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Sample records for dopamine system dysfunction

  1. Dopamine dysfunction in borderline personality disorder: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Robert O

    2004-06-01

    Research on the biological basis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused primarily on the serotonin model of impulsive aggression. However, there is evidence that dopamine (DA) dysfunction may also be associated with BPD. Pertinent research and review articles, identified by Medline searches of relevant topics, books, references from bibliographies, and conference proceedings from 1975 to 2003, were reviewed. Evidence of DA dysfunction in BPD derives from the efficacy of traditional and atypical antipsychotic agents in BPD, and from provocative challenges with amphetamine and methylphenidate of subjects with the disorder. In addition, human and animal studies indicate that DA activity plays an important role in emotion information processing, impulse control, and cognition. The results of this review suggest that DA dysfunction is associated with three dimensions of BPD, that is, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and cognitive-perceptual impairment. The main limitation of this hypothesis is that the evidence reviewed is circumstantial. There is no study that directly demonstrates DA dysfunction in BPD. In addition, the therapeutic effects of antipsychotic agents observed in BPD may be mediated by non-DA mechanisms of action. If the stated hypothesis is correct, DA dysfunction in BPD may result from genetic, developmental, or environmental factors directly affecting specific DA pathways. Alternatively, DA dysfunction in BPD may be a compensatory response to alterations in the primary neural systems that control emotion, impulse control, and cognition, and that are mediated by the brain's main neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, or in one or more other neuromodulatory pathways such as serotonin, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group

  2. Dopamine Dysfunction in DYT1 Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    brains removed. Frontal cortex, caudate-putamen and ventral midbrain were micro- dissected based on anatomical landmarks. Samples of each region from the...is linked to DYT1 dystonia [6]. TorsinA is a member of AAA + ATPase superfamily [6], associated with chaperone like functions in multiple processes...mRNA and protein expression for the same receptor may not correlate with each other), it appears that dopamine receptor expression and function undergo

  3. De novo mutation in the dopamine transporter gene associates dopamine dysfunction with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, P J; Campbell, N G; Sharma, S

    2013-01-01

    De novo genetic variation is an important class of risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recently, whole-exome sequencing of ASD families has identified a novel de novo missense mutation in the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) gene, which results in a Thr to Met substitution...... at site 356 (hDAT T356M). The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a presynaptic membrane protein that regulates dopaminergic tone in the central nervous system by mediating the high-affinity reuptake of synaptically released DA, making it a crucial regulator of DA homeostasis. Here, we report the first...

  4. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons.

  5. Computational systems analysis of dopamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qi

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD is the loss of dopamine in the striatum, and many therapeutic interventions for the disease are aimed at restoring dopamine signaling. Dopamine signaling includes the synthesis, storage, release, and recycling of dopamine in the presynaptic terminal and activation of pre- and post-synaptic receptors and various downstream signaling cascades. As an aid that might facilitate our understanding of dopamine dynamics in the pathogenesis and treatment in PD, we have begun to merge currently available information and expert knowledge regarding presynaptic dopamine homeostasis into a computational model, following the guidelines of biochemical systems theory. After subjecting our model to mathematical diagnosis and analysis, we made direct comparisons between model predictions and experimental observations and found that the model exhibited a high degree of predictive capacity with respect to genetic and pharmacological changes in gene expression or function. Our results suggest potential approaches to restoring the dopamine imbalance and the associated generation of oxidative stress. While the proposed model of dopamine metabolism is preliminary, future extensions and refinements may eventually serve as an in silico platform for prescreening potential therapeutics, identifying immediate side effects, screening for biomarkers, and assessing the impact of risk factors of the disease.

  6. Familial Parkinson mutant alpha-synuclein causes dopamine neuron dysfunction in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Tomoki; Koyama, Akihiko; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Masuda, Mayumi; Kowa, Hisatomo; Tsunoda, Makoto; Mitani, Shohei; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2006-01-06

    Mutations in alpha-synuclein gene cause familial form of Parkinson disease, and deposition of wild-type alpha-synuclein as Lewy bodies occurs as a hallmark lesion of sporadic Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, implicating alpha-synuclein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. Dopamine neurons in substantia nigra are the major site of neurodegeneration associated with alpha-synuclein deposition in Parkinson disease. Here we establish transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (TG worms) that overexpresses wild-type or familial Parkinson mutant human alpha-synuclein in dopamine neurons. The TG worms exhibit accumulation of alpha-synuclein in the cell bodies and neurites of dopamine neurons, and EGFP labeling of dendrites is often diminished in TG worms expressing familial Parkinson disease-linked A30P or A53T mutant alpha-synuclein, without overt loss of neuronal cell bodies. Notably, TG worms expressing A30P or A53T mutant alpha-synuclein show failure in modulation of locomotory rate in response to food, which has been attributed to the function of dopamine neurons. This behavioral abnormality was accompanied by a reduction in neuronal dopamine content and was treatable by administration of dopamine. These phenotypes were not seen upon expression of beta-synuclein. The present TG worms exhibit dopamine neuron-specific dysfunction caused by accumulation of alpha-synuclein, which would be relevant to the genetic and compound screenings aiming at the elucidation of pathological cascade and therapeutic strategies for Parkinson disease.

  7. Dysfunction of ventrolateral striatal dopamine receptor type 2-expressing medium spiny neurons impairs instrumental motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Takiue, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Keitaro; Xu, Ming; Yano, Ryutaro; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Okano, Hideyuki; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Takata, Norio; Drew, Michael R.; Sano, Hiromi; Mimura, Masaru; Tanaka, Kenji F.

    2017-01-01

    Impaired motivation is present in a variety of neurological disorders, suggesting that decreased motivation is caused by broad dysfunction of the nervous system across a variety of circuits. Based on evidence that impaired motivation is a major symptom in the early stages of Huntington's disease, when dopamine receptor type 2-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) are particularly affected, we hypothesize that degeneration of these neurons would be a key node regulating motivational status. Using a progressive, time-controllable, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation/dysfunction technique, we find that loss-of-function of D2-MSNs within ventrolateral striatum (VLS) is sufficient to reduce goal-directed behaviours without impairing reward preference or spontaneous behaviour. Moreover, optogenetic inhibition and ablation of VLS D2-MSNs causes, respectively, transient and chronic reductions of goal-directed behaviours. Our data demonstrate that the circuitry containing VLS D2-MSNs control motivated behaviours and that VLS D2-MSN loss-of-function is a possible cause of motivation deficits in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28145402

  8. GPA protects the nigrostriatal dopamine system by enhancing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Tamas L; Erion, Derek M; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Shulman, Gerald I; Andrews, Zane B

    2011-07-01

    Guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) increases AMPK activity, mitochondrial function and biogenesis in muscle and improves physiological function, for example during aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Here we tested whether GPA prevents neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system in MPTP-treated mice. Mice were fed a diet of 1% GPA or normal chow for 4 weeks and then treated with either MPTP or saline. Indices of nigrostriatal function were examined by HPLC, immunohistochemistry, stereology, electron microscopy and mitochondrial respiration. MPTP intoxication decreased TH neurons in the SNpc of normal chow-fed mice; however GPA-fed mice remarkably exhibited no loss of TH neurons in the SNpc. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine of both normal chow- and GPA-fed mice, although this effect was significantly attenuated in GPA-fed mice. GPA-fed mice showed increased AMPK activity, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial number in nigrostriatal TH neurons, suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of GPA involved AMPK-dependent increases in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. MPTP treatment produced a decrease in mitochondrial number and volume in normal chow-fed mice but not GPA-fed mice. Our results show the neuroprotective properties of GPA in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease are partially mediated by AMPK and mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common problem in neurodegeneration and thus GPA may slow disease progression in other models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on the dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Michael A P; Ashok, Abhishekh H; Volkow, Nora D; Howes, Oliver D

    2016-11-17

    The effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, are a pressing concern for global mental health. Patterns of cannabis use are changing drastically owing to legalization, the availability of synthetic analogues (commonly termed spice), cannavaping and an emphasis on the purported therapeutic effects of cannabis. Many of the reinforcing effects of THC are mediated by the dopamine system. Owing to the complexity of the cannabinoid-dopamine interactions that take place, there is conflicting evidence from human and animal studies concerning the effects of THC on the dopamine system. Acute THC administration causes increased dopamine release and neuron activity, whereas long-term use is associated with blunting of the dopamine system. Future research must examine the long-term and developmental dopaminergic effects of THC.

  10. Oxidative stress causes renal dopamine D1 receptor dysfunction and salt-sensitive hypertension in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees A; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-02-01

    Renal dopamine plays an important role in maintaining sodium homeostasis and blood pressure (BP) during increased sodium intake. The present study was carried out to determine whether renal dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) dysfunction contributes to increase in salt sensitivity during oxidative stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into various groups, received tap water (vehicle); 1% NaCl (high salt [HS]); L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an oxidant; and HS plus BSO with or without Tempol, an antioxidant, for 12 days. Compared with vehicle, HS intake increased urinary dopamine production and decreased basal renal Na/K-ATPase activity but did not affect BP. BSO-treated rats exhibited oxidative stress and a mild increase in BP. In these rats, D1R expression and G protein coupling were reduced, and SKF38393, a D1R agonist, failed to inhibit Na/K-ATPase activity and promote sodium excretion. Concomitant administration of BSO and HS caused oxidative stress, D1R dysfunction, and a marked increase in BP. Although renal dopamine production was increased, it failed to reduce the basal Na/K-ATPase activity in these animals. Treatment of BSO plus HS rats with Tempol decreased oxidative stress and restored endogenous, as well as exogenous, D1R agonist-mediated Na/K-ATPase inhibition and normalized BP. In conclusion, during HS intake, the increased dopamine production via Na/K-ATPase inhibition prevents an increase in BP. During oxidative stress, D1R function is defective, and there is mild hypertension. However, in the presence of oxidative stress, HS intake causes marked elevation in BP, which results from a defective renal D1R function leading to the failure of dopamine to inhibit Na/K-ATPase and promote sodium excretion.

  11. Dopamine and norepinephrine responses to film-induced sexual arousal in sexually functional and sexually dysfunctional women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meston, C M; McCall, K M

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to assess potential differences between sexually functional and dysfunctional women in dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to erotic stimuli. Blood levels of homovanillic acid (HVA; the major metabolite of DA) and NE were taken during the showing of a nonsexual and a sexual film from 9 women with female sexual arousal disorder and hypoactive sexual desire disorder and from 13 sexually functional women. We assessed sexual arousal subjectively using a self-report scale and physiologically using a vaginal photoplethysmograph. HVA levels significantly decreased in sexually functional and dysfunctional women during the erotic versus during the neutral film. NE levels were not significantly different for either group of women during the neutral and erotic films. Sexually dysfunctional women had significantly higher levels of NE during both the neutral and erotic films compared with functional women. Subjective or physiological arousal differences between neutral and erotic films were not significantly different between functional and dysfunctional women.

  12. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure results in dysfunction of the renal dopamine D1 receptor in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinquan; Luo, Hao; Chen, Caiyu; Chen, Ken; Wang, Jialiang; Cai, Yue; Zheng, Shuo; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhou, Lin; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2014-11-01

    Adverse environment in early life can modulate the adult phenotype, including blood pressure. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in utero results in increased blood pressure in the offspring, but the exact mechanisms are not clear. Studies have shown that the renal dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) plays an important role in maintaining sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure; dysfunction of D1R is associated with oxidative stress and hypertension. In this study, we determined if dysfunction of the renal D1R is involved in fetal-programmed hypertension, and if oxidative stress contributes to this process. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (0.79 mg/kg) or saline at gestation days 8, 10, and 12. As compared with saline-injected (control) dams, offspring of LPS-treated dams had increased blood pressure, decreased renal sodium excretion, and increased markers of oxidative stress. In addition, offspring of LPS-treated dams had decreased renal D1R expression, increased D1R phosphorylation, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 2 (GRK2) and type 4 (GRK4) protein expression, and impaired D1R-mediated natriuresis and diuresis. All of the findings in the offspring of LPS-treated dams were normalized after treatment with TEMPOL, an oxygen free radical scavenger. In conclusion, prenatal LPS exposure, via an increase in oxidative stress, impairs renal D1R function and leads to hypertension in the offspring. Normalization of renal D1R function by amelioration of oxidative stress may be a therapeutic target of fetal programming of hypertension.

  13. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network.

  14. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  15. The evolution of dopamine systems in chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei eYamamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory-motor programming, motivation, memory, emotion, and endocrine regulations. Some of the functions are conserved among different vertebrate groups, while others are not, and this is reflected in the anatomical aspects of DA systems in the forebrain and midbrain. Recent findings concerning a second tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH2 revealed new populations of DA synthesizing cells, as evidenced in the periventricular hypothalamic zones of teleost fish. It is likely that the ancestor of vertebrates possessed TH2 DA-synthesizing cells, and the TH2 gene has been lost secondarily in placental mammals. All the vertebrates possess DA cells in the olfactory bulb, retina and in the diencephalon. Midbrain DA cells are abundant in amniotes while absent in some groups, e.g. teleosts. Studies of protochordate DA cells suggest that the diencephalic DA cells were present before the divergence of the chordate lineage. In contrast, the midbrain cell populations have probably emerged in the vertebrate lineage following the development of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary. The functional flexibility of the DA systems, and the evolvability provided by duplication of the corresponding genes permitted a large diversification of these systems. These features were instrumental in the adaptation of brain functions to the very variable way of life of vertebrates.

  16. The evolution of dopamine systems in chordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kei; Vernier, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters, and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory-motor programming, motivation, memory, emotion, and endocrine regulations. Some of the functions are conserved among different vertebrate groups, while others are not, and this is reflected in the anatomical aspects of DA systems in the forebrain and midbrain. Recent findings concerning a second tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH2) revealed new populations of DA-synthesizing cells, as evidenced in the periventricular hypothalamic zones of teleost fish. It is likely that the ancestor of vertebrates possessed TH2 DA-synthesizing cells, and the TH2 gene has been lost secondarily in placental mammals. All the vertebrates possess DA cells in the olfactory bulb, retina, and in the diencephalon. Midbrain DA cells are abundant in amniotes while absent in some groups, e.g., teleosts. Studies of protochordate DA cells suggest that the diencephalic DA cells were present before the divergence of the chordate lineage. In contrast, the midbrain cell populations have probably emerged in the vertebrate lineage following the development of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary. The functional flexibility of the DA systems, and the evolvability provided by duplication of the corresponding genes permitted a large diversification of these systems. These features were instrumental in the adaptation of brain functions to the very variable way of life of vertebrates.

  17. Dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine synthesis and dopamine receptor subtypes have been shown in the kidney. Dopamine acts via cell surface receptors coupled to G proteins; the receptors are classified via pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies into two families, D1-like and D2-like. Two D1-like receptors cloned in mammals, the D1 and D5 receptors (D1A and D1B in rodents), are linked to adenylyl cyclase stimulation. Three D2-like receptors (D2, D3, and D4) have been cloned and are linked mainly to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Activation of D1-like receptors on the proximal tubules inhibits tubular sodium reabsorption by inhibiting Na/H-exchanger and Na/K-adenosine triphosphatase activity. Reports exist of defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function in human primary hypertension and in genetic models of animal hypertension. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to hypertension. A primary defect in D1-like receptors and an altered signaling system in proximal tubules may reduce dopamine-mediated effects on renal sodium excretion. The molecular basis for dopamine receptor dysfunction in hypertension is being investigated, and may involve an abnormal posttranslational modification of the dopamine receptor.

  18. Multiple system atrophy and cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-yang LANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the survival of patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA is prolonged, patients may present cognitive dysfunction or even dementia in addition to autonomic dysfunction, damage of extrapyramidal system and cerebellar ataxia. This article made a brief summary on the research progress of MSA combined with cognitive dysfunction reported at home and abroad. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.003

  19. Social behavior in a genetic model of dopamine dysfunction at different neurodevelopmental time points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabitzke, P A; Simpson, E H; Kandel, E R; Balsam, P D

    2015-09-01

    Impairments in social behavior characterize many neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. In fact, the temporal emergence and trajectory of these deficits can define the disorder, specify their treatment and signal their prognosis. The sophistication of mouse models with neurobiological endophenotypes of many aspects of psychiatric diseases has increased in recent years, with the necessity to evaluate social behavior in these models. We adapted an assay for the multimodal characterization of social behavior at different development time points (juvenile, adolescent and adult) in control mice in different social contexts (specifically, different sex pairings). Although social context did not affect social behavior in juvenile mice, it did have an effect on the quantity and type of social interaction as well as ultrasonic vocalizations in both adolescence and adulthood. We compared social development in control mice to a transgenic mouse model of the increase in postsynaptic striatal D2R activity observed in patients with schizophrenia (D2R-OE mice). Genotypic differences in social interactions emerged in adolescence and appeared to become more pronounced in adulthood. That vocalizations emitted from dyads with a D2R-OE subject were negatively correlated with active social behavior while vocalizations from control dyads were positively correlated with both active and passive social behavior also suggest social deficits. These data show that striatal dopamine dysfunction plays an important role in the development of social behavior and mouse models such as the one studied here provide an opportunity for screening potential therapeutics at different developmental time points. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  20. Dopamine system: Manager of neural pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eHong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a growing number of roles that midbrain dopamine (DA neurons assume, such as, reward, aversion, alerting and vigor. Here I propose a theory that may be able to explain why the suggested functions of DA came about. It has been suggested that largely parallel cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortico loops exist to control different aspects of behavior. I propose that (1 the midbrain DA system is organized in a similar manner, with different groups of DA neurons corresponding to these parallel neural pathways (NPs. The DA system can be viewed as the manager of these parallel NPs in that it recruits and activates only the task-relevant NPs when they are needed. It is likely that the functions of those NPs that have been consistently activated by the corresponding DA groups are facilitated. I also propose that (2 there are two levels of DA roles: the How and What roles. The How role is encoded in tonic and phasic DA neuron firing patterns and gives a directive to its target NP: how vigorously its function needs to be carried out. The tonic DA firing is to maintain a certain level of DA in the target NPs to support their expected behavioral and mental functions; it is only when a sudden unexpected boost or suppression of activity is required by the relevant target NP that DA neurons in the corresponding NP act in a phasic manner. The What role is the implementational aspect of the role of DA in the target NP, such as binding to D1 receptors to boost working memory. This What aspect of DA explains why DA seems to assume different functions depending on the region of the brain in which it is involved. In terms of the role of the lateral habenula (LHb, the LHb is expected to suppress maladaptive behaviors and mental processes by controlling the DA system. The demand-based smart management by the DA system may have given animals an edge in evolution with adaptive behaviors and a better survival rate in resource-scarce situations.

  1. Stereotypic circling behavior in mice with vestibular dysfunction: asymmetrical effects of intrastriatal microinjection of a dopamine agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Akio; Inagaki, Masumi; Kaga, Makiko

    2007-07-01

    Bronx Waltzer (bv) mouse, which has been used as a model of hearing and vestibular dysfunction, shows remarkable repetitive circling behavior. This study investigated whether the behavior is caused by the asymmetry of striatal function by observing the behavior of the bv mice following microinjection of dopamine D1 agonist, A68930 into the striatum ipsilaterally and contralaterally to the preferred direction of rotation separately. High dose of the drug induced opposite effects on ipsilateral rotations by the side of injections with statistical significance (p = .0026). These results suggested that the stereotypic circling behavior involves striatum and is based on striatal asymmetry.

  2. Motivation deficit in ADHD is associated with dysfunction of the dopamine reward pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Newcorn, J H; Kollins, S H; Wigal, T L; Telang, F; Fowler, J S; Goldstein, R Z; Klein, N; Logan, J; Wong, C; Swanson, J M

    2011-11-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is typically characterized as a disorder of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity but there is increasing evidence of deficits in motivation. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we showed decreased function in the brain dopamine reward pathway in adults with ADHD, which, we hypothesized, could underlie the motivation deficits in this disorder. To evaluate this hypothesis, we performed secondary analyses to assess the correlation between the PET measures of dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (obtained with [(11)C]raclopride and [(11)C]cocaine, respectively) in the dopamine reward pathway (midbrain and nucleus accumbens) and a surrogate measure of trait motivation (assessed using the Achievement scale on the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire or MPQ) in 45 ADHD participants and 41 controls. The Achievement scale was lower in ADHD participants than in controls (11±5 vs 14±3, PADHD participants, but not in controls. ADHD participants also had lower values in the Constraint factor and higher values in the Negative Emotionality factor of the MPQ but did not differ in the Positive Emotionality factor-and none of these were correlated with the dopamine measures. In ADHD participants, scores in the Achievement scale were also negatively correlated with symptoms of inattention (CAARS A, E and SWAN I). These findings provide evidence that disruption of the dopamine reward pathway is associated with motivation deficits in ADHD adults, which may contribute to attention deficits and supports the use of therapeutic interventions to enhance motivation in ADHD.

  3. Motivation deficit in ADHD is associated with dysfunction of the dopamine reward pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Newcorn, J.H.; Kollins, S.H.; Wigal, T.L.; Telang, F.; Folwer, J.S.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Klein, N.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.; Swanson, J.M.

    2010-08-17

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is typically characterized as a disorder of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity but there is increasing evidence of deficits in motivation. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we showed decreased function in the brain dopamine reward pathway in adults with ADHD, which, we hypothesized, could underlie the motivation deficits in this disorder. To evaluate this hypothesis, we performed secondary analyses to assess the correlation between the PET measures of dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (obtained with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and [{sup 11}C]cocaine, respectively) in the dopamine reward pathway (midbrain and nucleus accumbens) and a surrogate measure of trait motivation (assessed using the Achievement scale on the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire or MPQ) in 45 ADHD participants and 41 controls. The Achievement scale was lower in ADHD participants than in controls (11 {+-} 5 vs 14 {+-} 3, P < 0.001) and was significantly correlated with D2/D3 receptors (accumbens: r = 0.39, P < 0.008; midbrain: r = 0.41, P < 0.005) and transporters (accumbens: r = 0.35, P < 0.02) in ADHD participants, but not in controls. ADHD participants also had lower values in the Constraint factor and higher values in the Negative Emotionality factor of the MPQ but did not differ in the Positive Emotionality factor - and none of these were correlated with the dopamine measures. In ADHD participants, scores in the Achievement scale were also negatively correlated with symptoms of inattention (CAARS A, E and SWAN I). These findings provide evidence that disruption of the dopamine reward pathway is associated with motivation deficits in ADHD adults, which may contribute to attention deficits and supports the use of therapeutic interventions to enhance motivation in ADHD.

  4. Motivation Deficit in ADHD is Associated with Dysfunction of the Dopamine Reward Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Kollins, Scott H.; Wigal, Tim L.; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Klein, Nelly; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher; Swanson, James M.

    2010-01-01

    ADHD is typically characterized as a disorder of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity but there is increasing evidence of deficits in motivation. Using PET we showed decreased function in the brain dopamine reward pathway in adults with ADHD, which we hypothesized could underlie the motivation deficits in this disorder. To evaluate this hypothesis we performed secondary analyses to assess the correlation between the PET measures of dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (obtained with [11C]raclopride and [11C]cocaine, respectively) in the dopamine reward pathway (midbrain and nucleus accumbens), and a surrogate measures of trait motivation (assessed using the Achievement scale on the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire or MPQ) in 45 ADHD participants and 41 controls. The Achievement scale was lower in ADHD participants than in controls (11±5 vs 14±3, p<0.001) and was significantly correlated with D2/D3 receptors (accumbens: r=0.39, p<0.008; midbrain: r=0.41, p<0.005) and transporters (accumbens: r=0.35, p < 0.02) in ADHD participants, but not in controls. ADHD participants also had lower values in the Constraint factor and higher values in the Negative Emotionality factor of the MPQ but did not differ in the Positive Emotionality factor - and none of these were correlated with the dopamine measures. In ADHD participants scores in the Achievement scale were also negatively correlated with symptoms of inattention (CAARS A, E and SWAN-I). These findings provide evidence that disruption of the dopamine reward pathway is associated with motivation deficits in ADHD adults, which may contribute to attention deficits and supports the use of therapeutic interventions to enhance motivation in ADHD. PMID:20856250

  5. Genetic markers of striatal dopamine predict individual differences in dysfunctional, but not functional impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colzato, L.S.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van der Does, A.J.W.; Hommel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Various psychiatric disorders are characterized by elevated levels of impulsivity. Although extensive evidence supports a specific role of striatal, but not frontal dopamine (DA) in human impulsivity, recent studies on genetic variability have raised some doubts on such a role. Importantly, impulsiv

  6. Ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Mearini, Giulia; Schlossarek, Saskia; Willis, Monte S.; Carrier, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +49 40 42803 7208; fax: +49 40 42803 5925. (Carrier, Lucie) (Carrier, Lucie) Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology--> , University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf--> , Hamburg--> - GERMANY (Mearini, Giulia) Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and...

  7. Neurobehavioral evidence for changes in dopamine system activity during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Dustin; White, Tonya; Luciana, Monica

    2010-04-01

    Human adolescence has been characterized by increases in risk-taking, emotional lability, and deficient patterns of behavioral regulation. These behaviors have often been attributed to changes in brain structure that occur during this developmental period, notably alterations in gray and white matter that impact synaptic architecture in frontal, limbic, and striatal regions. In this review, we provide a rationale for considering that these behaviors may be due to changes in dopamine system activity, particularly overactivity, during adolescence relative to either childhood or adulthood. This rationale relies on animal data due to limitations in assessing neurochemical activity more directly in juveniles. Accordingly, we also present a strategy that incorporates molecular genetic techniques to infer the status of the underlying tone of the dopamine system across developmental groups. Implications for the understanding of adolescent behavioral development are discussed.

  8. Characterization of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in vivo- Implications for the treatment of schizophrenia and Parkinson s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isacson, Ruben

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine is fundamental in human behavior for movement, cognition and reward. A dysfunctional dopamine system is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson s disease and schizophrenia. Dopamine mediates its effects through five receptors. Dopamine D2 receptors are well studied and successful drug targets in the treatment of Parkinson s disease and schizophrenia. The functional role of dopamine D1 receptors is not fully understood and the c...

  9. Amisulpride-induced acute akathisia in OCD: an example of dysfunctional dopamine-serotonin interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersche, Karen D; Cumming, Paul; Craig, Kevin J; Müller, Ulrich; Fineberg, Naomi A; Bullmore, Edward T; Robbins, Trevor W

    2012-06-01

    We report about a clinical observation in a well-characterized group of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during an experimental medicine study in which a single dose of amisulpride (a selective D₂/₃ antagonist) was administered. Almost half of the OCD patients, in particular those with less severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms, experienced acute akathisia in response to the amisulpride challenge. This unexpectedly high incidence of akathisia in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-treated patients with OCD suggests that individual differences in dopamine-serotonin interactions underlie the clinical heterogeneity of OCD, and may thus explain the insufficiency of SSRI monotherapy in those patients not experiencing a satisfactory outcome in symptom reduction. We further speculate about the neuropathology possibly underlying this clinical observation and outline a testable hypothesis for future molecular imaging studies.

  10. Genetic control of midbrain dopamine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Simone Marije

    2005-01-01

    The midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) system, organized in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), regulates movement control and behavior as highlighted by the dramatic consequences of its degeneration in Parkinson’s disease and its implications in psychiatric and affective

  11. Developmental exposure to the pesticide dieldrin alters the dopamine system and increases neurotoxicity in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jason R; Caudle, W Michael; Wang, Minzheng; Dean, E Danielle; Pennell, Kurt D; Miller, Gary W

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to increase the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms responsible for this association are not clear. Here, we report that perinatal exposure of mice during gestation and lactation to low levels of dieldrin (0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg every 3 days) alters dopaminergic neurochemistry in their offspring and exacerbates MPTP toxicity. At 12 wk of age, protein and mRNA levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were increased by perinatal dieldrin exposure in a dose-related manner. We then administered MPTP (2 x 10 mg/kg s.c) at 12 wk of age and observed a greater reduction of striatal dopamine in dieldrin-exposed offspring, which was associated with a greater DAT:VMAT2 ratio. Additionally, dieldrin exposure during development potentiated the increase in GFAP and alpha-synuclein levels induced by MPTP, indicating increased neurotoxicity. In all cases there were greater effects observed in the male offspring than the female, similar to that observed in human cases of PD. These data suggest that developmental exposure to dieldrin leads to persistent alterations of the developing dopaminergic system and that these alterations induce a "silent" state of dopamine dysfunction, thereby rendering dopamine neurons more vulnerable later in life.

  12. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression.

  13. Intra-accumbens injection of a dopamine aptamer abates MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction in a model of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Holahan

    Full Text Available Systemic administration of the noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist, MK-801, has been proposed to model cognitive deficits similar to those seen in patients with schizophrenia. The present work investigated the ability of a dopamine-binding DNA aptamer to regulate these MK-801-induced cognitive deficits when injected into the nucleus accumbens. Rats were trained to bar press for chocolate pellet rewards then randomly assigned to receive an intra-accumbens injection of a DNA aptamer (200 nM; n = 7, tris buffer (n = 6 or a randomized DNA oligonucleotide (n = 7. Animals were then treated systemically with MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg and tested for their ability to extinguish their bar pressing response. Two control groups were also included that did not receive MK-801. Data revealed that injection of Tris buffer or the random oligonucleotide sequence into the nucleus accumbens prior to treatment with MK-801 did not reduce the MK-801-induced extinction deficit. Animals continued to press at a high rate over the entire course of the extinction session. Injection of the dopamine aptamer reversed this MK-801-induced elevation in lever pressing to levels as seen in rats not treated with MK-801. Tests for activity showed that the aptamer did not impair locomotor activity. Results demonstrate the in vivo utility of DNA aptamers as tools to investigate neurobiological processes in preclinical animal models of mental health disease.

  14. Intra-accumbens injection of a dopamine aptamer abates MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction in a model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Matthew R; Madularu, Dan; McConnell, Erin M; Walsh, Ryan; DeRosa, Maria C

    2011-01-01

    Systemic administration of the noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist, MK-801, has been proposed to model cognitive deficits similar to those seen in patients with schizophrenia. The present work investigated the ability of a dopamine-binding DNA aptamer to regulate these MK-801-induced cognitive deficits when injected into the nucleus accumbens. Rats were trained to bar press for chocolate pellet rewards then randomly assigned to receive an intra-accumbens injection of a DNA aptamer (200 nM; n = 7), tris buffer (n = 6) or a randomized DNA oligonucleotide (n = 7). Animals were then treated systemically with MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) and tested for their ability to extinguish their bar pressing response. Two control groups were also included that did not receive MK-801. Data revealed that injection of Tris buffer or the random oligonucleotide sequence into the nucleus accumbens prior to treatment with MK-801 did not reduce the MK-801-induced extinction deficit. Animals continued to press at a high rate over the entire course of the extinction session. Injection of the dopamine aptamer reversed this MK-801-induced elevation in lever pressing to levels as seen in rats not treated with MK-801. Tests for activity showed that the aptamer did not impair locomotor activity. Results demonstrate the in vivo utility of DNA aptamers as tools to investigate neurobiological processes in preclinical animal models of mental health disease.

  15. Dopamine system, cerebellum, and nucleus ruber in fish and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Small teleost fish including zebrafish and medaka have been used as animal models for research because of their small body size, vast amounts of eggs produced, their rapid development, low husbandry costs, and transparency during embryogenesis. Although the body size and appearance seem different, fish and mammals including human still possess anatomical and functional similarities in their brains. This review summarizes the similarities of brain structures and functions between teleost fish and mammalian brains, focusing on the dopamine system, functional regionalization of the cerebellum, and presence of the nucleus ruber. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  16. Sorting nexin 1 loss results in D5 dopamine receptor dysfunction in human renal proximal tubule cells and hypertension in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Jones, John Edward; Armando, Ines; Asico, Laureano D; Escano, Crisanto S; Lee, Hewang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yu; Pascua-Crusan, Annabelle M; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia P; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-01-04

    The peripheral dopaminergic system plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation through its actions on renal hemodynamics and epithelial ion transport. The dopamine D5 receptor (D(5)R) interacts with sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), a protein involved in receptor retrieval from the trans-Golgi network. In this report, we elucidated the spatial, temporal, and functional significance of this interaction in human renal proximal tubule cells and HEK293 cells stably expressing human D(5)R and in mice. Silencing of SNX1 expression via RNAi resulted in the failure of D(5)R to internalize and bind GTP, blunting of the agonist-induced increase in cAMP production and decrease in sodium transport, and up-regulation of angiotensin II receptor expression, of which expression was previously shown to be negatively regulated by D(5)R. Moreover, siRNA-mediated depletion of renal SNX1 in C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice resulted in increased blood pressure and blunted natriuretic response to agonist in salt-loaded BALB/cJ mice. These data demonstrate a crucial role for SNX1 in D(5)R trafficking and that SNX1 depletion results in D(5)R dysfunction and thus may represent a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of essential hypertension.

  17. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    expression and/or responses to dopamine or production of dopamine, (xiii) drugs that affect the dopaminergic system have potent effects on T cells (e.g. dopamine=Intropin, L-dopa, bromocriptine, haloperidol, quinpirole, reserpine, pergolide, ecopipam, pimozide, amantadine, tetrabenazine, nomifensine, butaclamol). Dopamine-induced activation of resting Teffs and suppression of Tregs seem beneficial for health and may also be used for immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. Independently, suppression of DRs in autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells, and also in cancerous T cells, may be advantageous. The review is relevant to Immunologists, Neurologists, Neuroimmunologists, Hematologists, Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Pharmacologists.

  18. Development and function of the midbrain dopamine system: what we know and what we need to.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonette, G B; Roesch, M R

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an explosion in our understanding of the origin and development of the midbrain dopamine system. Much of this work has been focused on the aspects of dopamine neuron development related to the onset of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, with the intent of hopefully delaying, preventing or fixing symptoms. While midbrain dopamine degeneration is a major focus for treatment and research, many other human disorders are impacted by abnormal dopamine, including drug addiction, autism and schizophrenia. Understanding dopamine neuron ontogeny and how dopamine connections and circuitry develops may provide us with key insights into potentially important avenues of research for other dopamine-related disorders. This review will provide a brief overview of the major molecular and genetic players throughout the development of midbrain dopamine neurons and what we know about the behavioral- and disease-related implications associated with perturbations to midbrain dopamine neuron development. We intend to combine the knowledge of two broad fields of neuroscience, both developmental and behavioral, with the intent on fostering greater discussion between branches of neuroscience in the service of addressing complex cognitive questions from a developmental perspective and identifying important gaps in our knowledge for future study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  19. Dopamine systems adaptation during acquisition and consolidation of a skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Sommer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a key role in motor learning. Striatal function depends strongly on dopaminergic neurotransmission, but little is known about neuroadaptions of the dopamine system during striatal learning. Using an established task that allows differentiation between acquisition and consolidation of motor learning, we here investigate D1 and D2-like receptor binding and transcriptional levels after initial and long-term training of mice. We found profound reduction in D1 binding within the dorsomedial striatum (DMS after the first training session on the accelerated rotarod and a progressive reduction in D2-like binding within the dorsolateral striatum (DLS after extended training. Given that similar phase- and region-specific striatal neuroadaptations have been found also during learning of complex procedural tasks including habit formation and automatic responding, the here observed neurochemical alterations are important for our understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders that show a dysbalance in the function of striatal circuits, such as in addictive behaviours.

  20. Intrarenal Dopamine Attenuates DOCA/HS-Induced Blood Pressure Elevation in Part through Activation of a Medullary COX-2 Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Bing; Raymond C. Harris; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Locally produced dopamine in the renal proximal tubule inhibits salt and fluid reabsorption, and a dysfunctional intrarenal dopaminergic system has been reported in essential hypertension and experimental hypertension models. Using catechol-O-methyl-transferase knockout (COMT−/−) mice, which have increased renal dopamine due to deletion of the major renal dopamine metabolizing enzyme, we investigated the effect of intrarenal dopamine on the development of hypertension in the deoxycorticostero...

  1. Interaction Between Brain Histamine and Serotonin, Norepinephrine, and Dopamine Systems: In Vivo Microdialysis and Electrophysiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Cremers, Thomas I H F; Westerink, Ben H C; Dremencov, Eliyahu

    2015-06-01

    Brain monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and histamine) play an important role in emotions, cognition, and pathophysiology and treatment of mental disorders. The interactions between serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine were studied in numerous works; however, histamine system received less attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between histamine and other monoamines, using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology. It was found that the inverse agonist of histamine-3 receptors, thioperamide, increased the firing activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Selective agonist of histamine-3 receptors, immepip, reversed thiperamide-induced stimulation of firing activity of dopamine neurons. The firing rates of serotonin and norpeinephrine neurons were not attenuated by immepip or thioperamide. Thioperamide robustly and significantly increased extracellular concentrations of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the rat prefrontal cortex and slightly increased norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. It can be concluded that histamine stimulates serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine transmission in the brain. Modulation of firing of dopamine neurons is a key element in functional interactions between histamine and other monoamines. Antagonists of histamine-3 receptors, because of their potential ability to stimulate monoamine neurotransmission, might be beneficial in the treatment of mental disorders.

  2. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:28170429

  3. The medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices differentially regulate dopamine system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Daniel J

    2011-05-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is essential for top-down control over higher-order executive function. In this study we demonstrate that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) differentially regulate VTA dopamine neuron activity, and furthermore, the pattern of activity in the PFC drastically alters the dopamine neuron response. Thus, although single-pulse activation of the mPFC either excites or inhibits equivalent numbers of dopamine neurons, activation of the OFC induces a primarily inhibitory response. Moreover, activation of the PFC with a pattern that mimics spontaneous burst firing of pyramidal neurons produces a strikingly different response. Specifically, burst-like activation of the mPFC induces a massive increase in dopamine neuron firing, whereas a similar pattern of OFC activation largely inhibits dopamine activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the mPFC and OFC differentially regulate dopamine neuron activity, and that the pattern of cortical activation is critical for determining dopamine system output.

  4. Dieldrin exposure induces oxidative damage in the mouse nigrostriatal dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Jaime M; Richardson, Jason R; Guillot, Thomas S; McCormack, Alison L; Di Monte, Donato A; Jones, Dean P; Pennell, Kurt D; Miller, Gary W

    2007-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we provide evidence that the insecticide dieldrin causes specific oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. We report that exposure of mice to low levels of dieldrin for 30 days resulted in alterations in dopamine-handling as evidenced by a decrease in dopamine metabolites, DOPAC (31.7% decrease) and HVA (29.2% decrease) and significantly increased cysteinyl-catechol levels in the striatum. Furthermore, dieldrin resulted in a 53% decrease in total glutathione, an increase in the redox potential of glutathione, and a 90% increase in protein carbonyls. Alpha-synuclein protein expression was also significantly increased in the striatum (25% increase). Finally, dieldrin caused a significant decrease in striatal expression of the dopamine transporter as measured by (3)H-WIN 35,428 binding and (3)H-dopamine uptake. These alterations occurred in the absence of dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. These effects represent the ability of low doses of dieldrin to increase the vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by inducing oxidative stress and suggest that pesticide exposure may act as a promoter of PD.

  5. Alterations in dopamine system function across the estrous cycle of the MAM rodent model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Stephanie M; Chen, Li; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-09-01

    Clinical studies have reported differences in the incidence and severity of schizophrenia symptoms between male and female schizophrenia patients. Unfortunately, the cause of these differences is not currently known due, in part, to the fact that preclinical studies largely focus on male subjects. Dopamine neuron activity has been previously demonstrated to change across the estrous cycle, and may therefore be of relevance, as aberrant dopamine signaling is thought to underlie the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Here we examine dopamine neuron activity across the estrous cycle in the MAM rodent model of schizophrenia. We demonstrate that the elevation in dopamine neuron activity, consistently observed in male MAM-treated rats, is most prominent during estrus and attenuated in met-estrus. Furthermore, this appears to be mediated, in part, by progesterone in the ventral hippocampus, as increases in dopamine neuron population activity (observed in estrus) were normalized by the intra-hippocampal administration of the progesterone receptor antagonist, mifepristone (but not the estrogen receptor antagonists, fulvestrant). Taken together, these data suggest that changes in dopamine system function occur across the estrous cycle in MAM-treated rats and may contribute to the differences in symptomatology between male and female schizophrenia patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidemiological surveys of dysfunction of the masticatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helkimo, M

    1976-01-01

    Findings in epidemiologic studies referred to in this review appear to warrant the following conclusions: 1. Symptoms of dysfunction of the masticatory system are very common in unselected materials - much more common than hitherto assumed. This implies that dentists in the future must interest themselves more than hitherto for diagnosis and treatment of functional disturbances of the masticatory system in general practice. 2. There are no differences in frequency of dysfunction between men and women in the general population. Why women dominate in patient materials has not been convincingly explained in the literature. 3. Symptoms of mandibular dysfunction have been found in perons in all age groups. The slight differences as to age distribution reported, indicate more frequent symptoms in old individuals than in young ones. 4. No predominant etiologic factor of dysfunction of the masticatory system has been found in the population studies. Various factors are obviously involved in the etiology of functional disorders. A certain correlation between the degree of dysfunction and the general state of health and the number of residual teeth has, however, been demonstrated. Besides occlusal disturbances and psyhic factors the general health therefore should be observed as an important variable in mandilular dysfunction. 5. In order to faciliate future comparisons between different materials and interpretation of results it is necessary to use the same dignostic criteria and to collect data by reference to suitalbe induces permitting assessment of the prevalence of different symptoms with their severity. 6. With the aid of a generally accepted dysfunction index it should be possible further to elucidate the still many obscure aspects of the etiology and further course of dysfunctional diseases of the masticatory system in clinical materials and population studies. 7. More epidemiologic research of different populations is necessary to increase our knowledge in this

  7. Reward system dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Nehrkorn, Barbara; Müller, Kristin; Fink, Gereon R.; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Schultz, Robert T.; Konrad, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that social deficits of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are related to reward circuitry dysfunction, very little is known about the neural reward mechanisms in ASD. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated brain activations in response to both social and monetary reward in a group of children with ASD, relative to matched controls. Participants with ASD showed the expected hypoactivation in the mesocorticolimbic circuitry in response to both reward types. In particular, diminished activation in the nucleus accumbens was observed when money, but not when social reward, was at stake, whereas the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex were hypoactivated within the ASD group in response to both rewards. These data indicate that the reward circuitry is compromised in ASD in social as well as in non-social, i.e. monetary conditions, which likely contributes to atypical motivated behaviour. Taken together, with incentives used in this study sample, there is evidence for a general reward dysfunction in ASD. However, more ecologically valid social reward paradigms are needed to fully understand, whether there is any domain specificity to the reward deficit that appears evident in ASD, which would be most consistent with the ASD social phenotype. PMID:22419119

  8. APRESS: apical regulatory super system, serotonin, and dopamine interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc, Cape Coral, FL, USA; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, USA; 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USABackground: The monoamines serotonin and dopamine are known to exist in two separate states: the endogenous state and the competitive inhibition state. The presence of the competitive inhibition state has been known to science for many years, but from a functional standpoint it has been noted in the literature as being "meaningless."Methods: A large database of monoamine transporter response to amino acid precursor administration variations with clinical outcomes was accumulated. In the process, a new organic cation transporter (OCT model has been published, and OCT functional status determination along with amino acid precursor manipulation methods have been invented and refined.Results: Methodology was developed whereby manipulation of the OCT, in the competitive inhibition state, is carried out in a predictable manner. This, in turn, has disproved the long-held assertion that the monoamine competitive inhibition state is functionally meaningless.Conclusion: The most significant aspect of this paper is the documentation of newly recognized relationships between serotonin and dopamine. When transport of serotonin and dopamine are both in the competitive inhibition state, manipulation of the concentrations of one will lead to predictable changes in concentrations of the other. From a functional standpoint, processes regulated and controlled by changes to only serotonin can now be controlled by changes to dopamine, and vice versa, in a predictable manner.Keywords: catecholamine, monoamine, competitive inhibition state

  9. Neuroimaging of the dopamine/reward system in adolescent drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Monique; Luciana, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Adolescence is characterized by heightened risk-taking, including substance misuse. These behavioral patterns are influenced by ontogenic changes in neurotransmitter systems, particularly the dopamine system, which is fundamentally involved in the neural coding of reward and motivated approach behavior. During adolescence, this system evidences a peak in activity. At the same time, the dopamine (DA) system is neuroplastically altered by substance abuse, impacting subsequent function. Here, we describe properties of the dopamine system that change with typical adolescent development and that are altered with substance abuse. Much of this work has been gleaned from animal models due to limitations in measuring dopamine in pediatric samples. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques have been used to examine structures that are heavily DA-innervated; they measure morphological and functional changes with age and with drug exposure. Presenting marijuana abuse as an exemplar, we consider recent findings that support an adolescent peak in DA-driven reward-seeking behavior and related deviations in motivational systems that are associated with marijuana abuse/dependence. Clinicians are advised that (1) chronic adolescent marijuana use may lead to deficiencies in incentive motivation, (2) that this state is due to marijuana's interactions with the developing DA system, and (3) that treatment strategies should be directed to remediating resultant deficiencies in goal-directed activity.

  10. [State of the dopamine system activity, as one of factors for the development of arterial hypertension and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzogub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Bogdan, T V; Sobol', V O

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of 5 subtypes of dopamine receptors revealed their important role in development of arterial hypertension and obesity. Reduce of their functional activity or number with age conduces to the increase of tone of the sympathetic nervous system, dyspoiesis of leptin, hyperphagia, development of obesity and arterial hypertension. Prescription of dopamine agonists conduces to reduction of in, normalization of leptin, diminishing of appetite and body mass, decrease of blood pressure. Combination of arterial hypertension and obesity is recommended to determine dopamine excretion and to appoint dopamine agonists at level of < 600 nmol/24 hours.

  11. Usefulness of the dopamine system-stabilizer aripiprazole for reducing morphine-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Mitsuru; Narita, Minoru; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Tadao; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2007-09-10

    In the management of pain, nausea and vomiting are some of the most distressing adverse effects induced by opioids. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the dopamine system-stabilizer aripiprazole on morphine-induced emesis. Morphine induced retching and vomiting in a dose-dependent manner in ferrets. The emetic effect of morphine was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with either the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol or aripiprazole. These results suggest that the co-administration of aripiprazole may be useful for reducing the severity of morphine-induced emesis.

  12. [Mirror neuron system dysfunction in schizophrenia and its clinical implication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Motoichiro; Kato, Yutaka

    2014-06-01

    Since the discovery of mirror neuron system, several neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies showed that the mirror neuron system might have a role in understanding other people's actions and intentions with automatic simulation of their actions. Moreover, some studies suggested that mirror neurons have a broader role in social cognition including understanding others' emotions and empathy. It has not been proved, however, whether the mirror neuron system is necessarily involved in empathy processes. In the domain of social cognition deficits, it is important to investigate the involvement of mirror neuron system dysfunction in psychosis such as schizophrenia. Using magnetoencephalography, we examined whether antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients displayed mirror neuron system dysfunction during observation of biological motion (jaw movement). Compared with normal controls, the patients with schizophrenia had fewer components of both the waveform and equivalent current dipole, suggesting aberrant brain activity resulting from dysfunction of the right inferior parietal cortex. They also lacked the changes of alpha band and gamma band oscillation seen in normal controls, and had weaker phase locking factors and gamma-synchronization predominantly in right parietal cortex. This finding demonstrated that untreated patients with schizophrenia exhibited aberrant mirror neuron system function based on the right inferior parietal cortex, which is characterized by dysfunction of gamma-synchronization.

