests that humans' punitive psychology evolved to defend personal interests. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Survey of the Golden-Cheeked Warbler on Fort Hood in Support of NEPA Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    are not to be used for advertising , publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or...contained 3 nestlings , which was the same number of fledglings observed being fed by both adults for at least 3 weeks within its territory. The sec- ond...nest was found on 17 May 2006 with a female incubating. Observa- tions were made of both adults feeding an unknown number of nestlings but the final

  8. Making Small-Scale Classroom Greenhouse Gas Flux Calculations Using a Handmade Gas Capture Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Peter W.; Sharma, Ashok; Burn, Stewart; Goodman, Nigel; Parisi, Alfio; Downs, Nathan; Lemckert, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The emissions of various types of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from natural and industrial sources are undergoing a great deal of scrutiny around the world. The three main GHGs that are of most concern are carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]), nitrous oxide (N[subscript 2]O) and methane (CH[subscript 4]). CO[subscript 2], N[subscript 2]O and CH[subscript…

  9. A Descriptive Study of the Utilization of Behavioral Health Resources in the Fort Hood Catchment Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-15

    s Non-psychotic 85% 80% 30 4-5 Questionnaire psychiatric illness (GHQ-30) Beck Depression s Depth of depression 92% 80% 21 14-Mild Inventory - II...par clinic 1 aaparata from abova provdar count and not Baaing pre 00 par protected FTE requiring a dedicated work space but not a private office Saa

  10. A review of the literature on child- hood Burkitt lymphoma in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-08

    Dec 8, 2015 ... south of the equator and characterized by malaria holoendemicity2. ..... Complete response rate (defined by complete tumour regression) was ..... Guinea 40 years on. Ann Trop ... phoma in the northern savanna of. Nigeria.

  11. Geospatial Data Enterprise Repository: A Report on the Prototype for Fort Hood, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiz, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    ...: duplication of data themes, uncertainty about accountability for the content of key data themes, turn over of GIS staff with a subsequent loss of institutional knowledge, and time-consuming data requests...

  12. 75 FR 62755 - Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon; Cooper Spur-Government Camp Land Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Government Camp may result in no net loss of wetlands. Cultural and Heritage resource surveys were conducted... quality, wetlands and floodplains, and cultural/historic sites revealed the following preliminary issues... will be conveying more wetlands than would be acquired. Executive Order 11990 requires no net loss of...

  13. Staying in the Hood: Black Lesbian and Transgender Women and Identity Management in North Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Siobhan

    2016-12-01

    The concept Don't Ask, Don't Tell regarding Black LGBT sexuality in Black communities has been an acceptable form of identity management for Black LGBT people. In other words, Black LGBT people are accepted as long as they are not vocal about their sexuality. However, this is changing with the issue of gay marriage, which is creating a space where Black LGBT people are more open about their gender identity and sexuality in heterosexual Black spaces. This new form of openness allows Black LGBT people to "stay in" their communities, as opposed to coming out. In this article I examine how Black LGBT women in North Philadelphia stay in their communities: being politically active regarding LGBT issues, disengaging from LGBT issues, passing, and educating straight Black people about issues affecting the Black LGBT community. I conclude with implications of staying in and intersectionality among Black heterosexual and LGBT women fighting for social change.

  14. Adapting to a New Core Curriculum at Hood College: From Computation to Quantitative Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Mayfield

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our institution, a small, private liberal arts college, recently revised its core curriculum. In the Department of Mathematics, we took this opportunity to formally introduce Quantitative Literacy into the language and the reality of the academic requirements for all students. We developed a list of characteristics that we thought all QL courses should exhibit, no matter in which department they are taught. We agreed on a short list of learning outcomes for students who complete those courses. Then we conducted a preliminary assessment of those two attributes: the fidelity of QL-labeled courses to our list of desired characteristics, and our students’ success in meeting the learning objectives. We also performed an attitudes survey in two courses, measuring students’ attitudes towards mathematics before and after completing a QL course. In the process we have had valuable conversations with full- and part-time faculty, and we have been led to re-examine the role of adjunct faculty in our department. In this paper we list our course characteristics and include one instructor’s description of how she ensured that her QL course exhibited many of those traits. We include examples of student work illustrating how they met the learning objectives, and we report on the results of our attitudes survey. Much remains to be done; we describe our preliminary conclusions and plans for the future.

  15. Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    representative of crow territorial communication and taking into account ground effect and air turbulence, we predict an optimal transmission frequency range between 0,5-1.6 kHz. In a natural open field crow habitat we measure, with sender and receiver heights of 2.8 m and transmission distances up to 320 m...

  16. Facilitators of transforming primary care: a look under the hood at practice leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Katrina E; Halladay, Jacqueline R; Wise, Alison; Reiter, Kristin; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Ward, Kimberly; Mitchell, Madeline; Qaqish, Bahjat

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how characteristics of practice leadership affect the change process in a statewide initiative to improve the quality of diabetes and asthma care. We used a mixed methods approach, involving analyses of existing quality improvement data on 76 practices with at least 1 year of participation and focus groups with clinicians and staff in a 12-practice subsample. Existing data included monthly diabetes or asthma measures (clinical measures) and monthly practice implementation, leadership, and practice engagement scores rated by an external practice coach. Of the 76 practices, 51 focused on diabetes and 25 on asthma. In aggregate, 50% to 78% made improvements within in each clinical measure in the first year. The odds of making practice changes were greater for practices with higher leadership scores (odds ratios = 2.41-4.20). Among practices focused on diabetes, those with higher leadership scores had higher odds of performing nephropathy screening (odds ratio = 1.37, 95% CI, 1.08-1.74); no significant associations were seen for the intermediate outcome measures of hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Focus groups revealed the importance of a leader, typically a physician, who believed in the transformation work (ie, a visionary leader) and promoted practice engagement through education and cross-training. Practices with greater change implementation also mentioned the importance of a midlevel operational leader who helped to create and sustain practice changes. This person communicated and interacted well with, and was respected by both clinicians and staff. In the presence of a vision for transformation, operational leaders within practices can facilitate practice changes that are associated with clinical improvement.

  17. The Mac'OS X command line Unix under the hood

    CERN Document Server

    McElhearn, Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The Mac command line offers a faster, easier way to accomplish many tasks. It''s also the medium for many commands that aren''t accessible using the GUI. The Mac OS X Command Line is a clear, concise, tutorial-style introduction to all the major functionality provided by the command line. It''s also packed with information the experienced users need, including little-known shortcuts and several chapters devoted to advanced topics. This is a book to get you started, but also a book you won't soon outgrow.

  18. How Living in the ‘Hood Affects Risky Behaviors Among Latino and African American Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Santiago

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Using data from a natural experiment in Denver, we investigate whether the initiation of running away from home, aggressive or violent behavior, and marijuana use during adolescence are statistically related to the neighborhood contexts in which low-income Latino and African American youth were raised. Our analysis is based on retrospective child, caregiver, household, and neighborhood data for a sample of approximately 850 Latino and African American youth whose families were quasi-randomly assigned to public housing operated by the Denver (CO Housing Authority during part of their childhood. We used Cox PH models and accelerated failure time models to estimate ethnic differentials in the hazards and timing of initiation of these risky behaviors during adolescence. We found that multiple dimensions of neighborhood context—especially safety, ethnic and nativity composition, and socioeconomic status—strongly and robustly predicted initiation of running away, aggressive or violence behavior, and marijuana use during adolescence.

  19. The Point of the Centre: Present and Past Discourses of “China”-hood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mervart

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El continuo auge económico y geopolítico de China nos recuerda que lo que actualmente se denomina China fue hace un tiempo el Reino del Centro, el centro del mundo. La implicación de esta afirmación es que al igual que la China histórica fue centro gravitacional global en Asia, su trayectoria actual puede reposicionar a China inexorablemente en el centro del orden mundial. El análisis histórico de Zhongguo o Zhonghua , la “Tierra del Medio” o la “Civilización Central”, y su postulación a convertirse en referencia moral universal, sin contar con la hegemonía geopolítica real sobre la región circundante, puede arrojar luz sobre este tema. La ambición de China se asemejaba a epítetos como “la Tierra de los hombres libres”, “la Nueva Roma” o “Zión”. Históricamente, la fuerza gravitacional que constituyó lo que algunos han denominado la sinoesfera procedía de esta postulación moral universal a la cual aspiraba. Dentro de la sinoesfera , en una compleja historia de negociación de relaciones con las sucesivas dinastías imperiales que gobernaban en el continente, Japón ha sido durante tiempo el punto focal de discusión sobre el significado y objetivo de la postulación china de representar el Reino del Centro. Efectivamente, a lo largo de su historia, Japón se ha definido a sí mismo a través del reconocimiento, la negación, la emulación o la demanda de esa centralidad. Quizás podamos entender mejor lo que China ha significado profundizando en las aspiraciones japonesas de ser China.

  20. The Digital Hood: Social Media Use among Youth in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robin; Gilliard-Matthews, Stacia; Dunaev, Jamie; Woods, Marcus; Brawner, Bridgette M

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the role of social media in the lives of youth living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Feminist Standpoint theory, which privileges the voices of marginalized communities in understanding social phenomena, suggests that youth at the margins have specific knowledge that helps us understand social media more broadly. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 females and 30 males aged 13 to 24 about their social worlds and neighborhoods, both on- and offline. The findings reveal a dynamic and somewhat concerning interplay between the geographic neighborhood and the digital neighborhood, whereby negative social interactions in the geographic neighborhood are reproduced and amplified on social media.