  13. Polymorphisms in Dopamine System Genes Are Associated with Individual Differences in Attention in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Karla; Nemoda, Zsofia; Fearon, R. M. Pasco; Csibra, Gergely; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Johnson, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the functional status of the frontal cortex in infancy is limited. This study investigated the effects of polymorphisms in four dopamine system genes on performance in a task developed to assess such functioning, the Freeze-Frame task, at 9 months of age. Polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase ("COMT") and the…

  14. Effects of low-dose dopamine on renal and systemic hemodynamics during incremental norepinephrine infusion in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenberg, K; Smit, AJ; Girbes, ARJ

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of low-dose dopamine on norepinephrine induced renal and systemic vasoconstriction in normotensive healthy subjects. Design: On separate days, either a low-dose dopamine (4 mu g/kg/min) or a placebo (5% glucose) infusion was added in a single, blinded, randomized or

  15. [Age-related features of neurohumoral effects of dopamine activity on the cardiovascular system in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzohub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Zaval's'ka, T V

    2012-12-01

    Determined the decrease in dopamine activity with age, that contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, abdominal obesity, the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. The article presents information describing the age-sensitive regulation of the cardiovascular system in elderly people, confirming the influence of the activity of dopamine receptors in the development of age pathology.

  16. Neuroprotective potential of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside A against dopamine receptor dysfunction in the cerebral cortex of neonatal hypoglycaemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roshni Baby; Joy, Shilpa; Ajayan, M S; Paulose, C S

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal hypoglycaemia initiates a series of events leading to neuronal death, even if glucose and glycogen stores return to normal. Disturbances in the cortical dopaminergic function affect memory and cognition. We recommend Bacopa monnieri extract or Bacoside A to treat neonatal hypoglycaemia. We investigated the alterations in dopaminergic functions by studying the Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor subtypes. Receptor-binding studies revealed a significant decrease (p Bacoside A ameliorated the dopaminergic and cAMP imbalance as effectively as the glucose therapy. The upregulated Bax expression in the present study indicates the high cell death in hypoglycaemic neonatal rats. Enzyme assay of SOD confirmed cortical cell death due to free radical accumulation. The gene expression of SOD in the cortex was significantly downregulated (p < 0.001). Bacopa treatment showed a significant reversal in the altered gene expression parameters (p < 0.001) of Bax and SOD. Our results suggest that in the rat experimental model of neonatal hypoglycaemia, Bacopa extract improved alterations in D1, D2 receptor expression, cAMP signalling and cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This is an important area of study given the significant motor and cognitive impairment that may arise from neonatal hypoglycaemia if proper treatment is not implemented.

  17. Central Auditory Nervous System Dysfunction in Echolalic Autistic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherby, Amy Miller; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The results showed that all the Ss had normal hearing on the monaural speech tests; however, there was indication of central auditory nervous system dysfunction in the language dominant hemisphere, inferred from the dichotic tests, for those Ss displaying echolalia. (Author)

  18. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  19. Rapid determination of dopamine in human plasma using a gold nanoparticle-based dual-mode sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Qi, Suijian; Liu, Zhonggang; Shi, Yupeng; Yue, Wanqing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine plays a very important role in biological systems and has a direct relationship with the ability of learning and cognition, human desires, feelings and mental state, as well as motor functions. Traditional methods for the detection of dopamine are complicated and time-consuming, therefore it is necessary to explore rapid and accurate detection of dopamine with high sensitivity and specificity. Herein we report a dual-mode system of colorimetric and fluorometric analyses based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and aptamers specifically targeting dopamine. Aptamers modified with the fluorophore were used as dopamine specific recognition probe and the sensing mechanism is based on the color change of AuNPs and the fluorescence recovery of fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers in the presence of dopamine. The addition of aptamers into AuNPs colloid solution would prevent the AuNPs from aggregation in the high-salt solution. The close distance between AuNPs and fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers would lead to the quenching of fluorescence signal. In the presence of dopamine, the conformation of the aptamers and the inter-particle distance would be changed, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs, which subsequently results in color change from red to blue and fluorescence signal recovery. The dual-mode sensing system demonstrated high specificity towards dopamine with the detection limit as low as 78.7 nM. The sensing system reflects on its simplicity as no surface functionalization is required for the nanoparticles, leading to less laborious and more cost-effective synthesis. The reaction time is only 6 min, demonstrating a simple approach for rapid analysis of dopamine. More importantly, the sensing system allows the detection of dopamine in both aqueous solution and complicated biological sample with sensitive response, illustrating the feasibility and reliability for the potential applications in clinical and biomedical analysis in the future.

  20. The effects of early-life stress on dopamine system function in adolescent female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher-Maślanka, Iwona; Solarz, Anna; Wędzony, Krzysztof; Chocyk, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    During adolescence, many neural systems, including the dopamine system, undergo essential remodeling and maturation. It is well known that early-life stress (ELS) increases the risk for many psychopathologies during adolescence and adulthood. It is hypothesized that ELS interferes with the maturation of the dopamine system. There is a sex bias in the prevalence of stress-related mental disorders. Information regarding the effects of ELS on brain functioning in females is very limited. In the current study, maternal separation (MS) procedures were carried out to study the effects of ELS on dopamine system functioning in adolescent female rats. Our study showed that MS increased the density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive fibers in the prelimbic cortex (PLC) and nucleus accumbens (Acb). These changes were accompanied by a decrease in the level of D5 receptor mRNA and an increase in D2 receptor mRNA expression in the PLC of MS females. Conversely, D1 and D5 receptor mRNA levels were augmented in the caudate putamen (CPu), while the expression of the D3 dopamine receptor transcript was reduced in MS females. Additionally, in the Acb, MS elicited a decrease in D2 receptor mRNA expression. At the behavioral level, MS increased apomorphine-induced locomotion; however, it did not change locomotor responses to selective D1/D5 receptor agonist and attenuated D2/D3 receptor agonist-triggered locomotion. Moreover, MS decreased D1/D5 receptor agonist-induced grooming behavior. These results indicate that ELS disrupts dopamine receptor function in the PLC and basal ganglia during adolescence in females and may predispose them to psychopathologies during adolescence and adulthood. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hub and switches: endocannabinoid signalling in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Miriam; Pistis, Marco

    2012-12-05

    The last decade has provided a wealth of experimental data on the role played by lipids belonging to the endocannabinoid family in several facets of physiopathology of dopamine neurons. We currently suggest that these molecules, being intimately connected with diverse metabolic and signalling pathways, might differently affect various functions of dopamine neurons through activation not only of surface receptors, but also of nuclear receptors. It is now emerging how dopamine neurons can regulate their constituent biomolecules to compensate for changes in either internal functions or external conditions. Consequently, dopamine neurons use these lipid molecules as metabolic and homeostatic signal detectors, which can dynamically impact cell function and fitness. Because dysfunctions of the dopamine system underlie diverse neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, the importance of better understanding the correlation between an unbalanced endocannabinoid signal and the dopamine system is even greater. Particularly, because dopamine neurons are critical in controlling incentive-motivated behaviours, the involvement of endocannabinoid molecules in fine-tuning dopamine cell activity opened new avenues in both understanding and treating drug addiction. Here, we review recent advances that have shed new light on the understanding of differential roles of endocannabinoids and their cognate molecules in the regulation of the reward circuit, and discuss their anti-addicting properties, particularly with a focus on their potential engagement in the prevention of relapse.

  2. Dopamine receptor and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chunyu; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport and reactive oxygen and by interacting with vasopressin, renin-angiotensin, and the sympathetic nervous system. Decreased renal dopamine production and/or impaired dopamine receptor function have been reported in hypertension. Disruption of any of the dopamine receptors (D(1), D(2), D(3), D(4), and D(5)) results in hypertension. In this paper, we review the mechanisms by which hypertension develops when dopamine receptor function is perturbed.

  3. Cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction in female rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, P V; Neelambikai, N; Mahesh, Arjun; Govindarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with (rheumatoid arthritis) RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like connective tissue disorders and it may be due to the vasculitis of vasa nervorum and secondary amyloidosis. The pathogenesis may also have an immune component that affects autonomic functions. In the present study, three standard cardiovascular parasympathetic function tests were performed in 207 RA patients and in 106 healthy controls. 14.45% patients were presented with symptoms related to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Heart rate variation to deep breathing (DBD), standing (30:15 ratio), Valsalva ratio (VR) were found to be significantly reduced in RA patients and was weakly associated with female RA patients (r = 0.165, p = 0.018) and was not correlated to disease duration, RF positivity & severity of the disease. In conclusion, this study has confirmed the presence of significant subclinical cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous dysfunction in RA patients and its positive association with female gender. Hence, inclusion of cardiovascular autonomic function tests in the routine clinical examination may be helpful in the early detection of autonomic dysfunction in RA.

  4. A new glaucoma hypothesis: a role of glymphatic system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostyn, Peter; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul; De Groot, Veva

    2015-06-29

    In a recent review article titled "A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation", Brinker et al. comprehensively described novel insights from molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging research, which indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology is much more complex than previously believed. The glymphatic system is a recently defined brain-wide paravascular pathway for CSF and interstitial fluid exchange that facilitates efficient clearance of interstitial solutes, including amyloid-β, from the brain. Although further studies are needed to substantiate the functional significance of the glymphatic concept, one implication is that glymphatic pathway dysfunction may contribute to the deficient amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we review several lines of evidence suggesting that the glymphatic system may also have potential clinical relevance for the understanding of glaucoma. As a clinically acceptable MRI-based approach to evaluate glymphatic pathway function in humans has recently been developed, a unique opportunity now exists to investigate whether suppression of the glymphatic system contributes to the development of glaucoma. The observation of a dysfunctional glymphatic system in patients with glaucoma would provide support for the hypothesis recently proposed by our group that CSF circulatory dysfunction may play a contributory role in the pathogenesis of glaucomatous damage. This would suggest a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, might be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including amyloid-β.

  5. [Analysis of the role of neurohumoral systems in action of dopaminomimetic dopamine on ion-regulating renal function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landar', L N; Kuz'min, O B

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine causes in anesthetized rats expressed diuretic response that is accompanied by an increase in GRF and a significant enhance of sodium and potassium excretion. Pretreatment the animals in diclofenac sodium or contrical in doses, that inhibit respectively activity of renal PG-system and kallikrein-kinin system, don't prevent of renal effects of dopamine. Preliminary assignment a direct renin inhibitor aliskiren enhances the diuretic, natriuretic and kaliyuretic effects of the drug. It is concluded that renal PG-system and kallikrein-kinin system are not involved in the formation of renal effects of dopamine. Renal tissue RAS directly included in the mechanism of action of dopamine in the kidney, acting as a modulator, preventing excessive loss of water and electrolytes with urine.

  6. Title: Does the difference between physically active and couch potato lie in the dopamine system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Amy M.; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and other inactivity related diseases are increasing at an alarming rate especially in Western societies. Because of this, it is important to understand the regulating mechanisms involved in physical activity behavior. Much research has been done in regard to the psychological determinants of physical activity behavior; however, little is known about the underlying genetic and biological factors that may contribute to regulation of this complex trait. It is true that a significant portion of any trait is regulated by genetic and biological factors. In the case of voluntary physical activity behavior, these regulating mechanisms appear to be concentrated in the central nervous system. In particular, the dopamine system has been shown to regulate motor movement, as well as motivation and reward behavior. The pattern of regulation of voluntary physical activity by the dopamine system is yet to be fully elucidated. This review will summarize what is known about the dopamine system and regulation of physical activity, and will present a hypothesis of how this signaling pathway is mechanistically involved in regulating voluntary physical activity behavior. Future research in this area will aid in developing personalized strategies to prevent inactivity related diseases. PMID:20224735

  7. Effect of dopamine injection on the hemocyte count and prophenoloxidase system of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Luqing; Hu, Fawen; Zheng, Debin

    2011-09-01

    Effects of dopamine injection on the hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, serine proteinase activity, proteinase inhibitor activity and α2-macroglobulin-like activity in L. vannamei were studied. Results showed that dopamine injection resulted in a significant effect on the parameters measured ( P proteinase inhibitor activity reached the minimum in 3 h, and α2-macroglobulin-like activity reached the maximum in 3 h, and all the three parameters became stable after 12 h. The results suggest that the activating mechanisms of the proPO system triggered by dopamine are different from those triggered by invasive agents or spontaneously activated under a normal physical condition.

  8. Methamphetamine Increases Locomotion and Dopamine Transporter Activity in Dopamine D5 Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Seiji Hayashizaki; Shinobu Hirai; Yumi Ito; Yoshiko Honda; Yosefu Arime; Ichiro Sora; Haruo Okado; Tohru Kodama; Masahiko Takada

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behaviora...

  9. Vagal nerve stimulation reverses aberrant dopamine system function in the methylazoxymethanol acetate rodent model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Stephanie M; Carreno, Flavia R; Frazer, Alan; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) is an alternative therapy for epilepsy and treatment refractory depression. Here we examine VNS as a potential therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia in the methylozoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model of the disease. We have previously demonstrated that hyperactivity within ventral regions of the hippocampus (vHipp) drives the dopamine system dysregulation in this model. Moreover, by targeting the vHipp directly, we can reverse aberrant dopamine system function and associated behaviors in the MAM model. Although the central effects of VNS have not been completely delineated, positron emission topographic measurements of cerebral blood flow in humans have consistently reported that VNS stimulation induces bilateral decreases in hippocampal activity. Based on our previous observations, we performed in vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings in MAM- and saline-treated rats to evaluate the effect of chronic (2 week) VNS treatment on the activity of putative vHipp pyramidal neurons, as well as downstream dopamine neuron activity in the ventral tegmental area. Here we demonstrate that chronic VNS was able to reverse both vHipp hyperactivity and aberrant mesolimbic dopamine neuron function in the MAM model of schizophrenia. Additionally, VNS reversed a behavioral correlate of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Because current therapies for schizophrenia are far from adequate, with a large number of patients discontinuing treatment due to low efficacy or intolerable side effects, it is important to explore alternative nonpharmacological treatments. These data provide the first preclinical evidence that VNS may be a possible alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  10. [Affection of cardiovascular system in diabetic patients with thyroid dysfunctions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroner, Z; Lazúrová, I

    2006-11-01

    Affection of cardiovascular system is one of the most frequent and--especially in higher age groups--the most serious clinical manifestations of thyroid dysfunction. Moreover, diabetics, mainly type 2 diabetes patients, have a marked predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, especially to atherosclerosis and its visceral complications. Simultaneous occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and thyroid dysfunctions involves a very high risk of development and progression of various forms of cardiovascular diseases. There are two basal aspects of the influence of hypothyreosis on cardiovascular system. Decreasing basal metabolism in the whole organism reduces requirements on the cardiovsuclar system. The second aspect of the influence of hypothyreosis on the cardiovascular system is its atherogenic effect. Hypothyreosis in diabetics accelerates the development of chronic, primarily macroangiopathic complications. As opposed to hypothyreosis, the clinical picture of which is not characterised by cardiovascular system disorders, cardiac involvement in patients with hyperthyreosis is more pronounced. In older diabetics hyperthyreosis is often manifested only by cardiovascular symptomatology. Subclinical hyperthyreosis in DM patients may stimulate cardiac function and increase the risk of atrial fibrillation.

  11. Donor dopamine treatment limits pulmonary oedema and inflammation in lung allografts subjected to prolonged hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanusch, Christine; Nowak, Kai; Toerlitz, Patrizia; Gill, Ishar S.; Song, Hui; Rafat, Neysan; Brinkkoetter, Paul T.; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Van Ackern, Klaus C.; Yard, Benito A.; Beck, Grietje C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Endothelial barrier dysfunction severely compromises organ function after reperfusion. Because dopamine pretreatment improves hypothermia mediated barrier dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine treatment of lung allografts positively affects tissue damage associated with hyp

  12. Successful treatment of dopamine dysregulation syndrome with dopamine D2 partial agonist antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizushima Jin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS consists of a series of complications such as compulsive use of dopaminergic medications, aggressive or hypomanic behaviors during excessive use, and withdrawal states characterized by dysphoria and anxiety, caused by long-term dopaminergic treatment in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Although several ways to manage DDS have been suggested, there has been no established treatment that can manage DDS without deterioration of motor symptoms. In this article, we present a case of PD in whom the administration of the dopamine D2 partial agonistic antipsychotic drug aripiprazole improved DDS symptoms such as craving and compulsive behavior without worsening of motor symptoms. Considering the profile of this drug as a partial agonist at D2 receptors, it is possible that it exerts its therapeutic effect on DDS by modulating the dysfunctional dopamine system.

  13. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka; Møller, Arne; Doudet, Doris Jeanne; Gjedde, Albert

    2012-10-30

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain-striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear function of expected reward and an inverse U-shaped function of uncertainty. In this study, we investigated the dopaminergic coding of reward and uncertainty in 18 pathological gambling sufferers and 16 healthy controls. We used positron emission tomography (PET) with the tracer [(11)C]raclopride to measure dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand, dopamine release coded uncertainty, we would find an inversely U-shaped function. The data supported an inverse U-shaped relation between striatal dopamine release and IGT performance if the pathological gambling group, but not in the healthy control group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of dopaminergic sensitivity toward uncertainty, and suggest that dopaminergic sensitivity to uncertainty is pronounced in pathological gambling, but not among non-gambling healthy controls. The findings have implications for understanding dopamine dysfunctions in pathological gambling and addictive behaviors.

  14. Inhibition of the dopamine system in rat amygdala attenuates the picrotoxin-induced locomoter hyperactivity and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C K; Wang, N L; Lin, M T

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether picrotoxin-induced locomotor hyperactivity and hypertension can be inhibited by dopaminergic inhibition in rat amygdala. Locomotor activity was detected using a modularized infrared light matrix system in freely moving rats. In anaesthetized rats, blood pressure was measured while dopamine release was detected using in vivo voltammetry with carbon fibre electrodes. Systemic administration of picrotoxin (1-4 mg/kg) increased both locomotor activity (including horizontal motion, vertical motion and total distance travelled) and the number of turnings (both clockwise and anticlockwise), but inhibited postural freezing. The locomotor hyperactivity induced by systemic administration of picrotoxin was mimicked by direct injection of a small dose (1-3 micro g in 1.0 micro L) of picrotoxin into the amygdala. In vivo voltammetry data revealed that systemic administration of picrotoxin increased the release of dopamine in the amygdala of rat brain accompanied by hypertension. Local injection of kainic acid into the paramedian reticular nucleus (PRN) of the medulla oblongata decreased both the spontaneous release of dopamine in the amygdala and spontaneous levels of locomotor activity in rats. Furthermore, the picrotoxin-induced locomotor hyperactivity, hypertension and increased amygdaloid dopamine release were all suppressed following chemical stimulation of the PRN with kainic acid. Blockade of dopamine receptors with systemic or intra-amygdaloid injection of haloperidol (a dopamine receptor antagonist) significantly attenuated the picrotoxin-induced locomotor hyperactivity and hypertension. These results demonstrate that picrotoxin-induced hyperactivity and hypertension involve an increase in amygdaloid dopamine transmission that can be modulated by ascending projections from the PRN in the medulla oblongata.

  15. (Dysfunctional relations between knowledge quality and education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional analysis of the relation between knowledge and education system from the viewpoint of quality is used in the paper. It is proved that it is not necessarily true that there is a correspondence between knowledge quality and construction of the education system, i.e. that the former quality is not an inevitable condition of the latter. In the first part of the paper, we distinguish the concept of quality from non-quality knowledge. Out of 19 indicators, five knowledge qualities are normative (exceptional sense, and the others descriptive (specific sense characteristics. In the second part, the conceptual approach to education system focuses on its (dysfunctional and non-functional connections. The tradition of national knowledge, the character of social relations established between the actors within the system and the influence of implicit knowledge on teacher and student actions in education system are discussed. All these factors can influence positively and negatively the direction and content of knowledge quality in education system. Knowledge quality in school curricula and textbooks may be ensured and then (not realized due to the influence of traditional, social and implicit factors on educational interaction. The concept of constellation is used to explain the favorable and unfavorable relation between knowledge quality and education system. In the concluding part, the author argues that education system cannot ensure complete realization of knowledge quality since it is, to a considerable extent, conditioned by school and non-school factors.

  16. An augmented dopamine system function is present prior to puberty in the methylazoxymethanol acetate rodent model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Perez, Stephanie M; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a disease typically associated with an adolescent onset. Although there have been a considerable number of imaging studies investigating the transition to psychosis in prodromal patients, there are relatively few preclinical studies examining potential mechanisms that may contribute to adolescent onset. We have previously demonstrated, in the methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model of schizophrenia, that an enhanced activity within the ventral hippocampus may underlie the dopamine system hyperfunction, suggested to contribute to positive symptoms in patients. Here we demonstrate that the aberrant regulation of dopamine system function, in MAM-treated rats, is present prior to puberty. Furthermore, we now report that while the afferent regulation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons (from the hippocampus and pedunculopontine tegmental area) appears intact in preadolescent rats, the behavioral response to alterations in dopamine system function appears to be attenuated in preadolescent rats. Thus, we posit that the pathological alterations underlying psychosis may be present prior to symptom onset and that the "normal" development of the postsynaptic side of the dopamine system may underlie the transition to psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Organization of Monosynaptic Inputs to the Serotonin and Dopamine Neuromodulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachie K. Ogawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here, we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR. We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shifted in the forebrain, and MR serotonin neurons receive inputs from more medial structures. Then, we compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc. We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Our results suggest three major input streams: a medial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, an intermediate stream regulates DR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and a lateral stream regulates SNc dopamine neurons. These results provide fundamental organizational principles of afferent control for serotonin and dopamine.

  18. White matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex E Jung

    Full Text Available Patients diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus have similar levels of neuropsychological dysfunction (i.e., 20-50% as those with Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE. We hypothesized a gradient between cognition and white matter integrity, such that strongest brain-behavior relationships would emerge in NPSLE, intermediate in non-NPSLE, and minimal in controls. We studied thirty-one patients (16 non-NPSLE; 15 NPSLE, ranging in age from 18 to 59 years old (100% female, and eighteen age and gender matched healthy controls. DTI examinations were performed on a 1.5T scanner. A broad neuropsychological battery was administered, tapping attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning. The Total z-score consisted of the combined sum of all neuropsychological measures. In control subjects, we found no significant FA-Total z-score correlations. NPSLE, non-NPSLE, and control subjects differed significantly in terms of Total z-score (NPSLE = -2.25+/-1.77, non-NPSLE = -1.22+/-1.03, Controls = -0.10+/-.57; F = 13.2, p<.001. In non-NPSLE subjects, FA within the right external capsule was significantly correlated with Total z-score. In NPSLE subjects, the largest FA-Total z-score clusters were observed within the left anterior thalamic radiation and right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In subsequent analyses the largest number of significant voxels linked FA with the Processing Speed z-score in NPSLE. The current results reflect objective white matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in both NPSLE and (to a lesser degree in non-NPSLE. non-NPSLE and NPSLE subjects did not differ significantly in terms of depression, as measured by the GDI; thus, previous hypotheses suggesting moderating effects of depression upon neuropsychological performance do not impact the current FA results.

  19. Epigenetic dysregulation of the dopamine system in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, Zivjena; Carlin, Jesse Lea; Totoki, Kathy; Reyes, Teresa M

    2012-03-01

    Chronic intake of high-fat (HF) diet is known to alter brain neurotransmitter systems that participate in the central regulation of food intake. Dopamine (DA) system changes in response to HF diet have been observed in the hypothalamus, important in the homeostatic control of food intake, as well as within the central reward circuitry [ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and pre-frontal cortex (PFC)], critical for coding the rewarding properties of palatable food and important in hedonically driven feeding behavior. Using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO), significant alterations in the expression of DA-related genes were documented in adult animals, and the general pattern of gene expression changes was opposite within the hypothalamus versus the reward circuitry (increased vs. decreased, respectively). Differential DNA methylation was identified within the promoter regions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT), and the pattern of this response was consistent with the pattern of gene expression. Behaviors consistent with increased hypothalamic DA and decreased reward circuitry DA were observed. These data identify differential DNA methylation as an epigenetic mechanism linking the chronic intake of HF diet with altered DA-related gene expression, and this response varies by brain region and DNA sequence. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Early Antipsychotic Treatment in Juvenile Rats Elicits Long-Term Alterations to the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Michael; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2016-11-22

    Prescription of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to children has substantially increased in recent years. Whilst current investigations into potential long-term effects have uncovered some alterations to adult behaviours, further investigations into potential changes to neurotransmitter systems are required. The current study investigated potential long-term changes to the adult dopamine (DA) system following aripiprazole, olanzapine and risperidone treatment in female and male juvenile rats. Levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated-TH (p-TH), dopamine active transporter (DAT), and D₁ and D₂ receptors were measured via Western blot and/or receptor autoradiography. Aripiprazole decreased TH and D₁ receptor levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and p-TH levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of females, whilst TH levels decreased in the PFC of males. Olanzapine decreased PFC p-TH levels and increased D₂ receptor expression in the PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females only. Additionally, risperidone treatment increased D₁ receptor levels in the hippocampus of females, whilst, in males, p-TH levels increased in the PFC and hippocampus, D₁ receptor expression decreased in the NAc, and DAT levels decreased in the caudate putamen (CPu), and elevated in the VTA. These results suggest that early treatment with various APDs can cause different long-term alterations in the adult brain, across both treatment groups and genders.

  1. Developmental changes in human dopamine neurotransmission: cortical receptors and terminators

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    Rothmond Debora A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is integral to cognition, learning and memory, and dysfunctions of the frontal cortical dopamine system have been implicated in several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is critical for working memory which does not fully mature until the third decade of life. Few studies have reported on the normal development of the dopamine system in human DLPFC during postnatal life. We assessed pre- and postsynaptic components of the dopamine system including tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine receptors (D1, D2 short and D2 long isoforms, D4, D5, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase (A and B in the developing human DLPFC (6 weeks -50 years. Results Gene expression was first analysed by microarray and then by quantitative real-time PCR. Protein expression was analysed by western blot. Protein levels for tyrosine hydroxylase peaked during the first year of life (p O-methyltransferase (p = 0.024 were significantly higher in neonates and infants as was catechol-O-methyltransferase protein (32 kDa, p = 0.027. In contrast, dopamine D1 receptor mRNA correlated positively with age (p = 0.002 and dopamine D1 receptor protein expression increased throughout development (p Conclusions We find distinct developmental changes in key components of the dopamine system in DLPFC over postnatal life. Those genes that are highly expressed during the first year of postnatal life may influence and orchestrate the early development of cortical neural circuitry while genes portraying a pattern of increasing expression with age may indicate a role in DLPFC maturation and attainment of adult levels of cognitive function.

  2. An Overview of the Association between Schizotypy and Dopamine

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    Christine eMohr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy refers to a constellation of personality traits that are believed to mirror the subclinical expression of schizophrenia in the general population. Evidence from pharmacological studies indicates that dopamine is involved in the aetiology of schizophrenia. Based on the assumption of a continuum between schizophrenia and schizotypy, researchers have begun investigating the association between dopamine and schizotypy using a wide range of methods. In this article, we review published studies on this association from the following areas of work: (1 Experimental investigations of the interactive effects of dopaminergic challenges and schizotypy on cognition, motor control and behaviour, (2 dopaminergically supported cognitive functions, (3 studies of associations between schizotypy and polymorphisms in genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, and (4 molecular imaging studies of the association between schizotypy and markers of the dopamine system. Together, data from these lines of evidence suggest that dopamine is important to the expression and experience of schizotypy and associated behavioural biases. An important observation is that the experimental designs, methods, and manipulations used in this research are highly heterogeneous. Future studies are required to replicate individual observations, to enlighten the link between dopamine and different schizotypy dimensions (positive, negative, cognitive disorganisation, and to guide the search for solid dopamine-sensitive behavioural markers. Such studies are important in order to clarify inconsistencies between studies. More work is also needed to identify differences between dopaminergic alterations in schizotypy compared to the dysfunctions observed in schizophrenia.

  3. Role for the mesocortical dopamine system in the motivating effects of cocaine.

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    Koob, G F; Caine, B; Markou, A; Pulvirenti, L; Weiss, F

    1994-01-01

    The search for a neurobiological substrate for the stimulant and reinforcing properties of cocaine has focused for some time on a particular part of the forebrain, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system. This mesocorticolimbic DA system innervates the region of the nucleus accumbens (NACC) (ventral striatum) in the anterior part of the basal forebrain and appears to play a critical role in mediating the acute reinforcing effects of cocaine and amphetamine. This chapter reviews the role of mesocorticolimbic DA in the reinforcing properties of psychomotor stimulants as measured by intravenous (IV) drug self-administration in rats. In addition, the primary neuropharmacological mechanism for cocaine reinforcement provides a rich substrate for studying nondopaminergic modulation of the reinforcing actions of cocaine.

  4. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

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    Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

  5. Urinary and erectile dysfunction in multiple system atrophy (MSA).

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    Papatsoris, A G; Papapetropoulos, S; Singer, C; Deliveliotis, C

    2008-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease of undetermined etiology that occurs sporadically and manifests itself as a combination of parkinsonian, autonomic, cerebellar, and pyramidal signs. Despite the lack of effective therapies, some of the symptoms may be, at least temporarily, improved with adequate symptomatic therapies. Urinary and erectile dysfunction (ED) symptoms are prominent early features in male MSA patients. Lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this disorder. More than 50% of MSA patients suffer from recurrent lower UTIs and a significant number (approximately 25%) die of complications related to them. Urogenital symptoms in MSA are usually due to a complex mixture of central and peripheral nervous abnormalities, sometimes superimposed on previous local pathological conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and perineal laxity. There have been instances were MSA-related urological symptoms were confused with symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, leading to unnecessary urological surgery. In this review, we present the phenotypic range and therapeutic approaches for common storage and voiding urological symptoms and ED, in patients with MSA.

  6. Dopamine and Huntington's disease.

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    Schwab, Laetitia C; Garas, Shady N; Garas, Shaady N; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Mason, Sarah L; Stott, Simon R; Barker, Roger A

    2015-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable, inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is defined by a combination of motor, cognitive and psychiatric features. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have demonstrated an important role for the dopamine (DA) system in HD with dopaminergic dysfunction at the level of both DA release and DA receptors. It is, therefore, not surprising that the drug treatments most commonly used in HD are anti-dopaminergic agents. Their use is based primarily on the belief that the characteristic motor impairments are a result of overactivation of the central dopaminergic pathways. While this is a useful starting place, it is clear that the behavior of the central dopaminergic pathways is not fully understood in this condition and may change as a function of disease stage. In addition, how abnormalities in dopaminergic systems may underlie some of the non-motor features of HD has also been poorly investigated and this is especially important given the greater burden these place on the patients' and families' quality of life. In this review, we discuss what is known about central dopaminergic pathways in HD and how this informs us about the mechanisms of action of the dopaminergic therapies used to treat it. By doing so, we will highlight some of the paradoxes that exist and how solving them may reveal new insights for improved treatment of this currently incurable condition, including the possibility that such drugs may even have effects on disease progression and pathogenesis.

  7. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia.

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    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies.

  8. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

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    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  9. Anxiety, depression and autonomic nervous system dysfunction in hypertension.

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    Bajkó, Zoltán; Szekeres, Csilla-Cecília; Kovács, Katalin Réka; Csapó, Krisztina; Molnár, Sándor; Soltész, Pál; Nyitrai, Erika; Magyar, Mária Tünde; Oláh, László; Bereczki, Dániel; Csiba, László

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the relationship between autonomic nervous system dysfunction, anxiety and depression in untreated hypertension. 86 newly diagnosed hypertensive patients and 98 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The psychological parameters were assessed with Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory by a skilled psychologist. Autonomic parameters were examined during tilt table examination (10min lying position, 10min passive tilt). Heart rate variability (HRV) was calculated by autoregressive methods. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated by non-invasive sequence method from the recorded beat to beat blood pressure values and RR intervals. Significantly higher state (42.6±9.3 vs. 39.6±10.7 p=0.05) and trait (40.1±8.9 vs. 35.1±8.6, p<0.0001) anxiety scores were found in the hypertension group. There was no statistically significant difference in the depression level. LF-RRI (Low Frequency-RR interval) of HRV in passive tilt (377.3±430.6 vs. 494.1±547, p=0.049) and mean BRS slope (11.4±5.5 vs. 13.2±6.4, p=0.07) in lying position were lower in hypertensives. Trait anxiety score correlates significantly with sympatho/vagal balance (LF/HF-RRI) in passive tilt position (Spearman R=-0.286, p=0.01). Anxiety could play a more important role than depression in the development of hypertension. Altered autonomic control of the heart could be one of the pathophysiological links between hypertension and psychological factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 多巴胺系统在甲基苯丙胺成瘾中的作用%The Role of Dopamine System in Methamphetamine Addiction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨黎华

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究多巴胺系统在甲基苯丙胺成瘾中的作用。方法:通过查阅近年来国内外专家对甲基苯丙胺对多巴胺、多巴胺受体、多巴胺转运体的作用,总结多巴胺系统在甲基苯丙胺成瘾中的作用。结果:多巴胺系统在甲基苯丙胺成瘾过程中起重要作用。结论:研究清楚多巴胺系统在甲基苯丙胺成瘾中的作用,为甲基苯丙胺成瘾治疗寻找有效靶点。%Objective:To study the role of dopamine system in methamphetamine addiction. Methods:The literature on dopamine, dopamine receptors, and dopamine transporter in methamphetamine addiction written by experts of domestic and abroad in recent years was reviewed, and the role of dopamine system in methamphetamine addiction was summarized. Results:The dopamine system played an important role in methamphetamine addiction. Conclusion:Studying the role of dopamine system in methamphetamine addiction clearly helps find effective treatment method for methamphetamine addiction.

  11. Neuronal and molecular effects of cannabidiol on the mesolimbic dopamine system: Implications for novel schizophrenia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Justine; Norris, Christopher; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2017-02-07

    Growing clinical and pre-clinical evidence points to a critical role for cannabidiol (CBD), the largest phytochemical component of cannabis, as a potential pharmacotherapy for various neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is associated with acute and neurodevelopmental pro-psychotic side-effects, CBD possesses no known psychoactive or dependence-producing properties. However, evidence has demonstrated that CBD strongly modulates the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system and may possess promising anti-psychotic properties. Despite the psychotropic differences between CBD and THC, little is known regarding their molecular and neuronal effects on the mesolimbic DA system, nor how these differential effects may relate to their potential pro vs. anti-psychotic properties. This review summarizes clinical and pre-clinical evidence demonstrating CBD's modulatory effects on DA activity states within the mesolimbic pathway, functional interactions with the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor system, and their downstream molecular signaling effects. Together with clinical evidence showing that CBD may normalize affective and cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia, CBD may represent a promising treatment for schizophrenia, acting through novel molecular and neuronal mesolimbic substrates.

  12. Effects of the organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor on dopamine metabolites and transporters in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Rosemary A; Richardson, Jason R; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A; Fiskum, Gary

    2009-03-01

    Pesticide exposure has been suggested as a risk factor in developing Parkinson's disease (PD). While the molecular mechanism underlying this association is not clear, several studies have demonstrated a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in PD. Although data on specific pesticides associated with PD are often lacking, several lines of evidence point to the potential involvement of the organochlorine class of pesticides. Previously, we have found that the organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (mxc) causes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria. Here, we sought to determine whether mxc-induced mitochondrial dysfunction results in oxidative damage and dysfunction of the dopamine system. Adult female CD1 mice were dosed with either vehicle (sesame oil) or mxc (16, 32, or 64 mg/kg/day) for 20 consecutive days. Following treatment, we observed a dose-related increase in protein carbonyl levels in non-synaptic mitochondria, indicating oxidative modification of mitochondrial proteins which may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction. Mxc exposure also caused a dose-related decrease in striatal levels of dopamine (16-31%), which were accompanied by decreased levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT; 35-48%) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; 21-44%). Because mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, and decreased levels of DAT and VMAT2 are found in PD patients, our data suggest that mxc should be investigated as a possible candidate involved in the association of pesticides with increased risk for PD, particularly in highly exposed populations.

  13. Renal dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tahir; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2003-02-01

    Dopamine has been recognized as an important modulator of central as well as peripheral physiologic functions in both humans and animals. Dopamine receptors have been identified in a number of organs and tissues, which include several regions within the central nervous system, sympathetic ganglia and postganglionic nerve terminals, various vascular beds, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, and the kidney. The peripheral dopamine receptors influence cardiovascular and renal function by decreasing afterload and vascular resistance and promoting sodium excretion. Within the kidney, dopamine receptors are present along the nephron, with highest density on proximal tubule epithelial cells. It has been reported that there is a defective dopamine receptor, especially D(1) receptor function, in the proximal tubule of various animal models of hypertension as well as in humans with essential hypertension. Recent reports have revealed the site of and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the defect in D(1) receptors in hypertension. Moreover, recent studies have also demonstrated that the disruption of various dopamine receptor subtypes and their function produces hypertension in rodents. In this review, we present evidence that dopamine and dopamine receptors play an important role in regulating renal sodium excretion and that defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function may contribute to the development of various forms of hypertension.

  14. Relationship between higher cortical dysfunction and the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Yamada, Yoichi; Yukawa, Susumu [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and organic lesions was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to clarify the etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. The subjects were 10 patients with SLE, and higher cortical dysfunction was observed in 8 (80%) of the 10 patients. Five (82.5%) of the 8 patients showed abnormal MRI findings. The findings of higher cortical dysfunction were consistent with the MRI findings in 1 of the 5 patients, but not in the remaining four. MRI revealed no lesion despite the presence of higher cortical dysfunction in three patients. These results suggest that the association of organic changes and functional changes in cerebral nerve cells is important for etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. (author).

  15. [Use of the Helkimo Index as screening of dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Majewsky, I; Simm, R

    1989-09-01

    The Helkimo index was used on 130 subjects to identify dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system. There were no significant discrepancies between the results obtained by two investigators except in the case of occlusal interference.

  16. N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine Modulates Acute Systemic Inflammation via Nonhematopoietic TRPV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Samira K.; Xu, Fengyun; Tran, Alphonso; Wong, Erika; Schumacher, Mark; Wilhelmsen, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    N-Arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) is an endogenous lipid that potently activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which mediates pain and thermosensation. NADA is also an agonist of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. We have reported that NADA reduces the activation of cultured human endothelial cells by LPS and TNF-α. Thus far, in vivo studies using NADA have focused on its neurologic and behavioral roles. In this article, we show that NADA potently decreases in vivo systemic inflammatory responses and levels of the coagulation intermediary plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in three mouse models of inflammation: LPS, bacterial lipopeptide, and polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis. We also found that the administration of NADA increases survival in endotoxemic mice. Additionally, NADA reduces blood levels of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide but increases the neuropeptide substance P in LPS-treated mice. We demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of NADA are mediated by TRPV1 expressed by nonhematopoietic cells and provide data suggesting that neuronal TRPV1 may mediate NADA’s anti-inflammatory effects. These results indicate that NADA has novel TRPV1-dependent anti-inflammatory properties and suggest that the endovanilloid system might be targeted therapeutically in acute inflammation. PMID:28701511

  17. Handling, genetic and housing effects on the mouse stress system, dopamine function, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Rodriguiz, Ramona Marie; Jones, Byron C

    2002-08-01

    This research was designed to examine how early stimulation (i.e., handling), subsequent housing conditions and genetic factors interact to produce adult differences in stress regulation. High-aggressive (NC900) and low-aggressive (NC100) mice were handled for 3 weeks potspartum and were subsequently isolated or grouped until observed as adults in an open field or a dyadic test. In NC100, handling abolished the temporal variations seen in open-field activity among the nonhandled subjects and reduced corticosterone (CORT) activation. In NC900, these two measures were unaffected by handling. Only among handled NC100 did subsequent group rearing further reduce CORT activation. By contrast, handling caused an up-regulation of D1 dopamine receptors in both lines, and, in NC100, this effect was increased by group rearing. In a dyadic encounter with another male mouse, subjects of both lines showed handling effects. NC100 froze less rapidly and NC900 attacked more rapidly. This multifactorial design showed that the systemic effects of handling are modulated by genetic background, and that measures of these effects are affected by experience beyond infancy. Our findings also showed that the effects of handling vary when assessed across different physiological systems and across social and nonsocial testing conditions.

  18. Dopamine controls neurogenesis in the adult salamander midbrain in homeostasis and during regeneration of dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Wang, Heng; Frisén, Jonas; Simon, András

    2011-04-08

    Appropriate termination of regenerative processes is critical for producing the correct number of cells in tissues. Here we provide evidence for an end-product inhibition of dopamine neuron regeneration that is mediated by dopamine. Ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons leads to complete regeneration in salamanders. Regeneration involves extensive neurogenesis and requires activation of quiescent ependymoglia cells, which express dopamine receptors. Pharmacological compensation for dopamine loss by L-dopa inhibits ependymoglia proliferation and regeneration in a dopamine receptor-signaling-dependent manner, specifically after ablation of dopamine neurons. Systemic administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol alone causes ependymoglia proliferation and the appearance of excessive number of neurons. Our data show that stem cell quiescence is under dopamine control and provide a model for termination once normal homeostasis is restored. The findings establish a role for dopamine in the reversible suppression of neurogenesis in the midbrain and have implications for regenerative strategies in Parkinson's disease.

  19. [{sup 123}I]β-CIT SPECT imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters in Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berding, G.; Gielow, P.; Harke, H.; Knoop, B.O.; Knapp, W.H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. School of Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Bruecke, Th. [Univ. Clinic of Neurology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Odin, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Zentralkrankenhaus Reinkenheide, Bremerhaven (Germany); Brooks, D.J. [MRC Clinical Sciences Centre and Div. of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial Coll., Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Kolbe, H.; Dengler, R. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. School of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Aims: Definition of the regional pattern of dopamine transporter (DAT) dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and evaluation of a potential correlation between DAT binding and symptoms; elucidation of the role of DAT imaging in the differential diagnosis of PD and multiple system atrophy (MSA); assessment and comparison of serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in PD and MSA. Methods: [{sup 123}I]β-CIT SPECT was performed in 14 patients with advanced PD, 10 with moderate MSA and 20 healthy persons. Specific to non-specific tracer binding ratios (V{sub 3}{sup ''}) were calculated via ROI analysis of uptake images at 4 h (SERT binding) and 24 h (DAT binding) p. i. Results: In PD bilateral reduction of striatal DAT binding (63-70%) was seen. The caudate ipsilateral to the clinically predominantly affected side showed relatively the least impairment. Significant correlations (r = -0.54 to -0.64) between DAT binding and Hoehn and Yahr stage, UPDRS-scores and duration of disease were found. In MSA DAT binding was less reduced (40-48%) targeting the putamen contralateral to the side of clinical predominance. Significantly lower SERT binding was observed in PD midbrain and MSA hypothalamus compared to controls - and in MSA relative to PD mesial frontal cortex. Conclusions: In advanced PD striatal DAT binding is markedly reduced with the least reduction in caudate ipsilateral to the clinically predominantly affected side. In moderate MSA with asymmetrical symptoms DAT dysfunction is predominant in the contralateral putamen, a pattern seen in early PD. The reduction of SERT in the midbrain area of PD patients suggests additional tegmental degeneration while in MSA the serotonergic system seems to be more generally affected. (orig.)

  20. Acute treatment with doxorubicin induced neurochemical impairment of the function of dopamine system in rat brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Romanska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The clinical studies have shown that chemotherapy may impair cognitive functions especially in the patients treated for breast cancer. It should be mention that only few studies have made use of animals to investigate the effects of chemotherapy on the brain function. Doxorubicin (Adriamycin) is an anthracycline antibiotic commonly used for chemotherapy of breast cancer. This study examined the effect of doxorubicin (1.5 and 3.0mg/kg ip) after acute administration on the levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and their metabolites in the rat brain structures connected with cognition and psychiatric disorders. The data indicate that doxorubicin produced a significant and specific for the dopamine system inhibition of its activity in the investigated structures connected with the fall of dopamine concentration (decrease from 25 to 30% in the frontal cortex; from 30 to 60% in the hippocampus and about 20% of the control in the striatum, pdopamine system activity in all investigated structures with the strongest effect in the hippocampus what may lead to the disturbances of the cognitive functions at the patients treated for cancer. Moreover, such treatment did not significantly affect others monoaminergic transmitters such as noradrenaline and serotonin. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Systemic blockade of dopamine D2-like receptors increases high-voltage spindles in the globus pallidus and motor cortex of freely moving rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yang

    Full Text Available High-voltage spindles (HVSs have been reported to appear spontaneously and widely in the cortical-basal ganglia networks of rats. Our previous study showed that dopamine depletion can significantly increase the power and coherence of HVSs in the globus pallidus (GP and motor cortex of freely moving rats. However, it is unclear whether dopamine regulates HVS activity by acting on dopamine D₁-like receptors or D₂-like receptors. We employed local-field potential and electrocorticogram methods to simultaneously record the oscillatory activities in the GP and primary motor cortex (M1 in freely moving rats following systemic administration of dopamine receptor antagonists or saline. The results showed that the dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists, raclopride and haloperidol, significantly increased the number and duration of HVSs, and the relative power associated with HVS activity in the GP and M1 cortex. Coherence values for HVS activity between the GP and M1 cortex area were also significantly increased by dopamine D₂-like receptor antagonists. On the contrary, the selective dopamine D₁-like receptor antagonist, SCH23390, had no significant effect on the number, duration, or relative power of HVSs, or HVS-related coherence between M1 and GP. In conclusion, dopamine D₂-like receptors, but not D₁-like receptors, were involved in HVS regulation. This supports the important role of dopamine D₂-like receptors in the regulation of HVSs. An siRNA knock-down experiment on the striatum confirmed our conclusion.

  2. Reduced levels of Cacna1c attenuate mesolimbic dopamine system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrillion, C E; Dao, D T; Cachope, R; Lobo, M K; Puche, A C; Cheer, J F; Gould, T D

    2017-06-01

    Genetic variation in CACNA1C, which codes for the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) Cav 1.2, is associated with clinical diagnoses of bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia. Dysregulation of the mesolimbic-dopamine (ML-DA) system is linked to these syndromes and LTCCs are required for normal DAergic neurotransmission between the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). It is unclear, however, how variations in CACNA1C genotype, and potential subsequent changes in expression levels in these regions, modify risk. Using constitutive and conditional knockout mice, and treatment with the LTCC antagonist nimodipine, we examined the role of Cacna1c in DA-mediated behaviors elicited by psychomotor stimulants. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, DA release and reuptake in the NAc were measured. We find that subsecond DA release in Cacna1c haploinsufficient mice lacks normal sensitivity to inhibition of the DA transporter (DAT). Constitutive haploinsufficiency of Cacna1c led to attenuation of hyperlocomotion following acute administration of stimulants specific to DAT, and locomotor sensitization of these mice to the DAT antagonist GBR12909 did not reach the same level as wild-type mice. The maintenance of sensitization to GBR12909 was attenuated by administration of nimodipine. Sensitization to GBR12909 was attenuated in mice with reduced Cacna1c selectively in the VTA but not in the NAc. Our findings show that Cacna1c is crucial for normal behavioral responses to DA stimulants and that its activity in the VTA is required for behavioral sensitization. Cacna1c likely exerts these effects through modifications to presynaptic ML-DA system function. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  3. Amygdala-prefrontal pathways and the dopamine system affect nociceptive responses in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onozawa Kitaro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated nociceptive discharges to be evoked by mechanical noxious stimulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. The nociceptive responses recorded in the PFC are conceivably involved in the affective rather than the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain. The PFC receives dense projection from the limbic system. Monosynaptic projections from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA to the PFC are known to produce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. We examined effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS delivered to the BLA on nociceptive responses in the rat PFC. Results HFS induced long lasting suppression (LLS of the specific high threshold responses of nociceptive neurons in the PFC. Microinjection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, dizocilpine (MK-801 and also metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR group antagonists (α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, and 2-[(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl]-3-(9H-xanthen-9-yl-D-alanine (LY341495, prevented the induction of LLS of nociceptive responses. We also examined modulatory effects of dopamine (DA on the LLS of nociceptive responses. With depletion of DA in response to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA injection into the ipsilateral forebrain bundle, LLS of nociceptive responses was decreased, while nociceptive responses were normally evoked. Antagonists of DA receptor subtypes D2 (sulpiride and D4 (3-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl piperazin-1-yl] methyl}-1H-pyrrolo [2, 3-b] pyridine (L-745,870, microinjected into the PFC, inhibited LLS of nociceptive responses. Conclusions Our results indicate that BLA-PFC pathways inhibited PFC nociceptive cell activities and that the DA system modifies the BLA-PFC regulatory function.

  4. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl l-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  5. Pathological hypersexuality predominantly linked to adjuvant dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Kevin J; Bower, James H; Josephs, Keith A; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Ahlskog, J Eric

    2005-09-01

    Pathological hypersexuality developed in 13 patients with PD and two patients ultimately diagnosed clinically with MSA. Hypersexuality began within 8 months after starting dopamine agonist therapy in 14 of 15 cases, including four on agonist monotherapy. It resolved in the four cases where the agonist was stopped, despite continued levodopa therapy. This was not an isolated behavioral problem in most, with additional compulsive or addictive behaviors coinciding in nine patients (60%). A systematic literature review of pathological hypersexuality in PD revealed similar medication histories; combining these cases with our series, 26 of 29 patients (90%) were on adjuvant dopamine agonists.

  6. Effect of Dopamine Injection on the Hemocyte Count and Prophenoloxidase System of the White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Luqing; HU Fawen; ZHENG Debin

    2011-01-01

    Effects of dopamine injection on the hemocyte count,phenoloxidase activity,serine proteinase activity,proteinase inhibitor activity and α2-macroglobulin-like activity in L.vannamei were studied.Results showed that dopamine injection resulted in a significant effect on the parameters measured (P<0.05),while no significant difference was observed in the control group (0.85% NaCl).In the experimental groups,the hemocyte count reached the minimum in 3 h; granular and semi-granular cells became stable after 12 h and hyaline cells and the total hemocyte count became stable after 18 h.Phenoloxidase activity reached the minimum in 6 h,and then became stable after 9h.Serine protease activity and proteinase inhibitor activity reached the minimum in 3 h,and α2-macroglobulin-like activity reached the maximum in 3 h,and all the three parameters became stable after 12 h.The results suggest that the activating mechanisms of the proPO system triggered by dopamine are different from those triggered by invasive agents or spontaneously activated under a normal physical condition.

  7. Investigation on the co-luminescence effect of europium (III)-lanthanum(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Hailin; Zhao, Fang; Cai, Huan

    2013-01-01

    A novel luminescence, enhancement phenomenon in the europium(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system was observed when lanthanum(III) was added. Based on this, a sensitive co-luminescence method was established for the determination of dopamine. The luminescence signal for the europium (III)-lanthanum(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system was monitored at λ(ex) = 300 nm, λ(em) = 618 nm and pH 8.3. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced luminescence signal responded linearly to the concentration of dopamine in the range 1.0 × 10(-10)-5.0 × 10(-7) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993 (n = 11). The detection limit (3σ) was 2.7 × 10(-11) mol/L and the relative standard deviation for 11 parallel measurements of 3.0 × 10(-8) mol/L dopamine was 1.9%. The presented method was successfully applied for the estimation of dopamine in samples of pharmaceutical preparations, human serum and urine. The possible luminescence enhancement mechanism of the system is discussed briefly.

  8. Modulation of Midbrain Dopamine Neurotransmission by Serotonin, a Versatile Interaction Between Neurotransmitters and Significance for Antipsychotic Drug Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Olijslagers; T.R. Werkman; A.C. McCreary; C.G. Kruse; W.J. Wadman

    2006-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been associated with a dysfunction of brain dopamine (DA). This, so called, DA hypothesis has been refined as new insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have emerged. Currently, dysfunction of prefrontocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic projections and dysfunction of

  9. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime M. Ross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing.

  10. Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction as harbingers of systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Kelly A

    2016-04-01

    Prescription sales of Testosterone and erectile aids such as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are at an all-time high, underscoring the importance of hypogonadism (HG) and erectile dysfunction (ED) to men's health. The effect of these debilitating conditions has a major impact on the quality of men's lives. Some risk factors for HG or ED including aging, obesity, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle. Notably, these are the same risk factors for several other medical co-morbidities that contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in men. HG and ED often co-exist with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. This review will explore these three co-morbidities that overlap with HG and ED, and will provide a review of their relationship with each other.

  11. HYPERACTIVE TISSUE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEMS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DYSFUNCTION - EXPERIMENTAL-EVIDENCE AND CLINICAL HYPOTHESES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PINTO, YM; BUIKEMA, H; VANGILST, WH

    1995-01-01

    In this review, hypotheses are discussed with regard to the role of local, tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the progression of cardiovascular dysfunction. After local renin-anglotensin systems had been described as functionally distinct systems, recent experimental studies have suggested an assoc

  12. Oxidative stress causes renal dopamine D1 receptor dysfunction and hypertension via mechanisms that involve nuclear factor-kappaB and protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Fazili, Fatima Rizwan; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2007-05-01

    Renal dopamine, via activation of D1 receptors, plays a role in maintaining sodium homeostasis and BP. There exists a defect in renal D1 receptor function in hypertension, diabetes, and aging, conditions that are associated with oxidative stress. However, the exact underlying mechanism of the oxidative stress-mediated impaired D1 receptor signaling and hypertension is not known. The effect of oxidative stress on renal D1 receptor function was investigated in healthy animals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received tap water (vehicle) and 30 mM L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an oxidant, with and without 1 mM tempol for 2 wk. Compared with vehicle, BSO treatment caused oxidative stress and increase in BP, which was accompanied by defective D1 receptor G-protein coupling and loss of natriuretic response to SKF38393. BSO treatment also increased NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, protein kinase C (PKC) activity and expression, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK-2) membranous translocation, and D1 receptor serine phosphorylation. In BSO-treated rats' supplementation of tempol decreased oxidative stress, normalized BP, and restored D1 receptor G-protein coupling and natriuretic response to SKF38393. Tempol also normalized NF-kappaB translocation, PKC activity and expression, GRK-2 sequestration, and D1 receptor serine phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results show that oxidative stress activates NF-kappaB, causing an increase in PKC activity, which leads to GRK-2 translocation and subsequent D1 receptor hyper-serine phosphorylation and uncoupling. The functional consequence of this phenomenon was the inability of SKF38393 to inhibit Na/K-ATPase activity and promote sodium excretion, which may have contributed to increase in BP. Tempol reduced oxidative stress and thereby restored D1 receptor function and normalized BP.

  13. Voluntary Exercise Improves Performance of a Discrimination Task through Effects on the Striatal Dopamine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a…

  14. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth.

  15. Modeling cognitive dysfunction in neurofibromatosis-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Gutmann, David H

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, including significant impairments in learning, behavior, and attention, is found in over 10% of children in the general population. However, in the common inherited cancer predisposition syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the prevalence of these cognitive deficits approaches 70%. As a monogenic disorder, NF1 provides a unique genetic tool to identify and dissect mechanistically the molecular and cellular bases underlying cognitive dysfunction. In this review, we discuss Nf1 fly and mouse systems that mimic many of the cognitive abnormalities seen in children with NF1. Further, we describe discoveries from these models that have uncovered defects in the regulation of Ras activity, cAMP generation, and dopamine homeostasis as key mechanisms important for cognitive dysfunction in children with NF1.

  16. Dysfunctional Neurotransmitter Systems in Fibromyalgia, Their Role in Central Stress Circuitry and Pharmacological Actions on These Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is considered a stress-related disorder, and hypo- as well as hyperactive stress systems (sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been found. Some observations raise doubts on the view that alterations in these stress systems are solely responsible for fibromyalgia symptoms. Cumulative evidence points at dysfunctional transmitter systems that may underlie the major symptoms of the condition. In addition, all transmitter systems found to be altered in fibromyalgia influence the body's stress systems. Since both transmitter and stress systems change during chronic stress, it is conceivable that both systems change in parallel, interact, and contribute to the phenotype of fibromyalgia. As we outline in this paper, subgroups of patients might exhibit varying degrees and types of transmitter dysfunction, explaining differences in symptomatoloy and contributing to the heterogeneity of fibromyalgia. The finding that not all fibromyalgia patients respond to the same medications, targeting dysfunctional transmitter systems, further supports this hypothesis.

  17. Dopamine, hypertension and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, F; Fouillioux, C; Bolívar, A; Simonovis, N; Hernández-Hernández, R; Armas-Hernandez, M J; Velasco, M

    2002-03-01

    Dopamine, a neurotransmitter, precursor of noradrenaline, is responsible for cardiovascular and renal actions, such as increase in myocardial contractility and cardiac output, without changes in heart rate, producing passive and active vasodilatation, diuresis and natriuresis. These cardiovascular and renal actions take place through the interaction with dopamine receptors, D(1), D(2), D(3), D(4), and D(5). Recent findings point to the possibility of D(6) and D(7)receptors. Dopamine is known to influence the control of arterial pressure by influencing the central and peripheral nervous system and target organs such as kidneys and adrenal glands, in some types of hypertension. Although dopamine and its derivatives have been shown to have antihypertensive effects, these are still being studied; therefore it is important to explain some physiological and pharmacological aspects of dopamine, its receptors, and the clinical uses it could have in the treatment of arterial hypertension and more recently in obesity, based on evidence proving a clear association between obesity and the decrease in the expression of D(2) receptors in the brain of obese persons.

  18. Antipsychotic treatment leading to dopamine supersensitivity persistently alters nucleus accumbens function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Cynthia; Bédard, Anne-Marie; Samaha, Anne-Noël

    2015-12-01

    Chronic exposure to some antipsychotic medications can induce supersensitivity to dopamine receptor stimulation. This is linked to a worsening of clinical outcome and to antipsychotic treatment failure. Here we investigated the role of striatal subregions [nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen (CPu)] in the expression of antipsychotic-induced dopamine supersensitivity. We treated rats with haloperidol (HAL) or olanzapine (OLZ), using regimens that achieve clinically relevant kinetics of striatal D2 receptor occupancy. Under these conditions, HAL produces dopamine supersensitivity whereas OLZ does not. We then assessed behaviors evoked by the dopamine agonist amphetamine (AMPH). We either injected AMPH into the striatum or inhibited striatal function with microinjections of GABA receptor agonists prior to injecting AMPH systemically. HAL-treated rats were dopamine supersensitive, as indicated by sensitization to systemic AMPH-induced potentiation of both locomotor activity and operant responding for a conditioned reward (CR). Intra-CPu injections of AMPH had no effect on these behaviors, in any group. Intra-NAc injections of AMPH enhanced operant responding for CR in OLZ-treated and control rats, but not in HAL-treated rats. In HAL-treated rats, inhibition of the NAc also failed to disrupt systemic AMPH-induced potentiation of operant responding for CR. Furthermore, while intra-NAc AMPH enhanced locomotion in both HAL-treated and control animals, inhibition of the NAc disrupted systemic AMPH-induced locomotion only in control rats. Thus, antipsychotic-induced dopamine supersensitivity persistently disrupts NAc function, such that some behaviors that normally depend upon NAc dopamine no longer do so. This has implications for understanding dysfunctions in dopamine-mediated behaviors in patients undergoing chronic antipsychotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and sudden death risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Branislav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The manifestations of autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction in autoimmune diseases have been the subject of many studies. However, the published results pertaining to such research are controversial. Sudden cardiac death due to fatal arrhythmias is frequent in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Objective. To analyze risk predictors of sudden cardiac death related to the degree of autonomic dysfunction. Methods. We performed cardiovascular ANS assessment in 90 patients in this case-controlled study, including 52 (6 male, 46 female patients with SLE, 38 (6 male, 32 female with RA and 41 (23 male, 17 female healthy subjects. The methodology included a comprehensive ECG analysis (with Schiller software AT-10 of QTc interval, late potentials, short-term heart rate variability (HRV and nonlinear HRV (Poincare plot analysis; 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring with ECG QTc interval analysis, HRV analysis; 24-hour blood pressure monitoring with systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability; cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (according to Ewing. Vagal dysfunction was established by performing 3 tests: Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing test and heart rate response to standing test. Dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system was examined by applying 2 tests: blood pressure response to standing and handgrip test. Results. In all cardiovascular reflex tests, the frequencies of abnormal results were significantly higher among the patients than among the healthy subjects. Severe autonomic dysfunction was more common in RA. QTc interval was more prolonged in patients with SLE. Both diseases were associated with depressed heart rate variability compared to controls, the reduction being greater in RA patients. In the patients with SLE, autonomic dysfunction is predominantly with higher sympathetic activity while in RA vagal predominance is evident. Conclusion. SLE and RA are associated with severe

  20. Elucidating the Biological Basis for the Reinforcing Actions of Alcohol in the Mesolimbic Dopamine System: The Role of Active Metabolites of Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Deehan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of successful pharmacotherapeutics for the treatment of alcoholism is predicated upon understanding the biological action of alcohol. A limitation of the alcohol research field has been examining the effects of alcohol only and ignoring the multiple biological active metabolites of alcohol. The concept that alcohol is a ‘pro-drug’ is not new. Alcohol is readily metabolized to acetaldehyde within the brain. Acetaldehyde is a highly reactive compound that forms a number of condensation products, including salsolinol and iso-salsolinol (acetaldehyde and dopamine. Recent experiments have established that numerous metabolites of ethanol do have direct CNS action, and could, in part or whole, mediate the reinforcing actions of alcohol within the mesolimbic dopamine system. The mesolimbic dopamine system originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and projects to forebrain regions that include the nucleus accumbens (Acb and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and is thought to be the neurocircuitry governing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse. Within this neurocircuitry there is convincing evidence that; 1 biologically active metabolites of alcohol can directly or indirectly increase the activity of VTA dopamine neurons, 2 alcohol and alcohol metabolites are reinforcing within the mesolimbic dopamine system, 3 inhibiting the alcohol metabolic pathway inhibits the biological consequences of alcohol exposure, 4 alcohol consumption can be reduced by inhibiting/attenuating the alcohol metabolic pathway in the mesolimbic dopamine system, 5 alcohol metabolites can alter neurochemical levels within the mesolimbic dopamine system, and 6 alcohol interacts with alcohol metabolites to enhance the actions of both compounds. The data indicate that there is a positive relationship between alcohol and alcohol metabolites in regulating the biological consequences of consuming alcohol and the potential of alcohol use escalating to

  1. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel as bioadhesive drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chu; Lu, Caicai; Li, Bingqiang; Shan, Meng; Wu, Guolin

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials with adhesive properties in wet environments have been considered as promising candidates for tissue adhesives. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is believed to be responsible for the water-resistant adhesive characteristics of mussel adhesive proteins. Under the inspiration of DOPA containing adhesive proteins, a dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative (PDAEA) was successfully synthesized by successive ring-opening reactions of polysuccinimide (PSI) with dopamine and ethanolamine, and an injectable bioadhesive hydrogel was prepared via simply mixing PDAEA and FeCl3 solutions. The formation mechanism of the hydrogel was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic, Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic, visual colorimetric measurements and EDTA immersion methods. The study demonstrated that the PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is a dual cross-linking system composed of covalent and coordination crosslinks. The PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is suitable to serve as a bioadhesive agent according to the rheological behaviors and the observed significant shear adhesive strength. The slow and sustained release of the model drug curcumin from the hydrogel in vitro demonstrated the hydrogel could also be potentially used for drug delivery. Moreover, the cytotoxicity tests in vitro suggested the prepared polymer and hydrogel possessed excellent cytocompatibility. All the results indicated that the dopamine modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative based hydrogel was a promising candidate for bioadhesive drug delivery system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1000-1008, 2017.

  2. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqin eXie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. However, the underlying neuronal mechanisms are unclear. Here we present an overview of some of the recent research on this topic. Electrophysiological studies reveal that dopaminergic neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA are a target of salsolinol. In acute brain slices from rats, salsolinol increases the excitability and accelerates the ongoing firing of dopamine neurons in the pVTA. Intriguingly, this action of salsolinol involves multiple pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms, including: (a depolarizing the membrane potential of dopamine neurons; (b activating mu opioid receptors on the GABAergic inputs to dopamine neurons, which decreases GABAergic activity and dopamine neurons are disinhibited; and (c enhancing presynaptic glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine neurons via activation of dopamine type 1 receptors, probably situated on the glutamatergic terminals. These novel mechanisms may contribute to the rewarding/reinforcing properties of salsolinol observed in vivo.

  3. Systemic blockade of D2-like dopamine receptors facilitates extinction of conditioned fear in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Nissim, Helen A.; Barad, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear in animals is the explicit model of behavior therapy for human anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Based on previous data indicating that fear extinction in rats is blocked by quinpirole, an agonist of dopamine D2 receptors, we hypothesized that blockade of D2 receptors might facilitate extinction in mice, while agonists should block extinction, as they do in rats. One day after fear con...

  4. Effects of systemic carbidopa on dopamine synthesis in rat hypothalamus and striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakkola, S.; Tuomainen, P.; Wurtman, R. J.; Mannisto, P. T.

    1992-01-01

    Significant concentrations of carbidopa (CD) were found in rat hypothalamus, striatum, and in striatal microdialysis efflux after intraperitoneal administration of the drug. Efflux levels peaked one hour after administration of 100 mg/kg at 0.37 micrograms/ml, or about 2% of serum levels. Concurrent CD levels in hypothalamus and striatum were about 2.5% and 1.5%, respectively, of corresponding serum levels. Levels of dopamine and its principal metabolites in striatal efflux were unaffected. The removal of the brain blood by saline perfusion decreased the striatal and hypothalamic CD concentrations only by 33% and 16%, respectively. In other rats receiving both CD and levodopa (LD), brain L-dopa, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels after one hour tended to be proportionate to LD dose. When the LD dose remained constant, increasing the CD dose dose-dependently enhanced L-dopa levels in the hypothalamus and striatum. However dopamine levels did not increase but, in contrast, decreased dose-dependently (although significantly only in the hypothalamus). CD also caused dose-dependent decrease in striatal 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and in striatal and hypothalamic homovanillic acid (HVA), when the LD dose was 50 mg/kg. We conclude that, at doses exceeding 50 mg/kg, sufficient quantities of CD enter the brain to inhibit dopamine formation, especially in the hypothalamus. Moreover, high doses of LD/CD, both of which are themselves catechols, can inhibit the O-methylation of brain catecholamines formed from the LD.

  5. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime M. Ross; Lars Olson; Giuseppe Coppotelli

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, t...

  6. ETUDE FONCTIONNELLE DES SYSTEMES DE CAPTURE SYNAPTOSOMALE ET VESICULAIRE DE DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M SLIMANI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available L‘injection stéréotaxique unilatérale dans la substance noire de la 6 hydroxy-dopamine ( 6OH-DA se traduit par une chute  parallèle  de  la   capture de dopamine tritiée au  niveau  synaptosomale de  l'ordre  de -70 % et dans les préparations vésiculaires de l'ordre de -69 %, comparées aux préparations issues de Rats non lésés. Ces résultats montrent que ces deux préparations synaptosomales et vésiculaires sont bien d'origine dopaminergique. D'autre part, une étude comparative de l'effet de quelques agents pharmacologiques (β carbolines, imipraminiques, amphétamine et les inhibiteurs purs de la capture synaptosomale sur la capture synaptosomale et vésiculaire de la dopamine tritiée in-vitro, montre qu'ils agissent comme de puissants inhibiteurs. Nous montrons également que le transporteur vésiculaire diffère du transporteur synaptosomal par sa stéréospécificité et sa sensibilité aux agents pharmacologiques.

  7. Different loss of dopamine transporter according to subtype of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won [Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Keimyung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung; Oh, Minyoung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Lee, Sang Joo; Oh, Seung Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sun Ju; Lee, Chong Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) loss as measured by {sup 18}F-fluorinated-N-3-fluoropropyl-2-b-carboxymethoxy-3-b-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane ([{sup 18}F]FP-CIT) PET differs according to the metabolic subtype of multiple system atrophy (MSA) as assessed by [{sup 18}F]FDG PET. This retrospective study included 50 patients with clinically diagnosed MSA who underwent [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT and [{sup 18}F]FDG brain PET scans. The PET images were analysed using 12 striatal subregional volume-of-interest templates (bilateral ventral striatum, anterior caudate, posterior caudate, anterior putamen, posterior putamen, and ventral putamen). The patients were classified into three metabolic subtypes according to the [{sup 18}F]FDG PET findings: MSA-P{sub m} (striatal hypometabolism only), MSA-mixed{sub m} (both striatal and cerebellar hypometabolism), and MSA-C{sub m} (cerebellar hypometabolism only). The subregional glucose metabolic ratio (MR{sub gluc}), subregional DAT binding ratio (BR{sub DAT}), and intersubregional ratio (ISR{sub DAT}; defined as the BR{sub DAT} ratio of one striatal subregion to that of another striatal subregion) were compared according to metabolic subtype. Of the 50 patients, 13 presented with MSA-P{sub m}, 16 presented with MSA-mixed{sub m}, and 21 presented with MSA-C{sub m}. The BR{sub DAT} of all striatal subregions in the MSA-P{sub m} and MSA-mixed{sub m} groups were significantly lower than those in the MSA-C{sub m} group. The posterior putamen/anterior putamen ISR{sub DAT} and anterior putamen/ventral striatum ISR{sub DAT} in the MSA-P{sub m} and MSA-mixed{sub m} groups were significantly lower than those in the MSA-C{sub m} group. Patients with MSA-P{sub m} and MSA-mixed{sub m} showed more severe DAT loss in the striatum than patients with MSA-C{sub m}. Patients with MSA-C{sub m} had more diffuse DAT loss than patients with MSA-P{sub m} and MSA-mixed{sub m}. (orig.)

  8. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine seeking: conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A

    2008-09-03

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever pressing for intravenous cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naive animals passively receiving similar "yoked" injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to approximately 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline for the rest of the cocaine intake period. In cocaine-naive animals, yoked cocaine injections raised ACh levels to the 140% plateau but did not cause the initial 160% peak. In cocaine-trained animals that received unexpected saline (extinction conditions) rather than the expected cocaine, the initial peak was seen but the subsequent plateau was absent. VTA ACh levels played a causal role and were not just a correlate of cocaine seeking. Blocking muscarinic input to the VTA increased cocaine intake; the increase in intake offset the decrease in cholinergic input, resulting in the same VTA dopamine levels as were seen in the absence of the ACh antagonists. Increased VTA ACh levels (resulting from 10 microM VTA neostigmine infusion) increased VTA dopamine levels and reinstated cocaine seeking in cocaine-trained animals that had undergone extinction; these effects were strongly attenuated by local infusion of a muscarinic antagonist and weakly attenuated by a nicotinic antagonist. These findings identify two cholinergic responses to cocaine self-administration, an unconditioned response to cocaine itself and a conditioned response triggered by cocaine-predictive cues, and confirm that these cholinergic responses contribute to the control of cocaine seeking.

  9. Dysfunction of stress responsive systems as a risk factor for functional somatic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, Lineke M.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of functional somatic syndromes or disorders (FSDs) is generally considered to be a multifactorial interplay between psychological, biological, and social factors. One of the most investigated biological factors is stress responsive system dysfunction Despite more than twenty years of r

  10. Silver nanoparticles-enhanced rare earth co-luminescence effect of Tb(III)-Y(III)-dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Wu, Xia

    2015-06-01

    It was found that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) could enhance co-luminescence effect of rare earths ions Tb(3+) and Y(3+). Based on this, a sensitive fluorescence detection method for the determination of dopamine (DA) was proposed. Moreover, the detection limit for DA was very low (down to nM). This is because DA can remarkably enhance the luminescence intensity of the Tb(3+) ion by Y(3+) in the colloidal solution of AgNPs, forming a new co-luminescence system. Furthermore, based on the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), AgNPs can sensitize the co-luminescence effect of the complex of Tb(3+)-Y(3+)-DA. In a neutral buffer solution (pH 7.50), the luminescence intensity of the system was linearly related to the concentration of DA in the range of 2.0-100 nM, with a limit of detection as low as 0.57 nM. The proposed method was applied for the determination of DA in dopamine hydrochloride injections and human serum samples with good accuracy and satisfactory recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioinspired near-infrared-excited sensing platform for in vitro antioxidant capacity assay based on upconversion nanoparticles and a dopamine-melanin hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan; Ke, Xuebin; Kang, Ning; Shen, Yuqing; Liu, Yongliang; Zhou, Xi; Wang, Hongjun; Chen, Changqing; Ren, Lei

    2015-02-11

    A novel core-shell structure based on upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) and dopamine-melanin has been developed for evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of biological fluids. In this approach, dopamine-melanin nanoshells facilely formed on the surface of UCNPs act as ultraefficient quenchers for upconversion fluorescence, contributing to a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism. This spontaneous oxidative polymerization of the dopamine-induced quenching effect could be effectively prevented by the presence of various antioxidants (typically biothiols, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), and Trolox). The chemical response of the UCNPs@dopamine-melanin hybrid system exhibited great selectivity and sensitivity toward antioxidants relative to other compounds at 100-fold higher concentration. A satisfactory correlation was established between the ratio of the "anti-quenching" fluorescence intensity and the concentration of antioxidants. Besides the response of the upconversion fluorescence signal, a specific evaluation process for antioxidants could be visualized by the color change from colorless to dark gray accompanied by the spontaneous oxidation of dopamine. The near-infrared (NIR)-excited UCNP-based antioxidant capacity assay platform was further used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of cell extracts and human plasma, and satisfactory sensitivity, repeatability, and recovery rate were obtained. This approach features easy preparation, fluorescence/visual dual mode detection, high specificity to antioxidants, and enhanced sensitivity with NIR excitation, showing great potential for screening and quantitative evaluation of antioxidants in biological systems.

  12. Effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on central dopamine and Met-enkephalin system ontogeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of utero ethanol exposure on the development of central neurotransmitter systems was examined in rat offspring of dams that consumed liquid diets containing 35% ethanol derived calories either before and during pregnancy (E-P and P), or exclusively during gestation (E-Preg). Autoradiography of tritiated ligand receptor binding was used to rapidly screen neurotransmitter receptors in cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, GABAergic, and opiatergic systems. The results led to a more comprehensive study of (1) the dopaminergic D-2 receptor binding using (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol, and (2) the opiatergic mu and delta receptor binding defined by (/sup 3/H)Met-enkephalin. Significant reductions in (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding were found in the 15 day old E-Preg caudate-putamen, which may be related to reductions in neurotransmission and increased locomotor activity. This provides a link between the hyperactivity reported in animal models and children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and its attenuation by drugs that facilitate dopaminergic transmission. Significant reductions were also seen in D-2 receptor binding in the inferior colliculus, which may be related to the functional deficits in the auditory processing of information by hyperactive children and the changes in the auditory evoked potentials of FAS children found at the level of that structure. The hyperactivity and auditory dysfunction improve with age, consistent with the trend in binding of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol to D-2 receptors. The D-2 receptor binding in the E-P and P group was normal in nearly all brain regions which suggests that ethanol exposure begun during pregnancy may be more harmful than when initiated before pregnancy.

  13. Dopamine, the Kidney, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond C. Harris; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the intrarenal dopaminergic system plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure, and defects in dopamine signaling appear to be involved in the development of hypertension. Recent experimental models have definitively demonstrated that abnormalities in intrarenal dopamine production or receptor signaling can predispose to salt-sensitive hypertension and a dysregulated renin-angiotensin system. In addition, studies in both experimental animal mo...

  14. The nature of the autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Samir M.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    The concept that multiple system atrophy (MSA, Shy-Drager syndrome) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system is several decades old. While there has been renewed interest in the movement disorder associated with MSA, two recent consensus statements confirm the centrality of the autonomic disorder to the diagnosis. Here, we reexamine the autonomic pathophysiology in MSA. Whereas MSA is often thought of as "autonomic failure", new evidence indicates substantial persistence of functioning sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves even in clinically advanced disease. These findings help explain some of the previously poorly understood features of MSA. Recognition that MSA entails persistent, constitutive autonomic tone requires a significant revision of our concepts of its diagnosis and therapy. We will review recent evidence bearing on autonomic tone in MSA and discuss their therapeutic implications, particularly in terms of the possible development of a bionic baroreflex for better control of blood pressure.

  15. A new glaucoma hypothesis: a role of glymphatic system dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In a recent review article titled “A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation”, Brinker et al. comprehensively described novel insights from molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging research, which indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology is much more complex than previously believed. The glymphatic system is a recently defined brain-wide paravascular pathway for CSF and interstitial fluid exchange that facilitates efficient clearance of interstitial solutes, includ...

  16. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearini, Giulia; Schlossarek, Saskia; Willis, Monte S; Carrier, Lucie

    2008-12-01

    Since proteins play crucial roles in all biological processes, the finely tuned equilibrium between their synthesis and degradation regulates cellular homeostasis. Controlling the quality of proteome informational content is essential for cell survival and function. After initial synthesis, membrane and secretory proteins are modified, folded, and assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas other proteins are synthesized and processed in the cytosol. Cells have different protein quality control systems, the molecular chaperones, which help protein folding and stabilization, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosomes, which degrade proteins. It has generally been assumed that UPS and lysosomes are regulated independently and serve distinct functions. The UPS degrades both cytosolic, nuclear proteins, and myofibrillar proteins, whereas the lysosomes degrade most membrane and extracellular proteins by endocytosis as well as cytosolic proteins and organelles via autophagy. Over the last two decades, the UPS has been increasingly recognized as a major system in several biological processes including cell proliferation, adaptation to stress and cell death. More recently, activation or impairment of the UPS has been reported in cardiac disease and recent evidence indicate that autophagy is a key mechanism to maintain cardiac structure and function. This review mainly focuses on the UPS and its various components in healthy and diseased heart, but also summarizes recent data suggesting parallel activation of the UPS and autophagy in cardiac disease.

  17. Design of a multi-dopamine-modified polymer ligand optimally suited for interfacing magnetic nanoparticles with biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Ji, Xin; Na, Hyon Bin; Safi, Malak; Smith, Alexandra; Palui, Goutam; Perez, J Manuel; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2014-06-03

    We have designed a set of multifunctional and multicoordinating polymer ligands that are optimally suited for surface functionalizing iron oxide and potentially other magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and promoting their integration into biological systems. The amphiphilic polymers are prepared by coupling (via nucleophilic addition) several amine-terminated dopamine anchoring groups, poly(ethylene glycol) moieties, and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PIMA) chain. This design greatly benefits from the highly efficient and reagent-free one-step reaction of maleic anhydride groups with amine-containing molecules. The availability of several dopamine groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity, via multiple coordination, to the magnetic NPs, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation with target biomolecules. Iron oxide nanoparticles ligand exchanged with these polymer ligands have a compact hydrodynamic size and exhibit enhanced long-term colloidal stability over the pH range of 4-12 and in the presence of excess electrolytes. Nanoparticles ligated with terminally reactive polymers have been easily coupled to target dyes and tested in live cell imaging with no measurable cytotoxicity. Finally, the resulting hydrophilic nanoparticles exhibit large and size-dependent r2 relaxivity values.

  18. Histone methylation in the nervous system: functions and dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaroni, Céline; Jacob, Claire

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin remodeling is a key epigenetic process controlling the regulation of gene transcription. Local changes of chromatin architecture can be achieved by post-translational modifications of histones such as methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, and ADP-ribosylation. These changes are dynamic and allow for rapid repression or de-repression of specific target genes. Chromatin remodeling enzymes are largely involved in the control of cellular differentiation, and loss or gain of function is often correlated with pathological events. For these reasons, research on chromatin remodeling enzymes is currently very active and rapidly expanding, these enzymes representing very promising targets for the design of novel therapeutics in different areas of medicine including oncology and neurology. In this review, we focus on histone methylation in the nervous system. We provide an overview on mammalian histone methyltransferases and demethylases and their mechanisms of action, and we discuss their roles in the development of the nervous system and their involvement in neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and behavioral disorders.

  19. Maternal bisphenol A alters fetal endocrine system: Thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    Because bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in animals, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of maternal BPA exposure on the fetal endocrine system (thyroid-adipokine axis). BPA (20 or 40 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In both treated groups, the dams and their fetuses had lower serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and higher thyrotropin (TSH) level than control dams and fetuses at GD 20. Some histopathological changes in fetal thyroid glands were observed in both maternal BPA groups at embryonic day (ED) 20, including fibroblast proliferation, hyperplasia, luminal obliteration, oedema, and degeneration. These disorders resulted in the suppression of fetal serum growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF1) and adiponectin (ADP) levels, and the elevation of fetal serum leptin, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels in both treated groups with respect to control. The depraved effects of both treated groups were associated with reduced maternal and fetal body weight compared to the control group. These alterations were dose dependent. Thus, BPA might penetrate the placental barrier and perturb the fetal thyroid adipokine axis to influence fat metabolism and the endocrine system.

  20. Central nervous system dysfunction in obesity-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Geoffrey A; Lim, Kyungjoon; Barzel, Benjamin; Burke, Sandra L; Davern, Pamela J

    2014-09-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is a major mechanism underlying both human and experimental models of obesity-related hypertension. While insulin and the adipokine leptin have long been thought to contribute to obesity-related neurogenic mechanisms, the evidence is now very strong that they play a major role, shown particularly in animal studies using selective receptor antagonists. There is not just maintenance of leptin's sympatho-excitatory actions as previously suggested but considerable amplification particularly in renal sympathetic nervous activity. Importantly, these changes are not dependent on short-term elevation or reduction in plasma leptin or insulin, but require some weeks to develop indicating a slow "neural adaptivity" within hypothalamic signalling. These effects can be carried across generations even when offspring are raised on a normal diet. A better understanding of the underlying mechanism should be a high research priority given the prevalence of obesity not just in the current population but also for future generations.

  1. Dopamine system genes are associated with orienting bias among healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozulinsky, Polina; Greenbaum, Lior; Brande-Eilat, Noa; Braun, Yair; Shalev, Idan; Tomer, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Healthy individuals display subtle orienting bias, manifested as a tendency to direct greater attention toward one hemispace, and evidence suggests that this bias reflects an individual trait, which may be modulated by asymmetric dopamine signaling in striatal and frontal regions. The current study examined the hypothesis that functional genetic variants within dopaminergic genes (DAT1 3' VNTR, dopamine D2 receptor Taq1A (rs1800497) and COMT Val158Met (rs4680)) contribute to individual differences in orienting bias, as measured by the greyscales paradigm, in a sample of 197 young healthy Israeli Jewish participants. For the Taq1A variant, homozygous carriers of the A2 allele displayed significantly increased leftward orienting bias compared to the carriers of the A1 allele. Additionally, and as previously reported by others, we found that bias towards leftward orienting of attention was significantly greater among carriers of the 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 3' VNTR as compared to the individuals who were homozygous for the 10-repeat allele. No significant effect of the COMT Val158Met on orienting bias was found. Taken together, our findings support the potential influence of genetic variants on inter-individual differences in orienting bias, a phenotype relevant to both normal and impaired cognitive processes.

  2. Dopamine, the kidney, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Raymond C; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that the intrarenal dopaminergic system plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure, and defects in dopamine signaling appear to be involved in the development of hypertension. Recent experimental models have definitively demonstrated that abnormalities in intrarenal dopamine production or receptor signaling can predispose to salt-sensitive hypertension and a dysregulated renin-angiotensin system. In addition, studies in both experimental animal models and in humans with salt-sensitive hypertension implicate abnormalities in dopamine receptor regulation due to receptor desensitization resulting from increased G-protein receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) activity. Functional polymorphisms that predispose to increased basal GRK4 activity both decrease dopamine receptor activity and increase angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor activity and are associated with essential hypertension in a number of different human cohorts.

  3. Levodopa acts centrally to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension through activation of D2 dopamine receptors and the orexinergic system in the brain in conscious rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikatsu Okumura

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneously (80 mg/rat or intracisternally (2.5 μg/rat administered levodopa significantly increased the threshold of colonic distension-induced AWR in conscious rats. The dose difference to induce the antinociceptive action suggests levodopa acts centrally to exert its antinociceptive action against colonic distension. While neither sulpiride, a D2 dopamine receptor antagonist, nor SCH23390, a D1 dopamine receptor antagonist by itself changed the threshold of colonic distension-induced AWR, the intracisternally injected levodopa-induced antinociceptive action was significantly blocked by pretreatment with subcutaneously administered sulpiride but not SCH23390. Treatment with intracisternal SB334867, an orexin 1 receptor antagonist, significantly blocked the subcutaneously administered levodopa-induced antinociceptive action. These results suggest that levodopa acts centrally to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension through activation of D2 dopamine receptors and the orexinergic system in the brain.

  4. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Guiqin eXie; Kresimir eKrnjevic; Jiang Hong Ye

    2013-01-01

    Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA) of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. ...

  5. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Guiqin; Krnjević, Krešimir; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic (DA) system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA) of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumb...

  6. Interaction between effects of genes coding for dopamine and glutamate transmission on striatal and parahippocampal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Andreina; Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Chaddock, Christopher A; Kane, Fergus; Kalidindi, Sridevi; McDonald, Colm; Kravariti, Eugenia; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Ehlert, Natascha; Georgiades, Anna; Murray, Robin; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2013-09-01

    The genes for the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the D-Amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA or G72) have been independently implicated in the risk for schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder and/or their related intermediate phenotypes. DAT and G72 respectively modulate central dopamine and glutamate transmission, the two systems most robustly implicated in these disorders. Contemporary studies have demonstrated that elevated dopamine function is associated with glutamatergic dysfunction in psychotic disorders. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we examined whether there was an interaction between the effects of genes that influence dopamine and glutamate transmission (DAT and G72) on regional brain activation during verbal fluency, which is known to be abnormal in psychosis, in 80 healthy volunteers. Significant interactions between the effects of G72 and DAT polymorphisms on activation were evident in the striatum, parahippocampal gyrus, and supramarginal/angular gyri bilaterally, the right insula, in the right pre-/postcentral and the left posterior cingulate/retrosplenial gyri (P dopamine and the glutamate system, thought to be altered in psychosis, have an impact in executive processing which can be modulated by common genetic variation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  7. Voluntary exercise improves performance of a discrimination task through effects on the striatal dopamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a D1R antagonist into the DLS prior to discrimination learning facilitated the performance of nonexercising rats but not exercising rats. Infusing a D2R antagonist impaired the performance of exercising rats but not nonexercising rats. Exercise-associated facilitation of this task may rely on an exercise-induced decrease in D1R and increase in D2R activation in the DLS. PMID:24934332

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with left ventricular dysfunction in the EULAR Scleroderma Trial and Research group (EUSTAR) database of patients with systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allanore, Y; Meune, C; Vonk, M C

    2010-01-01

    To measure the prevalence of, and factors associated with, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in systemic sclerosis (SSc).......To measure the prevalence of, and factors associated with, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in systemic sclerosis (SSc)....

  9. [Digestive system disease as manifestation of the pleiotropic action of genes in mitochondrial dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrechanina, O Ia; Hrechanina, Iu B; Husar, V A; Molodan, L V

    2014-11-01

    Defined involvement lesions of the digestive system of clinical manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction associated with both point mutations and polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA. The nature of the clinical signs of mtDNA polymorphisms carriers--multi organical, a progressive, clinical polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity with predominant involvement of energotropic bodies (cerebrum, cordis, hepatic). Set individual nosological forms of mitochondrial dysfunctions--syndromes Leia, Leber, Cairns, Sarah, MERRF, MELAS, NARP, MNGIE confirmed by clinical and genetic, morphological, biochemical, enzymatic, molecular genetics methods. It was found that 84-88% of these syndromes involving the violation of the digestive system with varying degrees of injury. This damage will be the first in the complex chain signs recovery which determines the direction of early rehabilitation.

  10. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction predicts poor prognosis in patients with mild to moderate tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsi Rohmah

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction is present in up to one third of patients with tetanus. The prognostic value of ANS dysfunction is known in severe tetanus but its value is not well established in mild to moderate tetanus. Methods Medical records of all patients admitted with tetanus at two academic tertiary care centers in Karachi, Pakistan were reviewed. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data was recorded and analyzed. ANS dysfunction was defined as presence of labile or persistent hypertension or hypotension and sinus tachycardia, tachyarrythmia or bradycardia on EKG. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence of ANS dysfunction (ANS group and non ANS group. Tetanus severity was classified on the basis of Ablett criteria. Results Ninety six (64 males; 32 females patients were admitted with the diagnosis over a period of 10 years. ANS group had 31 (32% patients while non ANS group comprised of 65 (68% patients. Both groups matched for age, gender, symptom severity, use of tetanus immunoglobulin and antibiotics. Twelve patients in ANS group had mild to moderate tetanus (Ablett I and II and 19 patients had severe/very severe tetanus (Ablett III and IV. Fifteen (50% patients in ANS group required ventilation as compared to 28 (45% in non-ANS group (p = 0.09. Fourteen (47% patients died in ANS group as compared to 10 (15% in non ANS group (p= 0.002. Out of those 14 patients died in ANS group, six patients had mild to moderate tetanus and eight patients had severe/ very severe tetanus. Major cause of death was cardiac arrhythmias (13/14; 93% in ANS group and respiratory arrest (7/10; 70% in non ANS group. Ten (33% patients had complete recovery in ANS group while in non ANS group 35(48% patients had complete recovery (p= 0.05. Conclusions ANS dysfunction was present in one third of our tetanus population. 40% patients with ANS dysfunction had only mild to moderate tetanus. ANS dysfunction

  11. Investigation into the regulation of the circadian system by dopamine and melatonin in the adult Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, G E; Hastings, M H; Ebling, F J

    1998-11-01

    Dopamine and melatonin have both been implicated in mediating maternal influences on the developing circadian system of altricial rodents. The aim of these studies was to investigate their role in the entrainment of the circadian system of the adult Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). In-situ hybridization revealed that D1-dopamine receptor (D1-R) mRNA was expressed in the adult suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) at levels comparable to neonates. As dopamine has been postulated to mimic photic stimulation during early development, experiment 1 compared the effects of a D1-R agonist and a light pulse on free-running wheel running rhythms in hamsters maintained in constant dim red light. A phase response curve to light was generated, revealing clear phase delays early in the subjective night, and large phase advances in the late subjective night. However, the D1-R agonist (SKF 81297, 2 mg/kg, s.c.) did not produce consistent phase shifts at any circadian phase. Experiment 2 tested the ability of this dopaminergic agonist to modulate photic responses of the circadian system. Free-running animals were pre-treated with SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) 30 min before a 15 min light pulse given early or late in the subjective night. This agonist had no effect on the magnitude of phase shifts at either circadian time. In experiment 3, light pulses at CT13-15 induced expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in the SCN, as assessed by immunocytochemistry for the protein product. In contrast, SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) at the same phase did not induce c-fos in the SCN, despite marked c-fos induction in the caudate-putamen, nor did it affect photic induction of c-fos in the SCN. To investigate whether dopamine might be involved in nonphotic regulation of the circadian system in adult hamsters, experiment 4 compared the response of free-running hamsters to a series of injections of SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) or melatonin (1 mg/kg, s.c.), since melatonin receptor expression in the SCN

  12. NOS3 Protects Against Systemic Inflammation and Myocardial Dysfunction in Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bougaki, Masahiko; Searles, Robert J.; Kida, Kotaro; Yu, JiaDe; Buys, Emmanuel; Ichinose, Fumito

    2010-01-01

    NO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. However, the role of NO synthase 3 (NOS3) during sepsis remains incompletely understood. Here, we examined the impact of NOS3 deficiency on systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction during peritonitis-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Severe polymicrobial sepsis was induced by colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) in wild-type (WT) and NOS3-deficient (NOS3KO) mice. NOS3KO mice exhibited shorter survival time than did WT mice af...

  13. Antiferroptotic activity of non-oxidative dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Peng, Yingpeng; Xie, Yangchun; Zhou, Borong; Sun, Xiaofang; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-11-25

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has many functions in the nervous and immune systems. Ferroptosis is a non-apoptotic form of regulated cell death that is involved in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of dopamine in ferroptosis remains unidentified. Here, we show that the non-oxidative form of dopamine is a strong inhibitor of ferroptotic cell death. Dopamine dose-dependently blocked ferroptosis in cancer (PANC1 and HEY) and non-cancer (MEF and HEK293) cells following treatment with erastin, a small molecule ferroptosis inducer. Notably, dopamine reduced erastin-induced ferrous iron accumulation, glutathione depletion, and malondialdehyde production. Mechanically, dopamine increased the protein stability of glutathione peroxidase 4, a phospholipid hydroperoxidase that protects cells against membrane lipid peroxidation. Moreover, dopamine suppressed dopamine receptor D4 protein degradation and promoted dopamine receptor D5 gene expression. Thus, our findings uncover a novel function of dopamine in cell death and provide new insight into the regulation of iron metabolism and lipid peroxidation by neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dopamine, fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandash, Orwa; Pantelis, Christos; Fornito, Alex

    2017-02-01

    A series of parallel, integrated circuits link distinct regions of prefrontal cortex with specific nuclei of the striatum and thalamus. Dysfunction of these fronto-striato-thalamic systems is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of psychosis. In this review, we examine evidence from human and animal investigations that dysfunction of a specific dorsal fronto-striato-thalamic circuit, linking the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal (associative) striatum, and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, is apparent across different stages of psychosis, including prior to the onset of a first episode, suggesting that it represents a candidate risk biomarker. We consider how abnormalities at distinct points in the circuit may give rise to the pattern of findings seen in patient populations, and how these changes relate to disruptions in dopamine, glutamate and GABA signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal imaging of the availability of dopamine transporter and D2 receptor in rat striatum following mild ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Yamato, Hiroko; Iimori, Hitoshi; Sumiyoshi, Hirokazu; Morimoto, Kenji; Imamoto, Natsumi; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Abe, Kohji

    2017-02-01

    The changes in the availability of striatal dopamine transporter and dopamine D2 receptor after mild focal ischemia in rats were measured using a small animal positron emission tomography system. Mild focal ischemia was induced by 20-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion. [(11)C]PE2I binding to dopamine transporter was transiently increased on the ipsilateral side of the striatum at 2 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. On day 7 and 14 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, [(11)C]PE2I binding levels were decreased. In contrast, [(11)C]raclopride binding to dopamine D2 receptor in the ipsilateral striatum had not changed at 2 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. [(11)C]Raclopride binding was significantly decreased on the ischemic side of the striatum at 7 and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Moreover, on day 1 and 2 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, significant circling behavior to the contralateral direction was induced by amphetamine challenge. This behavior disappeared at 7 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. At 14 days, circling behavior to the ipsilateral direction (middle cerebral artery occlusion side) was significantly increased, and that to the contralateral direction also appeared again. The present study suggested that amphetamine-induced circling behavior indicated striatal dopaminergic alterations and that dopamine transporter and dopamine D2 receptor binding could be key markers for predicting motor dysfunction after mild focal ischemia.