  1. 78 FR 8027 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... 5, 2012. The Coast Guard received zero comments submitted via regulations.gov and received zero... zero comments from the Small Business Administration on this rule. The Coast Guard certifies under 5 U... more in any one year. Though this rule will not result in such an expenditure, we do discuss the...

  2. Endangered Species Management Plan for Fort Hood, Texas: FY06-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Texas red oak, post oak, Texas ash (Fraxinus texensis), shin oak, blackjack oak (Quercus marilandica), slippery elm (Ulmus rubra), cedar elm ...by Ashe juniper and Texas oak. Other important tree species included live oak, cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), Lacey oak (Quercus laceyi), Arizona...0.83 m (Cimprich 2005). Nest substrates include shin oak, Texas red oak, Texas redbud, Ashe juniper, Texas ash, Plateau live oak, cedar elm , rusty

  3. Critical care in the Philippines: the "Robin Hood Principle" vs. Kagandahang loob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, L D; Sy, P A

    1998-12-01

    Practical medical decisions are closely integrated with ethical and religious beliefs in the Philippines. This is shown in a survey of Filipino physicians' attitudes towards severely compromised neonates. This is also the reason why the ethical analysis of critical care practices must be situated within the context of local culture. Kagandahang loob and kusang loob are indigenous Filipino ethical concepts that provide a framework for the analysis of several critical care practices. The practice of taking-from-the-rich-to-give-to-the-poor in public hospitals is not compatible with these concepts. The legislated definition of death and other aspects of the Philippine Law on Organ Transplants also fail to be compatible with these concepts. Many ethical issues that arise in a critical care setting have their roots outside the seemingly isolated clinical setting. Critical care need not apply only to individuals in a serious clinical condition. Vulnerable populations require critical attention because potent threats to their lives exist in the water that they drink and the air that they breathe. We cannot ignore these threats even as we move inevitably towards a technologically dependent, highly commercialized approach to health management.

  4. With Unix under the hood, the Mac has a toehold in the geophysical sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2004-05-01

    A new lease on life in the geophysical sector is predicted for Apple Computer as result of the company's decision first to convert to the Unix System, and then to develop a new operating system called OS X (O-S-Ten) which runs under a version of Unix called Free BSD. While Apple shows no indication of interest to market its hardware and software to the oil industry, at least one oil company, Houston-based Seitel Inc., is using Apple products for its high performance computing and technical desktop applications, such as storing its onshore and offshore 3-D seismic data on Apple's Xserve RAID rack storage system. In another application, Virginia Polytechnic Institute built a supercomputer using 1,100 64-bit G5 Power Macs. The result is the third fastest super-computer in the world, running at a blazing 10.28 teraflops, or 10.28 trillion calculations per second. By all accounts, it is well suited to oilpatch tasks such as seismic data processing and running large-scale simulations such as fluid flow through porous media. Seitel is also interested in Apple's 64-bit G5 computers to run its seismic data processing operations which require large amounts of computing power. While Apple's hardware and software appear to be well adopted to perform oilpatch tasks, proliferation of use of Apple products by oilpatch companies is hindered by the almost complete absence of oilpatch software. Parallel Geoscience Corporation which had long been interested in creating Mac-based software for geoscience applications, is in the process of filling that gap by refocusing its attention on an O-S-Ten version of its Seismic Precessing Workshop{sup T}M{sup (}SPW). How long it will take to make the conversion will depend on customer demand. 2 figs.

  5. 77 FR 60960 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... to ensure the safety of the maritime public during these exercises, which involve fast moving surface... to Foul Weather Bluff. These exercises include fast moving surface vessels, smoke machines, and... and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of Executive Order 12866 or under section 1 of Executive Order...

  6. 76 FR 70649 - Safety Zone; Department of Defense Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Canal from the entrance of Dabob Bay to Foulweather Bluff. This exercise will include fast moving... Regulation and Regulatory Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits under...

  7. 77 FR 59083 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Dabob Bay to Foul Weather Bluff. This exercise will include fast moving surface vessels, smoke machines... Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of...

  8. Seasonal abundance and biology of sporophagous thrips and notes on other thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera) on the Mediterranean oak, Quercus rotundifolia L. in Navarra (N Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Goldarazena, A.; Mound, L. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paperrecords the seasonal abundance of four species of sporophagous thrips collected on the Mediterranean oak, Quercus rotundifolia L., in the Mediterranean area of Navarra (N Spain). The life cycles of Cornpsothrips albosignatus (Reuter), Priesneriella clavicornis (Knechtel); Megalothrips bonannii Uzel and Cryptohrips nigripes (Reuter) are reported, and notes given about habitat specificity and wing development. Notes about host specific Terebrantia thrips of the Mediterranean oak are a...

  9. Within-plant distribution and seasonal population dynamics of flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) infesting French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasina, M.; Nderitu, J.; Nyamasyo, G.; Waturu, C.; Olubayo, F.; Obudho, E.; Yobera, D.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study spatial distribution of flower thrips on French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Kenya. Their build up and seasonal population dynamics was monitored using sticky blue colour traps and sampling of leaves and flowers in two seasons in 2002. Thrips infested French beans from the second week after crop emergence. Their population peaked at peak flowering. The sticky trap catches were linearly related to the actual presence of thrips on the crop and could estimate population build up of adult thrips on leaves and flowers. On the plants, most adults were on flowers. Larvae mainly inhabited leaves, buds and pods. The two thrips species, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) and Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom were spatially separated. The former colonized lower-canopy leaves and early flowers while the latter inhabited middle-canopy leaves and mature flowers. Overall, M. sjostedti was less than 5% of the total thrips population, implying that F. occidentalis was the main thrips pest of French beans. This study suggests that French bean growers should monitor thrips population before initiating any control measure. In addition, they should commence thrips control early, at pre-flowering, using larvicides to reduce the thrips pool and their migration to flowers. A combination of monitoring with sticky traps and proper sampling would contribute to sustainable thrips management. (Author) 36 refs.

  10. Molecular diagnosis of a previously unreported predator-prey association in coffee: Karnyothrips flavipes Jones (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) predation on the coffee berry borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Chapman, Eric G.; Vega, Fernando E.; Harwood, James D.

    2010-03-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most important pest of coffee throughout the world, causing losses estimated at US 500 million/year. The thrips Karnyothrips flavipes was observed for the first time feeding on immature stages of H. hampei in April 2008 from samples collected in the Kisii area of Western Kenya. Since the trophic interactions between H. hampei and K. flavipes are carried out entirely within the coffee berry, and because thrips feed by liquid ingestion, we used molecular gut-content analysis to confirm the potential role of K. flavipes as a predator of H. hampei in an organic coffee production system. Species-specific COI primers designed for H. hampei were shown to have a high degree of specificity for H. hampei DNA and did not produce any PCR product from DNA templates of the other insects associated with the coffee agroecosystems. In total, 3,327 K. flavipes emerged from 17,792 H. hampei-infested berries collected from the field between April and September 2008. Throughout the season, 8.3% of K. flavipes tested positive for H. hampei DNA, although at times this figure approached 50%. Prey availability was significantly correlated with prey consumption, thus indicating the potential impact on H. hampei populations.

  11. Identificación y fluctuación poblacional de especies de trips (Thysanoptera en aguacate 'hass' en Nayarit, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Urías-López

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio se realizó del año 2004 al 2006 en La Yerba (Tepic y Emiliano Zapata (Xalisco Nayarit, México. Los objetivos fueron conocer las especies de trips de inflorescencias y hojas, la dinámica poblacional en follaje y la incidencia en el follaje de árboles tratados con diferentes niveles de fertilización. Los trips fueron de las familias: Aeolthripidae (tres especies, Phlaeothripidae (dos especies y Thripidae (una especie. Se registran por primera vez en aguacate para Nayarit los trips depredadores; Erythrothrips durango, Franklinothrips vespiformis y Leptothrips mcconelli, junto con Pseudophilothrips perseae (fitófago. En La Yerba, la población más alta del complejo de trips (2.09 trips·hoja-1 ocurrió en junio; en E. Zapata, ésta se registró en julio (4.10 trips·hoja-1. Las poblaciones más altas de trips ocurrieron durante periodos de floración y crecimiento vegetativo, y más bajas durante los meses de lluvia de verano. Las poblaciones de trips fueron 60 % más altas en E. Zapata que en La Yerba. No se detectó mayor población de trips en árboles con fertilización control, respecto a los de fertilización balanceada.

  12. Post-mating interactions and their effects on fitness of female and male Echinothrips americanus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a new insect pest in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Jiang, Hong-Xue; Zhang, Xiao-Chen; Shelton, Anthony M; Feng, Ji-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Post-mating, sexual interactions of opposite sexes differ considerably in different organisms. Post-mating interactions such as re-mating behavior and male harassment can affect the fitness of both sexes. Echinothrips americanus is a new insect pest in Mainland China, and little is known about its post-mating interactions. In this study, we observed re-mating frequency and male harassment frequency and their effects on fitness parameters and offspring sex ratios of E. americanus females. Furthermore, we tested the impact of mating and post-mating interactions on fitness parameters of males. Our results revealed that the re-mating frequency in female adults was extremely low during a 30-day period. However, post-mating interactions between females and males, consisting mainly of male harassment and female resistance, did occur and significantly reduced female longevity and fecundity. Interestingly, increased access to males did not affect the ratio of female offspring. For males, mating dramatically reduced their longevity. However, post-mating interactions with females had no effects on the longevity of mated males. These results enrich our basic knowledge about female and male mating and post-mating behaviors in this species and provide important information about factors that may influence population regulation of this important pest species.