  16. Air Pollution-Induced Vascular Dysfunction: Potential Role of Endothelin-1 (ET-1) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Jordan; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to air pollution negatively impacts cardiovascular health. Studies show that increased exposure to a number of airborne pollutants increases the risk for cardiovascular disease progression, myocardial events, and cardiovascular mortality. A hypothesized mechanism linking air pollution and cardiovascular disease is the development of systemic inflammation and endothelium dysfunction, the latter of which can result from an imbalance of vasoactive factors within the vasculature. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent peptide vasoconstrictor that plays a significant role in regulating vascular homeostasis. It has been reported that the production and function of ET-1 and its receptors are upregulated in a number of disease states associated with endothelium dysfunction including hypertension and atherosclerosis. This mini-review surveys epidemiological and experimental air pollution studies focused on ET-1 dysregulation as a plausible mechanism underlying the development of cardiovascular disease. Although alterations in ET-1 system components are observed in some studies, there remains a need for future research to clarify whether these specific changes are compensatory or causally related to vascular injury and dysfunction. Moreover, further research may test the efficacy of selective ET-1 pharmacological interventions (e.g., ETA receptor inhibitors) to determine whether these treatments could impede the deleterious impact of air pollution exposure on cardiovascular health.

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. Different relationships between central dopamine system and sub-processes of inhibition: Spontaneous eye blink rate relates with N2 but not P3 in a Go/Nogo task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Cuicui; Tan, Fengping; Mou, Di; Zheng, Lijun; Chen, Antao

    2016-06-01

    Clinical studies show that dysfunction of the dopamine (DA) system could differently modulate N2 and P3 components in a Go/Nogo task, a classical inhibition task. However, results of previous clinical studies cannot be arbitrarily generalized to healthy adults. Thus, the present exploratory study aimed to investigate whether there are significant and variable relationships between individual differences of the DA system in normal healthy persons and N2- and P3-related sub-processes of inhibition in a Go/Nogo task. DA function was measured by spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), which is an effective clinical and non-invasive measure and strongly related to the activity of the central dopaminergic system. A total of 28 young adults participated in this experiment. Results showed that Nogo-N2 and Nogo-P3 of all participants were larger than Go-N2 and Go-P3, while Nogo-N2 and Nogo-P3 were significantly related with Nogo-accuracy. Moreover, it was shown that higher EBRs were significantly correlated with larger and more negative N2 amplitudes under Go- and Nogo-conditions; however, there were no significant correlations between participants' EBRs and N2 latencies, and between EBRs and average amplitudes of P3 under the two conditions. Based on these results, we concluded that the central DA system was associated with the N2-related conflict monitoring rather than P3-related sub-process of inhibition.

  19. Nos3 protects against systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougaki, Masahiko; Searles, Robert J; Kida, Kotaro; Yu, JiaDe; Buys, Emmanuel S; Ichinose, Fumito

    2010-09-01

    NO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. However, the role of NO synthase 3 (NOS3) during sepsis remains incompletely understood. Here, we examined the impact of NOS3 deficiency on systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction during peritonitis-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Severe polymicrobial sepsis was induced by colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) in wild-type (WT) and NOS3-deficient (NOS3KO) mice. NOS3KO mice exhibited shorter survival time than did WT mice after CASP. NOS3 deficiency worsened systemic inflammation assessed by the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the lung, liver, and heart. Colon ascendens stent peritonitis markedly increased the number of leukocyte infiltrating the liver and heart in NOS3KO but not in WT mice. The exaggerated systemic inflammation in septic NOS3KO mice was associated with more marked myocardial dysfunction than in WT mice 22 h after CASP. The detrimental effects of NOS3 deficiency on myocardial function after CASP seem to be caused by impaired Ca handling of cardiomyocytes. The impaired Ca handling of cardiomyocytes isolated from NOS3KO mice subjected to CASP was associated with depressed mitochondrial ATP production, a determinant of the Ca cycling capacity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase. The NOS3 deficiency-induced impairment of the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP after CASP was at least in part attributable to reduction in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. These observations suggest that NOS3 protects against systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction after peritonitis-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

  20. The Iowa Gambling Task and the three fallacies of dopamine in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Gambling disorder sufferers prefer immediately larger rewards despite long term losses on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), and these impairments are associated with dopamine dysfunctions. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter linked with temporal and structural dysfunctions in substance use disorder, which...... has supported the idea of impaired decision-making and dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. However, evidence from substance use disorders cannot be directly transferred to gambling disorder. This article focuses on three hypotheses of dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder, which appear...... to be “fallacies,” i.e., have not been supported in a series of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The first “fallacy” suggests that gambling disorder sufferers have lower dopamine receptor availability, as seen in substance use disorders. However, no evidence supported this hypothesis. The second...

  1. The Iowa Gambling Task and the three fallacies of dopamine in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Gambling disorder sufferers prefer immediately larger rewards despite long term losses on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), and these impairments are associated with dopamine dysfunctions. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter linked with temporal and structural dysfunctions in substance use disorder, which...... has supported the idea of impaired decision-making and dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. However, evidence from substance use disorders cannot be directly transferred to gambling disorder. This article focuses on three hypotheses of dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder, which appear...... to be “fallacies,” i.e., have not been supported in a series of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The first “fallacy” suggests that gambling disorder sufferers have lower dopamine receptor availability, as seen in substance use disorders. However, no evidence supported this hypothesis. The second...

  2. Lack of Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Causes Synapse Dysfunction in the Drosophila Visual System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Anna B; Ménagé, Cindy; Grégoire, Stéphane; Garcia, Thibault; Ferveur, Jean-François; Bretillon, Lionel; Grosjean, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential nutrients for animals and necessary for the normal functioning of the nervous system. A lack of PUFAs can result from the consumption of a deficient diet or genetic factors, which impact PUFA uptake and metabolism. Both can cause synaptic dysfunction, which is associated with numerous disorders. However, there is a knowledge gap linking these neuronal dysfunctions and their underlying molecular mechanisms. Because of its genetic manipulability and its easy, fast, and cheap breeding, Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as an excellent model organism for genetic screens, helping to identify the genetic bases of such events. As a first step towards the understanding of PUFA implications in Drosophila synaptic physiology we designed a breeding medium containing only very low amounts of PUFAs. We then used the fly's visual system, a well-established model for studying signal transmission and neurological disorders, to measure the effects of a PUFA deficiency on synaptic function. Using both visual performance and eye electrophysiology, we found that PUFA deficiency strongly affected synaptic transmission in the fly's visual system. These defects were rescued by diets containing omega-3 or omega-6 PUFAs alone or in combination. In summary, manipulating PUFA contents in the fly's diet was powerful to investigate the role of these nutrients on the fly´s visual synaptic function. This study aims at showing how the first visual synapse of Drosophila can serve as a simple model to study the effects of PUFAs on synapse function. A similar approach could be further used to screen for genetic factors underlying the molecular mechanisms of synaptic dysfunctions associated with altered PUFA levels.

  3. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction.

  4. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mina; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2006-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. In the present study, we investigated the role of the tPA-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus, respectively, of mice, by using in vivo microdialysis. Microinjection of either tPA or plasmin significantly potentiated 40 mM KCl-induced DA release without affecting basal DA levels. In contrast, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 dose-dependently reduced 60 mM KCl-induced DA release. The 60 mM KCl-evoked DA release in the NAc was markedly diminished in tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, although basal DA levels did not differ between the two groups. Microinjections of either exogenous tPA (100 ng) or plasmin (100 ng) into the NAc of tPA-/-mice restored 60 mM KCl-induced DA release, as observed in wild-type mice. In contrast, there was no difference in either basal or 60 mM KCl-induced ACh release in the hippocampus between wild-type and tPA-/-mice. Our findings suggest that the tPA-plasmin system is involved in the regulation of depolarization-evoked DA release in the NAc.

  5. Executive dysfunction, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Evidence for basal ganglia dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Ricardo Oliveira Horta; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Akemy, Bárbara; Cardoso, Francisco

    2016-01-15

    Chorea is well described in a group of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is less information, however, on other movement disorders as well as non-motor neuropsychiatric features such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS), executive dysfunction and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in subjects with SLE. Fifty-four subjects with SLE underwent a battery of neuropsychiatric tests that included the Mini Mental State Examination, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), the FAS verbal and the categorical (animals) semantic fluency tests, the Obsessive and Compulsive Inventory - Revised, the Yale-Brown Obsessive and Compulsive Scale and Beck's Anxiety and Depression Scales. ADHD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. SLE disease activity and cumulative damage were evaluated according to the modified SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (mSLEDAI-2K) and the SLICC/ACR, respectively. Six (11.1%) and 33 (61.1%) patients had cognitive impairment according to the MMSE and MoCA, respectively. Eleven (20.4%) had abnormal FAB scores, and 5 (9.3%) had lower semantic fluency scores than expected. The overall frequency of cognitive dysfunction was 72.2% (39 patients) and of neuropsychiatric SLE was 77.8% (42 patients). Two patients (3.7%) had movement disorders. Fifteen (27.8%) had OCS and 17 (31.5%) met diagnostic criteria for ADHD. ADHD and OCS correlated with higher disease activity, p=0.003 and 0.006, respectively. Higher cumulative damage correlated with lower FAB scores (p 0.026). Executive dysfunction, ADHD, OCS, and movement disorders are common in SLE. Our finding suggests that there is frequent basal ganglia dysfunction in SLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-02-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system.

  7. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  8. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of dexamphetamine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, S.; Aono, Y.; Fusa, K.; Takada, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic administration of high doses of dexamphetamine induces a dopamine efflux that has its intracellular origin in both the vesicular, reserpine-sensitive dopamine pool and the cytosolic, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive, newly synthesized dopamine pool. It remains unknown whether locally

  9. Contribution of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine to the increased striatal dopamine efflux elicited by intrastriatal injection of dexamphetamine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, S.; Aono, Y.; Fusa, K.; Takada, K.; Saigusa, T.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Systemic administration of high doses of dexamphetamine induces a dopamine efflux that has its intracellular origin in both the vesicular, reserpine-sensitive dopamine pool and the cytosolic, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive, newly synthesized dopamine pool. It remains unknown whether locally ad

  10. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothsna Kudaravalli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The presence of arterial stiffness indicated endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in RI and SI with treatment of N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin suggesting improvement in endothelial dysfunction. There was decrease in CRP (a marker of inflammation and MDA after treatment with N-acetylcysteine suggesting improvement in endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in CRP after treatment with atorvastatin, suggesting improvement in endothelial function. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction is associated with decreased incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular accidents.

  11. Outcomes and organ dysfunctions of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.T. Ranzani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to compare the pattern of organ dysfunctions and outcomes of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with patients with other systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD. We studied 116 critically ill SRD patients, 59 SLE and 57 other-SRD patients. The SLE group was younger and included more women. Respiratory failure (61% and shock (39% were the most common causes of ICU admission for other-SRD and SLE groups, respectively. ICU length-of-stay was similar for the two groups. The 60-day survival adjusted for the groups’ baseline imbalances was not different (P = 0.792. Total SOFA scores were equal for the two groups at admission and during ICU stay, although respiratory function was worse in the other-SRD group at admission and renal and hematological functions were worse in the SLE group at admission. The incidence of severe respiratory dysfunction (respiratory SOFA >2 at admission was higher in the other-SRD group, whereas severe hematological dysfunction (hematological SOFA >2 during ICU stay was higher in the SLE group. SLE patients were younger and displayed a decreased incidence of respiratory failure compared to patients with other-SRDs. However, the incidences of renal and hematological failure and the presence of shock at admission were higher in the SLE group. The 60-day survival rates were similar.

  12. Prediction of CNS occupancy of dopamine D2 receptor based on systemic exposure and in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamitsu, Kayoko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effect of drugs in the central nervous system (CNS) is closely related to occupancy of their target receptor. In this study, we integrated plasma concentrations, in vitro/in vivo data for receptor or protein binding, and in silico data, using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, to examine the predictability of receptor occupancy in humans. The occupancy of the dopamine D2 receptor and the plasma concentrations of the antipsychotic drugs quetiapine and perospirone in humans were collected from the literature or produced experimentally. Association and dissociation rate constants and unbound fractions in the serum and brain were determined in vitro/in vivo using human D2 receptor-expressing membrane fractions, human serum and mouse brain. The permeability of drugs across the blood-brain barrier was estimated based on their physicochemical properties. The effect of a metabolite of perospirone, ID-15036, was also considered. The time profiles of D2 receptor occupancy following oral dose of quetiapine and perospirone predicted were similar to the observed values. This approach could assist in the design of clinical studies for drug development and the prediction of the impact of drug-drug interactions on CNS function in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Peripubertal diazepam administration prevents the emergence of dopamine system hyperresponsivity in the MAM developmental disruption model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yijuan; Grace, Anthony A

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is believed to arise from an interaction of genetic predisposition and adverse environmental factors, with stress being a primary variable. We propose that alleviating anxiety produced in response to stress during a sensitive developmental period may circumvent the dopamine (DA) system alterations that may correspond to psychosis in adults. This was tested in a developmental rat model of schizophrenia based on prenatal administration of the mitotoxin methyl azoxymethanol acetate (MAM). MAM administration leads to a hyperdopaminergic state consisting of an increase in the number of DA neurons firing spontaneously, which correlates with an increased behavioral response to amphetamine. MAM-treated rats exhibited a heightened level of anxiety during adolescence. Peripubertal administration of the antianxiety agent diazepam was found to prevent the increase in DA neuron activity and blunt the behavioral hyperresponsivity to amphetamine in these rats. These data suggest that the pathophysiological factors leading to the onset of psychosis in early adulthood may be circumvented by controlling the response to stress during the peripubertal period.

  14. Renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction: Potential protective role of Angiotensin (1-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurta', Anna; Zambelli, Vanessa; Bellani, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction is a feared complication of mechanical ventilation that adversely affects the outcome of intensive care patients. Human and animal studies demonstrate atrophy and ultrastructural alteration of diaphragmatic muscular fibers attributable to increased oxidative stress, depression of the anabolic pathway regulated by Insulin-like growing factor 1 and increased proteolysis. The renin-angiotensin system, through its main peptide Angiotensin II, plays a major role in skeletal muscle diseases, mainly increasing oxidative stress and inducing insulin resistance, atrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, its counter-regulatory peptide Angiotensin (1-7) has a protective role in these processes. Recent data on rodent models show that renin-angiotensin system is activated after mechanical ventilation and that infusion of Angiotensin II induces diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy. Given: (A) common pathways shared by ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and skeletal muscle pathology induced by renin-angiotensin system, (B) evidences of an involvement of renin-angiotensin system in diaphragm atrophy and dysfunction, we hypothesize that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, while Angiotensin (1-7) can have a protective effect on this pathological process. The activation of renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be demonstrated by quantification of its main components in the diaphragm of ventilated humans or animals. The infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) in an established rodent model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be used to test its potential protective role, that can be further confirmed with the infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) antagonists like A-779. Verifying this hypothesis can help in understanding the processes involved in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction pathophysiology and open new possibilities for its

  15. A novel G protein-coupled receptor of Schistosoma mansoni (SmGPR-3 is activated by dopamine and is widely expressed in the nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad El-Shehabi

    Full Text Available Schistosomes have a well developed nervous system that coordinates virtually every activity of the parasite and therefore is considered to be a promising target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Neurotransmitter receptors, in particular those involved in neuromuscular control, are proven drug targets in other helminths but very few of these receptors have been identified in schistosomes and little is known about their roles in the biology of the worm. Here we describe a novel Schistosoma mansoni G protein-coupled receptor (named SmGPR-3 that was cloned, expressed heterologously and shown to be activated by dopamine, a well established neurotransmitter of the schistosome nervous system. SmGPR-3 belongs to a new clade of "orphan" amine-like receptors that exist in schistosomes but not the mammalian host. Further analysis of the recombinant protein showed that SmGPR-3 can also be activated by other catecholamines, including the dopamine metabolite, epinine, and it has an unusual antagonist profile when compared to mammalian receptors. Confocal immunofluorescence experiments using a specific peptide antibody showed that SmGPR-3 is abundantly expressed in the nervous system of schistosomes, particularly in the main nerve cords and the peripheral innervation of the body wall muscles. In addition, we show that dopamine, epinine and other dopaminergic agents have strong effects on the motility of larval schistosomes in culture. Together, the results suggest that SmGPR-3 is an important neuronal receptor and is probably involved in the control of motor activity in schistosomes. We have conducted a first analysis of the structure of SmGPR-3 by means of homology modeling and virtual ligand-docking simulations. This investigation has identified potentially important differences between SmGPR-3 and host dopamine receptors that could be exploited to develop new, parasite-selective anti-schistosomal drugs.

  16. Dopamine attenuates the chemoattractant effect of interleukin-8: a novel role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sookhai, S

    2012-02-03

    Activated neutrophil (PMN) adherence to vascular endothelium comprises a key step for both transendothelial migration and initiation of potentially deleterious release of PMN products. The biogenic amine, dopamine (DA), has been used for several decades in patients to maintain hemodynamic stability. The effect of dopamine on PMN transendothelial migration and adhesion receptor expression and on the endothelial molecules, E-selectin and ICAM-1, was evaluated. PMN were isolated from healthy controls, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and treated with dopamine. CD 11b and CD 18 PMN adhesion receptor expression were assessed flow cytometrically. In a separate experiment, the chemoattractant peptide, IL-8, was placed in the lower chamber of transwells, and PMN migration was assessed. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were stimulated with LPS\\/TNF-alpha and incubated with dopamine. ICAM-1 and E-selectin endothelial molecule expression were assessed flow cytometrically. There was a significant increase in transendothelial migration in stimulated PMN compared with normal PMN (40 vs. 14%, P < 0.001). In addition, PMN CD11b\\/CD18 was significantly upregulated in stimulated PMN compared with normal PMN (252.4\\/352.4 vs. 76.7\\/139.4, P < 0.001) as were endothelial E-selectin\\/ICAM-1 expression compared with normal EC (8.1\\/9 vs. 3.9\\/3.8, P < 0.05). After treatment with dopamine, PMN transmigration was significantly decreased compared with stimulated PMN (8% vs. 40%, P < 0.001). Furthermore, dopamine also attenuated PMN CD11b\\/CD18 and the endothelial molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1 compared with stimulated PMN\\/EC that were not treated dopamine (174\\/240 vs. 252\\/352, P < 0.05 and 4\\/4.4 vs. 8.1\\/9, P < 0.05. respectively). The chemoattractant effect of IL-8 was also attenuated. These results identify for the first time that dopamine attenuates the initial interaction between PMN and the endothelium

  17. Effects of Polyphenolic Derivatives on Heme Oxygenase-System in Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittala, Valeria; Vanella, Luca; Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Marrazzo, Agostino; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria

    2017-06-16

    occurring HO-1 inducers in metabolic dysfunction, focusing on the clinical potential of HO-1 activity to restore the balance between pro-oxidant and anti-oxidants systems. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    spontaneously. Our results demonstrate that topically applied diclofenac and oral diclofenac are equally effective in the treatment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction symptoms. Topical diclofenac has the advantage that it does not have adverse systemic effects, whereas oral diclofenac had untoward effects on the gastric apparatus. The efficacy of diclofenac topically applied on the temporomandibular joint region observed in group B is explained by the association of diclofenac with dimethyl-sulfoxide, which enables a rapid effective penetration into the joint tissues. It is noteworthy that dimethyl-sulfoxide favours transuctaneous absorption when used in a multi-dose regime as in our study with 4 doses a day. Thus, single, "as required", applications should be avoided because this practice results in scarce absorption of diclofenac.

  19. Effects of co-administration of ketamine and ethanol on the dopamine system via the cortex-striatum circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Xu, Tian-Yong; Zhang, Zhi-Bi; Leung, Chi-Kwan; You, Ding-Yun; Wang, Shang-Wen; Yi, Shuai; Jing, Qiang; Xie, Run-Fang; Li, Huifang-Jie; Zeng, Xiao-Feng

    2017-06-15

    Ketamine and ethanol are increasingly being used together as recreational drugs in rave parties. Their effects on the dopamine (DA) system remain largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of consuming two different concentrations of ketamine with and without alcohol on the DA system. We employed the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to evaluate the rewarding effects of the combined administration of two different doses of ketamine (30mg/kg and 60mg/kg) with ethanol (0.3156g/kg). We evaluated the effects of the combined drug treatment on the transcriptional output of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopa decarboxylase (DDC), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) as well as protein expression level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. We found that rats exhibited a dose-dependent, drug-paired, place preference to ketamine and ethanol associated with an elevated DA level in the striatum but not in the PFC. Moreover, treatment involving low- or high-dose ketamine with or without ethanol caused a differential regulatory response in the mRNA levels of the four DA metabolism genes and the cellular protein abundance of BDNF via the cortex-striatum circuitry. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms that occur following the combined administration of ketamine and ethanol in the DA system, which could potentially lead to alterations in the mental status and behavior of ketamine/ethanol users. Our findings may aid the development of therapeutic strategies for substance abuse patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of early cardiac dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with or without anticardiolipin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcu, A; Aksu, F; Ozcelik, F; Barutcu, C A E; Umit, G E; Pamuk, O N; Altun, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to use transthoracic Doppler echocardiographic (TTE) imaging methods to identify cardiac dysfunction, an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in terms of cardiac effects. This study involved 80 patients: a study group (n = 50) and control group (n = 30). They were categorized into four subgroups: anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) (+) (n = 14) and aCL (-) (n = 36); systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) ≥ 6 (n = 15) and SLEDAI 5 years group compared with the disease period <5 years group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Carrying out regular scans with TTE image of SLE patients is important in order to identify early cardiac involvement during monitoring and treatment. Identifying early cardiac involvement in SLE may lead to a reduction in mortality and morbidity rates.

  1. Cytokine balance and cytokine-driven natural killer cell dysfunction in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avau, Anneleen; Put, Karen; Wouters, Carine H; Matthys, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a severe inflammatory childhood disorder, characterized by a specific pattern of systemic features and a typical cytokine profile. Patients are at risk to develop macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), an acute life-threatening condition defined by excessive proliferation and activation of macrophages and T cells. Defects of unknown cause in the natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic capacity are presumed to underlie the pathogenesis of MAS and have been detected in sJIA patients. Here, we provide an overview of the cytokine profiles in sJIA and related mouse models. We discuss the influence of cytokines on NK cell function, and hypothesize that NK cell dysfunction in sJIA is caused by altered cytokine profiles.

  2. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine) Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaideep, Sriranjini Sitaram; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Sudhakara, D; Talakad, Sathyaprabha N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine) describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory) (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7) were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I) or Ayurveda treatment (Group II) for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F = 8.16, P = 0.007, F = 9.73, P = 0.004, F = 13.51, and P = 0.001, resp.). The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F = 10.129, P = 0.004). Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  3. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriranjini Sitaram Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7 were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I or Ayurveda treatment (Group II for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F=8.16, P=0.007, F=9.73, P=0.004, F=13.51, and P=0.001, resp.. The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F=10.129, P=0.004. Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  4. Neurochemical evidence that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) 55-102 peptide modulates the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing the dopamine release in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovska, Angelina; Baranyi, Maria; Windisch, Katalin; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Gagov, Hristo; Kalfin, Reni

    2017-08-09

    CART (Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript) peptide is a neurotransmitter naturally occurring in the CNS and found mostly in nucleus accumbens, ventrotegmental area, ventral pallidum, amygdalae and striatum, brain regions associated with drug addiction. In the nucleus accumbens, known for its significant role in motivation, pleasure, reward and reinforcement learning, CART peptide inhibits cocaine and amphetamine-induced dopamine-mediated increases in locomotor activity and behavior, suggesting a CART peptide interaction with the dopaminergic system. Thus in the present study, we examined the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on the basal, electrical field stimulation-evoked (EFS-evoked) (30V, 2Hz, 120 shocks) and returning basal dopamine (DA) release and on the release of the DA metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetaldehyde (DOPAL), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) as well as on norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine-o-quinone (Daq) in isolated mouse nucleus accumbens, in a preparation, in which any CART peptide effects on the dendrites or soma of ventral tegmental projection neurons have been excluded. We further extended our study to assess the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on basal cocaine-induced release of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAL, DOPAC, HVA, DOPET and 3-MT as well as on NE and Daq. To analyze the amount of [(3)H]dopamine, dopamine metabolites, Daq and NE in the nucleus accumbens superfusate, a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with electrochemical, UV and radiochemical detections was used. CART (55-102) peptide, 0.1μM, added alone, exerted: (i) a significant decrease in the basal and EFS-evoked levels of extracellular dopamine (ii) a significant increase in the EFS-evoked and returning basal levels of the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA, major products of dopamine degradation and (iii) a significant decrease in the returning basal

  5. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: THE ROLE OF SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Poddubnyy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the role of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.Material andMethods. 100 patients with ankylosing spondylitis were included into the study. Screening for arterial hypertension (HT and conventional cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hyper- and dislipoproteinemia, body overweight, heredity and diabetes mellitus was performed in all patients. 10-year coronary disease risk (Framingham scale and 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular event (SCORE scale was calculated. Additionally the follows cardiovascular risk factors were assessed: C-reactive protein level (CRP, fibrinogen level, platelet count, antithrombin III activity, plasma fibrinolytic activity, vonWillebrand factor (vWF activity, circulating endothelial cells (CEC count. Besides, endothelial functionwas evaluated by Doppler-ultrasonography of brachial artery in testswith reactive (endothelium-dependent or flow-mediated dilation and nitroglycerine (endotheliumindependent dilation hyperemia. 30 healthy patients were included into control group and were comparable with patients of studied group on sex and age.Results. 10-year coronary disease risk in patients with ankylosing spondylitis was significantly lower than this in patients of control group 4.0%(3,0; 7,5 vs 5.0%(3,0; 11,0, respectively (p<0,05. 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular event in studied group was relatively low 1.0% (1.0; 2.0. However, analysis of the additional risk factors shown increased thrombogenic potential of blood, which was related to systemic inflammation activity: high platelets count, high fibrinogen activity, increased vWF activity, and decreased fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, signs of endothelial injury (increased level of CEC and vWF activity and endothelial dysfunction were found in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.Conclusion. Cardiovascular risk in patientswith ankylosing spondylitis estimated

  6. Arterial dysfunction but maintained systemic blood pressure in cavin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Swärd

    Full Text Available Caveolae are omega-shaped plasma membrane micro-domains that are abundant in cells of the vascular system. Formation of caveolae depends on caveolin-1 and cavin-1 and lack of either protein leads to loss of caveolae. Mice with caveolin-1 deficiency have dysfunctional blood vessels, but whether absence of cavin-1 similarly leads to vascular dysfunction is not known. Here we addressed this hypothesis using small mesenteric arteries from cavin-1-deficient mice. Cavin-1-reporter staining was intense in mesenteric arteries, brain arterioles and elsewhere in the vascular system, with positive staining of both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Arterial expression of cavin-1, -2 and -3 was reduced in knockout (KO arteries as was expression of caveolin-1, -2 and -3. Caveolae were absent in the endothelial and smooth muscle layers of small mesenteric arteries as determined by electron microscopy. Arginase, a negative regulator of nitric oxide production, was elevated in cavin-1 deficient arteries as was contraction in response to the α1-adrenergic agonist cirazoline. Detailed assessment of vascular dimensions revealed increased media thickness and reduced distensibility, arguing that enhanced contraction was due to increased muscle mass. Contrasting with increased α1-adrenergic contraction, myogenic tone was essentially absent and this appeared to be due in part to increased nitric oxide production. Vasomotion was less frequent in the knock-out vessels. In keeping with the opposing influences on arterial resistance of increased agonist-induced contractility and reduced myogenic tone, arterial blood pressure was unchanged in vivo. We conclude that deficiency of cavin-1 affects the function of small arteries, but that opposing influences on arterial resistance balance each other such that systemic blood pressure in unstressed mice is well maintained.

  7. Systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and activation in clinically healthy children exposed to air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, L; Villarreal-Calderon, R; Valencia-Salazar, G; Henríquez-Roldán, C; Gutiérrez-Castrellón, P; Torres-Jardón, R; Osnaya-Brizuela, N; Romero, L; Torres-Jardón, R; Solt, A; Reed, W

    2008-03-01

    Mexico City children are chronically exposed to significant concentrations of air pollutants and exhibit chronic respiratory-tract inflammation. Epidemiological, controlled human exposures, laboratory-based animal models, and in vitro/in vivo studies have shown that inflammatory, endothelial dysfunction, and endothelial damage mediators are upregulated upon exposure to particulate matter (PM). Endothelial dysfunction is a critical event in cardiovascular disease. The focus of this work was to investigate whether exposure to ambient air pollution including PM(2.5) produces systemic inflammation and endothelial injury in healthy children. We measured markers of endothelial activation, and inflammatory mediators in 52 children age 8.6+/-0.1 yr, residents of Mexico City (n: 28) or of Polotitlán (n: 24), a city with low levels of pollutants. Mexico City children had significant increases in inflammatory mediators and vasoconstrictors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, prostaglandin (PG) E2, C-reactive protein, interleukin-1beta, and endothelin-1. There was a significant anti-inflammatory response, and a downregulation of vascular adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and -2, and selectins sE and sL. Results from linear regression found TNF a positively associated with 24- and 48-h cumulative levels of PM(2.5), while the 7-d PM(2.5) value was negatively associated with the numbers of white blood cells in peripheral blood in highly exposed children. Systemic subclinical inflammation, increased endothelin- 1, and significant downregulation of soluble adhesion molecules are seen in Mexico City children. Children chronically exposed to fine PM above the standard could be at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, stroke, and other systemic effects later in life.

  8. Effect of U and {sup 137}Cs chronic contamination on dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houpert, P.; Lestaevel, P. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de RadioBiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Lab. RadioToxicologie experimentale, Pierrelatte (France)]. E-mail: philippe.lestaevel@irsn.fr; Amourette, C. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees Emile Parde, Dept. de Radiobiologie et Radiopathologie, La Tronche (France); Dhieux, B.; Bussy, C.; Paquet, F. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de RadioBiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Lab. RadioToxicologie experimentale, Pierrelatte (France)

    2004-02-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the most significant problem for the population of the former Soviet Union for the next 50-70 years will be chronic internal contamination by radionuclides. One of the few experiments carried out in this field reported that neurotransmitter metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat was disturbed after feeding with oats contaminated by {sup 137}Cs for 1 month. The present study assessed the effect of chronic contamination by depleted U or {sup 137}Cs on the metabolism of two neurotransmitters in cerebral areas of rats. Dopamine and serotonin were chosen because their metabolism has been shown to be disturbed after external irradiation, even at moderate doses. Dopamine, serotonin, and some of their catabolites were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an electrochemical detector in five cerebral structures of rats contaminated over a 1-month period by drinking water (40 mg U{center_dot}L{sup -1} or 6500 Bq {sup 137}Cs{center_dot}L{sup -1}). In the striatum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, the dopamine, serotonin, and catabolite levels were not significantly different between the control rats and rats contaminated by U or {sup 137}Cs. These results are not in accordance with those previously described. (author)

  9. Oxytocin system dysfunction as a common mechanism underlying metabolic syndrome and psychiatric symptoms in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Daniel S; Dieset, Ingrid; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Westlye, Lars T; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in using intranasal oxytocin (OT) to treat social dysfunction in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders (i.e., psychotic disorders). While OT treatment results have been mixed, emerging evidence suggests that OT system dysfunction may also play a role in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which appears in one-third of individuals with psychotic disorders and associated with increased mortality. Here we examine the evidence for a potential role of the OT system in the shared risk for MetS and psychotic disorders, and its prospects for ameliorating MetS. Using several studies to demonstrate the overlapping neurobiological profiles of metabolic risk factors and psychiatric symptoms, we show that OT system dysfunction may be one common mechanism underlying MetS and psychotic disorders. Given the critical need to better understand metabolic dysregulation in these disorders, future OT trials assessing behavioural and cognitive outcomes should additionally include metabolic risk factor parameters.

  10. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-03-10

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders.

  11. Mechanisms involved in systemic nicotine-induced glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Jin, Yu; Yang, Kechun; Zhang, Die; Lukas, Ronald J; Wu, Jie

    2010-10-13

    Systemic exposure to nicotine induces glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that single, systemic exposure in rats to nicotine (0.17 mg/kg free base) increases the ratio of DA neuronal currents mediated by AMPA relative to NMDA receptors (AMPA/NMDA ratio) assessed 24 h later, based on slice-patch recording. The AMPA/NMDA ratio increase is evident within 1 h and lasts for at least 72 h after nicotine exposure (and up to 8 d after repeated nicotine administration). This effect cannot be prevented by systemic injection of either α7-nAChR (nicotinic ACh receptor)-selective [methyllycaconitine (MLA)] or β2*-nAChR-selective [mecamylamine (MEC)] antagonists but is prevented by coinjection of MLA and MEC. In either nAChR α7 or β2 subunit knock-out mice, systemic exposure to nicotine still increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio. Preinjection in rats of a NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate), but neither DA receptor antagonists [SCH-23390 (R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) plus haloperidol] nor a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine), prevents the nicotine-induced increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio. After systemic exposure to nicotine, glutamatergic (but not GABAergic) transmission onto rat VTA DA neuronal inputs is enhanced. Correspondingly, DA neuronal firing measured 24 h after nicotine exposure using extracellular single-unit recording in vivo is significantly faster, and there is conversion of silent to active DA neurons. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that systemic nicotine acting via either α7- or β2*-nAChRs increases presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic function, and consequently initiates glutamatergic synaptic plasticity, which may be an important, early neuronal adaptation in nicotine reward and reinforcement.

  12. Striatal dopamine receptors modulate the expression of insulin receptor, IGF-1 and GLUT-3 in diabetic rats: effect of pyridoxine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, M; Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paulose, C S

    2012-12-05

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is rising at alarming proportions. Central nervous system plays an important part in orchestrating glucose metabolism, with accumulating evidence linking dysregulated central nervous system circuits to the failure of normal glucoregulatory mechanisms. Pyridoxine is a water soluble vitamin and it has important role in brain function. This study aims to evaluate the role of pyridoxine in striatal glucose regulation through dopaminergic receptor expressions in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Radio receptor binding assays for dopamine D(1), D(2) receptors were done using [(3)H] 7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol and [(3)H] 5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-methylamino-N-[-2-methyl-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl]benzamide. Gene expressions were done using fluorescently labeled Taqman probes of dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor, Insulin receptor, Insulin like growth factor-1(IGF-1) and Glucose transporter-3 (GLUT-3). Bmax of dopamine D(1) receptor is decreased and B(max) of dopamine D(2) was increased in diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression of dopamine D(1) receptor was down regulated and dopamine D(2) receptor was up regulated in diabetic rats. Our results showed decreased gene expression of Insulin receptor, IGF-1 and increased gene expression of GLUT-3 in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treatment restored diabetes induced alterations in dopamine D(1), D(2) receptors, Insulin receptor, IGF-1, GLUT-3 gene expressions in striatum compared to diabetic rats. Insulin treatment reversed dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor, GLUT-3 mRNA expression, D(2) receptor binding parameters in the striatum compared to diabetic group. Our results suggest the potential role of pyridoxine supplementation in ameliorating diabetes mediated dysfunctions in striatal dopaminergic receptor expressions and insulin signaling. Thus pyridoxine has therapeutic significance in diabetes management.

  13. Early Iron Deficiency Has Brain and Behavior Effects Consistent with Dopaminergic Dysfunction123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoff, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    To honor the late John Beard’s many contributions regarding iron and dopamine biology, this review focuses on recent human studies that test specific hypotheses about effects of early iron deficiency on dopamine system functioning. Short- and long-term alterations associated with iron deficiency in infancy can be related to major dopamine pathways (mesocortical, mesolimbic, nigrostriatal, tuberohypophyseal). Children and young adults who had iron deficiency anemia in infancy show poorer inhibitory control and executive functioning as assessed by neurocognitive tasks where pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies implicate frontal-striatal circuits and the mesocortical dopamine pathway. Alterations in the mesolimbic pathway, where dopamine plays a major role in behavioral activation and inhibition, positive affect, and inherent reward, may help explain altered social-emotional behavior in iron-deficient infants, specifically wariness and hesitance, lack of positive affect, diminished social engagement, etc. Poorer motor sequencing and bimanual coordination and lower spontaneous eye blink rate in iron-deficient anemic infants are consistent with impaired function in the nigrostriatal pathway. Short- and long-term changes in serum prolactin point to dopamine dysfunction in the tuberohypophyseal pathway. These hypothesis-driven findings support the adverse effects of early iron deficiency on dopamine biology. Iron deficiency also has other effects, specifically on other neurotransmitters, myelination, dendritogenesis, neurometabolism in hippocampus and striatum, gene and protein profiles, and associated behaviors. The persistence of poorer cognitive, motor, affective, and sensory system functioning highlights the need to prevent iron deficiency in infancy and to find interventions that lessen the long-term effects of this widespread nutrient disorder. PMID:21346104

  14. No evidence for mirror system dysfunction in schizophrenia from a multimodal TMS/EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sophie C; Enticott, Peter G; Hoy, Kate E; Thomson, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-08-30

    Dysfunctional mirror neuron systems have been proposed to contribute to the social cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. A few studies have explored mirror systems in schizophrenia using various techniques such as TMS (levels of motor resonance) or EEG (levels of mu suppression), with mixed results. This study aimed to use a novel multimodal approach (i.e. concurrent TMS and EEG) to further investigate mirror systems and social cognition in schizophrenia. Nineteen individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 19 healthy controls participated. Single-pulse TMS was applied to M1 during the observation of hand movements designed to elicit mirror system activity. Single EEG electrodes (C3, CZ, C4) recorded brain activity. Participants also completed facial affect recognition and theory of mind tasks. The schizophrenia group showed significant deficits in facial affect recognition and higher level theory of mind compared to healthy controls. A significant positive relationship was revealed between mu suppression and motor resonance for the overall sample, indicating concurrent validity of these measures. Levels of mu suppression and motor resonance were not significantly different between groups. These findings indicate that in stable outpatients with schizophrenia, mirror system functioning is intact, and therefore their social cognitive difficulties may be caused by alternative pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Iowa Gambling Task and the Three Fallacies of Dopamine in Gambling Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob eLinnet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gambling disorder sufferers prefer immediately larger rewards despite long term losses on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, and these impairments are associated with dopamine dysfunctions. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter linked with temporal and structural dysfunctions in substance use disorder, which has supported the idea of impaired decision-making and dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. However, evidence from substance use disorders cannot be directly transferred to gambling disorder. This article focuses on three hypotheses of dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder, which appear to be fallacies, i.e., have not been supported in a series of positron emission tomography (PET studies. The first fallacy suggests that gambling disorder suffers, similar to substance use disorders, have lower dopamine receptor availability. No evidence supported this hypothesis. The second fallacy suggests that maladaptive decision-making in gambling disorder is associated with higher dopamine release during gambling. No evidence supported the hypothesis, and the literature on substance use disorders offers limited support for this hypothesis. The third fallacy suggests that maladaptive decision-making in gambling disorder is associated with higher dopamine release during winning. The evidence did not support this hypothesis either. Instead, dopaminergic coding of reward prediction and uncertainty might better account for dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. Studies of reward prediction and reward uncertainty shows a sustained dopamine response towards stimuli with maximum uncertainty, which may explain the continued dopamine release and gambling despite losses in gambling disorder. The findings from the studies presented here are consistent with the notion of dopaminergic dysfunctions of reward prediction and reward uncertainty signals in gambling disorder.

  16. Imaging of Dopamine in PD and Implications for Motor and Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of PD

    OpenAIRE

    Raul ede la Fuente-Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopamine depletion in the putamen, which leads to motor dysfunction. As the disease progresses, a substantial degree of dopamine depletion also occurs in caudate and nucleus accumbens. This may explain a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, including depression, apathy, and cognitive decline. Dopamine replacement therapy partially restores motor function but long-term treatment is often associated with motor complications (motor fluctuations ...

  17. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  18. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple-organ damage / dysfunction in complicated canine babesiosis

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    C. Welzl

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to document the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS in dogs with complicated babesiosis, and to assess their impact on outcome. Ninety-one cases were evaluated retro-spectively for SIRS and 56 for MODS. The liver, kidneys, lungs, central nervous system and musculature were assessed. Eighty-seven percent of cases were SIRS-positive. Fifty-two percent of the cases assessed for organ damage had single-organ damage and 48 % had MODS. Outcome was not significantly affected by either SIRS or MODS, but involvement of specific organs had a profound effect. Central nervous system involvement resulted in a 57 times greater chance of death and renal involvement in a 5-fold increased risk compared to all other complications. Lung involvement could not be statistically evaluated owing to co-linearity with other organs, but was associated with high mortality. Liver and muscle damage were common, but did not significantly affect outcome. There are manysimilarities between the observations in this study and previous human and animal studies in related fields, lending additional support to the body of evidence for shared underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in systemic inflammatory states.

  19. Targeting Palmitoyl acyltransferase ZDHHC21 Improves Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Resulting from Burn Induced Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ricci J; Wang, Chunyan; Yang, Clement Gy; Eitnier, Rebecca A; Wang, Fang; Wu, Mack H

    2017-08-24

    Clinical studies in burn patients demonstrate a close association between leaky guts and increased incidence or severity of sepsis and other complications. Severe thermal injury triggers intestinal inflammation that contributes to intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability, which exacerbates systemic response leading to multiple organ failure and sepsis. In this study, we identified a significant function of a particular palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT), ZDHHC21, in mediating signaling events required for gut hyperpermeability induced by inflammation. Using qPCR, we show that ZDHHC21 mRNA, production was enhanced by two-fold when intestinal epithelial cells were treated with TNFα/IFNγ in vitro. In addition, pharmacological targeting of PATs with 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) showed significant improvement in TNFα/IFNγ mediated epithelial barrier dysfunction by using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) assays, as well as FITC-dextran permeability assays. Using the ABE assay and click chemistry, we show that TNFα/IFNγ treatment of intestinal epithelial cells results in enhanced detection of total palmitoylated proteins, and this response is inhibited by 2-BP. Using ZDHHC21 deficient mice or wild-type mice treated with 2-BP, we showed that mice with impaired ZDHHC21 expression or pharmacological inhibition resulted in attenuated intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by thermal injury. Moreover, H&E staining of small intestine, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), showed mice with genetic interruption of ZDHHC21 had attenuated villus structure disorganization associated with thermal injury induced intestinal barrier damage. Taken together, these results suggest an important role of ZDHHC21 in mediating gut hyperpermeability resulting from thermal injury. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

  20. Contributions of dopamine-related genes and environmental factors to highly sensitive personality: a multi-step neuronal system-level approach.

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    Chunhui Chen

    Full Text Available Traditional behavioral genetic studies (e.g., twin, adoption studies have shown that human personality has moderate to high heritability, but recent molecular behavioral genetic studies have failed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL with consistent effects. The current study adopted a multi-step approach (ANOVA followed by multiple regression and permutation to assess the cumulative effects of multiple QTLs. Using a system-level (dopamine system genetic approach, we investigated a personality trait deeply rooted in the nervous system (the Highly Sensitive Personality, HSP. 480 healthy Chinese college students were given the HSP scale and genotyped for 98 representative polymorphisms in all major dopamine neurotransmitter genes. In addition, two environment factors (stressful life events and parental warmth that have been implicated for their contributions to personality development were included to investigate their relative contributions as compared to genetic factors. In Step 1, using ANOVA, we identified 10 polymorphisms that made statistically significant contributions to HSP. In Step 2, these polymorphism's main effects and interactions were assessed using multiple regression. This model accounted for 15% of the variance of HSP (p<0.001. Recent stressful life events accounted for an additional 2% of the variance. Finally, permutation analyses ascertained the probability of obtaining these findings by chance to be very low, p ranging from 0.001 to 0.006. Dividing these loci by the subsystems of dopamine synthesis, degradation/transport, receptor and modulation, we found that the modulation and receptor subsystems made the most significant contribution to HSP. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of a multi-step neuronal system-level approach in assessing genetic contributions to individual differences in human behavior. It can potentially bridge the gap between the high heritability estimates based on traditional

  1. Contributions of dopamine-related genes and environmental factors to highly sensitive personality: a multi-step neuronal system-level approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Chuansheng; Moyzis, Robert; Stern, Hal; He, Qinghua; Li, He; Li, Jin; Zhu, Bi; Dong, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Traditional behavioral genetic studies (e.g., twin, adoption studies) have shown that human personality has moderate to high heritability, but recent molecular behavioral genetic studies have failed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) with consistent effects. The current study adopted a multi-step approach (ANOVA followed by multiple regression and permutation) to assess the cumulative effects of multiple QTLs. Using a system-level (dopamine system) genetic approach, we investigated a personality trait deeply rooted in the nervous system (the Highly Sensitive Personality, HSP). 480 healthy Chinese college students were given the HSP scale and genotyped for 98 representative polymorphisms in all major dopamine neurotransmitter genes. In addition, two environment factors (stressful life events and parental warmth) that have been implicated for their contributions to personality development were included to investigate their relative contributions as compared to genetic factors. In Step 1, using ANOVA, we identified 10 polymorphisms that made statistically significant contributions to HSP. In Step 2, these polymorphism's main effects and interactions were assessed using multiple regression. This model accounted for 15% of the variance of HSP (p<0.001). Recent stressful life events accounted for an additional 2% of the variance. Finally, permutation analyses ascertained the probability of obtaining these findings by chance to be very low, p ranging from 0.001 to 0.006. Dividing these loci by the subsystems of dopamine synthesis, degradation/transport, receptor and modulation, we found that the modulation and receptor subsystems made the most significant contribution to HSP. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of a multi-step neuronal system-level approach in assessing genetic contributions to individual differences in human behavior. It can potentially bridge the gap between the high heritability estimates based on traditional behavioral genetics

  2. 多巴胺系统和酒精依赖%The dopamine system and alcohol dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马慧; 朱刚

    2014-01-01

    酒精依赖是一种常见的精神疾病,社会危害大,疾病负担重。目前致力于酒精依赖的预防和治疗的研究取得的成果比较有限。为了进一步完善酒精依赖的治疗和预防措施,有必要对酒精依赖潜在的生物学机制进行深入探究。迄今为止,针对酒精依赖错综复杂的病因学的研究,大部分聚焦于多巴胺系统的关键作用。本综述总结了目前国内外对饮酒行为与多巴胺能系统之间关系的研究,发现研究结果并不一致,甚至相互矛盾,可能是由于方法学的差异、非线性的剂量效应、样本的选取差异以及多巴胺系统与其它神经递质系统之间可能存在交互作用等因素造成。%Summary:Alcohol dependence is a common mental disorder that is associated with substantial disease burden. Current efforts at preveniton and treatment of alcohol dependence are of very limited effecitveness. A better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying dependence is essenital to improving the outcomes of treatment and preveniton iniitaitves. To date, most of the efforts have focused on the key role of the dopamine system in the complex eitological network of alcohol dependence. This review summarizes current research about the relaitonships between alcohol consumpiton and the dopaminergic system. We ifnd that many of the currently available studies have contradictory results, presumably due to differences in methodology, non-linear dosage effects, use of different samples, and the possible confounding effects of other neurotransmitter systems.

  3. Systemic HMGB1 neutralization prevents postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction in aged rats

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    Niccolo Terrando

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative neurocognitive disorders are common complications in elderly patients following surgery or critical illness. High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is rapidly released after tissue trauma and critically involved in response to sterile injury. Herein we assessed the role of HMGB1 after liver surgery in aged rats and explored the therapeutic potential of a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody in a clinically relevant model of postoperative neurocognitive disorders. 19-22 months Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned as: (1 control with saline; (2 surgery, a partial hepatolobectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia and analgesia, + immunoglobulin G as control antibody; (3 surgery + anti-HMGB1. A separate cohort of animals was used to detect His-tagged HMGB1 in the brain. Systemic anti-HMGB1 antibody treatment exerted neuroprotective effects preventing postoperative memory deficits and anxiety in aged rats by preventing surgery-induced reduction of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in the hippocampus. Although no evident changes in the intracellular distribution of HMGB1 in hippocampal cells were noted after surgery, HMGB1 levels were elevated on day 3 in rat plasma samples. Experiments with tagged HMGB1 further revealed a critical role of systemic HMGB1 to enable an access to the brain and causing microglial activation. Overall, these data demonstrate a pivotal role for systemic HMGB1 in mediating postoperative neuroinflammation. This may have direct implications for common postoperative complications like delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction.

  4. The possible interaction of dopamine system in nucleus accumbens shell and glutamate system of prelimbic region on locomotor activity in rat

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    Hatam Ahmadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nucleus accumbens (NAc and prefrontal cortex (PFC dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems are involved in regulating of locomotor activity behaviors. This study has investigated the interaction of NAc shell dopaminergic system and prelimbic glutamatergic systems in regulating locomotor activity and related parameters. Methods: The aim of this study was the effect the drugs injection interaction in the brain of male Wistar rats on locomotor activity and related parameters, in the order of this purpose, open field apparatus that automatically recorded locomotor activity was employed. Unilateral intra-cerebral injection of drugs was done. Results: Unilateral intra-prelimbic injection of D-AP7 (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid= NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl did not alter locomotor activity behaviors. However, infusion of NMDA (0.9μg/μl in this region increased locomotor activity (P<0.01, whereas decreased rearing (P<0.01 and grooming (P<0.01 which was blocked by D-AP7 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Moreover, unilateral infusion of SCH23390 (dopamine D1 receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl into the left NAc shell did not alter locomotor activity. However, injection of SKF38393 (dopamine D1 receptor agonist; 4μg/μl into the left NAc shell increased locomotor activity (P<0.05 which was blocked by SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Furthermore, the subthreshold dose infusion of SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl into the left NAc shell reduced the effect of intra- prelimbic NMDA on locomotor activity (P<0.01. In addition, intra-NAc shell administration of the subthreshold dose of SKF38393 (1μg/μl potentiated the middle dose (P<0.05, whereas decreased the higher dose of intra-left prelimbic NMDA response (P<0.05 on locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results suggested a modulatory effect of the NAc shell dopaminergic system on increased locomotor activity by activating glutamate system in prelimbic.

  5. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction and serum levels of neurotoxic and neurotrophic cytokines in patients with cobalamin deficiency

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    Özcan Çeneli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available neurotrophiccytokines epidermal growth factor (EGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 plays a role in the pathogenesisof cobalamin (Cbl deficiency-induced neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomicnervous system dysfunction and to look for any relationship between autonomic nervous systemdisturbances and serum cytokine levels (TNF-

  6. Magnetoencephalography study of right parietal lobe dysfunction of the evoked mirror neuron system in antipsychotic-free schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yutaka; Muramatsu, Taro; Kato, Motoichiro; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Shintani, Masuro; Mimura, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia commonly exhibit deficits of non-verbal communication in social contexts, which may be related to cognitive dysfunction that impairs recognition of biological motion. Although perception of biological motion is known to be mediated by the mirror neuron system, there have been few empirical studies of this system in patients with schizophrenia. Using magnetoencephalography, we examined whether antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients displayed mirror neuron system dysfunction during observation of biological motion (jaw movement of another individual). Compared with normal controls, the patients with schizophrenia had fewer components of both the waveform and equivalent current dipole, suggesting aberrant brain activity resulting from dysfunction of the right inferior parietal cortex. They also lacked the changes of alpha band and gamma band oscillation seen in normal controls, and had weaker phase-locking factors and gamma-synchronization predominantly in right parietal cortex. Our findings demonstrate that untreated patients with schizophrenia exhibit aberrant mirror neuron system function based on the right inferior parietal cortex, which is characterized by dysfunction of gamma-synchronization in the right parietal lobe during observation of biological motion.

  7. Magnetoencephalography study of right parietal lobe dysfunction of the evoked mirror neuron system in antipsychotic-free schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kato

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with schizophrenia commonly exhibit deficits of non-verbal communication in social contexts, which may be related to cognitive dysfunction that impairs recognition of biological motion. Although perception of biological motion is known to be mediated by the mirror neuron system, there have been few empirical studies of this system in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: Using magnetoencephalography, we examined whether antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients displayed mirror neuron system dysfunction during observation of biological motion (jaw movement of another individual. RESULTS: Compared with normal controls, the patients with schizophrenia had fewer components of both the waveform and equivalent current dipole, suggesting aberrant brain activity resulting from dysfunction of the right inferior parietal cortex. They also lacked the changes of alpha band and gamma band oscillation seen in normal controls, and had weaker phase-locking factors and gamma-synchronization predominantly in right parietal cortex. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that untreated patients with schizophrenia exhibit aberrant mirror neuron system function based on the right inferior parietal cortex, which is characterized by dysfunction of gamma-synchronization in the right parietal lobe during observation of biological motion.

  8. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome: current evidence and implications for future obesity therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqq, A M; DeLorey, D S; Sharma, A M; Freemark, M; Kreier, F; Mackenzie, M L; Richer, L P

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls essential functions like breathing, heart rate, digestion, body temperature and hormone levels. Evidence suggests that ANS dysfunction is associated with adult and childhood obesity and plays a role in the distribution of total body fat and the development of obesity-related complications in humans. This review summarizes our current understanding of ANS involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome. Available evidence of ANS dysfunction in the control of energy balance is limited and, in some cases, contradictory. Further investigation in this area is warranted in order to better understand the important contributions of the ANS to regulation of body fat, development of obesity and its comorbidities. Results from these studies will guide the development of novel obesity therapeutics targeting specific ANS dysfunction.

  9. Histamine and spontaneous motor activity: biphasic changes, receptors involved and participation of the striatal dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatto, S; Nasello, A G; Bernardi, M M

    1998-01-01

    The time- and dose-related effects of exogenous histamine on spontaneous motor activity and receptors involved were evaluated in male rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine (5.4 and 54.3 nmol) produced a biphasic effect with initial transitory hypoactivity and later hyperactivity expressed by locomotion frequency in an open-field. The rearing frequencies were only reduced by all doses of histamine used. The histamine-induced hypoactivity was inhibited by the H3-antagonist thioperamide and was also induced by the H3-agonist N-alpha-methylhistamine. The histamine-induced hyperactivity phase was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. The H2-antagonist ranitidine increased locomotion and rearing frequencies. The participation of other neurotransmitters in the persistent hypokinetic effect induced by 135.8 nmol of histamine was determined by HPLC in the striatum and hypothalamus as counter-proof. A decreased DOPAC/DA ratio was observed only in the striatum. In the hypothalamus, low levels of 5HT were detected, probably not correlated with motor activity. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the exogenous histamine-induced hypoactivity response is probably due to activation of H3-receptors as heteroreceptors reducing the activity of the striatal dopaminergic system. This effect can partially overlap with the expression of the hyperactivity induced by H1-receptor activation. The participation of H2-receptors requires further investigation.

  10. Insulin resistance impairs nigrostriatal dopamine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J K; Bomhoff, G L; Gorres, B K; Davis, V A; Kim, J; Lee, P-P; Brooks, W M; Gerhardt, G A; Geiger, P C; Stanford, J A

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have indicated a link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and Type 2 Diabetes. Although preclinical studies have examined the effect of high-fat feeding on dopamine function in brain reward pathways, the effect of diet on neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in PD and parkinsonism, is less clear. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet, which models early-stage Type 2 Diabetes, would disrupt nigrostriatal dopamine function in young adult Fischer 344 rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (60% calories from fat) or a normal chow diet for 12 weeks. High fat-fed animals were insulin resistant compared to chow-fed controls. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and dopamine clearance were measured in the striatum using in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine release was attenuated and dopamine clearance was diminished in the high-fat diet group compared to chow-fed rats. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of the high fat group. This finding was supported by alterations in the expression of several proteins involved in iron metabolism in the substantia nigra in this group compared to chow-fed animals. The diet-induced systemic and basal ganglia-specific changes may play a role in the observed impairment of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor gene inactivation in dopamine-innervated areas selectively decreases behavioral responses to amphetamine

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    Sebastien eParnaudeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The meso-cortico-limbic system, via dopamine release, encodes the rewarding and reinforcing properties of natural rewards. It is also activated in response to abused substances and is believed to support drug-related behaviors. Dysfunctions of this system lead to several psychiatric conditions including feeding disorders and drug addiction. These disorders are also largely influenced by environmental factors and in particular stress exposure. Stressors activate the corticotrope axis ultimately leading to glucocorticoid hormone (GCs release. GCs bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed including within the meso-cortico-limbic tract. While the GR within dopamine-innervated areas drives cocaine’s behavioral responses, its implication in responses to other psychostimulants such as amphetamine has never been clearly established. Moreover, while extensive work has been made to uncover the role of this receptor in addicted behaviors, its contribution to the rewarding and reinforcing properties of food has yet to be investigated. Using mouse models carrying GR gene inactivation in either dopamine neurons or in dopamine-innervated areas, we found that GR in dopamine responsive neurones is essential to properly build amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. c-Fos quantification in the nucleus accumbens further confirmed defective neuronal activation following amphetamine injection. These diminished neuronal and behavioral responses to amphetamine may involve alterations in glutamate transmission as suggested by the decreased MK801-elicited hyperlocomotion and by the hyporeactivity to glutamate of a subpopulation of medium spiny neurons. In contrast, GR inactivation did not affect rewarding and reinforcing properties of food suggesting that responding for natural reward under basal conditions is preserved in these mice.

  12. Imaging of dopamine transporters and D2 receptors in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, G M; Karlsborg, M; Thomsen, G

    2004-01-01

    of the striatonigral type (MSA) and healthy subjects. METHODS: SPECT measurements of the dopamine transporter (DAT) were done with 123I-beta-CIT, while for determination of the dopamine D2-like receptors (D2), 123I-epidepride was used. Clinical evaluation and SPECT scans were carried out in 14 patients with IPD, eight...... asymmetry than MSA patients. Striatal D2 binding did not differ significantly between patients and healthy controls but the ratio between caudate DAT and D2 binding was significantly higher in patients with IPD than in those with MSA, even when disease severity was taken into account. CONCLUSION: Patients...... diagnostic information, since the ratio between DAT and D2 receptor binding is significantly higher in IPD than in MSA...

  13. Sepsis, systemic inflammatory response, and multiple organ dysfunction: the mystery continues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Human sepsis is thought to be systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that is activated by invasive infection. The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is the identified failure of critical organ function in patients that have sustained SIRS. Because SIRS and MODS are consequences of the excessive activation of inflammation, extensive research and numerous clinical trials have pursued treatments that would modify the inflammatory response. This presentation reviews the normal local mechanisms of inflammation and provides a theoretical framework for the transition of the inflammatory process to a systemic level. Clinical trials with biomodulators to block or inhibit inflammation have generally failed to improve the outcomes in patients with severe sepsis, septic shock, and MODS. The role of counter-inflammatory signaling and the newer concept of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are being investigated, and newer hypotheses are focusing upon the balancing of proinflammatory and counter-inflammatory mechanisms as important directions for newer therapies. It is concluded that failure to define novel and effective treatments reflects fundamental gaps in our understanding of inflammation and its regulation.

  14. Prevention effects of Schisandra polysaccharide on radiation-induced immune system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Jia, Yun-Long; Ma, Ming; Duan, Yu-Qing; Liu, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficacy of SP (Schisandra polysaccharide) in prevention of radiation-induced immune dysfunction and discussed the underlying mechanisms with a Bal/bc mouse model. The data demonstrated that SP could reverse the decreases in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement C3 in blood serum were all decreased after radiation and SP could restore this radiation disorder. Furthermore, SP could reverse the deregulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood and thymus of mice after radiotherapy. We also performed terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the apoptosis and underlying mechanisms of SP in thymus. Data showed that radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes could be reversed by SP through inducing upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and downregulation of Fas and Bax levels. Furthermore, SP has no any side-effects on immunity of normal mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that SP could effectively prevent immune injury during radiotherapy by protecting the immune system. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for therapeutic interventions of prevention immune system damage in the radiation treatment.

  15. Calcium-dependent proteolytic system and muscle dysfunctions: a possible role of calpains in sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargelos, E; Poussard, S; Brulé, C; Daury, L; Cottin, P

    2008-02-01

    The calcium-dependent proteolytic system is composed of cysteine proteases named calpains. They are ubiquitous or tissue-specific enzymes. The two best characterised isoforms are the ubiquitously expressed mu- and m-calpains. Besides its regulation by calcium, calpain activity is tightly controlled by calpastatin, the specific endogenous inhibitor, binding to phospholipids, autoproteolysis and phosphorylation. Calpains are responsible for limited proteolytic events. Among the multitude of substrates identified so far are cytoskeletal and membrane proteins, enzymes and transcription factors. Calpain activity is involved in a large number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we will particularly focus on the implication of the calcium-dependent proteolytic system in relation to muscle physiology. Because of their ability to remodel cytoskeletal anchorage complexes, calpains play a major role in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration and fusion, three key steps of myogenesis. Calcium-dependent proteolysis is also involved in the control of cell cycle. In muscle tissue, in particular, calpains intervene in the regeneration process. Another important class of calpain substrates belongs to apoptosis regulating factors. The proteases may thus play a role in muscle cell death, and as a consequence in muscle atrophy. The relationships between calcium-dependent proteolysis and muscle dysfunctions are being further developed in this review with a particular emphasis on sarcopenia.

  16. Requirement for the endocannabinoid system in social interaction impairment induced by coactivation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenko, Michelle; Zhu, Yongyong; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Ren, Wei; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Xia

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine receptor family consists of D1-D5 receptors (D1R-D5R), and we explored the contributions of each dopamine receptor subtype in the piriform cortex (PirC) to social interaction impairment (SII). Rats received behavioral tests or electrophysiological recording of PirC neuronal activity after injection of the D1R/D5R agonist SKF38393, the D2R/D3R/D4R agonist quinpirole, or both, with or without pretreatment with dopamine receptor antagonists, D1R or D5R antisense oligonucleotides, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281, or the endocannabinoid transporter inhibitor VDM11. Systemic injection of SKF38393 and quinpirole together, but not each one alone, induced SII and increased PirC firing rate, which were blocked by D1R or D2R antagonist. Intra-PirC microinfusion of SKF38393 and quinpirole together, but not each one alone, also induced SII, which was blocked by D1R antisense oligonucleotides or D2R antagonist but not by D3R or D4R antagonist or D5R antisense oligonucleotides. SII induced by intra-PirC SKF38393/quinpirole was blocked by AM281 and enhanced by VDM11, whereas neither AM281 nor VDM11 alone affected social interaction behavior. Coadministration of SKF38393 and quinpirole produced anxiolytic effects without significant effects on locomotor activity, olfaction, and acquisition of olfactory short-term memory. These findings suggest that SII induced by coactivation of PirC D1R and D2R requires the endocannabinoid system.

  17. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  18. Combination of behaviorally sub-effective doses of glutamate NMDA and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impairs executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sagar J; Allman, Brian L; Rajakumar, Nagalingam

    2017-04-14

    Impairment of executive function is a core feature of schizophrenia. Preclinical studies indicate that injections of either N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) or dopamine D1 receptor blockers impair executive function. Despite the prevailing notion based on postmortem findings in schizophrenia that cortical areas have marked suppression of glutamate and dopamine, recent in vivo imaging studies suggest that abnormalities of these neurotransmitters in living patients may be quite subtle. Thus, we hypothesized that modest impairments in both glutamate and dopamine function can act synergistically to cause executive dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the effect of combined administration of "behaviorally sub-effective" doses of NMDA and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists on executive function. An operant conditioning-based set-shifting task was used to assess behavioral flexibility in rats that were systemically injected with NMDA and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists individually or in combination prior to task performance. Separate injections of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, and the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, at low doses did not impair set-shifting; however, the combined administration of these same behaviorally sub-effective doses of the antagonists significantly impaired the performance during set-shifting without affecting learning, retrieval of the memory of the initial rule, latency of responses or the number of omissions. The combined treatment also produced an increased number of perseverative errors. Our results indicate that NMDA and D1 receptor blockade act synergistically to cause behavioral inflexibility, and as such, subtle abnormalities in glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems may act cooperatively to cause deficits in executive function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction and their relationship with disease severity in children with atopic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, Ozkaya; Esra, Gursoy; Aysegül, Demir; Ufuk, Erenberk; Ayhan, Sogut; Rusen, Dundaroz M

    2012-09-30

    The involvement of autonomic imbalance has been reported in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the clinical severity of childhood asthma with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction and to define whether the severity of asthma correlates with ANS activity. In this case-control study, we evaluated the ANS activity by testing heart rate variability (HRV) and sympathetic skin response (SRR) in 77 asthmatic children, age 7-12 yrs, who had no co-morbidity and compared them with 40 gender- and age-matched control subjects. According to the severity of their asthma, study subjects were further divided into three groups: I (mild asthmatics), II (moderate asthmatics), and III (severe asthmatics). Inter-group ANS scale scores differed significantly (p<0.01) between Groups I and III and between Groups II and III. Combined use of HRV and SSR provides a higher degree of sensitivity for assessing disease severity in cases of pediatric asthma.

  20. Autologous Adipose Stem Cell Therapy for Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Two Young Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Ankur; Young, Jane; Butler, Ian. J.

    2017-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and neurocardiogenic syncope are clinical manifestations of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (dysautonomia) that can lead to impaired daily functions. We report two young patients presenting with dysautonomia and autoimmune disease who both received autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) infusions. This report is the first description of ASCs therapy for patients with combined dysautonomia and autoimmune disease. Case 1: A 21-year-old female presented at 12 years of age with escalating severe dysautonomia with weight loss and gastrointestinal symptoms. She had elevated autoantibodies and cytokines and received multiple immune modulation therapies. Her dysautonomia was treated by volume expanders, vasoconstrictors, and beta blockers with mild improvement. She received ASCs about 2 years before this report with dramatic improvement in her dysautonomia and autoimmune symptoms with a 10 kg weight gain. Case 2: A 7-year-old boy presented at 2 years of age with polyarthritis. At 5 years of age, he manifested orthostatic intolerance. He received immune modulatory therapies with mild improvement. He received ASCs and showed marked improvement of his dysautonomia and immune symptoms. Dysautonomia symptoms of these two patients improved significantly after modulation of autoimmune components by ASC therapy. Favorable clinical responses of these two cases warrant further case–control studies. PMID:27959743

  1. Treatment of Parkinson’s disease: nanostructured sol–gel silica–dopamine reservoirs for controlled drug release in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Tessy; Bata-García, José L; Esquivel, Dulce; Ortiz-Islas, Emma; Gonzalez, Richard; Ascencio, Jorge; Quintana, Patricia; Oskam, Gerko; Álvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have evaluated the use of silica–dopamine reservoirs synthesized by the sol–gel approach with the aim of using them in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, specifically as a device for the controlled release of dopamine in the striatum. Theoretical calculations illustrate that dopamine is expected to assume a planar structure and exhibit weak interactions with the silica surface. Methods Several samples were prepared by varying the wt% of dopamine added during the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The silica–dopamine reservoirs were characterized by N2 adsorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro release profiles were determined using ultraviolet visible absorbance spectroscopy. The textural analyses showed a maximum value for the surface area of 620 m2/g nanostructured silica materials. The stability of dopamine in the silica network was confirmed by infrared and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The reservoirs were evaluated by means of apomorphine-induced rotation behavior in hemiparkisonian rats. Results The in vitro dopamine delivery profiles indicate two regimes of release, a fast and sustained dopamine delivery was observed up to 24 hours, and after this time the rate of delivery became constant. Histologic analysis of formalin-fixed brains performed 24–32 weeks after reservoir implantation revealed that silica–dopamine implants had a reddish-brown color, suggesting the presence of oxidized dopamine, likely caused by the fixation procedure, while implants without dopamine were always translucent. Conclusion The major finding of the study was that intrastriatal silica–dopamine implants reversed the rotational asymmetry induced by apomorphine, a dopamine agonist, in hemiparkinsonian rats. No dyskinesias or other motor abnormalities were observed in animals implanted with silica or silica–dopamine. PMID:21289978

  2. Minireview: new roles for peripheral dopamine on metabolic control and tumor growth: let's seek the balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, Blanca; Maechler, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    In peripheral tissues, dopamine is released from neuronal cells and is synthesized within specific parenchyma. Dopamine released from sympathetic nerves predominantly contributes to plasma dopamine levels. Despite growing evidence for peripheral source and action of dopamine and the widespread expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral tissues, most studies have focused on functions of dopamine in the central nervous system. Symptoms of several brain disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and depression, are alleviated by pharmacological modulation of dopamine transmission. Regarding systemic disorders, the role of dopamine is still poorly understood. Here we describe the pioneering and recent evidence for functional roles of peripheral dopamine. Peripheral and central dopamine systems are sensitive to environmental stress, such as a high-fat diet, suggesting a basis of covariance of peripheral and central actions of dopaminergic agents. Given the extended use of such medications, it is crucial to better understand the integrated effects of dopamine in the whole organism. Delineation of peripheral and central dopaminergic mechanisms would facilitate targeted and safer use of drugs modulating dopamine action. We discuss the increasing evidence for a link between peripheral dopamine and obesity. This review also describes the recently uncovered protective actions of dopamine on energy metabolism and proliferation in tumoral cells.

  3. Dopamine and vascular dynamics control: present status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Amenta, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    The catecholamine dopamine is a precursors in the biosynthesis of norepinephrine and epinephrine as well as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Besides of its well known role of brain neurotransmitter, dopamine exerts specific functions at the periphery, being those at the level of the cardiovascular system and the kidney the most relevant. In fact it plays a role of modulator of blood pressure, sodium balance, and renal and adrenal functions through an independent peripheral dopaminergic system. In vivo administration or in vitro application of dopamine or of dopamine receptor agonists induce vasodilatation in the cerebral, coronary, renal and mesenteric vascular beds and cause hypotension. Moreover, dopamine stimulates cardiac contractility and induces diuresis and natriuresis. Dopamine probably plays a role in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport, vascular smooth muscle contractility and production of reactive oxygen species and by interacting with the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems. Dopamine exerts its actions via a class of cell surface receptors belonging to the rhodopsin-like family of G-protein coupled receptors. Dopamine receptors are classified into D1-like (D1 and D5) and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) subtypes based on their structure and pharmacology. Each of the dopamine receptor subtypes can participate in the regulation of blood pressure by specific mechanisms. Some receptors regulate blood pressure by influencing the central and/or autonomic nervous system; others influence epithelial transport and regulate the secretion and receptors of several humeral agents. This paper outlines the biochemistry, anatomical localization and physiology of the different dopamine receptors involved in the regulation of blood pressure, the relationship between dopamine receptor subtypes and hypertension and possibilities of modulating pharmacologically vascular dopamine receptor function.

  4. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    King, R; Barchas, J.D.; Huberman, B A

    1984-01-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of moo...

  5. Drosophila type IV collagen mutation associates with immune system activation and intestinal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Márton; Kiss, András A; Radics, Monika; Popovics, Nikoletta; Hermesz, Edit; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-01-01

    The basal lamina (BM) contains numerous components with a predominance of type IV collagens. Clinical manifestations associated with mutations of the human COL4A1 gene include perinatal cerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly, hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps (HANAC), ocular dysgenesis, myopathy, Walker–Warburg syndrome and systemic tissue degeneration. In Drosophila, the phenotype associated with dominant temperature sensitive mutations of col4a1 include severe myopathy resulting from massive degradation of striated muscle fibers, and in the gut, degeneration of circular visceral muscle cells and epithelial cells following detachment from the BM. In order to determine the consequences of altered BMfunctions due to aberrant COL4A1 protein, we have carried out a series of tests using Drosophila DTS-L3 mutants from our allelic series of col4a1 mutations with confirmed degeneration of various cell types and lowest survival rate among the col4a1 mutant lines at restrictive temperature. Results demonstrated epithelial cell degeneration in the gut, shortened gut, enlarged midgut with multiple diverticulae, intestinal dysfunction and shortened life span. Midgut immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed altered expression and distribution of BM components integrin PSI and PSII alpha subunits, laminin gamma 1, and COL4A1 both in larvae and adults. Global gene expression analysis revealed activation of the effector AMP genes of the primary innate immune system including Metchnikowin, Diptericin, Diptericin B, and edin that preceded morphological changes. Attacin::GFP midgut expression pattern further supported these changes. An increase in ROS production and changes in gut bacterial flora were also noted and may have further enhanced an immune response. The phenotypic features of Drosophila col4a1 mutants confirmed an essential role for type IV collagen in maintaining epithelial integrity, gut morphology and intestinal function and suggest that

  6. Connectivity, Pharmacology, and Computation: Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Neural System Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Cole, Michael W.; Repovs, Grega; Savic, Aleksandar; Driesen, Naomi R.; Yang, Genevieve; Cho, Youngsun T.; Murray, John D.; Glahn, David C.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and bipolar illness alter the structure and function of distributed neural networks. Functional neuroimaging tools have evolved sufficiently to reliably detect system-level disturbances in neural networks. This review focuses on recent findings in schizophrenia and bipolar illness using resting-state neuroimaging, an advantageous approach for biomarker development given its ease of data collection and lack of task-based confounds. These benefits notwithstanding, neuroimaging does not yet allow the evaluation of individual neurons within local circuits, where pharmacological treatments ultimately exert their effects. This limitation constitutes an important obstacle in translating findings from animal research to humans and from healthy humans to patient populations. Integrating new neuroscientific tools may help to bridge some of these gaps. We specifically discuss two complementary approaches. The first is pharmacological manipulations in healthy volunteers, which transiently mimic some cardinal features of psychiatric conditions. We specifically focus on recent neuroimaging studies using the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, to probe glutamate synaptic dysfunction associated with schizophrenia. Second, we discuss the combination of human pharmacological imaging with biophysically informed computational models developed to guide the interpretation of functional imaging studies and to inform the development of pathophysiologic hypotheses. To illustrate this approach, we review clinical investigations in addition to recent findings of how computational modeling has guided inferences drawn from our studies involving ketamine administration to healthy subjects. Thus, this review asserts that linking experimental studies in humans with computational models will advance to effort to bridge cellular, systems, and clinical neuroscience approaches to psychiatric disorders. PMID:24399974

  7. Connectivity, Pharmacology and Computation: Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Neural System Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eAnticevic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and bipolar illness alter the structure and function of distributed neural networks. Functional neuroimaging tools have evolved sufficiently to reliably detect system-level disturbances in neural networks. This review focuses on recent findings in schizophrenia and bipolar illness using resting-state neuroimaging, an advantageous approach for biomarker development given its ease of data collection and lack of task-based confounds. These benefits notwithstanding, neuroimaging does not yet allow the evaluation of individual neurons within local circuits, where pharmacological treatments ultimately exert their effects. This limitation constitutes an important obstacle in translating findings from animal research to humans and from healthy humans to patient populations. Integrating new neuroscientific tools may help to bridge some of these gaps. We specifically discuss two complementary approaches. The first is pharmacological manipulations in healthy volunteers, which transiently mimic some cardinal features of psychiatric conditions. We specifically focus on recent neuroimaging studies using the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, to probe glutamate synaptic dysfunction associated with schizophrenia. Second, we discuss the combination of human pharmacological imaging with biophysically-informed computational models developed to guide the interpretation of functional imaging studies and to inform the development of pathophysiologic hypotheses. To illustrate this approach, we review clinical investigations in addition to recent findings of how computational modeling has guided inferences drawn from our studies involving ketamine administration to healthy subjects. Thus, this review asserts that linking experimental studies in humans with computational models will advance to effort to bridge cellular, systems, and clinical neuroscience approaches to psychiatric disorders.

  8. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  9. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  10. You are what you eat: influence of type and amount of food consumed on central dopamine systems and the behavioral effects of direct- and indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Michelle G; Daws, Lynette C; France, Charles P

    2012-07-01

    The important role of dopamine (DA) in mediating feeding behavior and the positive reinforcing effects of some drugs is well recognized. Less widely studied is how feeding conditions might impact the sensitivity of drugs acting on DA systems. Food restriction, for example, has often been the focus of aging and longevity studies; however, other studies have demonstrated that mild food restriction markedly increases sensitivity to direct- and indirect-acting DA receptor agonists. Moreover, it is becoming clear that not only the amount of food, but the type of food, is an important factor in modifying the effects of drugs. Given the increased consumption of high fat and sugary foods, studies are exploring how consumption of highly palatable food impacts DA neurochemistry and the effects of drugs acting on these systems. For example, eating high fat chow increases sensitivity to some behavioral effects of direct- as well as indirect-acting DA receptor agonists. A compelling mechanistic possibility is that central DA pathways that mediate the effects of some drugs are regulated by one or more of the endocrine hormones (e.g. insulin) that undergo marked changes during food restriction or after consuming high fat or sugary foods. Although traditionally recognized as an important signaling molecule in regulating energy homeostasis, insulin can also regulate DA neurochemistry. Because direct- and indirect-acting DA receptor drugs are used therapeutically and some are abused, a better understanding of how food intake impacts response to these drugs would likely facilitate improved treatment of clinical disorders and provide information that would be relevant to the causes of vulnerability to abuse drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  11. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Donald A., E-mail: dafox@uh.edu [College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Hamilton, W. Ryan [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Jerry E. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX (United States); Xiao, Weimin [College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Miller, Diane B.; O' Callaghan, James P. [Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Research Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-NIOSH, Morgantown, WV USA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Gestational lead exposure (GLE) produces supernormal scotopic electroretinograms (ERG) in children, monkeys and rats, and a novel retinal phenotype characterized by an increased number of rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells in adult mice and rats. Since the loss of dopaminergic amacrine cells (DA ACs) in GLE monkeys and rats contributes to supernormal ERGs, the retinal DA system was analyzed in mice following GLE. C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to low (27 ppm), moderate (55 ppm) or high (109 ppm) lead throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10 (PN10). Blood [Pb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose GLE was {<=} 1, {<=} 10, {approx} 25 and {approx} 40 {mu}g/dL, respectively, on PN10 and by PN30 all were {<=} 1 {mu}g/dL. At PN60, confocal-stereology studies used vertical sections and wholemounts to characterize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and the number of DA and other ACs. GLE dose-dependently and selectively decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive (IR) DA ACs and their synaptic plexus without affecting GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic ACs. Immunoblots and confocal revealed dose-dependent decreases in retinal TH protein expression and content, although monoamine oxidase-A protein and gene expression were unchanged. High-pressure liquid chromatography showed that GLE dose-dependently decreased retinal DA content, its metabolites and DA utilization/release. The mechanism of DA selective vulnerability is unknown. However, a GLE-induced loss/dysfunction of DA ACs during development could increase the number of rods and bipolar cells since DA helps regulate neuronal proliferation, whereas during adulthood it could produce ERG supernormality as well as altered circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak [BPb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose newborn mice with gestational lead exposure: {<=} 1, {<=} 10, 25 and 40 {mu}g/dL Black

  12. Reduced Dopamine Transporter Availability and Neurocognitive Deficits in Male Patients with Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hung Yen

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays an important role in the development of alcohol dependence, cognitive dysfunction, and is regulated via dopamine transporter activity. Although dopamine transporter activity is critically involved in alcohol dependence, studies observing this relationship are limited. Thus the current study examined whether dopamine transporter availability is associated with developing of alcohol dependence and cognitive dysfunction. Brain imaging with 99mTc-TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure dopamine transporter availability among 26 male patients with pure alcohol dependence and 22 age- and sex- matched healthy volunteers. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ were administered to assess neurocognitive functioning and personality traits, respectively. Compared to healthy controls, patients with alcohol dependence showed a significant reduction in dopamine transporter availability (p < 0.001, as well as diminished performance on the WCST (p < 0.001. Dopamine transporter availability was negatively correlated with both total and perseverative WCST errors among healthy controls, but only patients with alcohol dependence showed a positive correlation between dopamine transporter availability and a harm avoidance personality profile. Thus, reductions in dopamine transporter availability may play a pathophysiological role in the development of pure alcohol dependence, given its association with neurocognitive deficits. Moreover, personality may influence the development of pure alcohol dependence; however, additional clinical subgroups should be examined to confirm this possibility.

  13. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, Jyrki; Tonnessen, Tor Inge

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT) during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly) gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs) are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP. PMID:28316860

  14. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP.

  15. Corticosterone regulates both naturally occurring and cocaine-induced dopamine signaling by selectively decreasing dopamine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Ebben, Amanda L; Kurtoglu, Beliz; Lovell, Marissa E; Bohn, Austin T; Jasek, Isabella A; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R; Gasser, Paul J; Wheeler, Robert A

    2017-10-01

    Stressful and aversive events promote maladaptive reward-seeking behaviors such as drug addiction by acting, in part, on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Using animal models, data from our lab and others show that stress and cocaine can interact to produce a synergistic effect on reward circuitry. This effect is also observed when the stress hormone corticosterone is administered directly into the nucleus accumbens (NAc), indicating that glucocorticoids act locally in dopamine terminal regions to enhance cocaine's effects on dopamine signaling. However, prior studies in behaving animals have not provided mechanistic insight. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, we examined the effect of systemic corticosterone on spontaneous dopamine release events (transients) in the NAc core and shell in behaving rats. A physiologically relevant systemic injection of corticosterone (2 mg/kg i.p.) induced an increase in dopamine transient amplitude and duration (both voltammetric measures sensitive to decreases in dopamine clearance), but had no effect on the frequency of transient release events. This effect was compounded by cocaine (2.5 mg/kg i.p.). However, a second experiment indicated that the same injection of corticosterone had no detectable effect on the dopaminergic encoding of a palatable natural reward (saccharin). Taken together, these results suggest that corticosterone interferes with naturally-occurring dopamine uptake locally, and this effect is a critical determinant of dopamine concentration specifically in situations in which the dopamine transporter is pharmacologically blocked by cocaine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annayya R Aroor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies support the notion that arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events contributing significantly to systolic hypertension, impaired ventricular-arterial coupling and diastolic dysfunction, impairment in myocardial oxygen supply and demand, and progression of kidney disease. Although arterial stiffness is associated with aging, it is accelerated in the presence of obesity and diabetes. The prevalence of arterial stiffness parallels the increase of obesity that is occurring in epidemic proportions and is partly driven by a sedentary life style and consumption of a high fructose, high salt and high fat western diet. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of arterial stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. The local tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS in the vascular tissue and immune cells and perivascular adipose tissue is recognized as an important element involved in endothelial dysfunction which contributes significantly to arterial stiffness. Activation of vascular RAAS is seen in humans and animal models of obesity and diabetes, and associated with enhanced oxidative stress and inflammation in the vascular tissue. The cross talk between angiotensin and aldosterone underscores the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors in modulation of insulin resistance, decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness. In addition, both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this local tissue activation of RAAS. In this review we will attempt to present a unifying mechanism of how environmental and immunological factors are involved in this local tissue RAAS activation, and the role of this process in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness and targeting tissue RAAS activation.

  17. Dopamine receptor expression and function in the normal and pathological hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pivonello (Rosario)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dopamine is the predominant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the human central nervous system, where it controls a variety of functions including cognition, emotion, locomotor activity, food intake and endocrine regulation. Dopamine also plays multiple roles in

  18. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain-striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear......]raclopride to measure dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand......, dopamine release coded uncertainty, we would find an inversely U-shaped function. The data supported an inverse U-shaped relation between striatal dopamine release and IGT performance if the pathological gambling group, but not in the healthy control group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis...

  19. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain—striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...... dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand......, dopamine release coded uncertainty, we would find an inversely U-shaped function. The data supported an inverse U-shaped relation between striatal dopamine release and IGT performance if the pathological gambling group, but not in the healthy control group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis...

  20. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain—striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...... dopamine release, and we used performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to determine overall reward and uncertainty. We hypothesized that we would find a linear function between dopamine release and IGT performance, if dopamine release coded reward in pathological gambling. If, on the other hand......, dopamine release coded uncertainty, we would find an inversely U-shaped function. The data supported an inverse U-shaped relation between striatal dopamine release and IGT performance if the pathological gambling group, but not in the healthy control group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis...

  1. Dopamine, vesicular transporters, and dopamine receptor expression in rat major salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Traini, Enea; Mancini, Manuele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Amenta, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The localization of dopamine stores and the expression and localization of dopamine (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) type-1 and -2 and of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes were investigated in rat submandibular, sublingual, and parotid salivary glands by HPLC with electrochemical detection, as well as immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Male Wistar rats of 2 mo of age were used. The highest dopamine levels were measured in the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and sublingual glands. Western blot analysis revealed DAT, VMAT-1, VMAT-2, and dopamine receptors immunoreactivity in membrane preparations obtained from the three glands investigated. Immunostaining for dopamine and transporters was developed within striated ducts. Salivary glands processed for dopamine receptors immunohistochemistry developed an immunoreaction primarily in striated and excretory ducts. In the submandibular gland, acinar cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for the D2 receptor, while cells of the convoluted granular tubules were negative for both D1-like and D2-like receptors. Parotid glands acinar cells displayed the highest immunoreactivity for both D1 and D2 receptors compared with other salivary glands. The above localization of dopamine and dopaminergic markers investigated did not correspond closely with neuron-specific enolase (NSE) localization. This indicates that at least in part, catecholamine stores and dopaminergic markers are independent from glandular innervation. These findings suggest that rat major salivary glands express a dopaminergic system probably involved in salivary secretion. The stronger immunoreactivity for dopamine transporters and receptors in striated duct cells suggests that the dopaminergic system could regulate not only quality, but also volume and ionic concentration of saliva.

  2. Regulation of blood pressure by dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Pedro A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A

    2003-01-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of blood pressure. Its actions on renal hemodynamics, epithelial transport and humoral agents such as aldosterone, catecholamines, endothelin, prolactin, pro-opiomelanocortin, renin and vasopressin place it in central homeostatic position for regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Dopamine also modulates fluid and sodium intake via actions in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract, and by regulation of cardiovascular centers that control the functions of the heart, arteries and veins. Abnormalities in dopamine production and receptor function accompany a high percentage of human essential hypertension and several forms of rodent genetic hypertension. Some dopamine receptor genes and their regulators are in loci linked to hypertension in humans and in rodents. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes that regulate dopamine receptors, alone or via the interaction with SNPs of genes that regulate the renin-angiotensin system, are associated with human essential hypertension. Each of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5) participates in the regulation of blood pressure by mechanisms specific for the subtype. Some receptors (D2 and D5) influence the central and/or peripheral nervous system; others influence epithelial transport and regulate the secretion and receptors of several humoral agents (e.g., the D1, D3 and D4 receptors interact with the renin-angiotensin system). Modifications of the usual actions of the receptor can produce blood pressure changes. In addition, abnormal functioning of these dopamine receptor subtypes impairs their antioxidant function.

  3. Hypothalamic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common causes of hypothalamic dysfunction are surgery, traumatic brain injury, tumors, and radiation. Other causes include: Anorexia nervosa or bulimia Bleeding Genetic disorders that cause iron ...

  4. Reinforcement signalling in Drosophila; dopamine does it all after all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Reinforcement systems are believed to drive synaptic plasticity within neural circuits that store memories. Recent evidence from the fruit fly suggests that anatomically distinct dopaminergic neurons ultimately provide the key instructive signals for both appetitive and aversive learning. This dual role for dopamine overturns the previous model that octopamine signalled reward and dopamine punishment. More importantly, this anatomically segregated double role for dopamine in reward and aversion mirrors that emerging in mammals. Therefore, an antagonistic organization of distinct reinforcing dopaminegic neurons is a conserved feature of brains. It now seems crucial to understand how the dopaminergic neurons are controlled and what the released dopamine does to the underlying circuits to convey opposite valence.

  5. Reward-based hypertension control by a synthetic brain–dopamine interface

    OpenAIRE

    Rossger, K.; Charpin-El Hamri, G.; Fussenegger, M

    2013-01-01

    Essential activities such as feeding and reproduction as well as social, emotional, and mental behavior are reinforced by the brain’s reward system. Pleasure status directly correlates with dopamine levels released in the brain. Because dopamine leaks into the bloodstream via the sympathetic nervous system, brain and blood dopamine levels are interrelated. We designed a synthetic dopamine sensor-effector device that enables engineered human cells, insulated by immunoprotective microcontainers...

  6. Dopamins renale virkninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1990-01-01

    Dopamine is an endogenic catecholamine which, in addition to being the direct precursor of noradrenaline, has also an effect on peripheral dopaminergic receptors. These are localized mainly in the heart, splanchnic nerves and the kidneys. Dopamine is produced in the kidneys and the renal metaboli...... dialysis unnecessary in a number of patients on account of increased diuresis and natriuresis. The effect of GFR and the significance for the prognosis are not known....

  7. Elevated tonic extracellular dopamine concentration and altered dopamine modulation of synaptic activity precede dopamine loss in the striatum of mice overexpressing human α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoa A; Wu, Nanping; Cely, Ingrid; Kelly, Rachel L; Hean, Sindalana; Richter, Franziska; Magen, Iddo; Cepeda, Carlos; Ackerson, Larry C; Walwyn, Wendy; Masliah, Eliezer; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Levine, Michael S; Maidment, Nigel T

    2011-07-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-synuclein (α-Syn), a protein associated with presynaptic vesicles, causes familial forms of Parkinson's disease in humans and is also associated with sporadic forms of the disease. We used in vivo microdialysis, tissue content analysis, behavioral assessment, and whole-cell patch clamp recordings from striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSSNs) in slices to examine dopamine transmission and dopaminergic modulation of corticostriatal synaptic function in mice overexpressing human wild-type α-Syn under the Thy1 promoter (α-Syn mice). Tonic striatal extracellular dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine levels were elevated in α-Syn mice at 6 months of age, prior to any reduction in total striatal tissue content, and were accompanied by an increase in open-field activity. Dopamine clearance and amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux were unchanged. The frequency of MSSN spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was lower in α-Syn mice. Amphetamine reduced sEPSC frequency in wild types (WTs) but produced no effect in α-Syn mice. Furthermore, whereas quinpirole reduced and sulpiride increased sEPSC frequency in WT mice, they produced the opposite effects in α-Syn mice. These observations indicate that overexpression of α-Syn alters dopamine efflux and D2 receptor modulation of corticostriatal glutamate release at a young age. At 14 months of age, the α-Syn mice presented with significantly lower striatal tissue dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase content relative to WT littermates, accompanied by an L-DOPA-reversible sensory motor deficit. Together, these data further validate this transgenic mouse line as a slowly progressing model of Parkinson's disease and provide evidence for early dopamine synaptic dysfunction prior to loss of striatal dopamine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction in acute nonmycobacterial infections of central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Acute and chronic central nervous system (CNS infections are not uncommon in tropical countries and are associated with high morbidity and mortality if specific targeted therapy is not instituted in time. Effects of tubercular meningitis, a form of chronic meningitis on hypothalamic pituitary axis, are well known both at the time of diagnosis and after few months to years of illness. However, there are few reports of pituitary dysfunction in subjects with acute CNS infections. Therefore, this study was aimed at evaluating the pituitary hormonal profile in patients with nonmycobacterial acute meningitis at the time of presentation. Materials and Methods: This prospective case series study included 30 untreated adult patients with acute meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis, due to various nonmycobacterial agents, admitted and registered with Lok Nayak Hospital, Maulana Aazd Medical College, New Delhi, between September 2007 and March 2009. Patients with preexisting endocrine diseases, tubercular meningitis and patients on steroids were carefully excluded from the study. The basal pituitary hormonal profile was measured by the electrochemilumniscence technique for serum cortisol, luetinizing hormone (LH, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH, prolactin (PRL, thyrotropin (TSH, free tri-iodothyronine (fT3, and free thyroxine (fT4. Results: The cases (n = 30 comprised of patients with acute pyogenic meningitis (n = 23, viral meningoencephalitis (n = 4, brain abscess (n = 2, and cryptococcal meningitis (n = 1. The mean age of patients was 28.97 ± 11.306 years. Out of 30 patients, 14 (46.7% were males and 16 (58.1% were females. Adrenal insufficiency both absolute and relative was seen in seven (23.3% and hyperprolactinemia was seen in nine (30.0% of the patients. One study subject had central hypothyroidism and seven (23.3 showed low levels of LH and/or FSH. None of patients showed clinical features suggestive of

  9. Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome and other psychiatric problems in Parkinson’s Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Ertan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In a small number of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, a series of behavioral disorders included within the spectrum of impulsive-compulsive disorders develop under the dopamine replacement therapy (DRT. These behaviors are grouped into three as “impulse control disorders (ICD” characterized by rewards-seeking behaviors, “punding” characterized by aimless, ritualist stereotypical repetative behaviors, and “dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS” characterized by drug overuse due to chemical addiction. The prevalance of DDS in PD was reported to be around 3-4%. Patients with DDS have an urge to increase their dopaminergic doses beyond their needs for parkinsonien symptoms. DDS is reported to be more common especially in patients with an early onset of disease, high doses of DRT, previous history of or current depression, history of alcohol or substance abuse, and in those having impulsive personality constantly seeking for a change or novelty. DDS is commonly observed in association with “punding” and ICD. The pathophysiology underlying these disorders is explained by specific mechanisms in addition to DRT. Dopamine is not only responsible in the control of the movement, but also plays an important role in the modulation of brain reward systems. The potential maladaptive dysfunction of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system underlies the pathogenesis of DDS. Although the most potent trigger of DDS in PD is known as L-dopa, subcutaneous apomorphine and oral dopamine agonists could also be responsible from the development of DDS. The patients and caregivers should be informed for these behavioral disorders that might emerge under DRT, the possible risk factors should be questioned before dopaminergic therapy, and the choice of drug should be made under these concerns. In patients with DDS, fast-acting DRT formulations should be avoided. In DDS cases associated with hypomaniac or psychotic episodes, treatment should made with

  10. Scoring System for Multiple Organ Dysfunction in Adult Horses with Acute Surgical Gastrointestinal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McConachie, E.; Giguère, S; Barton, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in horses with acute surgical gastrointestinal (GI) disease is unknown. Currently, there are no validated criteria to confirm MODS in adult horses. Objectives To develop criteria for a MODS score for horses with acute surgical colic (MODS SGI) and evaluate the association with 6‐month survival. To compare the MODS SGI score with a MODS score extrapolated from criteria used in people (MODS EQ). Animals Adult horses that re...