  13. Companion Cropping as Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Component for Management of Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in French Beans (Phasealous Vulgaris L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasina, J.

    2002-01-01

    Six companion crops, (Tagetes spp L. (African marigold), Daucus carota L. (carrot), Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), Brassica spp. L. kale), capsicum spp L. (chilli) and Zea mays (maize) were evaluated for their efficacy in suppressing field populations of the French bean flower thrips, (Frankliniella occidentals (Pergande), Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Megalurothrips sjostedti (trybom). The companion crops were compared to two insecticides, Labda cyhalothrin (Karate 1.75% EC) and Methiocarb (Mesurol 500 SC) and untreated mono-crop of French beans. Three of the treatments, coriander, maize and African marigold were found to be effective in that order, by repelling the pest away from the crop. It is concluded that these crops could be recommended to farmers for use and therefore are able to minimise the high use of chemical insecticides

  14. Seasonal dynamics of thrips (Thrips tabaci) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) transmitters of iris yellow spot virus: a serious viral pathogen of onion bulb and seed crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Sudeep; Rondon, Silvia I; Druffel, Keri L; Riley, David G; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-02-01

    Thrips-transmitted Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) is an important economic constraint to the production of bulb and seed onion crops in the United States and many other parts of the world. Because the virus is exclusively spread by thrips, the ability to rapidly detect the virus in thrips vectors would facilitate studies on the role of thrips in virus epidemiology, and thus formulation of better vector management strategies. Using a polyclonal antiserum produced against the recombinant, Escherichia coli-expressed nonstructural protein coded by the small (S) RNA of IYSV, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed for detecting IYSV in individual as well as groups of adult thrips. The approach enabled estimating the proportion of potential thrips transmitters in a large number of field-collected thrips collected from field-grown onion plants. Availability of a practical and inexpensive test to identify viruliferous thrips would be useful in epidemiological studies to better understand the role of thrips vectors in outbreaks of this economically important virus of onion.

  15. Post-mating interactions and their effects on fitness of female and male Echinothrips americanus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae, a new insect pest in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Li

    Full Text Available Post-mating, sexual interactions of opposite sexes differ considerably in different organisms. Post-mating interactions such as re-mating behavior and male harassment can affect the fitness of both sexes. Echinothrips americanus is a new insect pest in Mainland China, and little is known about its post-mating interactions. In this study, we observed re-mating frequency and male harassment frequency and their effects on fitness parameters and offspring sex ratios of E. americanus females. Furthermore, we tested the impact of mating and post-mating interactions on fitness parameters of males. Our results revealed that the re-mating frequency in female adults was extremely low during a 30-day period. However, post-mating interactions between females and males, consisting mainly of male harassment and female resistance, did occur and significantly reduced female longevity and fecundity. Interestingly, increased access to males did not affect the ratio of female offspring. For males, mating dramatically reduced their longevity. However, post-mating interactions with females had no effects on the longevity of mated males. These results enrich our basic knowledge about female and male mating and post-mating behaviors in this species and provide important information about factors that may influence population regulation of this important pest species.

  16. Regional and temporal variation in susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), in onion fields in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, A M; Nault, B A; Plate, J; Zhao, J Z

    2003-12-01

    Populations of onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, from commercial onion fields in New York were evaluated for their susceptibility to the commonly used pyrethroid, lambda-cyhalothrin (Warrior T), using a novel system called the Thrips Insecticide Bioassay System (TIBS). To use TIBS, thrips are collected directly from the plant into an insecticide-treated 0.5-ml microcentrifuge tube that has a flexible plastic cap with a small well into which 0.08 ml of a 10% sugar-water solution with food colorant is deposited. The solution is sealed into the well with a small piece of stretched parafilm through which the thrips can feed on the solution. Thrips mortality is assessed after 24 h with the help of a dissecting stereoscope. In 2001, onion thrips populations were collected from 16 different sites and resistance ratios were >1,000 in five populations. Percent mortality at 100 ppm, a recommended field rate, varied from 9 to 100%, indicating high levels of variation in susceptibility. Particular instances of resistance appeared to be the result of practices within an individual field rather than a regional phenomenon. In 2002, we also observed large differences in onion thrips susceptibility, not only between individual fields but also between thrips collected in a single field at mid season and late season, again suggesting that insecticide-use practices within an individual field caused differences in susceptibility. Additional tests indicated no differences in susceptibility between adult and larval onion thrips populations and only relatively minor differences between populations collected from different parts of the same field. Using TIBS, several populations of onion thrips with different susceptibilities to lambda-cyhalothrin were identified and then subjected to lambda-cyhalothrin-treated onion plants. There was a highly significant positive relationship between percent mortality of thrips from TIBS and percent mortality from the treated onion plants, indicating that results from TIBS could be used to predict spray performance. These data suggest that use of TIBS for evaluating susceptibility to particular insecticides could be instrumental for developing a resistance management strategy for onion thrips.

  17. Potential of a strain of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) as a biological control agent against western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five Beauveria bassiana strains were evaluated for control of western flower thrips. Strain RSB was the most virulent, causing 69-96% mortality at concentrations of 1×104 – 1×107 conidia mL-1, 10 days after inoculation of first instars. In greenhouse trials, RSB applied to broccoli foliage signifi...

  18. COMPORTAMIENTO ESPACIAL DE TRIPS (INSECTA: THYSANOPTERA), EN PLANTACIONES COMERCIALES DE AGUACATE (PERSEA AMERICANA MILL.) EN ZITÁCUARO, MICHOACÁN, MÉXICO

    OpenAIRE

    José Francisco RAMÍREZ DÁVILA

    2013-01-01

    México es el principal productor y exportador de aguacate en el mundo. Los trips son considerados como una de las principales plagas del aguacate en México, debido a su asociación con la enfermedad denominada roña del fruto, causada por el hongo Elsinoe perseae. Esta enfermedad representa una fuerte limitante a la producción del cultivo; el hongo penetra la fruta por las heridas causadas por el complejo de varias especies de trips. El análisis del comportamiento espacial de esta plaga proporc...

  19. Búsqueda de enemigos naturales nativos de Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande(thysanoptera: thripidae, sobre Dendranthema grandijlorum en el municipio de Piendamo, cauca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro V. Ulises

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available En la empresa "Flores del Cauca" en el municipio de Piendamó a 1S00 m.s.n.m. con temperatura promedia de 18° C y HR de SO ± 5%, se hizo una búsqueda de enemigos naturales nativos de F. occidentalis (Thysanóptera: Thripidae sobre eras experimentales de Dendranthema grandiflorum libres de control químico. La búsqueda se extendió a los hospedantes alternos del tisanóptero en áreas aledañas al cultivo. Semanalmente se cosechaban plantas de crisantemo, se llevaban al laboratorio para la recolección de thrips y sus enemigos naturales nativos. En el laboratorio se realizaron bioensayos para probar la acción depredadora de algunos de los enemigos de F. occídentalis que fueron encontrados en crisantemo. Se encontraron los siguientes enemigos naturales nativos: El hemíptero Orius sp. (Anthocoridae. los ácaros Amblyseius herbjcolus. Euseius naindaimei y Thyplodromalus peregrinus (Phytoseiidae, larvas de Chrysopidae; los thrips leptothirs sp. y Haplotrips gowdeyi (Phlaeothripidae, un ácaro de la familia Ascidae; difereflles especies de arañas; larvas de la familia Coccinellidae y adultos de F. occidentalis infectados por hongos no identificados.

  20. Low temperature–scanning electron microscopy to evaluate morphology and predation of Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) against spider mites (Acari: Tetranychidae: Tetranychus species)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper evaluates the potential usefulness of low temperature-scanning electron microscopy (LT-SEM) to evaluate morphology and predation behavior of the six-spotted thrips (Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande) against the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae (Koch)). Morphological features...

  1. Weathering and chemical degradation of methyl eugenol and raspberry ketone solid dispensers for detection, monitoring and male annihilation of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid male lure dispensers containing methyl eugenol (ME) and raspberry ketone (RK), or mixtures of the lures (ME + RK), and dimethyl dichloro-vinyl phosphate (DDVP) were evaluated in AWPM bucket or Jackson traps in commercial papaya (Carica papaya L.) orchards where both oriental fruit fly, Bactroc...

  2. Captures of wild Ceratitis capitata Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in traps with improved multi-lure TMR-Dispensers weathered in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2012-2013 two “attract and kill” systems were weathered in California as potential detection and male annihilation treatments (MAT). Solid Mallet TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) wafers impregnated with DDVP (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) insecticide...

  3. Comparative rearing parameters for bisexual and genetic sexing strains of Zeugodacus cucurbitae and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on an artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is an important component of area wide programs to control invading or established populations of pestiferous tephritids. The SIT involves the production, sterilization, and release of large numbers of the target species, with the goal of obtaining sterile male x w...

  4. Attraction of Bactrocera cucurbitae and B.dorsalis(Diptera: Tephritidae) to beer waste and other protein sources laced with ammonium acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is known that adult tephritid fruit fly females require protein sources for adequate egg production and that ammonia and its derivatives serve as volatile cues to locate protein-rich food. The attractiveness of beer waste and the commercially available baits Nulure, Buminal, and Bugs 4 Bugs Fruit...

  5. The combined effects of gamma radiation and low-temperature for the disinfestation of the Oriental fruit fly, Dacus dorsalis Hendel in mango and banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, S.; Ugsunantwiwat, A.; Sutantawong, M.