  11. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A Urra

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT, serotonin (SERT and norepinephrine (NET transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylaminostyryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+, as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909 and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  12. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT) in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urra, Javier A; Villaroel-Espíndola, Franz; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  13. Absence of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons attenuates dopamine release but not conditioned approach during Pavlovian conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jones G; Zweifel, Larry S; Clark, Jeremy J; Evans, Scott B; Phillips, Paul E M; Palmiter, Richard D

    2010-07-27

    During Pavlovian conditioning, phasic dopamine (DA) responses emerge to reward-predictive stimuli as the subject learns to anticipate reward delivery. This observation has led to the hypothesis that phasic dopamine signaling is important for learning. To assess the ability of mice to develop anticipatory behavior and to characterize the contribution of dopamine, we used a food-reinforced Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. As mice learned the cue-reward association, they increased their head entries to the food receptacle in a pattern that was consistent with conditioned anticipatory behavior. D1-receptor knockout (D1R-KO) mice had impaired acquisition, and systemic administration of a D1R antagonist blocked both the acquisition and expression of conditioned approach in wild-type mice. To assess the specific contribution of phasic dopamine transmission, we tested mice lacking NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) exclusively in dopamine neurons (NR1-KO mice). Surprisingly, NR1-KO mice learned at the same rate as their littermate controls. To evaluate the contribution of NMDARs to phasic dopamine release in this paradigm, we performed fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens of awake mice. Despite having significantly attenuated phasic dopamine release following reward delivery, KO mice developed cue-evoked dopamine release at the same rate as controls. We conclude that NMDARs in dopamine neurons enhance but are not critical for phasic dopamine release to behaviorally relevant stimuli; furthermore, their contribution to phasic dopamine signaling is not necessary for the development of cue-evoked dopamine or anticipatory activity in a D1R-dependent Pavlovian conditioning paradigm.

  14. The dysfunctional consequences of a performance measurement system: the case of the Iranian national hospital grading programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryankhesal, Aidin; Sheldon, Trevor A; Mannion, Russell; Mahdipour, Saeade

    2015-07-01

    Performance measurement systems are increasingly used to reward and improve provider performance. However, such initiatives may also inadvertently induce a range of unintended and dysfunctional side-effects. This study explores the unintended and adverse consequences induced by the Iranian national hospital grading programme, which incorporates financial incentives for meeting nationally defined standards. We interviewed key informants across four key groups with a legitimate interest in healthcare performance: four purposively selected hospitals; four health insurance organizations; the Iranian hospital accreditation body; and one grading agency. The transcribed interviews and field notes were analysed thematically, and subsequently, member checking was conducted. Seven dysfunctional consequences were identified: misrepresentation of data by hospitals; increased anxiety and stress among hospital employees; tunnel vision; financial pressures on poorly graded hospitals; incentives to purchase unnecessary equipment; erosion of public trust; and restricting access to hospital services by patients. These were caused by the way the grading system was implemented: poor standards of audit; the way in which the audit process was conducted; and the timing of audits. The pay for performance element of the grading system and the focus on structural aspects in the standards made improvement in grading particularly difficult for those hospitals that had been assessed as under-performing. Although the Iranian hospital grading system has resulted in a significant increase in the adoption of national standards, it has nevertheless induced a range of perverse outcomes. To mitigate these requires further refinement and recalibration of the system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Dampened Amphetamine-Stimulated Behavior and Altered Dopamine Transporter Function in the Absence of Brain GDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Jaakko J; Panhelainen, Anne; Af Bjerkén, Sara; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Varendi, Kärt; Olfat, Soophie; Montonen, Heidi; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2017-02-08

    Midbrain dopamine neuron dysfunction contributes to various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. Because of its well established dopaminotrophic effects, the therapeutic potential of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been studied extensively in various disorders with disturbed dopamine homeostasis. However, the outcomes from preclinical and clinical studies vary, highlighting a need for a better understanding of the physiological role of GDNF on striatal dopaminergic function. Nevertheless, the current lack of appropriate animal models has limited this understanding. Therefore, we have generated novel mouse models to study conditional Gdnf deletion in the CNS during embryonic development and reduction of striatal GDNF levels in adult mice via AAV-Cre delivery. We found that both of these mice have reduced amphetamine-induced locomotor response and striatal dopamine efflux. Embryonic GDNF deletion in the CNS did not affect striatal dopamine levels or dopamine release, but dopamine reuptake was increased due to increased levels of both total and synaptic membrane-associated dopamine transporters. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous GDNF plays an important role in regulating the function of dopamine transporters in the striatum.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Delivery of ectopic glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes the function, plasticity, and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the dysfunction of which contributes to various neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, how the deletion or reduction of GDNF in the CNS affects the function of dopaminergic neurons has remained unknown. Using conditional Gdnf knock-out mice, we found that endogenous GDNF affects striatal dopamine homeostasis and regulates amphetamine-induced behaviors by regulating the level and function of dopamine transporters. These data regarding the physiological role of GDNF are

  16. A dopamine-secreting pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Minami, M; Kano, H; Ohhira, M; Nakamura, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-01-01

    We describe a patient with pheochromocytoma, which secretes dopamine. He was admitted to hospital because of chronic diarrhea. After surgical resection of the tumor, dramatic cessation of the diarrhea and blood pressure elevation were observed. Decreased expression of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the tumor was considered a possible mechanism of producing a pathophysiological concentration of dopamine. This case shows that excessive excretion of dopamine, a vasodilative hormone, may affect blood pressure.

  17. Dopamine induces neutrophil apoptosis through a dopamine D-1 receptor-independent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sookhai, S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: For the normal resolution of an acute inflammatory response, neutrophil (PMN) apoptosis is essential to maintain immune homeostasis and to limit inappropriate host tissue damage. A delay in PMN apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Dopamine, a biogenic amine with known cardiovascular and neurotransmitter properties, is used in patients with SIRS to maintain hemodynamic stability. We sought to determine whether dopamine may also have immunoregulatory properties capable of influencing PMN apoptosis, function, and activation state in patients with SIRS. METHODS: PMNs were isolated from healthy volunteers and patients with SIRS and treated with varying doses of dopamine and a dopamine D-1 receptor agonist, fenoldopam. PMN apoptosis was assessed every 6 hours with use of propidium iodide DNA staining and PMN function was assessed with use of respiratory burst activity, phagocytosis ability, and CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 receptor expression as functional markers. RESULTS: There was a significant delay in PMN apotosis in patients with SIRS compared with controls. Treatment of isolated PMNs from both healthy controls and patients with SIRS with 10 and 100 mumol\\/L dopamine induced apoptosis. PMN ingestive and cytocidal capacity were both decreased in patients with SIRS compared with controls. Treatment with dopamine significantly increased phagocytic function. Fenoldopam did not induce PMN apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate for the first time that dopamine induces PMN apoptosis and modulates PMN function both in healthy controls and in patients with SIRS. These results indicate that dopamine may be beneficial during SIRS through a nonhemodynamic PMN-dependent proapoptotic mechanism.

  18. Mu-wave activity in schizophrenia: Evidence of a dysfunctional mirror neuron system from an Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantanava Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ′mirror-neuron system′ is thought to play an important role in automatic decoding of biological motions and interpretation of socially adaptive environmental stimuli. Accordingly, a dysfunction in this system in schizophrenia has been hypothesised to mediate the psychotic manifestations. Materials and Methods: As a part of an ongoing study, we evaluated the mirror neuron system using ′EEG mu-wave (8-13 Hz suppression′ paradigm in 15 drug naïve/drug free patients and compared the working to 15 age, sex and education matched controls. We also correlated the psychopathology scores on PANSS with the mu wave suppression in the schizophrenia patients, at baseline. We used high (192-channel resolution EEG to record the mu rhythm while the subjects watched alternating sequences of a socially-relevant biological motion and white visual-noise on a custom made video-clip. Results: We found a significant difference in the degree of mu wave suppression between the two groups. We also found that the degree of mu suppression over right sensorimotor cortex at presentation correlated significantly and negatively with thought disorder in the patient group, and had a strong linear relationship. Conclusion: This study replicates past findings regarding a dysfunctional mirror neuron system in schizophrenia patients, and also emphasizes the role of rMNS in schizophrenic thought disorders.

  19. Extracellular dopamine and alterations on dopamine transporter are related to reserpine toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckziegel, Patrícia; Chen, Pan; Caito, Sam; Gubert, Priscila; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fachinetto, Roselei; Aschner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Reserpine is used as an animal model of parkinsonism. We hypothesized that the involuntary movements induced by reserpine in rodents are induced by dopaminergic toxicity caused by extracellular dopamine accumulation. The present study tested the effects of reserpine on the dopaminergic system in Caenorhabditis elegans. Reserpine was toxic to worms (decreased the survival, food intake, development and changed egg laying and defecation cycles). In addition, reserpine increased the worms' locomotor rate on food and decreased dopamine levels. Morphological evaluations of dopaminergic CEP neurons confirmed neurodegeneration characterized by decreased fluorescence intensity and the number of worms with intact CEP neurons, and increased number of shrunken somas per worm. These effects were unrelated to reserpine's effect on decreased expression of the dopamine transporter, dat-1. Interestingly, the locomotor rate on food and the neurodegenerative parameters fully recovered to basal conditions upon reserpine withdrawal. Furthermore, reserpine decreased survival in vesicular monoamine transporter and dat-1 loss-of-function mutant worms. In addition, worms pre-exposed to dopamine followed by exposure to reserpine had decreased survival. Reserpine activated gst-4, which controls a phase II detoxification enzymes downstream of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2. Our findings establish that the dopamine transporter, dat-1, plays an important role in reserpine toxicity, likely by increasing extracellular dopamine concentrations.

  20. Role of purinergic P2X4 receptors in regulating striatal dopamine homeostasis and dependent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Sheraz; Shah, Vivek; Garcia, Damaris; Asatryan, Liana; Jakowec, Michael W; Davies, Daryl L

    2016-10-01

    Purinergic P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) belong to the P2X superfamily of ion channels regulated by ATP. We recently demonstrated that P2X4R knockout (KO) mice exhibited deficits in sensorimotor gating, social interaction, and ethanol drinking behavior. Dopamine (DA) dysfunction may underlie these behavioral changes, but there is no direct evidence for P2X4Rs' role in DA neurotransmission. To test this hypothesis, we measured markers of DA function and dependent behaviors in P2X4R KO mice. P2X4R KO mice exhibited altered density of pre-synaptic markers including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter; post-synaptic markers including dopamine receptors and phosphorylation of downstream targets including dopamine and cyclic-AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and cyclic-AMP-response element binding protein in different parts of the striatum. Ivermectin, an allosteric modulator of P2X4Rs, significantly affected dopamine and cyclic AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and extracellular regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation in the striatum. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine model of DA depletion, P2X4R KO mice exhibited an attenuated levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior, whereas ivermectin enhanced this behavior. Collectively, these findings identified an important role for P2X4Rs in maintaining DA homeostasis and illustrate how this association is important for CNS functions including motor control and sensorimotor gating. We propose that P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) regulate dopamine (DA) homeostasis and associated behaviors. Pre-synaptic and post-synaptic DA markers were significantly altered in the dorsal and ventral striatum of P2X4R KO mice, implicating altered DA neurotransmission. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Ivermectin (IVM), a positive modulator of P2X4Rs, enhanced levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior. These studies highlight potential

  1. In-line Filtration Decreases Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Renal and Hematologic Dysfunction in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Michael; Dziuba, Friederike; Jack, Thomas; Köditz, Harald; Kaussen, Torsten; Bertram, Harald; Beerbaum, Philipp; Boehne, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently leads to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with concomitant organ malfunction. Infused particles may exacerbate inflammatory syndromes since they activate the coagulation cascade and alter inflammatory response or microvascular perfusion. In a randomized, controlled, prospective trial, we have previously shown that particle-retentive in-line filtration prevented major complications in critically ill children. Now, we investigated the effect of in-line filtration on major complications in the subgroup of cardiac patients. Children admitted to tertiary pediatric intensive care unit were randomized to either control or filter group obtaining in-line filtration throughout complete infusion therapy. Risk differences and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of several complications such as SIRS, sepsis, mortality, various organ failure and dysfunction were compared between both groups using the Wald method. 305 children (n = 150 control, n = 155 filter group) with cardiac diseases were finally analyzed. The majority was admitted after cardiac surgery with CPB. Risk of SIRS (-11.3 %; 95 % CI -21.8 to -0.5 %), renal (-10.0 %; 95 % CI -17.0 to -3.0 %) and hematologic (-8.1 %; 95 % CI -14.2 to -0.2 %) dysfunction were significantly decreased within the filter group. No risk differences were demonstrated for occurrence of sepsis, any other organ failure or dysfunctions between both groups. Infused particles might aggravate a systemic hypercoagulability and inflammation with subsequent organ malfunction in pediatric cardiac intensive care patients. Particle-retentive in-line filtration might be effective in preventing SIRS and maintaining renal and hematologic function. In-line filtration offers a novel therapeutic option to decrease morbidity in cardiac intensive care.

  2. Tuberoinfundibular transport of intrahypothalamic-administered dopamine in normo- and hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The dopamine transport system in the tuberoinfundibular tract of the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated. The results show that the rate of dopamine transport in this tract is strain-specific. SD rats transported twice as much dopamine (in 30 minutes) as WKY and SHR. The dopamine transport system in the SHR, being at par with that of the WKY, remained intact. These findings suggest that hypertension and the alleged reduced central dopaminergic activity in the SHR is not related to the transport of dopamine in the tuberoinfundibular tract.

  3. Renal Dopamine Receptors, Oxidative Stress, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Armando; Van Anthony Villar; Pedro A. Jose; Santiago Cuevas

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R) results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxi...

  4. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties - which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to two hours. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, non-electrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sucrose reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sucrose-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify up-regulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  5. A microchip-based flow injection-amperometry system with mercaptopropionic acid modified electroless gold microelectrode for the selective determination of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Luo, Jie; Chen, Hengwu; He, Qiaohong; Gan, Nin; Li, Tianhua

    2008-09-12

    A novel chip-based flow injection analysis (FIA) system has been developed for automatic, rapid and selective determination of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). The system is composed of a polycarbonate (PC) microfluidic chip with an electrochemical detector (ED), a gravity pump, and an automatic sample loading and injection unit. The selectivity of the ED was improved by modification of the gold working microelectrode, which was fabricated on the PC chip by UV-directed electroless gold plating, with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Postplating treatment methods for cleaning the surface of electroless gold microelectrodes were investigated to ensure the formation of high quality SAMs. The effects of detection potential, flow rate, and sampling volume on the performance of the chip-based FIA system were studied. Under optimum conditions, a detection limit of 74 nmol L(-1) for DA was achieved at the sample throughput rate of 180 h(-1). A RSD of 0.9% for peak heights was observed for 19 runs of a 100 micromol L(-1) DA solution. Interference-free determination of DA could be conducted if the concentration ratio of AA-DA was no more than 10.

  6. ILLICIT DOPAMINE TRANSIENTS: RECONCILING ACTIONS OF ABUSED DRUGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Garris, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phasic increases in brain dopamine are required for cue-directed reward seeking. While compelling within the framework of appetitive behavior, the view that illicit drugs hijack reward circuits by hyper-activating these dopamine transients is inconsistent with established psychostimulant pharmacology. However, recent work reclassifying amphetamine (AMPH), cocaine, and other addictive dopamine-transporter inhibitors (DAT-Is) supports transient hyper-activation as a unifying hypothesis of abused drugs. We argue here that reclassification also identifies generating burst firing by dopamine neurons as a keystone action. Unlike natural rewards, which are processed by sensory systems, drugs act directly on the brain. Consequently, to mimic natural reward and exploit reward circuits, dopamine transients must be elicited de novo. Of available drug targets, only burst firing achieves this essential outcome. PMID:24656971

  7. Tamoxifen and its active metabolites inhibit dopamine transporter function independently of the estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelman, Sarah R; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2017-04-01

    As one of the primary mechanisms by which dopamine signaling is regulated, the dopamine transporter (DAT) is an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of diseases based in dopaminergic dysfunction. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that the commonly prescribed breast cancer therapeutic tamoxifen and its major metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, inhibit DAT function. Tamoxifen inhibits [(3) H]dopamine uptake into human DAT (hDAT)-N2A cells via an uncompetitive or mixed mechanism. Endoxifen, an active metabolite of tamoxifen, asymmetrically inhibits DAT function in hDAT-N2A cells, showing a preference for the inhibition of amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux as compared to dopamine uptake. Importantly, we demonstrate that the effects of tamoxifen and its metabolites on the DAT occur independently of its activity as selective estrogen receptor modulators. This work suggests that tamoxifen is inhibiting DAT function through a previously unidentified mechanism. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Monitoring axonal and somatodendritic dopamine release using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2013-01-01

    Brain dopamine pathways serve wide-ranging functions including the control of movement, reward, cognition, learning, and mood. Consequently, dysfunction of dopamine transmission has been implicated in clinical conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Establishing factors that regulate dopamine release can provide novel insights into dopaminergic communication under normal conditions, as well as in animal models of disease in the brain. Here we describe methods for the study of somatodendritic and axonal dopamine release in brain slice preparations. Topics covered include preparation and calibration of carbon-fiber microelectrodes for use with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, preparation of midbrain and forebrain slices, and procedures of eliciting and recording electrically evoked dopamine release from in vitro brain slices.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Dopamine Release by Nicotine and Dopamine D1 Receptor Ligands: An In Vitro Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Study in Rat Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutier, W; Lowry, J P; McCreary, A C; O'Connor, J J

    2016-05-01

    Nicotine is a highly addictive drug and exerts this effect partially through the modulation of dopamine release and increasing extracellular dopamine in regions such as the brain reward systems. Nicotine acts in these regions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The effect of nicotine on the frequency dependent modulation of dopamine release is well established and the purpose of this study was to investigate whether dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) ligands have an influence on this. Using fast cyclic voltammetry and rat corticostriatal slices, we show that D1R ligands are able to modulate the effect of nicotine on dopamine release. Nicotine (500 nM) induced a decrease in dopamine efflux at low frequency (single pulse or five pulses at 10 Hz) and an increase at high frequency (100 Hz) electrical field stimulation. The D1R agonist SKF-38393, whilst having no effect on dopamine release on its own or on the effect of nicotine upon multiple pulse evoked dopamine release, did significantly prevent and reverse the effect of nicotine on single pulse dopamine release. Interestingly similar results were obtained with the D1R antagonist SCH-23390. In this study we have demonstrated that the modulation of dopamine release by nicotine can be altered by D1R ligands, but only when evoked by single pulse stimulation, and are likely working via cholinergic interneuron driven dopamine release.

  10. Nuclear factor of activated T cells regulates neutrophil recruitment, systemic inflammation, and T-cell dysfunction in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Wang, Yongzhi; Gomez, Maria F; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The signaling mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment, systemic inflammation, and T-cell dysfunction in polymicrobial sepsis are not clear. This study explored the potential involvement of the calcium/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), in abdominal sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) triggered NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity in the lung, spleen, liver, and aorta in NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. Treatment with the NFAT inhibitor A-285222 prior to CLP completely prevented sepsis-induced NFAT activation in all these organs. Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced sepsis-induced formation of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL5 chemokines and edema as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Notably, NFAT inhibition efficiently reduced the CLP-evoked increases in HMBG1, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and CXCL5 levels in plasma. Moreover, administration of A-285222 restored sepsis-induced T-cell dysfunction, as evidenced by markedly decreased apoptosis and restored proliferative capacity of CD4 T cells. Along these lines, treatment with A-285222 restored gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IL-4 levels in the spleen, which were markedly reduced in septic mice. CLP-induced formation of regulatory T cells (CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) in the spleen was also abolished in A-285222-treated animals. All together, these novel findings suggest that NFAT is a powerful regulator of pathological inflammation and T-cell immune dysfunction in abdominal sepsis. Thus, our data suggest that NFAT signaling might be a useful target to protect against respiratory failure and immunosuppression in patients with sepsis.

  11. Anatomical evaluation of penile venous system by CT cavernosography in patients with erectile dysfunction and venous leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Famili

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erectile dysfunction is an important problem in men and an organic cause is found in about 50% of cases. When a vasculogenic etiology is suspected, imaging assessments are of great help. Cavernosography is traditionally recognized as an imaging modality for evaluation of venous leakage in men with impotency. We employed CT cavernosography as a novel technique for demonstrating penile venous anatomy and leaking veins.Methods: In the present case series study, we recruited 45 patients with erectile dysfunction by convenient sampling at Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during one year (1390. The patients had previously been diagnosed with venous incompetency by Doppler study. After intracavernosal injection of prostaglandin E1, we injected sterile normal saline into the corpora cavernosa to achieve penile erection. Later, we injected contrast media into the corpus cavernosum, which was followed by CT scan of the penis and pelvic area to show the venous anatomy and leakage sites.Results: The mean age of the patients was 35.8±8.9 years. 36 (80% patients had venous leakage in crural veins, 27 (60% in cavernosal veins, 27 (60% in circumflex veins, 24 (52.3% in urethral veins, 21 (46.7% in deep dorsal vein, 3 (6.7% in para-arterial veins and 3 (6.7% in corpus spongiosum. Conclusion: The results of this study show the high prevalence of venous leakage in patients referring for erectile dysfunction. Moreover, CT cavernosography was shown to be a useful method for evaluating penile venous system and its related leakage sites which are important for surgical planning.

  12. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes.

  13. The Aversive Agent Lithium Chloride Suppresses Phasic Dopamine Release Through Central GLP-1 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Samantha M; Chartoff, Elena H; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2016-01-01

    Unconditioned rewarding stimuli evoke phasic increases in dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) while discrete aversive stimuli elicit pauses in dopamine neuron firing and reductions in NAc dopamine concentration. The unconditioned effects of more prolonged aversive states on dopamine release dynamics are not well understood and are investigated here using the malaise-inducing agent lithium chloride (LiCl). We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure phasic increases in NAc dopamine resulting from electrical stimulation of dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Systemic LiCl injection reduced electrically evoked dopamine release in the NAc of both anesthetized and awake rats. As some behavioral effects of LiCl appear to be mediated through glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation, we hypothesized that the suppression of phasic dopamine by LiCl is GLP-1R dependent. Indeed, peripheral pretreatment with the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9) potently attenuated the LiCl-induced suppression of dopamine. Pretreatment with Ex-9 did not, however, affect the suppression of phasic dopamine release by the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, salvinorin A, supporting a selective effect of GLP-1R stimulation in LiCl-induced dopamine suppression. By delivering Ex-9 to either the lateral or fourth ventricle, we highlight a population of central GLP-1 receptors rostral to the hindbrain that are involved in the LiCl-mediated suppression of NAc dopamine release. PMID:26211731

  14. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-03-10

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  15. Erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  16. The Feasibility of Using CT-Guided ROI for Semiquantifying Striatal Dopamine Transporter Availability in a Hybrid SPECT/CT System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chin Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid SPECT/CT system provides accurate coregistration of functional and morphological images. CT-guided region of interest (ROI for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter (DAT availability may be a feasible method. We therefore assessed the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of manual SPECT and CT-guided ROI methods and compared their semiquantitative data with data from MRI-guided ROIs. We enrolled twenty-eight patients who underwent Tc-99m TRODAT-1 brain SPECT/CT and brain MRI. ROIs of the striatal, caudate, putamen, and occipital cortex were manually delineated on the SPECT, CT, and MRI. ROIs from CT and MRI were transferred to the coregistered SPECT for semiquantification. The striatal, caudate, and putamen nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND were calculated. Using CT-guided ROIs had higher intra- and interobserver concordance correlation coefficients, closer Bland-Altman biases to zero, and narrower limits of agreement than using manual SPECT ROIs. The correlation coefficients of striatal, caudate, and putamen BPND were good between manual SPECT and MRI-guided ROI methods and even better between CT-guided and MRI-guided ROI methods. Conclusively, CT-guided ROI delineation for semiquantifying striatal DAT availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system is highly reproducible, and the semiquantitative data correlate well with data from MRI-guided ROIs.

  17. Trivalent copper chelate-luminol chemiluminescence system for highly sensitive CE detection of dopamine in biological sample after clean-up using SPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Ying; Xie, Haoyue; Fu, Zhifeng

    2012-06-01

    A transition metal chelate unstable at a high oxidation state, diperiodatocuprate (III) (K₅[Cu(HIO₆)₂], DPC), was synthesized and applied in the luminol-based chemiluminescence (CL) system for highly sensitive CE end-column detection of dopamine (DA). This method was based on the fact that DA enhanced the CL emission resulting from the reaction between luminol and DPC in alkaline medium. The DPC-luminol-DA CL system showed very intensive emission and very fast kinetic characteristics, thus resulting in a high sensitivity in flow-through detection mode for CE. Under optimal conditions, the linear range was 1.0 × 10⁻⁸-5.0 × 10⁻⁵ g/mL (R² = 0.9984) with a limit of detection of 6.0 × 10⁻⁹ g/mL (S/N = 3). The RSDs of the peak height and the migration time were about 4.2 and 2.4% for a standard sample at 3.0 × 10⁻⁶ g/mL (n = 5), respectively. The presented method has been successfully used for the determination of DA in commercial preparation and human urine samples after clean-up using SPE.

  18. The feasibility of using CT-guided ROI for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Chin; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Che; Tang, Shu-Wen; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid SPECT/CT system provides accurate coregistration of functional and morphological images. CT-guided region of interest (ROI) for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability may be a feasible method. We therefore assessed the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of manual SPECT and CT-guided ROI methods and compared their semiquantitative data with data from MRI-guided ROIs. We enrolled twenty-eight patients who underwent Tc-99m TRODAT-1 brain SPECT/CT and brain MRI. ROIs of the striatal, caudate, putamen, and occipital cortex were manually delineated on the SPECT, CT, and MRI. ROIs from CT and MRI were transferred to the coregistered SPECT for semiquantification. The striatal, caudate, and putamen nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) were calculated. Using CT-guided ROIs had higher intra- and interobserver concordance correlation coefficients, closer Bland-Altman biases to zero, and narrower limits of agreement than using manual SPECT ROIs. The correlation coefficients of striatal, caudate, and putamen BPND were good between manual SPECT and MRI-guided ROI methods and even better between CT-guided and MRI-guided ROI methods. Conclusively, CT-guided ROI delineation for semiquantifying striatal DAT availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system is highly reproducible, and the semiquantitative data correlate well with data from MRI-guided ROIs.

  19. Running from Disease: Molecular Mechanisms Associating Dopamine and Leptin Signaling in the Brain with Physical Inactivity, Obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N. Ruegsegger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Accelerometry data suggest that a majority of US adults fail to perform substantial levels of physical activity needed to improve health. Thus, understanding the molecular factors that stimulate physical activity, and physical inactivity, is imperative for the development of strategies to reduce sedentary behavior and in turn prevent chronic disease. Despite many of the well-known health benefits of physical activity being described, little is known about genetic and biological factors that may influence this complex behavior. The mesolimbic dopamine system regulates motivating and rewarding behavior as well as motor movement. Here, we present data supporting the hypothesis that obesity may mechanistically lower voluntary physical activity levels via dopamine dysregulation. In doing so, we review data that suggest mesolimbic dopamine activity is a strong contributor to voluntary physical activity behavior. We also summarize findings suggesting that obesity leads to central dopaminergic dysfunction, which in turn contributes to reductions in physical activity that often accompany obesity. Additionally, we highlight examples in which central leptin activity influences physical activity levels in a dopamine-dependent manner. Future elucidation of these mechanisms will help support strategies to increase physical activity levels in obese patients and prevent diseases caused by physical inactivity.

  20. PCBs Alter Dopamine Mediated Function in Aging Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Learning slope BDI (+) CVLT, Proactive Interference (List B Compared to List A trial 1) Direct Solvent Exposure Based on Hobbies, Osteoporosis , Other...in possible cognitive deficits in infants and children (Jacobson and Jacobson, 2003; Stewart et al., 2005). Negative consequences are also seen in...1185. Cyr, M., et al., 2003. Sustained elevation of extracellular dopamine causes motor dysfunction and selective degeneration of striatal GABAergic

  1. Striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: widespread influences on methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Noah B; Duncker, Patrick C; Marshall, John F

    2011-11-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is an addictive psychostimulant drug that releases monoamines through nonexocytotic mechanisms. In animals, binge mAMPH dosing regimens deplete markers for monoamine nerve terminals, for example, dopamine and serotonin transporters (DAT and SERT), in striatum and cerebral cortex. Although the precise mechanism of mAMPH-induced damage to monoaminergic nerve terminals is uncertain, both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are known to be important. Systemic administration of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists to rodents prevents mAMPH-induced damage to striatal dopamine nerve terminals. Because these studies employed systemic antagonist administration, the specific brain regions involved remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the contribution of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum to mAMPH-induced DAT and SERT neurotoxicities. In this experiment, either the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH23390, or the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride, was intrastriatally infused during a binge mAMPH regimen. Striatal DAT and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT were assessed as markers of mAMPH-induced neurotoxicity 1 week following binge mAMPH administration. Blockade of striatal dopamine D1 or D2 receptors during an otherwise neurotoxic binge mAMPH regimen produced widespread protection against mAMPH-induced striatal DAT loss and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT loss. This study demonstrates that (1) dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum, like nigral D1 receptors, are needed for mAMPH-induced striatal DAT reductions, (2) these same receptors are needed for mAMPH-induced SERT loss, and (3) these widespread influences of striatal dopamine receptor antagonists are likely attributable to circuits connecting basal ganglia to thalamus and cortex.

  2. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John A; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2016-03-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk.

  3. Are alpha-blockers involved in lower urinary tract dysfunction in multiple system atrophy? A comparison of prazosin and moxisylyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Uchiyama, T; Suenaga, T; Takahashi, H; Yamanishi, T; Egoshi, K; Sekita, N

    2000-03-15

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). alpha1-Adrenergic receptors are present in the proximal urethra where impaired relaxation may be responsible for voiding difficulty and a large amount of residual urine. An open study was designed to evaluate whether the blockade of these receptors by prazosin (a nonselective alpha1 blocker) and moxisylyte (an alpha1A-selective blocker) would improve bladder emptying in patients with MSA. Post-micturition residual volumes and clinical symptoms of 49 patients with MSA were evaluated at trial entry and after 4 weeks (prazosin; n=21 and moxisylyte; n=28). The respective means for the prazosin and moxisylyte groups were 38.1% and 35.2% reductions in residual urine volume (P<0.05), and there was lessening of urinary symptoms. Side effects due to orthostatic hypotension were seen in 23.8% of the prazosin group but in only 10.7% of the moxisylyte group. These effects were common in patients with postural hypotension of more than -30 mmHg at trial entry (P<0.05). Modulation of alpha1-receptors may function in the management of lower urinary tract dysfunction in MSA.

  4. Biology of Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic difficulties more often than not coexist, suggesting an integration of phases. Sexual dysfunction can result from a wide variety of psychological and physiological causes including derangements in the levels of sex hormones and neurotrensmitters. This review deals with the biology of different phases of sexual function as well as implications of hormones and neurotransmitters in sexual dysfunction

  5. Erectile dysfunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that increase blood flow to the penis. The blood ... The pressure of the blood in the chambers makes the ... What are the risk factors for erectile dysfunction? The most .... losing excessive weight and increasing physical activity, may improve the ...

  6. Putamen–midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rieckmann, A.; Gomperts, S.N.; Johnson, K A; Growdon, J.H.; Van Dijk, K.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain-striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) av...

  7. NEW DOPAMINE AGONISTS IN CARDIOVASCULAR THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIRBES, ARJ; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; SMIT, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Dopamine, a naturally occurring catecholamine, has been extensively used in intensive care for many years. Dopamine stimulates different types of adrenergic receptors: alpha-1 and -2, beta-1 and -2, and dopamine-1 and -2. The renal effects of dopamine are the result of dopamine-1 receptor (DA1)

  8. NEW DOPAMINE AGONISTS IN CARDIOVASCULAR THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIRBES, ARJ; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; SMIT, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Dopamine, a naturally occurring catecholamine, has been extensively used in intensive care for many years. Dopamine stimulates different types of adrenergic receptors: alpha-1 and -2, beta-1 and -2, and dopamine-1 and -2. The renal effects of dopamine are the result of dopamine-1 receptor (DA1) stim

  9. The implication of tissue Doppler echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise in early detection of cardiac dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Basant M.; Abdelghafar, Ayman Saeed Mohamed; Khalik, El Shazly Abdul; Algethami, Mohammed Mesfer; Basiony, A.S.; Al-otaibi, Mona Dhaif Allah; Al-otaibi, Maram Eidhah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can present limitations to exercise capacity and quality of life (QoL) because of various clinical conditions, such as pulmonary disease or heart disease. Tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) offers the promise of an objective measurement to quantify regional and global ventricular function through the assessment of myocardial velocity data. This study aimed to assess the intensity of left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction in SLE patients by means of TDE and cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing to determine their impact on QoL. Material and Methods Overall, 56 SLE patients within two tertiary healthcare centers as well as 50 healthy controls were examined with TDE after the exclusion of cardiovascular risk factors. TDE was performed for maximal systolic (S), early diastolic (E′), and late diastolic (A′) velocities of the mitral and tricuspid annulus. Pulsed wave (PW) Doppler of mitral and tricuspid valve inflow was performed in addition to the estimation of the left ventricle ejection fraction and assessment of right ventricle systolic function by tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). Disease activity was assessed by the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), and the damage index was assessed by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index (SDI). CPX tests according to the modified Bruce protocol were performed. Results SLE patients in both subgroups had more or less similar laboratory data and statistically higher values of ESR, CRP, and anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies compared to the control group. LV function showed statistically insignificant EF compared to the control group, being lower in the patient group. Tissue Doppler image revealed that E′ and A′ of the mitral annulus were lower in the patient group than in the control group. Concerning RV, TAPSE in the patient group was

  10. Dysfunction of endothelial NO system originated from homocysteine-induced aberrant methylation pattern in promoter region of DDAH2 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-ge; LIU Jun-xu; LI Zhu-hua; WANG Li-zhen; JIANG Yi-deng; WANG Shu-ren

    2007-01-01

    Background Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-mediated dysfunction of endothelial NO system is an important mechanism for atherosclerotic pathogenesis.Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) is the key enzyme for degrading asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA),which is an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS).This study was designed to investigate whether the dysfunction of endothelial NO system originates from HHcy-mediated aberrant methylation modification in promotor region of DDAH2 gene.Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured to the third generation and treated with homocysteine (Hcy) at different concentrations (0,10,30,100,and 300 μmol/L) for 72 hours.The methylation pattern in promoter region CpG island of DDAH2 gene was analyzed by nested methylation-specific PCR (nMSP).The mRNA expression of eNOS gene and DDAH2 gene was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.The activity of DDAH2 and eNOS in cells,and the concentrations of ADMA and NO in culture medium were assayed respectively.Results Mild increased concentration of Hcy (10 and 30 μmol/L) induced hypomethylation,while high concentration of Hcy (100 and 300 μmol/L) induced hypermethylation in the promoter CpG island of DDAH2 gene.The mRNA expression of DDAH2 increased in mild enhanced concentration of Hcy,and decreased in high concentration of Hcy correspondingly.The inhibition of DDAH2 activity,the increase of ADMA concentration,the reduction of eNOS activity and the decrease of NO production were all consistently relevant to the alteration of Hcy concentration Conclusion The increased concentration of Hcy induced aberrant methylation pattern in promotor region of DDAH2 gene and the successive alterations in DDAH/ADMA/NOS/NO pathway,which showed highly relevant and dose-effect relationship.The results suggested that the dysfunction of endothelial NO system induced by HHcy could be partially originated from Hcy-mediated aberrant methylation in

  11. Towards a computer-aided diagnosis system for colon motility dysfunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Ben; Buhmann, Sonja; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2007-03-01

    Colon motility disorders are a very common problem. A precise diagnosis with current methods is almost unachievable. This makes it extremely difficult for the clinical experts to decide for the right intervention such as colon resection. The use of cine MRI for visualizing the colon motility is a very promising technique. In addition, if image segmentation and qualitative motion analysis provide the necessary tools, it could provide the appropriate diagnostic solution. In this work we defined necessary steps in the image processing workflow to gain valuable measurements for a computer aided diagnosis of colon motility disorders. For each step, we developed methods to deal with the dynamic image data. There is need for compensating the breathing motion since no respiratory gating could be used. We segment the colon using a graph cuts approach in 2D and 3D for further analysis and visualization. The analysis of the large bowel motility is done by tracking the extension of the colon during a propagating peristaltic wave. The main objective of this work is to extract a motion model to define a clinical index that can be used in diagnosis of large bowel motility dysfunction. We aim at the classification and localization of such pathologies.

  12. Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunctions via Improving Cholinergic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Qing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium Tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS is a derivative of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA. Tan IIA has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, whether STS possesses effect on AD remains unclear. This study aims to estimate whether STS could protect against scopolamine- (SCOP- induced learning and memory deficit in Kunming mice. Morris water maze results showed that oral administration of STS (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg and Donepezil shortened escape latency, increased crossing times of the original position of the platform, and increased the time spent in the target quadrant. STS decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and increased the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT in the hippocampus and cortex of SCOP-treated mice. Oxidative stress results showed that STS increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and reactive oxygen species (ROS in hippocampus and cortex. In addition, western blot was carried out to detect the expression of apoptosis related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3. STS upregulated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and downregulated the proteins expression of Bax and Caspase-3. These results indicated that STS might become a promising therapeutic candidate for attenuating AD-like pathological dysfunction.

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in Body Dysmorphic Disorder: New implications for nosological systems & neurobiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies-Sewell, K; Chamberlain, SR; Fineberg, NA; Laws, KR

    2017-01-01

    Background Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a debilitating disorder, characterised by obsessions and compulsions relating specifically to perceived appearance, newly classified within the DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders grouping. Until now, little research has been conducted into the cognitive profile of this disorder. Materials and Methods Participants with BDD (n=12) and healthy controls (n=16) were tested using a computerised neurocognitive battery investigating attentional set-shifting (Intra/Extra Dimensional Set Shift Task), decision-making (Cambridge Gamble Task), motor response-inhibition (Stop-Signal Reaction Time Task) and affective processing (Affective Go-No Go Task). The groups were matched for age, IQ and education. Results In comparison to controls, patients with BDD showed significantly impaired attentional set shifting, abnormal decision-making, impaired response inhibition and greater omission and commission errors on the emotional processing task. Conclusions Despite the modest sample size, our results showed that individuals with BDD performed poorly compared to healthy controls on tests of cognitive flexibility, reward and motor impulsivity and affective processing. Results from separate studies in OCD patients suggest similar cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, these findings are consistent with the re-classification of BDD alongside OCD. These data also hint at additional areas of decision-making abnormalities that might contribute specifically to the psychopathology of BDD. PMID:27899165

  14. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

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    Ashby FG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available F Gregory Ashby, Vivian V Valentin, Stella S von Meer Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract: Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. Keywords: dopamine, cognition, memory systems, learning

  15. Dopamine Agonists and Pathologic Behaviors

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    Brendan J. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine agonists ropinirole and pramipexole exhibit highly specific affinity for the cerebral dopamine D3 receptor. Use of these medications in Parkinson’s disease has been complicated by the emergence of pathologic behavioral patterns such as hypersexuality, pathologic gambling, excessive hobbying, and other circumscribed obsessive-compulsive disorders of impulse control in people having no history of such disorders. These behavioral changes typically remit following discontinuation of the medication, further demonstrating a causal relationship. Expression of the D3 receptor is particularly rich within the limbic system, where it plays an important role in modulating the physiologic and emotional experience of novelty, reward, and risk assessment. Converging neuroanatomical, physiological, and behavioral science data suggest the high D3 affinity of these medications as the basis for these behavioral changes. These observations suggest the D3 receptor as a therapeutic target for obsessive-compulsive disorder and substance abuse, and improved understanding of D3 receptor function may aid drug design of future atypical antipsychotics.

  16. Effects of dopamine receptor agonist and antagonists on cholestasis-induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Zarrindast, Mohammad; Eslimi Esfahani, Delaram; Oryan, Shahrbano; Nasehi, Mohammad; Torabi Nami, Mohammad

    2013-02-28

    Dysfunctions in the dopamine transmission system have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. In an experimental animal model, cholestasis induction through bile duct ligation may present several main pathological features of hepatic encephalopathy. Dopaminergic systems are shown to play pivotal roles in regulation of anxiety-like behaviors. The main bile duct in male Wistar rats, weighing 220-240 g, was ligated using two ligatures plus duct transection in between. Anxiety-like behaviors were measured using the elevated plus maze task. Cholestasis increased the open arm time percentage (%OAT), 13 but not 10 days after bile duct ligation, indicating an anxiolytic-like effect. Sole intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine (dopamine D1/D2 receptor agonist, 0.25 mg/kg), SCH23390 (dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02 mg/kg) or sulpiride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg) did not alter %OAT, open arm entries percentage (%OAE) and locomotor activity in the sham-operated rats. Meanwhile, the higher dose apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in this group. The subthreshold dose injection of SCH23390 or sulpiride, partially reversed the anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by cholestasis (13 days after bile duct ligation). On the other hand, subthreshold dose of apomorphine in cholestatic rats (10 days post bile duct ligation) induced anxiolytic-like effects which could be blocked by SCH23390 or sulpiride. The effective doses of above drugs did not alter locomotor activity, number of rearings, groomings and defections. These findings suggested that the dopaminergic system may potentially be involved in the modulation of cholestasis-induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in rats.

  17. Dopamine, kidney, and hypertension: studies in dopamine receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Armando, Ines; Eisner, Gilbert M.; Felder, Robin A.; Pedro A. Jose

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine is important in the pathogenesis of hypertension because of abnormalities in receptor-mediated regulation of renal sodium transport. Dopamine receptors are classified into D1-like (D1, D5) and D2-like (D2, D3, D4) subtypes, all of which are expressed in the kidney. Mice deficient in specific dopamine receptors have been generated to provide holistic assessment on the varying physiological roles of each receptor subtype. This review examines recent studies on these mutant mouse models...

  18. Acute fasting increases somatodendritic dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseberry, Aaron G

    2015-08-01

    Fasting and food restriction alter the activity of the mesolimbic dopamine system to affect multiple reward-related behaviors. Food restriction decreases baseline dopamine levels in efferent target sites and enhances dopamine release in response to rewards such as food and drugs. In addition to releasing dopamine from axon terminals, dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) also release dopamine from their soma and dendrites, and this somatodendritic dopamine release acts as an autoinhibitory signal to inhibit neighboring VTA dopamine neurons. It is unknown whether acute fasting also affects dopamine release, including the local inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release in the VTA. In these studies, I have tested whether fasting affects the inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release within the VTA by examining whether an acute 24-h fast affects the inhibitory postsynaptic current mediated by evoked somatodendritic dopamine release (D2R IPSC). Fasting increased the contribution of the first action potential to the overall D2R IPSC and increased the ratio of repeated D2R IPSCs evoked at short intervals. Fasting also reduced the effect of forskolin on the D2R IPSC and led to a significantly bigger decrease in the D2R IPSC in low extracellular calcium. Finally, fasting resulted in an increase in the D2R IPSCs when a more physiologically relevant train of D2R IPSCs was used. Taken together, these results indicate that fasting caused a change in the properties of somatodendritic dopamine release, possibly by increasing dopamine release, and that this increased release can be sustained under conditions where dopamine neurons are highly active.

  19. Dopamine, kidney, and hypertension: studies in dopamine receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M; Armando, Ines; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2008-12-01

    Dopamine is important in the pathogenesis of hypertension because of abnormalities in receptor-mediated regulation of renal sodium transport. Dopamine receptors are classified into D(1)-like (D(1), D(5)) and D(2)-like (D(2), D(3), D(4)) subtypes, all of which are expressed in the kidney. Mice deficient in specific dopamine receptors have been generated to provide holistic assessment on the varying physiological roles of each receptor subtype. This review examines recent studies on these mutant mouse models and evaluates the impact of individual dopamine receptor subtypes on blood pressure regulation.

  20. Abnormal relationship between medial temporal lobe and subcortical dopamine function in people with an ultra high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Paul; Chaddock, Christopher A; Howes, Oliver D; Egerton, Alice; Seal, Marc L; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Valli, Isabel; Day, Fern; McGuire, Philip K

    2012-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies in humans have implicated both dysfunction of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and the dopamine system in psychosis, but the relationship between them is unclear. We addressed this issue by measuring MTL activation and striatal dopaminergic function in individuals with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS) for psychosis, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), respectively. Thirty-four subjects (20 ARMS and 14 Controls), matched for age, gender, digit span performance, and premorbid IQ, were scanned using fMRI, while performing a verbal encoding and recognition task, and using 18F-DOPA PET. All participants were naïve to antipsychotic medication. ARMS subjects showed reduced MTL activation when encoding words and made more false alarm responses for Novel words than controls. The relationship between striatal dopamine function and MTL activation during both verbal encoding and verbal recognition was significantly different in ARMS subjects compared with controls. An altered relationship between MTL function and dopamine storage/synthesis capacity exists in the ARMS and may be related to psychosis vulnerability.

  1. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Vidya, E-mail: vidya.patil@ruparel.edu; Patki, Mugdha, E-mail: mugdha.patki@ruparel.edu [D. G. Ruparel College, Senapati Bapat Marg, Mahim, Mumbai – 400 016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  2. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  3. Dopamine Induced Neurodegeneration in a PINK1 Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi; Duchen, Michael R.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine depletion in the striatum. Mutations in the PINK1 gene cause an autosomal recessive form of Parkinson's disease. Loss of PINK1 function causes mitochondrial dysfunction, increased reactive oxygen species production and calcium dysregulation, which increases susceptibility to neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. The basis of neuronal vulnerability to dopamine in Parkinson's disease is not well understood. Methodology We investigated the mechanism of dopamine induced cell death in transgenic PINK1 knockout mouse neurons. We show that dopamine results in mitochondrial depolarisation caused by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Dopamine-induced mPTP opening is dependent on a complex of reactive oxygen species production and calcium signalling. Dopamine-induced mPTP opening, and dopamine-induced cell death, could be prevented by inhibition of reactive oxygen species production, by provision of respiratory chain substrates, and by alteration in calcium signalling. Conclusions These data demonstrate the mechanism of dopamine toxicity in PINK1 deficient neurons, and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22662171

  4. The dopamine theory of addiction: 40 years of highs and lows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Erritzoe, David; Stokes, Paul R A

    2015-05-01

    For several decades, addiction has come to be viewed as a disorder of the dopamine neurotransmitter system; however, this view has not led to new treatments. In this Opinion article, we review the origins of the dopamine theory of addiction and discuss the ability of addictive drugs to elicit the release of dopamine in the human striatum. There is robust evidence that stimulants increase striatal dopamine levels and some evidence that alcohol may have such an effect, but little evidence, if any, that cannabis and opiates increase dopamine levels. Moreover, there is good evidence that striatal dopamine receptor availability and dopamine release are diminished in individuals with stimulant or alcohol dependence but not in individuals with opiate, nicotine or cannabis dependence. These observations have implications for understanding reward and treatment responses in various addictions.