    1971-01-01

    The Numdocmai mango and Homtong banana containing the 22-24-hour old eggs of the Oriental fruit fly were subjected to gamma rays at 2-20 krads. After irradiation, the infested fruits were stored at 27+-1 0 C, 20 0 C and 17 0 C with 80-90% relative humidity. The percentages of eggs failed to develop into larvae were calculated. When the storage temperature was 27+-1 0 C or 20 0 C, the LD 50 and LD 99 for eggs in mango was 5.9 and 29 krads respectively, in banana was 3.4 and 12 krads respectively. While the storage temperature was 17 0 C, the LD 50 and LD 99 for eggs in mango was 4.1 and 20 krads respectively; in banana was 3 and 10 krads respectively. The 8-day-old and 3-day-old pupae were also exposed to gamma rays and stored at different temperatures. The mortality of the irradiated pupae stored at 17 0 C was higher than when stored at 27+-1 0 C or 20 0 C. The storage temperature of 17 0 C led to higher mortality in the irradiated immature stages of the fruit fly. Studies would also be extended to investigate the effect of low-temperature in addition to radiation for the disinfestation of the Oriental fruit fly in other fruits

  6. Geographic List of Prime Contract Awards. Oct 91 - Sep 92. FY92. (Fort Hood Texas - Northfield Vermont)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    00N00LALAm00)LA0 -- n, o-, nc4-- n( )m-zTI o-ir -- * 0)CIO 1C) -- i-s a) CI W N 1wo jini nI-I 0 o o01 o ,w 4-1t in WL L L L 0 00 0 0 A 0 01"C4 0 ’ ~ 0C14r...411 N ,N 1`4 NJ I Q -4-4 to >-.-- zzzzzzz z zz ZZ ZZ> >>--> - Uf C41I 0-40 11 au Mə <<- JINI 4- (04 4N014INN Uf 00(n o U n (inl ý4 - I4-4- 4 -4 i...N Is 1(000o atoz z z z z z z z zz z motto00 It 7) 00 0U)..VN(to-4 N l (a0 000 0 0 In01C* an 0 Ga I(00 Gao If 0)C0an.0(0 In O0NC 0 0 0 -*MM’ N o A IC

  7. Energy Surveys of Army Hospitals, Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Delta) difference between valuls 0 3 I I I i I b’osoital. rort mood. Texas, I 5. ui’.ber 1984, Contr~ct No~. A634. l53 ’~%di ficatiov, A00001. Z... td thdLl be uWe’ for peattratii’ the aoooeti aralycst at all BCOa and proo jeers. Casetet"cton cost ascalatlsO fetor %rew 1111 *gbdtootem eell ba3

  8. DAP in the 'Hood: Perceptions of Child Care Practices by African American Child Care Directors Caring for Children of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kay E.; Deihl, Amy; Kyler, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative analysis concerning child care practices by six African American directors of subsidized child care centers located in a low-income, racial ethnic minority area of Los Angeles, California. These programs are traditionally African American programs that experienced an influx of Latino immigrant enrollment. Using…

  9. 75 FR 27497 - Determination That Children's Upper Outerwear in Sizes 2T to 12 With Neck or Hood Drawstrings and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... the drawstrings with items such as playground slides, cribs, and school buses. The proposed rule would...., Engineering Psychologist, Division of Human Factors, April 14, 2010. 5. CPSC staff memorandum, ``Inclusion of...., Engineering Psychologist, Division of Human Factors, Leader, Children's Program Area Team, January 26, 2010. 6...

  10. Dressing Uncivil Neighbor(hoods. Walt Whitman's Adhesive Democracy in “Calamus” and “Drum-Taps”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López Peña

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes 19th-century US poet Walt Whitman’s vindication of “adhesiveness” as imperative to the formation of a social democracy which might heal the neighborly hatreds of a divided United States and bind the nation together at a time of violent fragmentation and Civil War. The article examines Whitman’s location of the possibility of politics and democracy at the interpersonal level, and connects the poet’s political project in his 1860 “Calamus” with that in the 1865 “Drum-Taps”, studying how Whitman’s belief in the uniting capacity of love between men remained constant even as he was witnessing the tragic consequences of a four-year Civil War which would widen even more the irreconcilable gulfs between different Americans.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Ongoing and Future Operations at U.S. Navy Dabob Bay and Hood Canal Military Operating Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...) of the Department of the Navy gives notice that an Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared for the proposed action of implement inc an Operations Management Plan for ongoing and future operations at the U.S...

  12. Development and evaluation of the OHCITIES instrument: assessing alcohol urban environments in the Heart Healthy Hoods project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Xisca; Espelt, Albert; Villalbí, Joan R; Cebrecos, Alba; Baranda, Lucía; Pearce, Jamie; Franco, Manuel

    2017-10-05

    To describe the development and test-retest reliability of OHCITIES, an instrument characterising alcohol urban environment in terms of availability, promotion and signs of consumption. This study involved: (1) developing the conceptual framework for alcohol urban environment by means of literature reviewing and previous alcohol environment research experience; (2) pilot testing and redesigning the instrument; (3) instrument digitalisation; (4) instrument evaluation using test-retest reliability. Data for testing the reliability of the instrument were collected in seven census sections in Madrid in 2016 by two observers. We computed per cent agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficients to estimate inter-rater and test-retest reliability for alcohol outlet environment measures. We calculated interclass coefficients and their 95% CIs to provide a measure of inter-rater reliability for signs of alcohol consumption measures. We collected information on 92 on-premise and 24 off-premise alcohol outlets identified in the studied areas about availability, accessibility and promotion of alcohol. Most per cent-agreement values for alcohol measures in on-premise and off-premise alcohol outlets were greater than 80%, and inter-rater and test-retest reliability values were generally above 0.80. Observers identified 26 streets and 3 public squares with signs of alcohol consumption. Intraclass correlation coefficient between observers for any type of signs of alcohol consumption was 0.50 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.77). Few items promoting alcohol unrelated to alcohol outlets were found on public spaces. The OHCITIES instrument is a reliable instrument to characterise alcohol urban environment. This instrument might be used to understand how alcohol environment associates with alcohol behaviours and its related health outcomes, and can help in the design and evaluation of policies to reduce the harm caused by alcohol. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Renal myogenic constriction protects the kidney from age-related hypertensive renal damage in the Fawn-Hooded rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavrinec, Peter; Henning, Robert H.; Goris, Maaike; Landheer, Sjoerd W.; Buikema, Hendrik; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    Introduction:Intact myogenic constriction plays a role in renal blood flow autoregulation and protection against pressure-related (renal) injury. However, to what extent alterations in renal artery myogenic constriction are involved in development of renal damage during aging is unknown. Therefore,

  14. Three-dimensional simulation of nonstationary flow phenomena in last stage. Exhaust hood compartment and its elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodov, V G [Kharkov State Automobile and Highway Technical University, Theoretical Mechanics and Hydraulics Department, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1998-12-31

    The article describes numerical models and some results of numerical simulation of self-excited oscillatory flow regimes through exhaust diffusers of large steam turbines, operating as a part of compartment (jointly with last stage). The modelling is based on a model of ideal gas flow and full nonstationary 3D formulation and 2nd time and space order explicit Godunov`s scheme. (author) 11 refs.

  15. Is Robin Hood the "Prince of Thieves" or a Pathway to Equity?: Applying Critical Race Theory to Finance Political Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Enrique, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Aleman examines how Mexican American district leaders conceptualize and argue for a more equitable system of school finance. The superintendents studied are politically active educational leaders who participate in the school finance debate while advocating for their Mexican American constituency. The author addresses the nature…

  16. Development and evaluation of the OHCITIES instrument: assessing alcohol urban environments in the Heart Healthy Hoods project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Xisca; Espelt, Albert; Villalbí, Joan R; Cebrecos, Alba; Baranda, Lucía; Pearce, Jamie; Franco, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and test–retest reliability of OHCITIES, an instrument characterising alcohol urban environment in terms of availability, promotion and signs of consumption. Design This study involved: (1) developing the conceptual framework for alcohol urban environment by means of literature reviewing and previous alcohol environment research experience; (2) pilot testing and redesigning the instrument; (3) instrument digitalisation; (4) instrument evaluation using test–retest reliability. Setting Data for testing the reliability of the instrument were collected in seven census sections in Madrid in 2016 by two observers. Primary and secondary outcome measures We computed per cent agreement and Cohen’s kappa coefficients to estimate inter-rater and test–retest reliability for alcohol outlet environment measures. We calculated interclass coefficients and their 95% CIs to provide a measure of inter-rater reliability for signs of alcohol consumption measures. Results We collected information on 92 on-premise and 24 off-premise alcohol outlets identified in the studied areas about availability, accessibility and promotion of alcohol. Most per cent-agreement values for alcohol measures in on-premise and off-premise alcohol outlets were greater than 80%, and inter-rater and test–retest reliability values were generally above 0.80. Observers identified 26 streets and 3 public squares with signs of alcohol consumption. Intraclass correlation coefficient between observers for any type of signs of alcohol consumption was 0.50 (95% CI −0.09 to 0.77). Few items promoting alcohol unrelated to alcohol outlets were found on public spaces. Conclusions The OHCITIES instrument is a reliable instrument to characterise alcohol urban environment. This instrument might be used to understand how alcohol environment associates with alcohol behaviours and its related health outcomes, and can help in the design and evaluation of policies to reduce the harm caused by alcohol. PMID:28982829

  17. Walking in a fairy tale forest in search of a second primitivity with the help of Little Red Riding Hood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. M.A. de Ronde

    2018-01-01

    In our modern society, self-reflection is valued as an important tool to work on a positive and lasting self-identity and to find and define our own path in life. Self-reflection can be seen as the fruit of the scientific approach, which has taught us to divide reality into subject and object. The

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of nonstationary flow phenomena in last stage. Exhaust hood compartment and its elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodov, V.G. [Kharkov State Automobile and Highway Technical University, Theoretical Mechanics and Hydraulics Department, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The article describes numerical models and some results of numerical simulation of self-excited oscillatory flow regimes through exhaust diffusers of large steam turbines, operating as a part of compartment (jointly with last stage). The modelling is based on a model of ideal gas flow and full nonstationary 3D formulation and 2nd time and space order explicit Godunov`s scheme. (author) 11 refs.

  19. Intersection of neighborhood dynamics and socioeconomic status in small-area walkability: the Heart Healthy Hoods project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Pedro; Bilal, Usama; Cebrecos, Alba; Badland, Hannah M; Galán, Iñaki; Franco, Manuel

    2017-06-06

    Previous studies found a complex relationship between area-level socioeconomic status (SES) and walkability. These studies did not include neighborhood dynamics. Our aim was to study the association between area-level SES and walkability in the city of Madrid (Spain) evaluating the potential effect modification of neighborhood dynamics. All census sections of the city of Madrid (n = 2415) were included. Area-level SES was measured using a composite index of 7 indicators in 4 domains (education, wealth, occupation and living conditions). Two neighborhood dynamics factors were computed: gentrification, proxied by change in education levels in the previous 10 years, and neighborhood age, proxied by median year of construction of housing units in the area. Walkability was measured using a composite index of 4 indicators (Residential Density, Population Density, Retail Destinations and Street Connectivity). We modeled the association using linear mixed models with random intercepts. Area-level SES and walkability were inversely and significantly associated. Areas with lower SES showed the highest walkability. This pattern did not hold for areas with an increase in education level, where the association was flat (no decrease in walkability with higher SES). Moreover, the association was attenuated in newly built areas: the association was stronger in areas built before 1975, weaker in areas built between 1975 and 1990 and flat in areas built from 1990 on. Areas with higher neighborhood socioeconomic status had lower walkability in Madrid. This disadvantage in walkability was not present in recently built or gentrified areas.

  20. Agriculture and Rural Development on Fort Hood Lands, 1849-1942: National Register Assessments of 710 Historic Archeological Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Martha

    2001-01-01

    ... (as reported in Blake 1999), and archival collections held at the following repositories: Killeen, Gatesville, and Copperas Cove Public Libraries, the Texas State Library and Archives, Baylor University, the Sterling C...

  1. Post-transcriptional mending of gene sequences: looking under the hood of mitochondrial gene expression in diplonemids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, M.; Moreira, S.; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 12 (2016), s. 1204-1211 ISSN 1547-6286 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptic genes * gene fragmentation * trans-splicing * RNA editing * multipartite mtDNA * diplonemids Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.900, year: 2016

  2. Population densities of wheat thrips, Haplothrips tritici Kurdjumov ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-18

    Jul 18, 2011 ... Key words: Thysanoptera, Haplothrips tritici, population density, bread wheat, durum wheat, barley, cultivars. INTRODUCTION. Some thrips types of the order Thysanoptera constitute one of the harmful groups found on grains (Minaei and. Mound, 2008). The most common species observed on grains in ...

  3. Aislamiento, identificación y evaluación de hongos entomopatógenos como posibles agentes de control de trips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) asociados a cultivos de aguacate (Persea americana Miller)

    OpenAIRE

    Restrepo Quiróz, Tatiana Inés

    2014-01-01

    Resumen: Los problemas fitosanitarios del sistema productivo del aguacate, como el ataque de insectos plaga, particularmente los trips, afectan la competitividad de este cultivo considerado como una de las apuestas exportadoras del país. Esto hace indispensable la búsqueda de soluciones que respondan al reto de la competitividad y exigencias del mercado. Los trips son insectos difíciles de controlar debido su carácter polífago, su alta tasa reproductiva y hábito críptico. La principal medida ...

  4. Irradiation as Quarantine Treatment of Rambutan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pransopon, Prapon; Kongratarpon, Titima; Vongchili, Satit; Segsarnviriya, Suchada; Limohpasmanee, Wanith; Eamsiri, Jarurat; Sajjabut, Surasak

    2006-01-01

    Eggs and larvae of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera correcta were investigated for their tolerant dose of irradiation. Artificially in feasted rambutans were irradiated at target doses of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy. The results showed that the lowest dose that could inhibit adult emergence was 102.89 Gy for B. dorsalis and 97.61 Gy for B. correcta (P=0.999968, Probit 9). Larvae of B. dorsalis were irradiated at the dose

  5. The Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Govinda; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prey preference of 3rd instar green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), between western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and lettuce aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae...

  6. Screening for attractants compatible with entomopathogenic fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... Several thrips attractants were screened for compatibility with Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff). Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and a subset of these for attraction to Megalurothrips sjostedti. Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Conidial germination and germ tube length of M. anisopliae were.

  7. Potential use of the fungus Beauveria bassiana against the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis without reducing the effectiveness of its natural predator Orius sauteri (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orius sauteri (Poppius) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) is an important predator of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Orius sauteri would be directly exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuillemin in the field should the fu...

  8. 76 FR 43804 - Movement of Hass Avocados From Areas Where Mediterranean Fruit Fly or South American Fruit Fly Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... dorsalis), peach fruit fly (Anastrepha zonata), and sapote fruit fly (Anastrepha serpentina) in the... obliqua, Anastrepha serpentina, and Anastrepha striata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Mexico. J. Econ. Entomol...

  9. A multi-year longitudinal study of water quality parameters in four salmon-bearing and recreational streams on mount hood, Oregon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Wasowski

    Full Text Available Four streams-Clear Fork, Lost Creek, Camp Creek and Still Creek-in northwestern Oregon's Sandy River Basin were monitored for temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, and fecal bacterial concentrations in a multi-year analysis examining stream health for recreational users and anchor habitat for Pacific Salmon. Temperatures were recorded using micro -T temperature loggers at 15 locations, during 22 July - 5 September 2006, 2 July - 4 September 2007, 20 June - 7 September 2008, 23 June - 9 September 2009, and 2 July -9 September 2010. The Seven-Day Average Maximum water temperature (7-DAM of 13°C was used as a reference value for the biological limit governing suitable salmonid spawning and egg incubation conditions. The maximum 7-DAM temperatures occurred on different dates and all streams neared or exceeded the 13°C standard at least once each summer. Dissolved oxygen levels were measured at weekly or longer intervals in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009. Dissolved oxygen levels fell below the 9.0 ppm standard for Clear Fork on almost half the sampling dates in 2006, 2007, and 2009. Concentrations of the bacterial genus Enterococcus were measured as an indicator of fecal contamination. Samples were collected at 15 sites along the four streams. Weekly samples were collected during a 9 week period from July - September 2007, an 11 week period from June - September 2008, and an 11 week period from June - September 2009. Enterococcus counts exceeded the federal recommended national criterion value of 61 colony forming units (CFU per 100 mL every year in Camp Creek and occasionally elsewhere, with exceedances trending towards late summer.

  10. Christopher Hood & Ruth Dixon: A Government that Worked Better and Cost Less? Evaluating Three Decades of Reform and Change in UK central Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Juul

    2017-01-01

    Bogen A Government that Worked Better and Cost Less? er en evaluering af 30 års New Public Management reformer i Storbritanien. Evalueringen viser, at NPM ikke holder hvad det lover. Reformer har ikke givet mere velfærd for færre penge tværtimod, reformerne har giver mindre velfærd for flere penge....

  11. 2014 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mean Low Low Water Color Mosaic of Hood Canal - Port Townsend to Annas Bay, Washington: Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  12. A Look Under the Hood: How the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System Uses Database Technologies to Present Big Data to Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knosp, B.; Gangl, M.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Kim, R. M.; Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q. A.

    2015-12-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) brings together satellite, aircraft, and model forecast data from several NASA, NOAA, and other data centers to assist researchers in comparing and analyzing data and model forecast related to tropical cyclones. The TCIS has been running a near-real time (NRT) data portal during North Atlantic hurricane season that typically runs from June through October each year, since 2010. Data collected by the TCIS varies by type, format, contents, and frequency and is served to the user in two ways: (1) as image overlays on a virtual globe and (2) as derived output from a suite of analysis tools. In order to support these two functions, the data must be collected and then made searchable by criteria such as date, mission, product, pressure level, and geospatial region. Creating a database architecture that is flexible enough to manage, intelligently interrogate, and ultimately present this disparate data to the user in a meaningful way has been the primary challenge. The database solution for the TCIS has been to use a hybrid MySQL + Solr implementation. After testing other relational database and NoSQL solutions, such as PostgreSQL and MongoDB respectively, this solution has given the TCIS the best offerings in terms of query speed and result reliability. This database solution also supports the challenging (and memory overwhelming) geospatial queries that are necessary to support analysis tools requested by users. Though hardly new technologies on their own, our implementation of MySQL + Solr had to be customized and tuned to be able to accurately store, index, and search the TCIS data holdings. In this presentation, we will discuss how we arrived on our MySQL + Solr database architecture, why it offers us the most consistent fast and reliable results, and how it supports our front end so that we can offer users a look into our "big data" holdings.

  13. CTD cast data collected in Dabob Bay, Hood Canal, Puget Sound, Washington during eight cruises aboard the CLIFFORD A. BARNES, May 2006 - April 2008 (NODC Accession 0041970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains raw and processed CTD cast data collected during eight cruises to Dabob Bay, Washington in 2006 - 2008. Data were collected on one CTD cast per...