  5. Suppressive effect of paroxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, on tetrahydrobiopterin levels and dopamine as well as serotonin turnover in the mesoprefrontal system of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideki; Kitagami, Tomitsune; Ozaki, Norio

    2007-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is a coenzyme of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), which are rate-limiting enzymes of monoamine biosynthesis. According to the monoamine hypothesis of depression, antidepressants will restore the function of the brain monoaminergic system and the BH(4) concentration. In the present study, we investigated the effect of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the BH(4) levels and dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) turnover in the mesoprefrontal system, incorporating two risk factors of depression, social isolation and acute environmental change. Male ddY mice (8W) were divided into two housing groups, i.e., group-housing (eight animals per cage; 28 days), and isolation-housing (one per cage; 28 days), being p.o.-administered paroxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg; days 15-28), and exposed to a 20-min novelty stress (day 28). The levels of BH(4), DA, homovanilic acid (HVA), 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in the prefrontal cortex and midbrain. In both the regions, novelty stress significantly increased BH(4) levels under the isolation-housing condition, whereas these levels were decreased under the group-housing condition. Thus, social isolation altered the neurochemical response to novelty stress. Paroxetine significantly decreased BH(4) levels under the isolation-housing condition, whereas decreased HVA/DA and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios were observed under the group-housing condition. Thus, social isolation may have influenced the suppressive effects of paroxetine on BH(4) levels as well as exerted an influence on DA and 5-HT turnover. We replicated our recent findings that SSRI, fluvoxamine, suppressed BH(4) levels, as well as DA and 5-HT turnover in the mouse mesoprefrontal system.

  6. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  7. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  8. Dopamine function and the efficiency of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Li, Xiaoyan; Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard

    2014-03-01

    To sustain successful behavior in dynamic environments, active organisms must be able to learn from the consequences of their actions and predict action outcomes. One of the most important discoveries in systems neuroscience over the last 15 years has been about the key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in mediating such active behavior. Dopamine cell firing was found to encode differences between the expected and obtained outcomes of actions. Although activity of dopamine cells does not specify movements themselves, a recent study in humans has suggested that tonic levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may in part enable normal movement by encoding sensitivity to the energy cost of a movement, providing an implicit "motor motivational" signal for movement. We investigated the motivational hypothesis of dopamine by studying motor performance of patients with Parkinson disease who have marked dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum and compared their performance with that of elderly healthy adults. All participants performed rapid sequential movements to visual targets associated with different risk and different energy costs, countered or assisted by gravity. In conditions of low energy cost, patients performed surprisingly well, similar to prescriptions of an ideal planner and healthy participants. As energy costs increased, however, performance of patients with Parkinson disease dropped markedly below the prescriptions for action by an ideal planner and below performance of healthy elderly participants. The results indicate that the ability for efficient planning depends on the energy cost of action and that the effect of energy cost on action is mediated by dopamine.

  9. Endothelial and non-endothelial coronary blood flow reserve and left ventricular dysfunction in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Marchi Rocha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the impairment of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent coronary blood flow reserve after administration of intracoronary acetylcholine and adenosine, and its association with hypertensive cardiac disease. INTRODUCTION: Coronary blood flow reserve reduction has been proposed as a mechanism for the progression of compensated left ventricular hypertrophy to ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Eighteen hypertensive patients with normal epicardial coronary arteries on angiography were divided into two groups according to left ventricular fractional shortening (FS. Group 1 (FS >0.25: n=8, FS=0.29 ± 0.03; Group 2 (FS <0.25: n=10, FS= 0.17 ± 0.03. RESULTS: Baseline coronary blood flow was similar in both groups (Group 1: 80.15 ± 26.41 mL/min, Group 2: 100.09 ± 21.51 mL/min, p=NS. In response to adenosine, coronary blood flow increased to 265.1 ± 100.2 mL/min in Group 1 and to 300.8 ± 113.6 mL/min (p <0.05 in Group 2. Endothelium-independent coronary blood flow reserve was similar in both groups (Group 1: 3.31 ± 0.68 and Group 2: 2.97 ± 0.80, p=NS. In response to acetylcholine, coronary blood flow increased to 156.08 ± 36.79 mL/min in Group 1 and to 177.8 ± 83.6 mL/min in Group 2 (p <0.05. Endothelium-dependent coronary blood flow reserve was similar in the two groups (Group 1: 2.08 ± 0.74 and group Group 2: 1.76 ± 0.61, p=NS. Peak acetylcholine/peak adenosine coronary blood flow response (Group 1: 0.65 ± 0.27 and Group 2: 0.60 ± 0.17 and minimal coronary vascular resistance (Group 1: 0.48 ± 0.21 mmHg/mL/min and Group 2: 0.34 ± 0.12 mmHg/mL/min were similar in both groups (p= NS. Casual diastolic blood pressure and end-systolic left ventricular stress were independently associated with FS. CONCLUSIONS: In our hypertensive patients, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent coronary blood flow reserve vasodilator administrations had similar effects in patients with either normal or decreased left

  10. The onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid dysfunction following graves’ disease - a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanga Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Graves’ disease is a multifactorial autoimmune thyroid disease, with the presence of typical circulating autoantibodies that can activate the thyroid hormone receptors, resulting in hyperthyroidism, goiter, and ophthalmopathy. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multi-systemic autoimmune disease that involves almost all the organs of the human body and is characterized by autoantibodies formation. Several studies have reported that autoimmune thyroid and rheumatic disorders can present an unusual relationship. Case Outline. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with systemic lupus erythematosus one year after being diagnosed with Graves’ disease. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide were administered to control the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Furthermore, a percutaneous thyroid biopsy was performed for further confirmation of Graves’ disease. Methimazole instead of propylthiouracil was added into the therapeutic scheme. A month later, the patient’s clinical manifestation and laboratory tests got significant improvement, except that new thyr o id dysfunction appeared opposite to the original one. The administration of anti-thyroid drug was discontinued. With a period of decreased administration of prednisone, the patient’s thyroid function gradually got back to normal levels without any levothyroxine replacement. Conclusion. In conclusion, the clinical use of prednisone and antithyroid drugs may result in instability of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and thyroid function should be carefully monitored in such patients.

  11. Nosography of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in internal medicine patients

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    Silvia Spoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is defined by the presence of at least two systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria associated with an infection microbiologically or clinically evidenced. In Italy sepsis is responsible for 80,000 hospital admissions per year and, in the last decades, severe sepsis and septic shock cases are increasing, in correlation with the increased prevalence of multi-drugresistant microbial strains. The predominant etiologic agents are Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but sepsis caused by fungi is increasing. The host response with both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes is responsible for organic failures, which complicate the syndrome, and for the susceptibility to secondary infections. The impairment of one or more organs or systems may be the onset clinical presentation. The organ dysfunctions complicating sepsis involve mainly cardiorespiratory system, kidneys, hemostatis and central nervous system. Fever or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, leukocytosis or leukopenia, elevated blood levels of lactate and procalcitonin, hypotension are diagnostically sensitive findings for sepsis. Definitive diagnosis requires isolation of the pathogen from blood sample or from the focus of infection. Therapeutic success against sepsis depends on the appropriate use of antibiotics, on the treatment of hemodynamic and respiratory disorder and on general supportive care. In some cases the use of activated protein C is to take in consideration.

  12. The roles of serine protease, intracellular and extracellular phenoloxidase in activation of prophenoloxidase system, and characterization of phenoloxidase from shrimp haemocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide or dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Pan, Luqing; Xu, Wujie; Yue, Feng

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dopamine (DA) on the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of Litopenaeus vannamei. LPS and DA were shown with a negative dose-dependent effect on hyalne cells (HC), semi-granular cells (SGC), large granular cells (LGC), and total haemocyte count (THC). When haemocytes were treated with LPS or DA, serine proteinase activity and intracellular phenoloxidase (PO) activity were significantly reduced, but extracellular PO activity increased significantly. These findings indicated that the reduction in haemocyte counts was mainly because of the degranulation and activation of the proPO system from semi-granule and large granule cells. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, and the TPK inhibitor, genistein, had an inhibitory effect on extracellular PO activity, while serine proteinase and intracellular PO activity increased. This suggests that the LPS and DA induce the activation of proPO in haemocytes via PKC and TPK-related signaling pathways, but serine proteinase may be activated only by PKC, as the genistein effects were not statistically significant. Electrophoresis analysis revealed that POs induced by LPS or DA have the same molecular mass and high diphenolase activity. Two PO bands at 526 kDa and 272 kDa were observed in PAGE, while in the haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), only a 272-kDa band was observed. This band was resolved after SDS-PAGE under non-reducing and reducing conditions into two groups of POs, 166 kDa and 126 kDa, and 78.1 kDa and 73.6 kDa, respectively, suggesting that PO in L. vannamei is an oligomer, which may have different compositions intra- and extracellularly.

  13. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  14. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uban, Kristina A; Comeau, Wendy L; Ellis, Linda A; Galea, Liisa A M; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-10-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine (DA) systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic DA activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and DA systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and DA systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24h following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared to CVS-exposed control

  15. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  16. The influence of the dopamine system on the cognitive function of patients with Alzheimer's disease%多巴胺系统对阿尔茨海默病患者认知功能影响的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 肖世富

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, usually characterized by cognitive dysfunction and memory disorders, and its pathological process is extremely complex as well as irreversible. At present, many mechanisms have been proposed, such as the oxidative stress, abnormal accumulation of Aβprotein, the formation of neurofibrillary tangles of the intracellular, neurotoxicity, gene mutation, nerve inflammation, tau protein phosphorylation, apoptosis and so on. However, up to now, these theories are still unable to explain the pathogenesis of AD satisfactorily. But a recent study has found that the dopamine system is closely related to the cognitive function in AD patients, what is more, it can well predict the type of the rapid development of AD. And the possible mechanism will involve that dopamine can affect the sleep cycle, regulate the excitability of the cerebral cortex, and have an influence on the moods. Therefore, the proposed of the dopamine theory, might be able to bring the dawn to the AD research. This paper focused on the impact of the dopamine system on cognitive function in patients with AD, and gave a detailed discuss about the possible mechanisms.%阿尔茨海默病(AD)是一种神经退行性疾病,通常以进行性的认知功能减退和记忆障碍为特征,其病理过程极为复杂,且不可逆转。目前已经提出的相关机制包括:氧化应激、Aβ蛋白的异常堆积、细胞内神经纤维缠结的形成、金属诱导的神经毒性、基因突变、神经炎症反应、tau蛋白的异常磷酸化以及凋亡等。但直到目前为止,上述学说均无法圆满地解释 AD 的发病机制。而最近的研究发现,多巴胺系统与AD患者的认知功能密切相关,并可以预测快速发展型的AD。其涉及的可能机制包括有多巴胺可以影响睡眠周期、调节大脑皮质的兴奋性、影响情绪等。因此,多巴胺学说的提出,或许能为 AD 的研究带来曙

  17. Biology of Sexual Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    MN, Anil Kumar; Pai, NB; Rao, S; Rao, TSS; Goyal, N.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic di...

  18. Renal Dopamine Receptors, Oxidative Stress, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Armando

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1, paraoxonase 2 (PON2, and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2, all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  19. Renal dopamine receptors, oxidative stress, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Santiago; Villar, Van Anthony; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2013-08-27

    Dopamine, which is synthesized in the kidney, independent of renal nerves, plays an important role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and systemic blood pressure. Lack of any of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, and D5R) results in hypertension. D1R, D2R, and D5R have been reported to be important in the maintenance of a normal redox balance. In the kidney, the antioxidant effects of these receptors are caused by direct and indirect inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes, specifically, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) oxidase, and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzymes, which can also indirectly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. Thus, stimulation of the D2R increases the expression of endogenous anti-oxidants, such as Parkinson protein 7 (PARK7 or DJ-1), paraoxonase 2 (PON2), and heme oxygenase 2 (HO-2), all of which can inhibit NADPH oxidase activity. The D5R decreases NADPH oxidase activity, via the inhibition of phospholipase D2, and increases the expression of HO-1, another antioxidant. D1R inhibits NADPH oxidase activity via protein kinase A and protein kinase C cross-talk. In this review, we provide an overview of the protective roles of a specific dopamine receptor subtype on renal oxidative stress, the different mechanisms involved in this effect, and the role of oxidative stress and impairment of dopamine receptor function in the hypertension that arises from the genetic ablation of a specific dopamine receptor gene in mice.

  20. Palmitoylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastedt, Danielle E; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Foster, James D

    2017-10-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) plays a key role in several biological processes including reward, mood, motor activity and attention. Synaptic DA homeostasis is controlled by the dopamine transporter (DAT) which transports extracellular DA into the presynaptic neuron after release and regulates its availability to receptors. Many neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are associated with imbalances in DA homeostasis that may be related to DAT dysfunction. DAT is also a target of psychostimulant and therapeutic drugs that inhibit DA reuptake and lead to elevated dopaminergic neurotransmission. We have recently demonstrated the acute and chronic modulation of DA reuptake activity and DAT stability through S-palmitoylation, the linkage of a 16-carbon palmitate group to cysteine via a thioester bond. This review summarizes the properties and regulation of DAT palmitoylation and describes how it serves to affect various transporter functions. Better understanding of the role of palmitoylation in regulation of DAT function may lead to identification of therapeutic targets for modulation of DA homeostasis in the treatment of dopaminergic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and factors associated with left ventricular dysfunction in the EULAR Scleroderma Trial and Research group (EUSTAR) database of patients with systemic sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allanore, Y.; Meune, C.; Vonk, M.C.; Airo, P.; Hachulla, E.; Caramaschi, P.; Riemekasten, G.; Cozzi, F.; Beretta, L.; Derk, C.T.; Komocsi, A.; Farge, D.; Balbir, A.; Riccieri, V.; Distler, O.; Chiala, A.; Papa, N.D.; Simic, K.P.; Ghio, M.; Stamenkovic, B.; Rednic, S.; Host, N.; Pellerito, R.; Zegers, E.; Kahan, A.; Walker, U.A.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the prevalence of, and factors associated with, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: The EUSTAR database was first searched. A case-control study of a patient subset was then performed to further identify independent factors associated with

  2. Reduced Striatal Dopamine Transporters in People with Internet Addiction Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, internet addiction disorder (IAD has become more prevalent worldwide and the recognition of its devastating impact on the users and society has rapidly increased. However, the neurobiological mechanism of IAD has not bee fully expressed. The present study was designed to determine if the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT levels measured by T99mc-TRODAT-1 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT brain scans were altered in individuals with IAD. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 5 male IAD subjects and 9 healthy age-matched controls. The volume (V and weight (W of bilateral corpus striatum as well as the T99mc-TRODAT-1 uptake ratio of corpus striatum/the whole brain (Ra were calculated using mathematical models. It was displayed that DAT expression level of striatum was significantly decreased and the V, W, and Ra were greatly reduced in the individuals with IAD compared to controls. Taken together, these results suggest that IAD may cause serious damages to the brain and the neuroimaging findings further illustrate IAD is associated with dysfunctions in the dopaminergic brain systems. Our findings also support the claim that IAD may share similar neurobiological abnormalities with other addictive disorders.

  3. Dopamine in Socioecological and Evolutionary Perspectives: Implications for Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie eYamaguchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA transmission in brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAcc plays important roles in cognitive and affective function. As such, DA deficits have been implicated in a number of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Accumulating evidence suggests that DA is also involved in social behavior of animals and humans. Although most animals organize and live in social groups, how the DA system functions in such social groups of animals, and its dysfunction causes compromises in the groups has remained less understood. Here we propose that alterations of DA signaling and associated genetic variants and behavioral phenotypes, which have been normally considered as deficits in investigation at an individual level, may not necessarily yield disadvantages, and even work advantageously, depending on social contexts in subjects with such DA alterations living in social groups. This hypothesis could provide a novel insight into our understanding of the biological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders, and a potential explanation that disadvantageous phenotypes associated with DA deficits in psychiatric disorders have remained in humans through evolution.

  4. Decentralizing decision making in modularization strategies: Overcoming barriers from dysfunctional accounting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Poul; Jørgensen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Research on product modularity is dominated by an operations management (OM) perspective, through which numerous models to predict optimal modularization strategies have been developed. However, we argue that implementation of these predictions is hampered by prevailing project accounting systems...

  5. Syntaxin 1A interaction with the dopamine transporter promotes amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binda, Francesca; Dipace, Concetta; Bowton, Erica

    2008-01-01

    of the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) as the site of direct interaction with SYN1A. Amphetamine (AMPH) increases the association of SYN1A with human DAT (hDAT) in a heterologous expression system (hDAT cells) and with native DAT in murine striatal synaptosomes. Immunoprecipitation of DAT from the biotinylated...

  6. (Dysfunctionality of accounting cost systems in manufacturing companies of Tuzla canton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sado Puškarević

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of the conducted primary survey on functionality of cost systems in manufacturing companies of Tuzla Canton (hereinafter “TC”. This paper assesses their adequacy to the needs of these companies: the present needs, and the ones that will be brought by the changes in the environment. These systems have to be up-to-date, as they influence the process of cost management, which is the key factor of companies’ adaptation to the conditions of a modern market. Cost management, which is based on the information of a cost system, enables the company to take the adequate stand towards customers on markets and toward their competition. Also, the quality cost information is a precondition for effective and efficient allocation of limited resources in a transitional period of society development. Therefore, only quality designed cost system in transitional economy will enable recovery, and then, growth and development of a company. This emphasizes the importance of research of the stated issues for transitional countries. The research results should also help to persuade the management about the need to modernize the operation organization, primarily the accounting function, mainly in the part of cost system organization. The determined defects, as well as deviances in relation to current needs for information about costs, are guidelines for an adequate process of redesigning cost systems in companies of transitional economy.

  7. Minimally invasive arthrodesis for chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction using the SImmetry SI Joint Fusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic sacroiliac (SI) joint-related low back pain (LBP) is a common, yet under-diagnosed and undertreated condition due to difficulties in accurate diagnosis and highly variable treatment practices. In patients with debilitating SI-related LBP for at least 6 months duration who have failed conservative management, arthrodesis is a viable option. The SImmetry(®) SI Joint Fusion System is a novel therapy for SI joint fusion, not just fixation, which utilizes a minimally invasive surgical approach, instrumented fixation for immediate stability, and joint preparation with bone grafting for a secure construct in the long term. The purpose of this report is to describe the minimally invasive SI Joint Fusion System, including patient selection criteria, implant characteristics, surgical technique, postoperative recovery, and biomechanical testing results. Advantages and limitations of this system will be discussed.

  8. A new possibility for repairing the anal dysfunction by promoting regeneration of the reflex pathways in the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsui, Renta; Kojima, Yu; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Shimizu, Juichiro; Koyama, Fumikazu; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Takaki, Miyako

    2008-04-01

    Moderate rectal distension elicits recto-rectal reflex contractions and simultaneous recto-internal anal sphincter reflex relaxations that together comprise the defecation reflex. Both reflexes are controlled by 1) pelvic nerves, 2) lumbar colonic nerves, and 3) enteric nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore a novel approach to repairing the defecation reflex dysfunction by using the plasticity of enteric nervous pathways. Experiments were performed in anesthetized guinea pigs with ethyl carbamate. The rectum 30 mm oral from the anal verge was transected without damage to extrinsic nerves, and subsequent end-to-end one-layer anastomosis was performed. Recovery of the defecation reflex and associated reflex pathways were evaluated. Eight weeks after sectioning of intrinsic reflex nerve pathways in the rectum, the defecation reflex recovered to the control level, accompanied with regeneration of reflex pathways. The 5-HT(4)-receptor agonist mosapride (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) significantly (P nervous system with local application of BDNF.

  9. Could dopamine agonists aid in drug development for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K W

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  10. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  11. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eFrank

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  12. Metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenouda, Sylvia K; Varner, Kurt J; Carvalho, Felix; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2009-03-01

    Repeated administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) produces eccentric left ventricular (LV) dilation and diastolic dysfunction. While the mechanism(s) underlying this toxicity are unknown, oxidative stress plays an important role. MDMA is metabolized into redox cycling metabolites that produce superoxide. In this study, we demonstrated that metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Metabolites of MDMA used in this study included alpha-methyl dopamine, N-methyl alpha-methyl dopamine and 2,5-bis(glutathion-S-yl)-alpha-MeDA. Dihydroethidium was used to detect drug-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in ventricular myocytes. Contractile function and changes in intracellular calcium transients were measured in paced (1 Hz), Fura-2 AM loaded, myocytes using the IonOptix system. Production of ROS in ventricular myocytes treated with MDMA was not different from control. In contrast, all three metabolites of MDMA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent increases in ROS that were prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). The metabolites of MDMA, but not MDMA alone, significantly decreased contractility and impaired relaxation in myocytes stimulated at 1 Hz. These effects were prevented by NAC. Together, these data suggest that MDMA-induced oxidative stress in the left ventricle can be due, at least in part, to the metabolism of MDMA to redox active metabolites.

  13. Anti-NR2A/B Antibodies and Other Major Molecular Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Hee Tay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1–45.3 per 100,000 people worldwide. Although deaths as a result of active and renal diseases have been substantially declining amongst SLE patients, disease involving the central nervous system (CNS, collectively termed neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE, remains one of the important causes of death in these patients. Cognitive dysfunction is one of the most common manifestations of NPSLE, which comprises deficits in information-processing speed, attention and executive function, in conjunction with preservation of speech. Albeit a prevalent manifestation of NPSLE, the pathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction remain unclear. Recent advances in genetic studies, molecular techniques, neuropathology, neuroimaging and cognitive science have gleaned valuable insights into the pathophysiology of lupus-related cognitive dysfunction. In recent years, a role for autoantibodies, molecular and cellular mechanisms in cognitive dysfunction, has been emerging, challenging our previous concept of the brain as an immune privileged site. This review will focus on the potential pathogenic factors involved in NPSLE, including anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit NR2A/B (anti-NR2A/B antibodies, matrix metalloproteinase-9, neutrophil extracellular traps and pro-inflammatory mediators. Better understanding of these mechanistic processes will enhance identification of new therapeutic modalities to halt the progression of cognitive decline in SLE patients.

  14. Anti-NR2A/B Antibodies and Other Major Molecular Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sen Hee; Mak, Anselm

    2015-05-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1-45.3 per 100,000 people worldwide. Although deaths as a result of active and renal diseases have been substantially declining amongst SLE patients, disease involving the central nervous system (CNS), collectively termed neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE), remains one of the important causes of death in these patients. Cognitive dysfunction is one of the most common manifestations of NPSLE, which comprises deficits in information-processing speed, attention and executive function, in conjunction with preservation of speech. Albeit a prevalent manifestation of NPSLE, the pathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction remain unclear. Recent advances in genetic studies, molecular techniques, neuropathology, neuroimaging and cognitive science have gleaned valuable insights into the pathophysiology of lupus-related cognitive dysfunction. In recent years, a role for autoantibodies, molecular and cellular mechanisms in cognitive dysfunction, has been emerging, challenging our previous concept of the brain as an immune privileged site. This review will focus on the potential pathogenic factors involved in NPSLE, including anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit NR2A/B (anti-NR2A/B) antibodies, matrix metalloproteinase-9, neutrophil extracellular traps and pro-inflammatory mediators. Better understanding of these mechanistic processes will enhance identification of new therapeutic modalities to halt the progression of cognitive decline in SLE patients.

  15. A gender gap in primary and secondary heart dysfunctions in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In agreement with other autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a strong sex bias. However, unlike lupus, the effects of sex on disease phenotype and prognosis are poorly known. Therefore, we aimed to determine sex effects on outcomes. METHOD: We performed...

  16. Dysfunctional astrocytes as key players in the pathogenesis of central nervous system disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Mostert, Jop P.; Koch, Marcus W.

    2008-01-01

    Once considered little more than the glue that holds neurons in place, astrocytes are now becoming appreciated for the key roles they play in central nervous system functions. They supply neurons and oligodendrocytes with substrates for energy metabolism, control extracellular water and electrolyte

  17. Dysfunctional astrocytes as key players in the pathogenesis of central nervous system disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Mostert, Jop P.; Koch, Marcus W.

    2008-01-01

    Once considered little more than the glue that holds neurons in place, astrocytes are now becoming appreciated for the key roles they play in central nervous system functions. They supply neurons and oligodendrocytes with substrates for energy metabolism, control extracellular water and electrolyte

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Parkinson's disease: ECS and dopamine enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumper, Samantha K; Ahle, Gabriella M; Liebman, Lauren S; Kellner, Charles H

    2014-06-01

    In addition to its effects in major psychiatric illness, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is known to have a beneficial effect on the core motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). This effect is believed to be mediated via dopamine in the striatum. Electroconvulsive shock (ECS), the animal analogue of ECT, is the model in which investigators have sought to elucidate the specific dopaminergic mechanisms by which ECT exerts its therapeutic effect in PD. Electroconvulsive shock has been given to intact animals as well as to animals with neurotoxic lesions that create parkinsonism. In this paper, we selectively review the electroconvulsive shock literature on dopamine in the striatum. Electroconvulsive shock, and by extension, ECT, is associated with increased dopamine release and modulation of dopamine receptors. Better understanding of how ECT works to enhance dopaminergic systems in the brain could help to make it a more accepted treatment for PD.

  19. Effect of long-term actual spaceflight on the expression of key genes encoding serotonin and dopamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Nina; Shenkman, Boris; Naumenko, Vladimir; Kulikov, Alexander; Kondaurova, Elena; Tsybko, Anton; Kulikova, Elisabeth; Krasnov, I. B.; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Sinyakova, Nadezhda

    The effect of long-term spaceflight on the central nervous system represents important but yet undeveloped problem. The aim of our work was to study the effect of 30-days spaceflight of mice on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 on the expression in the brain regions of key genes of a) serotonin (5-HT) system (main enzymes in 5-HT metabolism - tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), monoamine oxydase A (MAO A), 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors); b) pivotal enzymes in DA metabolism (tyrosine hydroxylase, COMT, MAO A, MAO B) and D1, D2 receptors. Decreased expression of genes encoding the 5-HT catabolism (MAO A) and 5-HT2A receptor in some brain regions was shown. There were no differences between “spaceflight” and control mice in the expression of TPH-2 and 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 receptor genes. Significant changes were found in genetic control of DA system. Long-term spaceflight decreased the expression of genes encoding the enzyme in DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase in s.nigra), DA metabolism (MAO B in the midbrain and COMT in the striatum), and D1 receptor in hypothalamus. These data suggested that 1) microgravity affected genetic control of 5-HT and especially the nigrostriatal DA system implicated in the central regulation of muscular tonus and movement, 2) the decrease in the expression of genes encoding key enzyme in DA synthesis, DA degradation and D1 receptor contributes to the movement impairment and dyskinesia produced by the spaceflight. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant № 14-04-00173.

  20. 氯胺酮相关性泌尿系统损害%"Street ketamine" associated urinary system dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴芃; 朱秀群; 姚铭广; 郑少斌; 谭万龙; 文志卫; 韦安阳; 程祎; 吴威武

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨滥用氯胺酮(K粉)所引发的泌尿系损害及其诊治方法. 方法 因吸食K粉导致泌尿系统损害患者20例.男14例,女6例.平均年龄22岁.吸食K粉1~4年.均有严重的尿频、尿急、尿痛和(或)血尿症状.尿培养阴性.B超提示双侧上尿路积水16例,14例行IVU及10例行CT检查均提示上尿路积水扩张、膀胱挛缩,1例肾乳头坏死,合并不同程度肝肾功能损害.治疗时要求患者戒断毒品并实验性用药. 结果 6例活检病理提示膀胱黏膜炎性改变,在停止或减少滥用K粉后,12例症状逆转,戊聚硫钠及透明质酸钠治疗6例症状缓解. 结论 K粉相关性泌尿系统损害可能是一种以下尿路刺激症状为主要表现的全尿路炎性损害,其发生机制及治疗方法有待进一步研究.%Objective To investigate the clinical, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of the lower urinary system dysfunction among chronic recreational ketamine abusers. Methods From 2000-2008, 20 ketamine abusers(14 men and 6 women; mean age, 22.3 years), from 3 hospitals in Guangzhou and Hongkong, and suffering from lower urinary tract dysfunction was reported. All of them had abused ketamine for 1 to 4 years, and presented with severe lower urinary tract symptoms. Complaint of severe frequency, urgency, urge incontinence, and painful haematuria was common. Urine cultures were negative. Six men suffered from severe dysuria. B ultrasound examination of 16 cases demonstrated the presence of bilateral hydronephrosis. Fourteen IVU and 10 CT investigations demonstrated the presence of bilateral hydronephrosis, bladder contraction, and 1 case showed papillary necrosis of the kidney. Different levels of abnormal liver function and chronic/acute renal failure were observed. All of the patients were required to withdraw the narcotics and the experimental medicine were given. Results The biopsies of 6 cases demonstrated the cystitis. Twelve cases' symptoms were reversible after

  1. Severe cognitive dysfunction and shrinking lung syndrome in systemic lupus erythematous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno José Alencar Pires Barbosa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease that can affect any organ or system. Neuropsychiatric and pulmonary involvement can occur in 40 and 50% of patients respectively, and may occur in several different clinical forms. While the main neuropsychiatric manifestations are represented by cognitive impairment, organic cerebral syndromes, delirium, psychosis, seizures, and peripheral neuropathies, the main forms of pulmonary involvement are pleurisy with or without pleural effusion, pneumonitis, interstitial disease, pulmonary hypertension, and alveolar hemorrhage. The authors report the case of a 49-year-old woman whose first manifestation of SLE was represented by two rare manifestations: rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, which was associated with respiratory failure caused by the shrinking lung syndrome. The authors call attention to the under-diagnosis of lupus pulmonary complications and its association with severe cognitive impairment that often necessitates aggressive treatment.

  2. Dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system and vocal aspects in Fahr disease: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Fraga, Bruno Francisco de; Cardoso, Maria Cristina de Almeida Freitas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the case of a patient with Fahr's Disease in order to describe the main stomatognathic and vocal changes that can be found in individuals with this disease. In order to establish the diagnosis, an assessment of the conditions of orofacial motor system and speech production, as well the efficiency of swallowing, was realized. Based on these assessments, there were difficulties in coordinating and sustaining muscle during speech and presence of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Speech disorders found in Fahr's disease manifest themselves in complex and cover various aspects of phonological knowledge and the diseases that affect the basal ganglia have similar frames of speech-language disorders of the stomatognathic system, being able to present a picture of dysarthria.

  3. [Systemic inflammatory reaction and indices of the organ hepatic dysfunction in patients with abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliev, N A; Ismailov, V F

    2011-03-01

    In 26 patients in complex of treatment of abdominal sepsis there was applied a 1.5% solution of reamberin intravenously in 400 ml dose during 5 days. The results of treatment were estimated, studying indices of systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR) and hepatic tests. Reamberin application have promoted rapid normalization of the parameters studied. The authors consider, that efficacy of reamberin is caused not only by positive impact on the SIR course, but by hepatoprotective action of the preparation as well.

  4. Dysfunction of the Ubiquitin Proteasome and Ubiquitin-Like Systems in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, María D; Wood, Krista; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2013-01-01

    Protein expression abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but the underlying cause of these changes is not known. We sought to investigate ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) systems (SUMOylation, NEDD8ylation, and Ufmylation) as putative mechanisms underlying protein expression abnormalities seen in schizophrenia. For this, we performed western blot analysis of total ubiquitination, free ubiquitin, K48- and K63-linked ubiquitination, and E1 activases, E2 c...

  5. The endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of motor dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that cannabinoid-based medicines that are selective for different targets in the cannabinoid signalling system (e.g. receptors, inactivation mechanism, enzymes) might be beneficial in basal ganglia disorders, namely Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These benefits not only include the alleviation of specific motor symptoms [e.g. choreic movements with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)/transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonists in HD; bradyki...

  6. Minimally invasive arthrodesis for chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction using the SImmetry SI Joint Fusion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Jon E Block21Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: Chronic sacroiliac (SI joint-related low back pain (LBP is a common, yet under-diagnosed and undertreated condition due to difficulties in accurate diagnosis and highly variable treatment practices. In patients with debilitating SI-related LBP for at least 6 months duration who have failed conservative management, arthrodesis is a viable option. The SImmetry® SI Joint Fusion System is a novel therapy for SI joint fusion, not just fixation, which utilizes a minimally invasive surgical approach, instrumented fixation for immediate stability, and joint preparation with bone grafting for a secure construct in the long term. The purpose of this report is to describe the minimally invasive SI Joint Fusion System, including patient selection criteria, implant characteristics, surgical technique, postoperative recovery, and biomechanical testing results. Advantages and limitations of this system will be discussed. Keywords: arthrodesis, fusion, minimally invasive, sacroiliac, SImmetry

  7. The potential role of dopamine D₃ receptor neurotransmission in cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chow, Tiffany; Le Foll, Bernard; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2013-08-01

    Currently available treatments have limited pro-cognitive effects for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The primary objective of this work is to review the literature on the role of dopamine D₃ receptors in cognition, and propose dopamine D₃ receptor antagonists as possible cognitive enhancers for neuropsychiatric disorders. A literature search was performed to identify animal and human studies on D₃ receptors and cognition using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. The search terms included "dopamine D₃ receptor" and "cognition". The literature search identified 164 articles. The results revealed: (1) D₃ receptors are associated with cognitive functioning in both healthy individuals and those with neuropsychiatric disorders; (2) D₃ receptor blockade appears to enhance while D₃ receptor agonism seems to impair cognitive function, including memory, attention, learning, processing speed, social recognition and executive function independent of age; and (3) D₃ receptor antagonists may exert their pro-cognitive effect by enhancing the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex, disinhibiting the activity of dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens or prefrontal cortex, or activating CREB signaling in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that D₃ receptor blockade may enhance cognitive performance in healthy individuals and treat cognitive dysfunction in individuals with a neuropsychiatric disorder. Clinical trials are needed to confirm these effects.

  8. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment.

  9. In Vivo Microdialysis in Awake, Freely Moving Rats Demonstrates HIV-1 Tat-Induced Alterations in Dopamine Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may develop neuropsychological impairment, and a modest percentage may progress to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Research using human and nonhuman, in vitro and in vivo models, demonstrates that subcortical dopamine (DA) systems may be particularly vulnerable to HIV-induced neurodegeneration. The goal of the current investigation is to provide an understanding of the extent to which the HIV-1 protein Tat induces alterations in striatal DA transmission using in vivo brain microdialysis in awake, freely moving rats. The current study was designed to investigate Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction between 24-h and 48-h post-Tat administration, and demonstrates a reduction in evoked DA for the Tat-treated group relative to vehicle-treated group at 24 and 48 h. The Tat-induced reduction of DA overflow by 24 h suggests dysfunction of nerve terminals, and a compromised DA system in Tat-treated animals. Furthermore, the current study provides direct support for HIV-associated decline of DA function at a systemic level, helping to characterize the functional outcome of the relatively large amount of research on the molecular and behavioral levels of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. This initial study may provide additional characteristics of Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction to inform research on therapeutic intervention, and it provides a springboard for future in vivo research currently needed in the field. PMID:19086089

  10. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  11. Primary graft dysfunction; possible evaluation by high resolution computed tomography, and suggestions for a scoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmaati, Esther; Jensen, Claus; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2009-01-01

    /exclusion criteria of patients, pilot testing, and training investigators through review of disagreements, were possibilities suggested for decreasing inter/intra observer variability. Factors affecting the image attenuation (Hounsfield numbers) and thus, the reproducibility of CT densitometric measurements were...... of minimal influence. Studies have reported on how lung tissue images, derived by HRCT, can be scored and graded. There does not seem to be a golden standard for evaluating these images, which makes comparison between methods challenging. These scoring systems assess the presence, severity, and extent...

  12. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg–1 min–1) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function. PMID:24396060

  13. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-15

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function.

  14. Dopamine and extinction: a convergence of theory with fear and reward circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Antony D; Neve, Kim A; Lattal, K Matthew

    2014-02-01

    Research on dopamine lies at the intersection of sophisticated theoretical and neurobiological approaches to learning and memory. Dopamine has been shown to be critical for many processes that drive learning and memory, including motivation, prediction error, incentive salience, memory consolidation, and response output. Theories of dopamine's function in these processes have, for the most part, been developed from behavioral approaches that examine learning mechanisms in reward-related tasks. A parallel and growing literature indicates that dopamine is involved in fear conditioning and extinction. These studies are consistent with long-standing ideas about appetitive-aversive interactions in learning theory and they speak to the general nature of cellular and molecular processes that underlie behavior. We review the behavioral and neurobiological literature showing a role for dopamine in fear conditioning and extinction. At a cellular level, we review dopamine signaling and receptor pharmacology, cellular and molecular events that follow dopamine receptor activation, and brain systems in which dopamine functions. At a behavioral level, we describe theories of learning and dopamine function that could describe the fundamental rules underlying how dopamine modulates different aspects of learning and memory processes.

  15. Does dysfunction of the mirror neuron system contribute to symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Andrew; Lemon, Roger; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hornberger, Michael; Turner, Martin R

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence that mirror neurons, initially discovered over two decades ago in the monkey, are present in the human brain. In the monkey, mirror neurons characteristically fire not only when it is performing an action, such as grasping an object, but also when observing a similar action performed by another agent (human or monkey). In this review we discuss the origin, cortical distribution and possible functions of mirror neurons as a background to exploring their potential relevance in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have recently proposed that ALS (and the related condition of frontotemporal dementia) may be viewed as a failure of interlinked functional complexes having their origins in key evolutionary adaptations. This can include loss of the direct projections from the corticospinal tract, and this is at least part of the explanation for impaired motor control in ALS. Since, in the monkey, corticospinal neurons also show mirror properties, ALS in humans might also affect the mirror neuron system. We speculate that a defective mirror neuron system might contribute to other ALS deficits affecting motor imagery, gesture, language and empathy. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Catalpol Induces Neuroprotection and Prevents Memory Dysfunction through the Cholinergic System and BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role and mechanism of catalpol on neuroprotective effects and memory enhancing effects simultaneously, neuroprotective effects of catalpol were assessed by neurological deficits score, TTC staining, and cerebral blood flow detecting. Morris water maze was employed to investigate its effects on learning and memory and then clarify its possible mechanisms relating the central cholinergic system and BDNF. Edaravone and oxiracetam were used for positive control drugs based on its different action. Results showed that catalpol and edaravone significantly facilitated neurological function recovery, reduced infarction volume, and increased cerebral blood flow in stroke mice. Catalpol and oxiracetam decreased the escape latency significantly and increased the numbers of crossing platform obviously. The levels of ACh, ChAT, and BDNF in catalpol group were increased in a dose-dependent manner, and AChE declined with a U-shaped dose-response curve. Moreover, the levels of muscarinic AChR subtypes M1 and M2 in hippocampus were considerably raised by catalpol. These results demonstrated that catalpol may be useful for neuroprotection and memory enhancement, and the mechanism may be related to the central cholinergic system.

  17. Assessment of the autonomic nervous system is an appropriate biological marker for the well-being in erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tolga Dogru; Orhan Murat Kocak; Nurper Erberk-Ozen; Murat Basar

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the autonomic nervous system (ANS) components are suitable biological markers for representing well-being in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods: The present study included 74 male patients who had applied for check-ups in the cardiology outpatient clinic at Kirikkale University (Kirikkale, Turkey) and who had been diagnosed as having hyperlipidemia. Of these patients, 26 had an additional diagnosis of ED and made up the patient group. The remaining 48 patients formed the control group. Well-being was assessed with short- form 36 (SF-36). The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) was used as a measure of libido and erectile function. Quantitative assessment of the ANS was made based on the analysis of heart rate variability by means of 24-h holter monitorization. Results: Comparisons between the ED and control groups showed significant differences only in energy scale of SF-36. The ED group also had significantly higher values of sympathetic activity. Except for the general health score of SF-36, which was found to be correlated with parasympathetic activity only in ED group, there were similar correlation patterns within the groups. Although well-being and sympathetic activity were corre- lated negatively, parasympathetic activity and well-being were correlated positively. Conclusion: Quantitative as- sessment of the ANS by heart rate variability analysis might be a suitable marker for well-being of patients with ED. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 643-650)

  18. Influence of Different Doses of Levofloxacin on Antioxidant Defense Systems and Markers of Renal and Hepatic Dysfunctions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenezer Tunde Olayinka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Levofloxacin (LFX is a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in the treatment of infections such as pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, and sinusitis. The present study assessed the likely toxic effect of LFX on hepatic and renal tissues in rats. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: A: control, B: 5 mg/kg bw LFX (half therapeutic dose, C: 10 mg/kg bw LFX (therapeutic dose, and D: 20 mg/kg bw LFX (double therapeutic dose. After seven days of administration, result indicated significant (P<0.05 increase in plasma ALT, AST, and ALP activities in the treated groups compared to control. Also, there was a significant increase in plasma creatinine, urea, and total bilirubin in the treated groups relative to control. Plasma total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides also increased significantly in the treated groups relative to control. Also, hepatic MDA level increased significantly in all the treated groups. However, hepatic SOD, catalase, and GST activities were significantly reduced in the LFX-treated animals. Moreover, GSH and ascorbic acid levels were significantly decreased in the LFX-treated groups relative to control. In conclusion, three doses of levofloxacin depleted antioxidant defense system and induced oxidative stress and hepatic and renal dysfunctions in rats.

  19. Possible sites of therapeutic action in restless legs syndrome: focus on dopamine and α2δ ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Andrew J; Clair, Andrew; Hochman, Shawn; Clemens, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by abnormal sensations that occur primarily at rest or during sleep, which are alleviated by movement of the affected limb. The pathophysiology of RLS remains unclear, although roles for dopamine dysfunction and brain iron deficiency have been proposed. The hypothalamic A11 dopaminergic circuit is used to explain the dopamine dysfunction in RLS and the potential therapeutic actions of dopamine D(2) agonists. Modulation of central and peripheral neuronal circuits may also explain the potential therapeutic sites of action of opioids, adenosine receptor ligands, and voltage-gated calcium channel α(2)δ ligands in RLS. The known and possible therapeutic benefits of these agents and their relationship to dopaminergic dysfunction in RLS are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Telmisartan prevents angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbit aorta via activating HGF/Met system and PPARγ pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ze-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Ling; Qian, Hai-Yan; Fang, Nan; Wang, Bang-Ning; Wang, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Telmisartan with partial activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) powerfully reduces blood pressure, improves endothelial function and lipid metabolism. Hepatocyte growth factor/mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (HGF/Met) system in the local vasculature plays a pivotal role in maintaining normal endothelial function. This study is aimed to evaluate whether telmisartan directly prevents angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED) via activating HGF/Met system and/or PPARγ pathway. The isolated aortic rings of rabbits were incubated with Ang II (0.01-1 μM), telmisartan (0.1-10 μM), SU11274 (5 μM) as a specific Met inhibitor, GW9662 (10 μM) as a PPARγ antagonist alone or a combination for 6 h. Ang II obviously inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of HGF, Met and PPARγ, and the accumulative concentration-relaxation of the aortic rings to acetylcholine, among which the inhibitory effect of 1 μM Ang II was most significant. By contrast, telmisartan significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HGF, Met, and PPARγ, thus preventing Ang II-induced ED in a dose-dependent pattern. However, SU11274, GW9662 or a combination of both partially abolished the protective effects derived from telmisartan, with the effect of SU11274 exceeding that of GW9662. These results demonstrate that Ang II-induced ED in rabbit aortic rings in vitro can be prevented by telmisartan through selective PPARγ-modulating pathway. Moreover, this study indicates for the first time that activating HGF/Met system in the local vasculature is involved in the protective mechanism of telmisartan. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Challenges of Diagnosing Cognitive Dysfunction with Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlE'ed, Ashwaq; Vega-Fernandez, Patricia; Muscal, Eyal; Hinze, Claas; Tucker, Lori B; Appenzeller, Simone; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Roth, Johannes; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S; Levy, Deborah M; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Brunner, Hermine

    2016-12-19

    The diagnosis of Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus disease (NPSLE) is challenging. The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) has been shown to be an accessible and promising tool for evaluating possible NPSLE in adult and childhood lupus. In this review, we present information about the development and use of Ped-ANAM; the benefit of using Ped-ANAM in children with and without NPSLE in the assessment and follow up of their disease condition; and the correlation of Ped-ANAM to imaging studies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PedANAM was validated in children with cSLE in different studies. Cognitive performance can be a challenging clinical feature to efficiently assess. However, research with the Ped-ANAM has produced a Cognitive Performance Score (CPS) that allows for a reliable and efficient estimation of cognitive ability and the presence of cognitive limitations that children with cSLE may show. Compared with traditional neurocognitive assessment tools, Ped-ANAM-CPS offers a promising alternative to overcome the difficulties that practitioners previously faced. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Cereblon is recruited to aggresome and shows cytoprotective effect against ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Naoya; Wakabayashi, Satoru; Matsumoto, Kodai; Yamada, Haruka; Asahi, Toru

    2015-09-04

    Cereblon (CRBN) is encoded by a candidate gene for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID). The nonsense mutation, R419X, causes deletion of 24 amino acids at the C-terminus of CRBN, leading to mild ID. Although abnormal CRBN function may be associated with ID disease onset, its cellular mechanism is still unclear. Here, we examine the role of CRBN in aggresome formation and cytoprotection. In the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, exogenous CRBN formed perinuclear inclusions and co-localized with aggresome markers. Endogenous CRBN also formed perinuclear inclusions under the same condition. Treatment with a microtubule destabilizer or an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CRBN blocked formation of CRBN inclusions. Biochemical analysis showed CRBN containing inclusions were high-molecular weight, ubiquitin-positive. CRBN overexpression in cultured cells suppressed cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, knockdown of endogenous CRBN in cultured cells increased cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor, compared with control cells. Our results show CRBN is recruited to aggresome and has functional roles in cytoprotection against ubiquitin-proteasome system impaired condition.

  3. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cerebellum of aging Ts65Dn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, Daniela; Lomoio, Selene; Scherini, Elda

    2011-12-01

    In the cerebellum of adult-aging Ts65Dn mice, a murine model of Down syndrome, Purkinje cells undergo degeneration. Searching for the cause of Purkinje cell degeneration, we have studied the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the cerebellum of aging Ts65Dn mice. Inhibition of UPS is sufficient to induce neuron degeneration and death. Proteasome chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity was reduced by 35% in the cerebellum of Ts65Dn mice in comparison with euploid animals. Accordingly, Western blot analysis of ubiquitin showed an increase in ubiquitinated proteins. Immunocytochemistry for ubiquitin revealed strongly positive intranuclear inclusions in Purkinje cells and large neurons of cerebellar nuclei. The Western blot analysis of ubiquitin in nuclear protein extracts confirmed the increase of ubiquitinated proteins in the cell nuclei. After FUS immunocytochemistry, large intranuclear inclusions were visible in Purkinje cells and large neurons of cerebellar nuclei in Ts65Dn mice. Together, data indicate a possible role for proteasome inhibition in the cerebellar neurodegeneration in Ts65Dn mice.