  14. Technology Demonstration of Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Gasoline Fueled Ford F-150 Series Bifuel Prep Vehicles at Ft. Hood, TX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarez, R

    2000-01-01

    ...) of 1988, the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the acceptability of alternative-fueled- vehicles in a Department of Defense (DOD) U.S...

  15. Laps(epõlv 19. sajandi teise poole Eestis omaelulooliste tekstide näitel. Child(hood in 19th Century Estonia: a Study of Autobiographical Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ave Mattheus

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I discuss autobiographical texts which focus on children and childhood in late 19th century Estonia. Childhood memories as well as other autobiographical material became popular in Estonia in the 1920s-1930s, when most of the studied works--the memoirs by Anna Haava, Mait Metsanurk, Jaan Lattik, Jaan Vahtra, Friedebert Tuglas, August Kitzberg and Marta Sillaots--were written. Some texts come from the 19th century (e.g. Lilli Suburg’s autobiographical works or early 20th century (e.g. manuscripts by Hans Leoke, and Johannes Kõrv. Childhood as described in these autobiographical texts covers a period of circa 1850-1900, and the majority of the authors come from the families of South-Estonian peasants or manorial servants. In addition to being written in Estonian and having the same theme, they were all also written by authors of fiction for children or by people who had close contact with children, such as schoolteachers. The article offers a novel approach in the Estonian context by presenting a typology of childhood stories and looking at childhood recollections as an important part of childhood studies. The researchers of childhood investigate how society understands and values children and childhood, what children’s everyday life is like, what possibilities there are for development and if there exists a specific children’s culture in society (such as clothing, food, language, leisure activities, or independent creative work. Childhood studies as a separate discipline does not exist in Estonia, although some important works have been published by educational scholars and art historians. The autobiographical texts under discussion show that in the late 19th century, the majority of Estonian children lived in the countryside in patriarchal families, and childhood was short because children had to help their parents with farmwork quite early, at the age of six. The boundary of childhood was around the age of 10-11, when children started school and often left their childhood homes as the schools were usually far away. Childhood in the city is described by one author (Sillaots and this is only natural as urbanisation in Estonia gained momentum in the early 20th century. Although childhood in Estonia in the late 19th century had scarcely any specific elements of children’s culture (children in the cities had more toys, children-style clothes, leisure, etc., this period in the authors’ lives is remembered as a carefree and happy time. We should emphasise that in early Estonian childhood memories, the child is described as emotionally vulnerable (i.e. feels strongly about punishment, with intellectual interests and creativity; these are features that are not usually associated with agrarian society. These characteristics, however, may be connected with the fact that memories were written by creative people and construed as stories about the growth of a creative person. Another important aspect of childhood stories is that as confessional texts they are stories of individualisation and socialisation. In the second part of the article, I analyse the self-images of the authors, which are closely connected with the motivation and purpose of writing that may be worded explicitly (in the title or in the preface or hidden between the lines. Several texts are construed as stories that focus on the development of the writer and the growth of the self (e.g. Metsanurk, Tuglas, and Vahtra; even if the text is a family history or a social history, it is a story of the awakening of the creative power (e.g. Haava, Kitzberg, Sillaots. The analysis of the self-image in childhood stories led me to the conclusion that female protagonists define themselves through familial or social communication networks (such as representatives of an ethnic group, and male protagonists are described as relatively independent individuals. In the last part of the article the narrative and rhetoric techniques are discussed by using literary terminology. Although all the late 19th century Estonian childhood stories share similar techniques (such as the perspective of the first-person or personal narrative, the split of the storyteller into the first-person child and the first-person adult, story elements (such as the first memory of a room flooded by golden sunlight, and recurrent motifs (such as child’s loneliness and close relation to nature, educational strivings, each story is written in a different way. The works written by professional writers are characterised by lively dialogue, individualised descriptions of the scenery, symbols, metaphors and other stylistic devices, whereas the texts written by the so-called ordinary intellectuals are not as rich in imagery and style. It is quite natural that the childhood memories written by professional writers have better withstood the test of time. The present study is the first to have a more comprehensive view of childhood as reflected in autobiographical writing in Estonia in the 19th century and therefore is somewhat fragmented; I attempt to make a list of possible research ideas and offer some methods for analysis that may be productive in the future. The broadening of the research perspective in the temporary, linguistic and spatial sense may offer more scope; a large number of childhood stories have been published in the 20th and the 21st century in Estonia and the comparison of stories telling us about Estonian children’s childhoods with those recounting German or Russian children’s experiences may offer new insights, as these ethnic groups have occupied one and the same geographical space, although there are significant differences. Another topic for research would be the study of autobiographical texts against the background of the authors’ fictional works.

  16. Treatment of Zenker's diverticulum through a flexible endoscope with a transparent oblique-end hood attached to the tip and a monopolar forceps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaens, P.; de Roock, W.; van Olmen, A.; Moons, V.; D'Haens, G.

    2007-01-01

    Zenker's diverticulum was commonly treated by means of external transcervical diverticulectomy, myotomy or diverticulopexy, or by means of an endoscopic myotomy through a rigid endoscope. Gastroenterologists first described flexible endoscopic therapy for Zenker's diverticulum in 1995. In our

  17. Lechery, lycanthropy and Little Red Riding Hood in Type O Negative’s ‘Wolf Moon (Including Zoanthropic Paranoia)’

    OpenAIRE

    Digioia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Type O Negative’s ‘Wolf Moon (including Zoanthropic Paranoia)’ seems to be a melodic ode to lascivious werewolves or to sexual intercourse during menstruation, which is transformative, allowing participation to channel animalistic instincts. Subject to more critical examination, ‘Wolf Moon (including Zoanthropic Paranoia)’ can also be presented as a contemporary incarnation of the ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ myth. Both contain the same themes: the stigmatization of eroticism, reclamation of agen...

  18. EXPOSURE TO DIETHYL HEXYL PHTHALATE (DEHP) DELAYS PUBERTY AND REDUCES ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT TISSUE WEIGHTS IN LONG EVANS HOODED AND SPRAGUE DAWLEY MALE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEHP is a plasticizer that alters sexual differentiation in the male rat by reducing fetal Leydig cell testosterone synthesis and insl3 mRNA levels. When exposure includes the pubertal stage of life, DEHP and other phthalates delay puberty and reduce androgen-dependent tissue wei...

  19. A Ticking Time Bomb: Counterterrorism Lessons From the U.S. Government’s Failure to Prevent the Fort Hood Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    tested against the requirements imposed by the rapidly mounting complexity of national security problems." President Barack Obama himself...Committee (September 22, 2010); Michael Leiter, Director, National Counterterrorism Center, Statement before the Senate Homeland Securily and Governmental...particularly given the growing complexity and diversity of the homegrown terrorist threat. The challenges involve not just reforming or creating new

  20. 2014 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mean Low Low Water Near-Infrared Mosaic of Hood Canal - Port Townsend to Annas Bay, Washington: Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  1. Archaeological Survey at Fort Hood, Texas Fiscal Year 1987: The MCA range Construction, Pidcoke Land Exchange, and Phantom Range Projects. Archeological Resource Management Series Research Report Number 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    granted to Coryell County. 1930 Community Natural Gas Company provided service for 500 customers. 1935 Community Public Service provided electricity for...berm-girded ditch feature is noted, and domestic vegetation includes horehound and nopale . Observed artifacts include coarse earthenwares, undecorated

  2. Rain-Induced Wash-Off of Chemical Warfare Agent (VX) from Foliar Surfaces of Living Plants Maintained in a Surety Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    RAIN-INDUCED WASH-OFF OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENT (VX) FROM FOLIAR SURFACES OF LIVING PLANTS MAINTAINED IN A...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2014 – Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rain-Induced Wash-Off of Chemical Warfare Agent (VX) from Foliar...galli Foliage Chemical warfare agent (CWA) O-ethyl-S-(2

  3. DNA binding sites recognised in vitro by a knotted class 1 homeodomain protein encoded by the hooded gene, k, in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusell, L; Rasmussen, I; Gausing, K

    1997-01-01

    of knotted1 from maize was isolated from barley seedlings and expressed as a maltose binding protein fusion in E. coli. The purified HvH21-fusion protein selected DNA fragments with 1-3 copies of the sequence TGAC. Gel shift experiments showed that the TGAC element was required for binding and the results...

  4. Synonymization of key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): taxonomic changes based on a review of 20 years of integrative morphological, molecular, cytogenetic, behavioral, and c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White are four horticultural pest tephritid fruit fly species that are highly morphologically and genetically similar to the destructive pest, th...

  5. First records of two species of mammals in the Huachuca Mountains: results of ecological stewardship at Fort Huachuca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnie Sidner; H. Sheridan Stone

    2005-01-01

    We report the first voucher of the cliff chipmunk (Neotamias dorsalis) and observations of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) from the Huachuca Mountains, Arizona, where these species had not been documented. While presence of T. brasiliensis was expected on Fort Huachuca, N. dorsalis was a surprise after a century...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Animals often evaluate the degree of risk posed by a predator and respond ... lizards (Psammophilus dorsalis) can perceive these two indicators of predation risk by ... GKVK Campus, Bellary Road, Bangalore 560 065, India; Key Laboratory of ...

  7. CTD cast and zooplankton count data collected in Dabob Bay, Hood Canal, Puget Sound, Washington during twenty-six cruises aboard the CLIFFORD A. BARNES, February 2002 - April 2004 (NODC Accession 0014832)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains CTD cast and zooplankton data collected during twenty-six cruises to Dabob Bay, Washington in 2002 - 2004 for the project entitled "Copepod -...

  8. Retraction: 'Number needed to treat with 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate for urgent warfarin reversal' by Andrew Chua, Vishal Patel, Allison Perrin, Lee Stern, Jenifer Ehreth, Laurel Omert, Christopher Hood, Julie Farley, Michael McGlynn and Liping Huang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The above abstract from the THSNA 2016 Summit Abstract Proceedings, first published online in the American Journal of Hematology on 20 July 2016 in Wiley OnlineLibrary (www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com), and in Volume 91, Issue 9, p. E427, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Carlo Brugnara, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to concerns from the submitting authors that the abstract was inadvertently submitted prior to receiving approval from all authors and proper review of data analytics, thereby rendering it incomplete. THSNA 2016 Summit Abstract Proceedings (2016). Am. J. Hematol., 91: E427. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajh.24471. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. "Todas las caperucitas rojas se vuelven lobos en la práctica pospornográfica" "All little red riding hoods become wolves in post-pornographic practices"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Prada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La teoría feminista ha construido una crítica particular de la pornografía que está lejos de ser uniforme y toma el carácter de un debate. Sus orígenes tienen lugar en Estados Unidos a finales de los setenta, en donde se consolidan dos posiciones: una antipornografía y otra pro-sex. En España, autoras como Raquel Osborne y Dolores Juliano asumen la segunda postura, abonando el terreno para la consolidación del porno-feminismo, que intenta eliminar los sesgos androcéntricos del discurso pornográfico, produciendo pornografía con fines adicionales al masturbatorio.Feminist theory has constructed a particular criticism of pornography that is far from being uniform and takes the character of a debate. Its origins take place in the U.S. in the late seventies, where two positions consolidate: an anti-pornography and a pro-sex. In Spain authors like Raquel Osborne and Dolores Juliano assume the second posture, creating grounds for the consolidation of porn-feminism, which tries to eliminate andocentric biases of the pornographic speech, producing pornography with additional purposes besides the masturbatory.

  10. Exploiting the igloo principle and greenhouse effect to regulate humidity and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Karthick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxic epidermal necrolysis can be fatal and nursing care with careful monitoring of temperature and humidity can improve survival rate. We adapted the greenhouse and igloo principle using a common hood to monitor the temperature and humidity. Methods: A small heater with a regulator was placed in a mini hood and temperature was recorded inside the uncovered hood and hood covered with green cloth and aluminium foil separately. The regular hood was placed over a volunteer and the temperature was measured inside the open hood and hood covered with green cloth and aluminium foil separately. The relative humidity was also monitored using Zeal mercury dry - wet bulb hygrometer. Results: Temperature increase was most marked in the foil-covered hood followed by cloth-covered hood, both with the heater and the volunteer. Similarly, in the volunteer study, the humidity was best maintained inside the aluminium foil-covered hood. Conclusion: We recommend the use of regular hood with suitable cover to monitor the humidity and temperature of patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis.

  11. Effect of host plant on body size of Frankliniella occidentalis and its correlation with reproductive capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogel, de W.J.; Bosco, D.; Hoek, van der M.; Mollema, C.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of different host plants on Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) body size was investigated. Thrips from three different populations, from the Netherlands, Italy, and USA, achieved greater body sizes when reared on cucumber than on bean. The same thrips grew

  12. Plant odours with potential for a push-pull strategy to control the onion thrips (Thrips tabaci)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van R.W.H.M.; James, D.E.; Kogel, de W.J.; Teulon, D.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of four plant essential oils to repel onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), in the presence of an attractive odour, ethyl iso-nicotinate in a pasture field. Four horizontal white sticky plates were placed adjacent to (directions: N, S, E, W) a

  13. Population densities of wheat thrips, Haplothrips tritici Kurdjumov ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population densities of Haplothrips tritici (H. tritici) Kurdjumov (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) were studied in Kahramanmaras, Turkey. In 2002, bread wheat cultivars, Bocro 4, Pehlivan and Yüreğir 89, durum wheat cultivars, Balcali 85, Ceylan 95 and Harran 95 and barley cultivars, Esterel and Pacific, were used. In 2003 ...

  14. Intraguild predation among plant pests: western flower thrips larvae feed on whitefly crawlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, R.; Broufas, G.; Oveja, M.F.; Sabelis, M.W.; Janssen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Omnivores obtain resources from more than one trophic level, and choose their food based on quantity and quality of these resources. For example, omnivores may switch to feeding on plants when prey are scarce. Larvae of the western flower thrips Frankiniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera:

  15. Effects of thrips feeding on tospovirus transmission in chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetering, van de F.

    1999-01-01

    The introduction and rapid spread of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Western Europe since the 1980s led to a considerable increase of losses in different, mainly ornamental crops due to tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) infections.

  16. Guidelines for selection of radiological protective head covering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, G.R. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The hood is recognized throughout the nuclear industry as the standard radiological protective head covering for use in radioactively contaminated work environments. As of June 15, 1995, hoods were required for all activities performed in contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant. The use of hoods had historically been limited to those radiological activities with a high potential for personnel contamination. Due to the large size of many posted contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant, and compounding safety factors, requirements for the use of hoods are being reevaluated. The purpose of the evaluation is to develop technically sound guidelines for the selection of hoods when prescribing radiological protective head covering. This report presents the guidelines for selection of radiological protective hoods

  17. Three promising fungal strains pathogenic to fruit flies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, T.; Praveena, R.; Babu, Kavitha; Naseema, A.; Anitha, N. [College of Agriculture, Kerala (India)

    2006-07-01

    Pathogenicity of the fungi Paecilomyces lilacinus, isolated from Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Aspergillus candidus, isolated from B. dorsalis, was tested. Cross infectivity of P. lilacinus on B. dorsalis and A. candidus on B. cucurbitae and cross infectivity of a local isolate of B. bassiana from bhindi leaf roller (Sylepta derogata) on fruit flies (B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis ) were also studied. These fungi were new records in these hosts. P. lilacinus at 109 spores / ml caused 96.67% and 100 % cumulative mortality in fruit flies on the second and on the third days. LC50 values of P. lilacinus on B. cucurbitae were 5.0 x 106, 8.0 x 105, 7.0 x 105 spores/ ml on second, third and fourth day, respectively. The fungus was found to cross infect B. dorsalis. LC50 values of A. candidus on B. cucurbitae were 1.29 x 108, 1.22 x 107, 2.27 x 106 spores / ml on third, fourth and fifth day, respectively. The fungus was found to be cross infective to B. cucurbitae. B. bassiana at 109 spores/ ml on B. dorsalis was found to cause 70%, 80% and 90% mortality on fourth, fifth and sixth day. LC50 values of B. bassiana on B. dorsalis were 7.0 x 108, 2.0 x 107, 5.0 x 106 spores/ ml on third, fourth and fifth day ,respectively . Formulation of P. lilacinus as wettable powder and granules and B. bassiana as wettable powder, were also prepared and their efficacy was tested on hosts. (author)

  18. Three promising fungal strains pathogenic to fruit flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiji, T.; Praveena, R.; Babu, Kavitha; Naseema, A.; Anitha, N.

    2006-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the fungi Paecilomyces lilacinus, isolated from Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Aspergillus candidus, isolated from B. dorsalis, was tested. Cross infectivity of P. lilacinus on B. dorsalis and A. candidus on B. cucurbitae and cross infectivity of a local isolate of B. bassiana from bhindi leaf roller (Sylepta derogata) on fruit flies (B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis ) were also studied. These fungi were new records in these hosts. P. lilacinus at 109 spores / ml caused 96.67% and 100 % cumulative mortality in fruit flies on the second and on the third days. LC50 values of P. lilacinus on B. cucurbitae were 5.0 x 106, 8.0 x 105, 7.0 x 105 spores/ ml on second, third and fourth day, respectively. The fungus was found to cross infect B. dorsalis. LC50 values of A. candidus on B. cucurbitae were 1.29 x 108, 1.22 x 107, 2.27 x 106 spores / ml on third, fourth and fifth day, respectively. The fungus was found to be cross infective to B. cucurbitae. B. bassiana at 109 spores/ ml on B. dorsalis was found to cause 70%, 80% and 90% mortality on fourth, fifth and sixth day. LC50 values of B. bassiana on B. dorsalis were 7.0 x 108, 2.0 x 107, 5.0 x 106 spores/ ml on third, fourth and fifth day ,respectively . Formulation of P. lilacinus as wettable powder and granules and B. bassiana as wettable powder, were also prepared and their efficacy was tested on hosts. (author)

  19. Chemistry of clothianidin and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneme, Hideki

    2011-04-13

    Clothianidin, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has been found by former Agro Division, Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd. (Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., at present) and codeveloped with Bayer CropScience. During the studies on neonicotinoid insecticides, nitenpyram (an open-chain nitromethylene derivative) was prepared first, showing a potent activity against Hemiptera and Thysanoptera pests, and its modification led to clothianidin (a nitroguanidine derivative). Clothianidin exhibits excellent control efficacies in small amounts for a wide variety of insect pests such as Hemiptera, Thysanoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera for the long term, with excellent systemic action and by a variety of application methods. The structural features of clothianidin are a thiazole ring and an open-chain guanidine skeleton. The structure-activity relationships of guanidine derivatives and the synthetic studies of clothianidin are also discussed.

  20. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  1. Retrograde pedal access with a 20-gauge intravenous cannula after failed antegrade recanalization of a tibialis anterior artery in a diabetic patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Colkesen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde tibiopedal approach is being used frequently in below-the-knee vascular interventions. In patients with diabetic foot pathology, complex anatomy often requires a retrograde technique when the distal vascular anatomy and puncture site is suitable. The dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries can be punctured because of their relatively superficial position. We report a retrograde puncturing technique in patients with chronic total occlusions. After failed antegrade recanalization, puncturing and cannulation of a tiny dorsalis pedis artery with a narrow bore [20-gauge (0.8 mm] intravenous cannula is described.

  2. Thrips on fabaceous plants and weeds in an ecotone in northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Élison Fabrício Bezerra; Zucchi, Roberto Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Thrips (Thysanoptera) on 33 species of Fabaceae (ornamental and forage) and some weed species were surveyed in areas of caatinga-cerrado ecotone in northeastern Brazil. Twenty species of thrips were identified, all of which are associated for the first time with the plants sampled in this study, totaling 26 new host associations, based on collections of immatures. Five species are probably new to science, illustrating the diversity of thrips in the region. A few thrips species that ...

  3. Prey Preference of the Predatory Mite, Amblyseius swirskii between First Instar Western Flower Thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and Nymphs of the Twospotted Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xuenong; Enkegaard, Annie

    2010-01-01

    The prey preference of polyphagous predators plays an important role in suppressing different species of pest insects. In this study the prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was examined between nymphs of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and first instar larvae of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), as well as between active and chrysa...

  4. The Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea: Preference between Lettuce Aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri, and Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Govinda; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prey preference of 3rd instar green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), between western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and lettuce aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in laboratory experiments at 25 ? 1? C and 70 ? 5% RH with five prey ratios (10 aphids:80 thrips, 25 aphids:65 thrips, 45 aphids:45 thrips, 65 aphids:25 thrips, and 80 aphids:10 thrips). Third instar...

  5. Assessing the effects of cultivating genetically modified glyphosate-tolerant varieties of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) on populations of field arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Osamu; Shi, Kun; Iimura, Keiji; Takamizo, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the effects of cultivating two genetically modified (GM) glyphosate-tolerant soybean varieties (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) derived from Event 40-3-2 and a Japanese conventional variety on arthropods under field conditions, with weed control using glyphosate and conventional weed control for two years. Plant height and dry weight of the conventional variety were significantly larger than those of the GM varieties, but the GM varieties bore more pods than the conventional variety. We found arthropods of nine taxonomic orders (Araneae, Acari, Thysanoptera, Homoptera, Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera, and Hymenoptera) on the plants. The arthropod incidence (number per plant unit weight pooled for each taxonomic order) on the soybean stems and leaves generally did not differ significantly between the GM and conventional varieties. However, the incidence of Thysanoptera and total incidence (all orders combined) were greater on the GM variety in the second year. The weed control regimes had no significant influence on the arthropod incidence on the soybean stems and leaves. The number of flower-inhabiting Thysanoptera (the dominant arthropod in the flowers) was not significantly different between the GM and conventional varieties. Asphondylia yushimai (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae) was more numerous on the pods of the GM variety in both years. Neither the soybean variety nor the weed control regime significantly affected the density of soil macro-organisms. However, the glyphosate weed control affected arthropods between the rows of plants by decreasing the abundances of Homoptera, Heteroptera, Coleoptera and Lepidoptera, and diversity of arthropods. © ISBR, EDP Sciences, 2011.

  6. The diastal urethral stenosis in female children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The distal urethral stenosis in female children is a pathological reality. It is represented by the hymenal hood, the meatal stenosis and the distal urethral ring. Diagnosis and localisation of the stenosis is maintained by calibration with bougies a boule. Therapeutical consequences are: internal urethrotomy, bilateral meatotomy and excision of hymenal hoods. (Author)

  7. VULTURE NEWS 55.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Hooded Vulture Neophron monachus occurs naturally in most of Zambia's rural areas, especially around large cattle farms and human habitations. Being next to a large game farm, The Meintjes have a number of Hooded Vultures on their farm, Kamfinsa Dairy Farm. About seven years ago they slaughtered a sheep.

  8. National Writing Project's Multimodal Literacies and Teacher Collaboration: Enhanced Student Learning on Global Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Kalpana; Hood, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Iyengar and Hood, both teacher consultants with the San Antonio Writing Project (SAWP), and instructors of an undergraduate society and social issues class, collaborated to enhance their undergraduate students' writing experiences using the National Writing Project model (Lieberman & Wood, 2003). Iyengar and Hood used strategies such as…

  9. 78 FR 42929 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 41-Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ..., electric motors for exhaust/ ventilation, electric motors for downdraft range hoods, parts used on electric motors, light ballasts, transformers, magnets for range hoods, portable heaters and fans, heating.../heater units, relays, motor starters, wall switches, various switch types, lamp sockets, other electrical...

  10. 75 FR 22554 - Notice of Petitions by Firms for Determination of Eligibility To Apply for Trade Adjustment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... Specialty truck cabs, Joplin, MO 68801. hoods, etc.; construction and military cabs, hoods, etc.; Water... Company, Inc 1209 Logan Circle NW., 4/13/2010 The firm produces custom Atlanta, GA 30318. wood counter, table, and vanity tops. Primary material is wood. KMS Fab, LLC 100 Parry Street, Luzerne, 4/14/2010...

  11. 76 FR 55648 - Sunsations Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ...) 504-7809. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The text of the Agreement and Order appears below. Dated... upper outerwear products with drawstrings at the hood or neck. Specifically, from March 2008 through... the hood or neck (sweatshirts), manufactured by GJC International and Top Image USA. From May 2009...

  12. 77 FR 71163 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Windshield Zone Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... fully determined. Those influences are more stringent U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE... materials to meet CAFE standards, including materials in and around the hoods of vehicles. Hood design could... evolves in response to CAFE standards. Additionally, in November 2008, the World Forum for Harmonization...

  13. Aldrich 1991, Clarke 1986, Nesis 1987, Roelev

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    either beak; d = length of the baseline in profile, lower beak; e ... beak; HdL (= g) = hood length in the midline, either beak; JW ..... edge of hood with broad deep notch in the midline. ... rior tip to form shallow and hollow cone (CoLI 1.20),. 116.

  14. WASTE GAS COMPUTER SIMULATION OF BOF CONVERTES PRIMARY GAS DEDUSTING SYSTEMS OF ARCELORMITTAL TUBARÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Sartim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available tract A numerical simulation to simulate the fluid flow inside a BOF hood of the ArcelorMittal Tubarão converters is performed. Motivated by the historical failure due to wear in the walls of the hood the objective of the present work is to understand the flow structure, so that it can reduce wear rates. For this study a Computational Fluid Dynamics software ANSYS CFX II is used. The results show that there are basically two mechanisms of wear in the hoods: (i erosion due the projection of the particulate material at high speed in the posterior wall of the output curve of the hood; (ii abrasion due the falling down of the heavier particulate in the opposite direction to the flow in the region of low speed in the slope of the hood

  15. Evaluating mating compatibility within fruit fly cryptic species complexes and the potential role of sex pheromones in pre-mating isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juárez, M. L.; Devescovi, F.; Břízová, Radka; Bachmann, G.; Segura, D. F.; Kalinová, Blanka; Fernández, P.; Ruiz, M. J.; Yang, J.; Teal, P. E. A.; Cáceres, C.; Vreysen, M. J. B.; Hendrichs, J.; Vera, M. T.

    -, č. 540 (2015), s. 125-155 ISSN 1313-2989 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB13AR018 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : species delimitation * field cages * Tephritidae * Anastrepha fraterculus * Bactrocera dorsalis Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.938, year: 2015 http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=6133

  16. Susceptibility of low-chill blueberry cultivars to oriental fruit fly, mediterranean fruit fly, and melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forced infestation studies were conducted to determine if fruits of southern highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L. hybrids) are hosts for three invasive tephritid fruit flies. Fruits of 17 blueberry cultivars were exposed to gravid female flies of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (oriental frui...

  17. Resveratrol modifies tephritid fruit fly response to nutritional and radiation stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol is a recently discovered compound. Three concentrations (50, 100, 200 µM) of resveratrol were evaluated against Bactrocera dorsalis and B. cucurbitae by incorporating resveratrol into fruit fly liquid larval diet under the following conditions: 1) with or without wheat germ oil (WGO) in ...

  18. Ecological and biogeographical observations on Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) from California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, Ian

    2009-01-01

    New ecological and biogeographical observations are presented for the following 32 species of Cerambycidae from California: Atimia confusa dorsalis LeConte, Anelaphus albofasciatus (Linell), Aneflus prolixus prolixus LeConte, Anoplocurius incompletus Linsley, Brothylus conspersus LeConte, Callidiellum virescens Chemsak and Linsley, Calloides lorquini (Buquet), Clytus chemsaki Hovore and Giesbert, Enaphalodes hispicornis (Linnaeus), Methia brevis Fall, Neaneflus fuchsi (Wickham), Neoclytus bal...

  19. 2553 IJBCS-Article-Seyni Sané

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Etude de la dynamique de Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) dans les vergers ... faibles «densités» semblent être les périodes les plus propices pour le contrôle des mouches. ... meilleure gestion des populations de mouches.

  20. An anocellar polistine wasp (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Polistinae from Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Lohrmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable teratological female of Polistes (Fuscopolistes dorsalis neotropicus Bequaert, 1940 (Vespidae: Polistinae is described and illustrated. The specimen lacks all three external dorsal ocelli but is normally developed in almost every other aspect. Additionally, similar findings in other Hymenoptera are briefly discussed, as are the consequences and the reasons that might cause the random loss of ocelli.