  4. New Implications for the Melanocortin System in Alcohol Drinking Behavior in Adolescents: The Glial Dysfunction Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Cerpa, Waldo; Carvajal, Maria F.; Lerma-Cabrera, José M.; Karahanian, Eduardo; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol dependence causes physical, social, and moral harms and currently represents an important public health concern. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), alcoholism is the third leading cause of death worldwide, after tobacco consumption and hypertension. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a growing trend in alcohol abuse among adolescents, characterized by the consumption of large doses of alcohol over a short time period. Since brain development is an ongoing process during adolescence, short- and long-term brain damage associated with drinking behavior could lead to serious consequences for health and wellbeing. Accumulating evidence indicates that alcohol impairs the function of different components of the melanocortin system, a major player involved in the consolidation of addictive behaviors during adolescence and adulthood. Here, we hypothesize the possible implications of melanocortins and glial cells in the onset and progression of alcohol addiction. In particular, we propose that alcohol-induced decrease in α-MSH levels may trigger a cascade of glial inflammatory pathways that culminate in altered gliotransmission in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc). The latter might potentiate dopaminergic drive in the NAc, contributing to increase the vulnerability to alcohol dependence and addiction in the adolescence and adulthood. PMID:28424592

  5. Urine proteomes of healthy aging humans reveal extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations and immune system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakun, M; Senatorski, G; Rubel, T; Lukasik, A; Zielenkiewicz, P; Dadlez, M; Paczek, L

    2014-02-01

    Aging is a complex physiological process that poses considerable conundrums to rapidly aging societies. For example, the risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases and/or cancer steadily declines for people after their 60s, and other causes of death predominate for seniors older than 80 years of age. Thus, physiological aging presents numerous unanswered questions, particularly with regard to changing metabolic patterns. Urine proteomics analysis is becoming a non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic method. We investigated the urine proteomes in healthy elderly people to determine which metabolic processes were weakened or strengthened in aging humans. Urine samples from 37 healthy volunteers aged 19-90 years (19 men, 18 women) were analyzed for protein expression by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This generated a list of 19 proteins that were differentially expressed in different age groups (young, intermediate, and old age). In particular, the oldest group showed protein changes reflective of altered extracellular matrix turnover and declining immune function, in which changes corresponded to reported changes in cardiovascular tissue remodeling and immune disorders in the elderly. Thus, urinary proteome changes in the elderly appear to reflect the physiological processes of aging and are particularly clearly represented in the circulatory and immune systems. Detailed identification of "protein trails" creates a more global picture of metabolic changes that occur in the elderly.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Herrera, Samantha; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Flores-Gutierrez, Enrique Octavio; Quintero-Fabián, Saray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS) that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R). The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS), there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers. PMID:27795960

  7. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arreola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS, has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R. The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS, there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers.

  8. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

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    Khaled M. Othman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring analyzed for arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV in the time and frequency domains. Results: The trans-mitral Doppler of early to atrial wave (E/A ratio was reversed in five patients (16.6% and the tricuspid E/A ratio was reversed in 10 patients (33.3%. Holter analysis for SSc patients revealed an increased prevalence of premature ventricular contractions (PVC $ 10/h (P = 0.02, supra-ventricular tachycardias (SVTs (P = 0.2, and total PVC count (P = 0.0000. Highly significant (P = 0.000 impairment in all HRV parameters was demonstrated in the SSc patients. Total skin thickness score (TSS, Raynaud’s phenomenon and anti-scleroderma 70 (anti-SCL70 showed significant positive correlations with all arrhythmia parameters, while showing a significant negative correlation with the impaired ventricular diastolic function and various HRV parameters. No correlation was found between arrhythmia and HRV parameters and disease duration, disease type, or presence of anti-centromere antibodies. Conclusion: Low heart rate variability, increased TSS and the presence of anti-SCL70 are correlated with preclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients and may predict the likelihood of malignant arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, noninvasive HRV evaluation before clinical cardiac involvement in these patients might be beneficial when added to the clinical and laboratory assessments in detecting high-risk patients, and may allow for implementation of preventive

  9. Dysfunction of the Human Mirror Neuron System in Ideomotor Apraxia: Evidence from Mu Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Toledo, Silvi; Liebermann, Dario G; Bentin, Shlomo; Soroker, Nachum

    2016-06-01

    Stroke patients with ideomotor apraxia (IMA) have difficulties controlling voluntary motor actions, as clearly seen when asked to imitate simple gestures performed by the examiner. Despite extensive research, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying failure to imitate gestures in IMA remain controversial. The aim of the current study was to explore the relationship between imitation failure in IMA and mirror neuron system (MNS) functioning. Mirror neurons were found to play a crucial role in movement imitation and in imitation-based motor learning. Their recruitment during movement observation and execution is signaled in EEG recordings by suppression of the lower (8-10 Hz) mu range. We examined the modulation of EEG in this range in stroke patients with left (n = 21) and right (n = 15) hemisphere damage during observation of video clips showing different manual movements. IMA severity was assessed by the DeRenzi standardized diagnostic test. Results showed that failure to imitate observed manual movements correlated with diminished mu suppression in patients with damage to the right inferior parietal lobule and in patients with damage to the right inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis-areas where major components of the human MNS are assumed to reside. Voxel-based lesion symptom mapping revealed a significant impact on imitation capacity for the left inferior and superior parietal lobules and the left post central gyrus. Both left and right hemisphere damages were associated with imitation failure typical of IMA, yet a clear demonstration of relationship to the MNS was obtained only in the right hemisphere damage group. Suppression of the 8-10 Hz range was stronger in central compared with occipital sites, pointing to a dominant implication of mu rather than alpha rhythms. However, the suppression correlated with De Renzi's apraxia test scores not only in central but also in occipital sites, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism for IMA, with a possible

  10. Early weaning PCB 95 exposure alters the neonatal endocrine system: thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R G

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that can severely disrupt the endocrine system. In the present study, early-weaned male rats were administered a single dose of 2,3,6-2',5'-pentachlorinated biphenyl (PCB 95; 32 mg/kg per day, by i.p. injection) for two consecutive days (postnatal days (PNDs) 15 and 16) and killed 24 and 48 h after the administration of the last dose. Compared with the control group, administration of PCB 95 induced a reduction (P<0.01) in serum concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and GH and an increase (P<0.01) in the serum concentration of TSH at PNDs 17 and 18. These conspicuous perturbations led to some histopathological deterioration in the thyroid gland characterized by follicular degeneration, edema, fibrosis, hemorrhage, luminal obliteration, and hypertrophy with reduced colloidal contents at PND 18. The dyshormonogenesis and thyroid dysgenesis may be attributed to the elevation of DNA fragmentation at PNDs 17 and 18. Furthermore, this hypothyroid state revealed higher (P<0.01) serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor and lower (P<0.01) serum concentrations of IGF1 and insulin at both PNDs compared with the control group. Interestingly, the body weight of the neonates in the PCB 95 group exhibited severe decreases throughout the experimental period in relation to that of the control group. These results imply that PCB 95 may act as a disruptor of the developmental hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hypothyroidism caused by PCB 95 may impair the adipokine axis, fat metabolism, and in general postnatal development. Thus, further studies need to be carried out to understand this concept.

  11. Dopamine and glucose, obesity and Reward Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth eBlum

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and many well described eating disorders are accurately considered a global epidemic. The consequences of Reward Deficiency Syndrome, a genetic and epigenetic phenomena that involves the interactions of powerful neurotransmitters, are impairments of brain reward circuitry, hypodopaminergic function and abnormal craving behavior. Numerous sound neurochemical and genetic studies provide strong evidence that food addiction is similar to psychoactive drug addiction. Important facts which could translate to potential therapeutic targets espoused in this review include: 1 brain dopamine (DA production and use is stimulated by consumption of alcohol in large quantities or carbohydrates bingeing; 2 in the mesolimbic system the enkephalinergic neurons are in close proximity, to glucose receptors; 3 highly concentrated glucose activates the calcium channel to stimulate dopamine release from P12 cells; 4 blood glucose and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid, the dopamine metabolite, are significantly correlated and 5 2-deoxyglucose the glucose analogue, in pharmacological doses associates with enhanced dopamine turnover and causes acute glucoprivation. Evidence from animal studies and human fMRI support the hypothesis that multiple, but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug dependence and DA-modulated reward circuits are involved in pathologic eating behaviors. Treatment for addiction to glucose and drugs alike, based on a consensus of neuroscience research, should incorporate dopamine agonist therapy, in contrast to current theories and practices that use dopamine antagonists. Until now, powerful dopamine-D2 agonists have failed clinically, due to chronic down regulation of D2 receptors instead, consideration of novel less powerful D2 agonists that up-regulate D2 receptors seems prudent. We encourage new strategies targeted at improving DA function in the treatment and prevention of obesity a subtype of

  12. The Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene ("DRD4") Moderates Family Environmental Effects on ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Nikolas, Molly; Jernigan, Katherine; Friderici, Karen; Waldman, Irwin; Nigg, Joel T.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prime candidate for exploration of gene-by-environment interaction (i.e., G x E), particularly in relation to dopamine system genes, due to strong evidence that dopamine systems are dysregulated in the disorder. Using a G x E design, we examined whether the "DRD4" promoter 120-bp tandem repeat…

  13. The Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene ("DRD4") Moderates Family Environmental Effects on ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Nikolas, Molly; Jernigan, Katherine; Friderici, Karen; Waldman, Irwin; Nigg, Joel T.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prime candidate for exploration of gene-by-environment interaction (i.e., G x E), particularly in relation to dopamine system genes, due to strong evidence that dopamine systems are dysregulated in the disorder. Using a G x E design, we examined whether the "DRD4" promoter 120-bp tandem repeat…

  14. Clinical performance of an interactive clinical decision support system for assessment of plasma lactate in hospitalized patients with organ dysfunction

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    Raschke RA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Elevated plasma lactate concentration can be a useful measure of tissue hypo-perfusion in acutely deteriorating patients, focusing attention on the need for urgent resuscitation. But lactate is not always assessed in a timely fashion in patients who have deteriorating vital signs. We hypothesized that an electronic medical record (EMR-based decision support system could interact with clinicians to prompt assessment of plasma lactate in appropriate clinical situations in order to risk stratify a population of inpatients and identify those who are acutely deteriorating in real-time. Methods: All adult patients admitted to our hospital over a three month period were monitored by an EMR-based lactate decision support system (lactate DSS programmed to detect patients exhibiting acute organ dysfunction and engage the clinician in the decision to order a plasma lactate concentration. Inpatient mortality was determined for the five risk categories that this system generated, and chart review was performed on a high-risk subgroup to describe the spectrum of bedside events that triggered the system logic. Results: The lactate DSS segregated inpatients into five strata with mortality rates of 0.8% (95%CI:0.6-1.0%; 2.7% (95%CI:1.0-4.4%; 7.9% (95%CI: 6.0-10.1%, 13.0% (95%CI: 9.0-17.8% and 42.1% (95%CI: 32.0-52.4%, achieving a discriminant accuracy of 80% (95%CI:76-84% by AUROC for predicting inpatient mortality. Classification into the two highest risk strata had a positive predictive value for detecting acute life-threatening clinical events of 54% (95%CI: 41.5-66.5%. Conclusions: Our lactate decision support system is different than previously-described computerized “early warning systems”, because it engages the clinician in decision-making and incorporates clinical judgment in risk stratification. Our system has favorable operating characteristics for the prediction of inpatient mortality and real-time detection of acute life

  15. Purity and Enrichment of Laser-Microdissected Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

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    Amanda L. Brown

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to microdissect individual cells from the nervous system has enormous potential, as it can allow for the study of gene expression in phenotypically identified cells. However, if the resultant gene expression profiles are to be accurately ascribed, it is necessary to determine the extent of contamination by nontarget cells in the microdissected sample. Here, we show that midbrain dopamine neurons can be laser-microdissected to a high degree of enrichment and purity. The average enrichment for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH gene expression in the microdissected sample relative to midbrain sections was approximately 200-fold. For the dopamine transporter (DAT and the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (Vmat2, average enrichments were approximately 100- and 60-fold, respectively. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad65 expression, a marker for GABAergic neurons, was several hundredfold lower than dopamine neuron-specific genes. Glial cell and glutamatergic neuron gene expression were not detected in microdissected samples. Additionally, SN and VTA dopamine neurons had significantly different expression levels of dopamine neuron-specific genes, which likely reflects functional differences between the two cell groups. This study demonstrates that it is possible to laser-microdissect dopamine neurons to a high degree of cell purity. Therefore gene expression profiles can be precisely attributed to the targeted microdissected cells.

  16. Levodopa therapy: consequences of the nonphysiologic replacement of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, T N

    1998-05-01

    Normal motor function is dependent on the highly regulated synthesis and release of the transmitter dopamine by neurons projecting from the substantia nigra to the corpus striatum. Parkinson's disease involves the progressive degeneration of these neurons. Its core symptoms are a direct consequence of a striatal insufficiency of intrasynaptic dopamine. Levodopa, the standard of care for the treatment of PD, acts after its conversion to dopamine by restoring striatal dopaminergic transmission. However, there are significant differences between the normally functioning dopamine system and the restoration of function provided by standard levodopa treatment. Increasing clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that the intermittent stimulation of dopamine receptors resulting from current therapeutic regimens contributes to the response complications that ultimately affect most parkinsonian patients. It now appears that chronic nonphysiologic stimulation of dopaminergic receptors on striatal GABAergic neurons activates characteristic signaling pathways, leading to a potentiation of the synaptic efficacy of adjacent glutamatergic receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype. As a result, function of these GABAergic efferent neurons changes in ways that favor the appearance of motor complications. Conceivably, use of dopaminomimetic replacement strategies that provide more continuous dopamine receptor stimulation will act to prevent or alleviate these disabling complications. A number of promising approaches to achieving this goal are now under development.

  17. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

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    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  18. Ventral tegmental area dopamine revisited: effects of acute and repeated stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Elizabeth N; Miczek, Klaus A

    2016-01-01

    Aversive events rapidly and potently excite certain dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), promoting phasic increases in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. This is in apparent contradiction to a wealth of literature demonstrating that most VTA dopamine neurons are strongly activated by reward and reward-predictive cues while inhibited by aversive stimuli. How can these divergent processes both be mediated by VTA dopamine neurons? The answer may lie within the functional and anatomical heterogeneity of the VTA. We focus on VTA heterogeneity in anatomy, neurochemistry, electrophysiology, and afferent/efferent connectivity. Second, recent evidence for a critical role of VTA dopamine neurons in response to both acute and repeated stress will be discussed. Understanding which dopamine neurons are activated by stress, the neural mechanisms driving the activation, and where these neurons project will provide valuable insight into how stress can promote psychiatric disorders associated with the dopamine system, such as addiction and depression.

  19. Flow injection fluorescence determination of dopamine using a photo induced electron transfer (PET) boronic acid derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebru Seckin, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Volkan, Muervet [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: murvet@metu.edu.tr

    2005-08-15

    An automated flow injection analysis system was developed for the fluorometric determination of dopamine in pharmaceutical injections. The method is based on the quenching effect of dopamine on m-dansylaminophenyl boronic acid (DAPB) fluorescence due to the reverse photo induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Effects of pH and interfering species on the determination of dopamine were examined. Calibration for dopamine, based on quenching data, was linear in the concentration range of 1.0 x 10{sup -5} to 1.0 x 10{sup -4} M. Detection limit (3 s) of the method was found to be 3.7 x 10{sup -6} M. Relative standard deviation of 1.2% (n = 10) was obtained with 1.0 x 10{sup -5} M dopamine standard solution. The proposed method was applied successfully for the determination of dopamine in pharmaceutical injection sample. The sampling rate was determined as 24 samples per hour.

  20. Effects of p-Aminosalicylic acid on the Neurotoxicity of Manganese and Levels of Dopamine and Serotonin in the Nervous System and Innervated Organs of Crassostrea virginica

    OpenAIRE

    King, Candice; Myrthil, Marie; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Manganese is a neurotoxin causing Manganism in individuals chronically exposed to elevated levels in their environment. Toxic manganese exposure causes mental and emotional disturbances, and a movement disorder similar to Idiopathic Parkinsons Disease. Manganese interferes with dopamine neurons involved in control of body movements. Recently, p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is being used to alleviate symptoms of Manganism, but its mechanism of action is unknown. The eastern oyster, Crassostrea vi...

  1. Effects of Neonatal Exposure to Estradiol on Prolactin Secretion and Activity of the Tubero-lnfundibular Dopamine System in Young Adulthood: Comparison with Neonatal Prolactin Deficiency*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, W R; Shah, G V; Watanobe, H; Grosvenor, C E

    1990-02-01

    Abstract Previous results from this laboratory indicate that female rats who consume milk deficient in prolactin (PRL) during the neonatal period subsequently display hyperprolactinemia, associated with decreased activity in the tubero-infundibular dopamine (DA) system and decreased lactotrope responsiveness to DA receptor stimulation. The present studies tested whether these neuroendocrine consequences of neonatal PRL deficiency can be mimicked by exposure of neonatal rats to estradiol. Female rats were injected sc with 1 mUg estradiol benzoate or oil vehicle on postpartum Days one to 3, while in other experiments, females were made neonatally deficient in PRL through treatment of their mothers with the DA agonist bromocriptine, a treatment that reduces the levels of PRL in milk. Females treated neonatally with estradiol benzoate, as well as offspring of the bromocriptine-treated mothers, displayed hyperprolactinemia as young adults, as compared to their respective vehicle-matched controls, and in both cases, this was abolished by ovariectomy, indicating dependence upon ovarian secretions. As reported previously in neonatal PRL-deficient females, neonatal estradiol benzoate-treated animals also exhibited reduced steady state levels and decreased turnover rates of DA in the median eminence when 35 days of age. DA levels and turnover rates in this region were still significantly reduced on postpartum Day 60. The DA agonist bromocriptine suppressed PRL release to a similar extent in cultured anterior pituitary cells from neonatal estrogen-treated and control rats, suggesting normal responsiveness of DA receptors on lactotrope cells in both groups. The present results confirm the ability of estradiol treatment or induction of a PRL deficiency during the early neonatal period to induce subsequent hyperprolactinemia in female rats, and further indicate that the hyperprolactinemic conditions resulting from either neonatal manipulation are dependent on the ovary and are

  2. Progression of dopamine transporter decline in patients with the Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy: a voxel-based analysis of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT

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    Nocker, Michael; Seppi, Klaus; Wenning, Gregor K.; Poewe, Werner; Scherfler, Christoph [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Donnemiller, Eveline; Virgolini, Irene [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    We characterized the progression of dopamine transporter (DAT) decline in the striatum and extrastriatal regions including the midbrain and pons of patients with the Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P) and compared longitudinally collected SPECT results with those in a cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Eight patients with MSA-P (age 60.4 {+-} 7.7 years, disease duration 2.4 {+-} 1 years, UPDRS-III motor score 39.7 {+-} 4.7), and 11 patients with PD (age 61.2 {+-} 6.4 years, disease duration 2.4 {+-} 1.1 years, UPDRS-III motor score 18.9 {+-} 7.6) underwent a baseline and follow-up [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT investigation within a time period of 1.3 years. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and a repetitive ANOVA design were used to objectively localize the decline in DAT availability without having to make an a priori hypothesis as to its location. SPM localized significant reductions in [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT uptake in the dorsal brainstem of MSA-P patients compared to PD patients (p < 0.001) at baseline. Additional reductions in the DAT signal were localized in the caudate and anterior putamen of patients with MSA-P patients compared to PD patients at the follow-up examination (p < 0.001). Relative decline in tracer binding was evident in the caudate and anterior putamen of MSA-P patients compared to PD patients in the longitudinal analysis (p < 0.05), whereas no significant relative signal alteration was observed in the brainstem. In contrast to PD, the relatively higher rate of signal reduction in the caudate and anterior putamen is consistent with the faster disease progression reported in MSA-P. At baseline, the tracer uptake in the brainstem was already at very low levels in the MSA-P patients compared to that in healthy control subjects and did not progress any further, suggesting that the degeneration of monoaminergic neurons is almost complete early in the disease course. (orig.)

  3. Mesolimbic and Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Systems: Behavioral Neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    markers in the basal ganglia ( Lesch and Nyhan 1964; Lloyd et al. 1981). Self-mutilation can be produced in rodents by other agents without prior dopamine... Lesch M and Nyhan WL (1964) A familial disorder of uric acid metabolism and central nervous system function. Am J Med 36:561-570 130 Lindvall 0...Shibuya M, Kelley WN, Fox IH (1981) Biochemical evidence of dysfunction of brain neurotransmitters in the Lesch - Nyhan syndrome. N Eng J Med 305:1106

  4. Neuropharmacology of novel dopamine modulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Erik Tomas te

    2014-01-01

    De neurotransmitter dopamine speelt een essentiële rol in diverse neurofysiologische functies en is betrokken bij de pathofysiologie van diverse neuropsychiatrische aandoeningen, waaronder de ziekte van Parkinson, schizofrenie, drugsverslaving en hyperprolactinemie. De huidige

  5. Activation, internalization, and recycling of the serotonin 2A receptor by dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Raote, Ishier; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2006-01-01

    Serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, and their functional interactions, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of various CNS disorders. Here, we use recombinant serotonin (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) receptors to further investigate direct interactions between dopamine and 5-HT receptors. Previous studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that dopamine, although not the cognate ligand for the 5-HT2A receptor, acts as a partial-efficacy agonist. At micromolar concentrations, dopamine also acts as a partial-efficacy agonist on 5-HT2A receptors in HEK293 cells. Like 5-HT, dopamine also induces receptor-internalization in these cells, although at significantly higher concentrations than 5-HT. Interestingly, if the receptors are first sensitized or “primed” by subthreshold concentrations of 5-HT, then dopamine-induced internalization occurs at concentrations ≈10-fold lower than when dopamine is used alone. Furthermore, unlike 5-HT-mediated internalization, dopamine-mediated receptor internalization, alone, or after sensitization by 5-HT, does not depend on PKC. Dopamine-internalized receptors recycle to the surface at rates similar to those of 5-HT-internalized receptors. Our results suggest a previously uncharacterized role for dopamine in the direct activation and internalization of 5-HT2A receptors that may have clinical relevance to the function of serotonergic systems in anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia and also to the treatment of these disorders. PMID:17005723

  6. Interval timing, dopamine, and motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Balcı, Fuat

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine clock hypothesis suggests that the dopamine level determines the speed of the hypothetical internal clock. However, dopaminergic function has also been implicated for motivation and thus the effect of dopaminergic manipulations on timing behavior might also be independently mediated by altered motivational state. Studies that investigated the effect of motivational manipulations on peak responding are reviewed in this paper. The majority of these studies show that a higher reward...

  7. Morphometric evaluation of nitric oxide synthase isoforms and their cytokine regulators predict pulmonary dysfunction and survival in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Parra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because histopathological changes in the lungs of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc are consistent with alveolar and vessel cell damage, we presume that this interaction can be characterized by analyzing the expression of proteins regulating nitric oxide (NO and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 synthesis. To validate the importance of alveolar-vascular interactions and to explore the quantitative relationship between these factors and other clinical data, we studied these markers in 23 cases of SSc nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (SSc-NSIP. We used immunohistochemistry and morphometry to evaluate the amount of cells in alveolar septa and vessels staining for NO synthase (NOS and PAI-1, and the outcomes of our study were cellular and fibrotic NSIP, pulmonary function tests, and survival time until death. General linear model analysis demonstrated that staining for septal inducible NOS (iNOS related significantly to staining of septal cells for interleukin (IL-4 and to septal IL-13. In univariate analysis, higher levels of septal and vascular cells staining for iNOS were associated with a smaller percentage of septal and vascular cells expressing fibroblast growth factor and myofibroblast proliferation, respectively. Multivariate Cox model analysis demonstrated that, after controlling for SSc-NSIP histological patterns, just three variables were significantly associated with survival time: septal iNOS (P=0.04, septal IL-13 (P=0.03, and septal basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; P=0.02. Augmented NOS, IL-13, and bFGF in SSc-NSIP histological patterns suggest a possible functional role for iNOS in SSc. In addition, the extent of iNOS, PAI-1, and IL-4 staining in alveolar septa and vessels provides a possible independent diagnostic measure for the degree of pulmonary dysfunction and fibrosis with an impact on the survival of patients with SSc.

  8. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulin Cheng

    Full Text Available Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49 and women (n = 52 with and without NAFLD.Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS. Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot.Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA, aromatic amino acid (AAA and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all. Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all, whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all.Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis.

  9. Differential behavioral reinforcement effects of dopamine receptor agonists in the rat with bilateral lesion of the posterior ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouachikh, Omar; Dieb, Wisam; Durif, Franck; Hafidi, Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease has been attributed to dopamine replacement therapies and/or a lesion of the dopaminergic system. The dopaminergic neuronal loss targets the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We hypothesize that dopamine replacement therapy is responsible for the potential reinforcement effect in Parkinson's disease by acting on the neuronal reward circuitry. Therefore this study was designed to explore the potential motivational effect of dopamine replacement therapy in bilateral VTA-lesioned animals. The posterior (p)VTA, which project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) constitutes the major dopamine neuronal circuitry implicated in addictive disorders. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral paradigm, we investigated the motivational effects of dopamine receptor agonists, and cocaine in rat with a 6-OHDA bilateral lesion of the pVTA. Amongst the dopamine receptor agonists used in this study only the D2R and D3R agonists (bromocriptine, PD128907 and pramipexole), induced a significant CPP in pVTA-lesioned animals. Dopamine receptor agonists did not induce behavioral sensitization in sham animals. Moreover, confocal D2R immunostaining analysis showed a significant increase in the number of D2R per cell body in the NAc shell of pVTA lesioned rats compared to sham. This result correlated, for the first time, the dopamine receptor agonists effect with DR2 overexpression in the NAc shell of pVTA-lesioned rats. In addition, cocaine, which is known to increase dopamine release, induced behavioral sensitization in sham group but not in dopamine deprived group. Thus, the later result highlighted the importance of pVTA-NAc dopaminergic pathway in positive reinforcements. Altogether these data suggested that the implication of the dopamine replacement therapy in the appearance of dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease is probably due to both neuronal degeneration in the posterior VTA and

  10. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  11. Dopamine, affordance and active inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Friston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level.

  12. Dynamic Nigrostriatal Dopamine Biases Action Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher D; Li, Hao; Geddes, Claire E; Jin, Xin

    2017-03-22

    Dopamine is thought to play a critical role in reinforcement learning and goal-directed behavior, but its function in action selection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that nigrostriatal dopamine biases ongoing action selection. When mice were trained to dynamically switch the action selected at different time points, changes in firing rate of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, as well as dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum, were found to be associated with action selection. This dopamine profile is specific to behavioral choice, scalable with interval duration, and doesn't reflect reward prediction error, timing, or value as single factors alone. Genetic deletion of NMDA receptors on dopamine or striatal neurons or optogenetic manipulation of dopamine concentration alters dopamine signaling and biases action selection. These results unveil a crucial role of nigrostriatal dopamine in integrating diverse information for regulating upcoming actions, and they have important implications for neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease and substance dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Salamone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements. Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  14. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  15. 多巴胺D3受体功能研究进展%Progress of dopamine D3 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏琼

    2010-01-01

    The role of dopamine D3 receptors playing in drug dependence has attracted a lot of attention.Pharmacological experiments suggest that dopamine D3 receptors be involved in mechanism of drug addiction and affect the movement and behavior of rodents. Dopamine D3 receptor gene is considered as a candidate gene related to dopaminergic system dysfunction including schizophrenic disorders and essential tremor.%多巴胺D3受体在药物依赖中的作用越来越受到关注,药理学实验证明多巴胺D3受体参与成瘾药物的强化作用,影响啮齿类动物的运动和行为.多巴胺D3受体基因被看作包括精神分裂性障碍和特发性震颤在内的与多巴胺能系统有关的机能障碍候选基因.

  16. Caffeine regulates frontocorticostriatal dopamine transporter density and improves attention and cognitive deficits in an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Pablo; Machado, Nuno J; Köfalvi, Attila; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2013-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely involves dopaminergic dysfunction in the frontal cortex and striatum, resulting in cognitive and motor abnormalities. Since both adenosine and dopamine modulation systems are tightly intertwined, we tested if caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) attenuated the behavioral and neurochemical changes in adolescent spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, a validated ADHD animal model) compared to their control strain (Wistar Kyoto rats, WKY). SHR were hyperactive and had poorer performance in the attentional set-shifting and Y-maze paradigms and also displayed increased dopamine transporter (DAT) density and increased dopamine uptake in frontocortical and striatal terminals compared with WKY rats. Chronic caffeine treatment was devoid of effects in WKY rats while it improved memory and attention deficits and also normalized dopaminergic function in SHR. Additionally, we provide the first direct demonstration for the presence of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) in frontocortical nerve terminals, whose density was increased in SHR. These findings underscore the potential for caffeine treatment to normalize frontocortical dopaminergic function and to abrogate attention and cognitive changes characteristic of ADHD.

  17. Natural killer cell dysfunction is a distinguishing feature of systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and macrophage activation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Joyce; Lee, Susan; Giannini, Edward H; Graham, Thomas B; Passo, Murray H; Filipovich, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been reported in association with many rheumatic diseases, most commonly in systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (sJRA). Clinically, MAS is similar to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a genetic disorder with absent or depressed natural killer (NK) function. We have previously reported that, as in HLH, patients with MAS have profoundly decreased NK activity, suggesting that this abnormality might be relevant to the pathogenesis of the syndrome. Here we examined the extent of NK dysfunction across the spectrum of diseases that comprise juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from patients with pauciarticular (n = 4), polyarticular (n = 16), and systemic (n = 20) forms of JRA. NK cytolytic activity was measured after co-incubation of PBMC with the NK-sensitive K562 cell line. NK cells (CD56+/T cell receptor [TCR]-alphabeta-), NK T cells (CD56+/TCR-alphabeta+), and CD8+ T cells were also assessed for perforin and granzyme B expression by flow cytometry. Overall, NK cytolytic activity was significantly lower in patients with sJRA than in other JRA patients and controls. In a subgroup of patients with predominantly sJRA, NK cell activity was profoundly decreased: in 10 of 20 patients with sJRA and in only 1 of 20 patients with other JRA, levels of NK activity were below two standard deviations of pediatric controls (P = 0.002). Some decrease in perforin expression in NK cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes was seen in patients within each of the JRA groups with no statistically significant differences. There was a profound decrease in the proportion of circulating CD56bright NK cells in three sJRA patients, a pattern similar to that previously observed in MAS and HLH. In conclusion, a subgroup of patients with JRA who have not yet had an episode of MAS showed decreased NK function and an absence of circulating CD56bright population, similar to the abnormalities observed

  18. Transient Dysregulation of Dopamine Signaling in a Developing Drosophila Arousal Circuit Permanently Impairs Behavioral Responsiveness in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lachlan; Petty, Alice; Rohrscheib, Chelsie; Troup, Michael; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Eyles, Darryl W.; van Swinderen, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine ontogeny hypothesis for schizophrenia proposes that transient dysregulation of the dopaminergic system during brain development increases the likelihood of this disorder in adulthood. To test this hypothesis in a high-throughput animal model, we have transiently manipulated dopamine signaling in the developing fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and examined behavioral responsiveness in adult flies. We found that either a transient increase of dopamine neuron activity or a transient decrease of dopamine receptor expression during fly brain development permanently impairs behavioral responsiveness in adults. A screen for impaired responsiveness revealed sleep-promoting neurons in the central brain as likely postsynaptic dopamine targets modulating these behavioral effects. Transient dopamine receptor knockdown during development in a restricted set of ~20 sleep-promoting neurons recapitulated the dopamine ontogeny phenotype, by permanently reducing responsiveness in adult animals. This suggests that disorders involving impaired behavioral responsiveness might result from defective ontogeny of sleep/wake circuits. PMID:28243212

  19. Long-Term Stimulant Treatment Affects Brain Dopamine Transporter Level in Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Wigal, Timothy; Kollins, Scott H.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Jayne, Millard; Wong, Christopher T.; Han, Hao; Fowler, Joanna S.; Zhu, Wei; Swanson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Brain dopamine dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could explain why stimulant medications, which increase dopamine signaling, are therapeutically beneficial. However while the acute increases in dopamine induced by stimulant medications have been associated with symptom improvement in ADHD the chronic effects have not been investigated. Method We used positron emission tomography and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand) to measure dopamine transporter availability in the brains of 18 never-medicated adult ADHD subjects prior to and after 12 months of treatment with methylphenidate and in 11 controls who were also scanned twice at 12 months interval but without stimulant medication. Dopamine transporter availability was quantified as non-displaceable binding potential using a kinetic model for reversible ligands. Results Twelve months of methylphenidate treatment increased striatal dopamine transporter availability in ADHD (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum: +24%, p<0.01); whereas there were no changes in control subjects retested at 12-month interval. Comparisons between controls and ADHD participants revealed no significant difference in dopamine transporter availability prior to treatment but showed higher dopamine transporter availability in ADHD participants than control after long-term treatment (caudate: p<0.007; putamen: p<0.005). Conclusion Upregulation of dopamine transporter availability during long-term treatment with methylphenidate may decrease treatment efficacy and exacerbate symptoms while not under the effects of the medication. Our findings also suggest that the discrepancies in the literature regarding dopamine transporter availability in ADHD participants (some studies reporting increases, other no changes and other decreases) may reflect, in part, differences in treatment histories. PMID:23696790

  20. Dopamine and extinction: A convergence of theory with fear and reward circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Antony D.; Neve, Kim A.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Research on dopamine lies at the intersection of sophisticated theoretical and neurobiological approaches to learning and memory. Dopamine has been shown to be critical for many processes that drive learning and memory, including motivation, prediction error, incentive salience, memory consolidation, and response output. Theories of dopamine’s function in these processes have, for the most part, been developed from behavioral approaches that examine learning mechanisms in reward-related tasks. A parallel and growing literature indicates that dopamine is involved in fear conditioning and extinction. These studies are consistent with long-standing ideas about appetitive-aversive interactions in learning theory and they speak to the general nature of cellular and molecular processes that underlie behavior. We review the behavioral and neurobiological literature showing a role for dopamine in fear conditioning and extinction. At a cellular level, we review dopamine signaling and receptor pharmacology, cellular and molecular events that follow dopamine receptor activation, and brain systems in which dopamine functions. At a behavioral level, we describe theories of learning and dopamine function that could describe the fundamental rules underlying how dopamine modulates different aspects of learning and memory processes. PMID:24269353

  1. Direct affinity of dopamine to lipid membranes investigated by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, Yashasvi; Ray, Bruce D; Petrache, Horia I

    2016-04-08

    Dopamine, a naturally occurring neurotransmitter, plays an important role in the brain's reward system and acts on sensory receptors in the brain. Neurotransmitters are contained in lipid membraned vesicles and are released by exocytosis. All neurotransmitters interact with transport and receptor proteins in glial cells, on neuronal dendrites, and at the axonal button, and also must interact with membrane lipids. However, the extent of direct interaction between lipid membranes in the absence of receptors and transport proteins has not been extensively investigated. In this report, we use UV and NMR spectroscopy to determine the affinity and the orientation of dopamine interacting with lipid vesicles made of either phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids which are primary lipid components of synaptic vesicles. We quantify the interaction of dopamine's aromatic ring with lipid membranes using our newly developed method that involves reference spectra in hydrophobic environments. Our measurements show that dopamine interacts with lipid membranes primarily through the aromatic side opposite to the hydroxyl groups, with this aromatic side penetrating deeper into the hydrophobic region of the membrane. Since dopamine's activity involves its release into extracellular space, we have used our method to also investigate dopamine's release from lipid vesicles. We find that dopamine trapped inside PC and PS vesicles is released into the external solution despite its affinity to membranes. This result suggests that dopamine's interaction with lipid membranes is complex and involves both binding as well as permeation through lipid bilayers, a combination that could be an effective trigger for apoptosis of dopamine-generating cells.

  2. Bitropic D3 Dopamine Receptor Selective Compounds as Potential Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Robert R; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Malik, Mahinder; Reichert, David E; Mach, R H

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders represent a substantial social and health care issue. The National Institutes of Health estimates that greater than 2 million adults suffer from neuropsychiatric disorders in the USA. These individuals experience symptoms that can include auditory hallucinations, delusions, unrealistic beliefs and cognitive dysfunction. Although antipsychotic medications are available, suboptimal therapeutic responses are observed for approximately one-third of patients. Therefore, there is still a need to explore new pharmacotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many of the medications that are used clinically to treat neuropsychiatric disorders have a pharmacological profile that includes being an antagonist at D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) dopamine receptor subtypes. However, dopamine receptor subtypes are involved in a variety of neuronal circuits that include movement coordination, cognition, emotion, affect, memory and the regulation of prolactin. Consequently, antagonism at D2-like receptors can also contribute to some of the adverse side effects associated with the long-term use of antipsychotics including the a) adverse extrapyramidal symptoms associated with the use of typical antipsychotics and b) metabolic side effects (weight gain, hyperglycemia, increased risk of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and gynecomastia) associated with atypical antipsychotic use. Preclinical studies suggest that D3 versus D2 dopamine receptor selective compounds might represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of the symptoms of schizophrenia. In this review we discuss a) how bitropic Nphenylpiperazine D3 dopamine receptor selective compounds have been developed by modification of the primary (orthosteric) and secondary (allosteric or modulatory) pharmacophores to optimize D3 receptor affinity and D2/D3 binding selectivity ratios and b) the functional selectivity of these compounds. Examples of how these compounds might be

  3. Intrarenal dopamine attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate/high salt-induced blood pressure elevation in part through activation of a medullary cyclooxygenase 2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bing; Harris, Raymond C; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Locally produced dopamine in the renal proximal tubule inhibits salt and fluid reabsorption, and a dysfunctional intrarenal dopaminergic system has been reported in essential hypertension and experimental hypertension models. Using catechol-O-methyl-transferase knockout (COMT(-/-)) mice, which have increased renal dopamine because of deletion of the major renal dopamine-metabolizing enzyme, we investigated the effect of intrarenal dopamine on the development of hypertension in the deoxycorticosterone acetate/high-salt (DOCA/HS) model. DOCA/HS led to significant increases in systolic blood pressure in wild-type mice (from 115+/-2 to 153+/-4 mm Hg), which was significantly attenuated in COMT(-/-) mice (from 114+/-2 to 135+/-3 mm Hg). In DOCA/HS COMT(-/-) mice, the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 increased systolic blood pressure (156+/-2 mm Hg). DOCA/HS COMT(-/-) mice also exhibited more urinary sodium excretion (COMT(-/-) versus wild-type: 3038+/-430 versus 659+/-102 micromol/L per 24 hours; Pdopamine stimulates medullary prostaglandin production. Renal medullary COX-2 expression and urinary prostaglandin E2 excretion were significantly higher in COMT(-/-) than in wild-type mice after DOCA/HS treatment. In DOCA/HS-treated COMT(-/-) mice, the COX-2 inhibitor SC-58236 reduced urinary sodium and prostaglandin E(2) excretion and increased systolic blood pressure (153+/-2 mm Hg). These studies indicate that an activated renal dopaminergic system attenuates the development of hypertension, at least in large part through activating medullary COX-2 expression/activity, and also decreases oxidative stress resulting from DOCA/HS.

  4. Effects of Dopamine D2-Like Receptor Antagonists on Light Responses of Ganglion Cells in Wild-Type and P23H Rat Retinas.

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    Ralph Jensen

    Full Text Available In animal models of retinitis pigmentosa the dopaminergic system in the retina appears to be dysfunctional, which may contribute to the debilitated sight experienced by retinitis pigmentosa patients. Since dopamine D2-like receptors are known to modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, I examined the effects of dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. Extracellular electrical recordings were made from RGCs in isolated transgenic P23H rat retinas and wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat retinas. Intensity-response curves to flashes of light were evaluated prior to and during bath application of a dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist. The dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists sulpiride and eticlopride and the D4 receptor antagonist L-745,870 increased light sensitivity of P23H rat RGCs but decreased light sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. In addition, L-745,870, but not sulpiride or eticlopride, reduced the maximum peak responses of Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. I describe for the first time ON-center RGCs in P23H rats that exhibit an abnormally long-latency (>200 ms response to the onset of a small spot of light. Both sulpiride and eticlopride, but not L-745,870, reduced this ON response and brought out a short-latency OFF response, suggesting that these cells are in actuality OFF-center cells. Overall, the results show that the altered dopaminergic system in degenerate retinas contributes to the deteriorated light responses of RGCs.

  5. Blockade of Dopamine Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Impairs Learning Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman-Assif, Orit; Laurent, Vincent; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to investigate the role of dopamine activity in learning to inhibit conditioned fear responses (freezing) in extinction. In Experiment 1, rats systemically injected with the D2 dopamine antagonist, haloperidol, froze more across multiple extinction sessions and on a drug-free retention test than control rats. In…

  6. Blockade of Dopamine Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Impairs Learning Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman-Assif, Orit; Laurent, Vincent; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to investigate the role of dopamine activity in learning to inhibit conditioned fear responses (freezing) in extinction. In Experiment 1, rats systemically injected with the D2 dopamine antagonist, haloperidol, froze more across multiple extinction sessions and on a drug-free retention test than control rats. In…

  7. Preserved dopaminergic homeostasis and dopamine-related behaviour in hemizygous TH-Cre mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard; Jensen, Kathrine L; Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M

    2017-01-01

    assessment of the dopaminergic system in hemizygous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre mice in comparison to wild-type (WT) controls. Our data show that TH-Cre mice display preserved dopaminergic homeostasis with unaltered levels of TH and dopamine as well as unaffected dopamine turnover in striatum. TH-Cre mice...

  8. Veratridine-evoked release of dopamine from guinea pig isolated cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, G; Gáborján, A; Lendvai, B; Répássy, G; Szabó, L Z; Vizi, E S

    2000-01-01

    Dopamine released from the lateral olivocochlear efferent system is thought to inhibit the toxic effect of the extreme glutamate outflow from the inner hair cells during ischemia or acoustic trauma. Using in vitro microvolume superfusion, we have studied the release of [(3)H]dopamine from the latera

  9. Online electrochemical system as an in vivo method to study dynamic changes of ascorbate in rat brain during 3-methylindole-induced olfactory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Yinghong; Hao, Jie; Liu, Junxiu; Yu, Ping; Ma, Furong; Mao, Lanqun

    2016-04-07

    This study demonstrates the application of an online electrochemical system (OECS) as an in vivo method to investigate the dynamic change of microdialysate ascorbate in the olfactory bulb (OB) of rats during the acute period of olfactory dysfunction induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 3-methylindole (3-MI). The OECS is developed by directly coupling an electrochemical detector to in vivo microdialysis for the direct monitoring of ascorbate. The system benefits from the good electrochemical activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes towards the oxidation of ascorbate and exhibits high selectivity, good stability, reproducibility and linearity for the measurement of ascorbate in the OB under physiological conditions. With this method, the basal level of microdialysate ascorbate in the OB is determined to be 48.64 ± 5.44 μM. The administration of 3-MI clearly increases the microdialysate ascorbate in the OB after 3-MI treatments and this increase is obviously alleviated by intravenous administration of ascorbate and glutathione (GSH) within 10 min after i.p. injection of 3-MI. These observations with the OECS suggest that ascorbate may be involved in chemical processes during the early stages of 3-MI-induced olfactory dysfunction. This study essentially validates the OECS as an in vivo method for effective measurement of ascorbate in the OB in rat brain and such a method will find interesting applications in investigating chemical process associated with ascorbate underlying olfactory dysfunction.

  10. A role for accumbal glycine receptors in modulation of dopamine release by the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga eHöifödt Lidö

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAccumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935-ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol’s effects within this system.

  11. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  12. Dopamine and renal function and blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando, Ines; Villar, Van Anthony M; Jose, Pedro A

    2011-07-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of systemic blood pressure via multiple mechanisms. It affects fluid and electrolyte balance by its actions on renal hemodynamics and epithelial ion and water transport and by regulation of hormones and humoral agents. The kidney synthesizes dopamine from circulating or filtered L-DOPA independently from innervation. The major determinants of the renal tubular synthesis/release of dopamine are probably sodium intake and intracellular sodium. Dopamine exerts its actions via two families of cell surface receptors, D1-like receptors comprising D1R and D5R, and D2-like receptors comprising D2R, D3R, and D4R, and by interactions with other G protein-coupled receptors. D1-like receptors are linked to vasodilation, while the effect of D2-like receptors on the vasculature is variable and probably dependent upon the state of nerve activity. Dopamine secreted into the tubular lumen acts mainly via D1-like receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner to regulate ion transport in the proximal and distal nephron. These effects are mediated mainly by tubular mechanisms and augmented by hemodynamic mechanisms. The natriuretic effect of D1-like receptors is caused by inhibition of ion transport in the apical and basolateral membranes. D2-like receptors participate in the inhibition of ion transport during conditions of euvolemia and moderate volume expansion. Dopamine also controls ion transport and blood pressure by regulating the production of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory response. Essential hypertension is associated with abnormalities in dopamine production, receptor number, and/or posttranslational modification.

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs comprise a heterogeneous group of complex neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by the presence of progressive cerebellar ataxia, associated or otherwise with ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, extrapyramidal features, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Objective: To verify the presence of cognitive dysfunction among the main types of SCA described in the literature. Methods: the review was conducted using the search system of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. Results: Cognitive dysfunction occurs in a considerable proportion of SCA, particularly in SCA 3, which is the most frequent form of SCA worldwide. Dementia has been described in several other types of SCA such as SCA 2, SCA 17 and DRPLA. Mental retardation is a specific clinical feature of SCA 13. Conclusions: The role of the cerebellum in cognitive functions has been observed in different types of SCAs which can manifest varying degrees of cognitive dysfunction, dementia and mental retardation.

  14. Dopamine natriuresis in salt-repleted, water-loaded humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Olsen, M H; Bonde, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to define the dose-response relationship between exogenous dopamine and systemic haemodynamics, renal haemodynamics, and renal excretory function at infusion rates in the range 0 to 12.5 microg kg(-1) min(-1) in normal volunteers.......The purpose of the present study was to define the dose-response relationship between exogenous dopamine and systemic haemodynamics, renal haemodynamics, and renal excretory function at infusion rates in the range 0 to 12.5 microg kg(-1) min(-1) in normal volunteers....

  15. Dopamine natriuresis in salt-repleted, water-loaded humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Olsen, M H; Bonde, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to define the dose-response relationship between exogenous dopamine and systemic haemodynamics, renal haemodynamics, and renal excretory function at infusion rates in the range 0 to 12.5 microg kg(-1) min(-1) in normal volunteers.......The purpose of the present study was to define the dose-response relationship between exogenous dopamine and systemic haemodynamics, renal haemodynamics, and renal excretory function at infusion rates in the range 0 to 12.5 microg kg(-1) min(-1) in normal volunteers....

  16. Apraxia and Motor Dysfunction in Corticobasal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, James R.; Michael Hornberger; Steve Vucic; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impai...

  17. Structural change in dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in a patient with neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, A.; Cao, Q.; Gershon, E.S. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system has been suggested as a pathogenic mechanism in neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Therefore, we examined the complete coding sequences of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DRD2) gene for structural abnormalities in 12 patients with a history of NMS, including two cases of familial NMS. Mutational analysis was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a highly sensitive technique for detecting sequence differences. We found in one patient with a history of NMS a nucleotide substitution at codon 310 (CCG{r_arrow}TCG) of exon 7 of the DRD2 gene which predicts the replacement of proline to serine in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor, a part of the receptor that interacts with G-proteins. A larger series of patients with NMS needs to be investigated to establish whether this allele is associated with an increased susceptibility to NMS. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  18. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...

  19. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzgerald

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signalling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behaviour. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings.

  20. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...

  1. Behavioural effects of chemogenetic dopamine neuron activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhoudt, L

    2016-01-01

    Various psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and major depressive disorder, have been associated with altered dopamine signalling in the brain. However, it remains unclear which specific changes in dopamine activity are related to specific p

  2. Intermittent hypoxia from obstructive sleep apnea may cause neuronal impairment and dysfunction in central nervous system: the potential roles played by microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Q

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Qingchan Yang,1,* Yan Wang,2,* Jing Feng,2 Jie Cao,2 Baoyuan Chen2 1Graduate School of Tianjin Medical University, 2Respiratory Department, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition characterized by repetitive episodes of complete (apnea or partial (hypopnea obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, resulting in oxygen desaturation and arousal from sleep. Intermittent hypoxia (IH resulting from OSA may cause structural neuron damage and dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS. Clinically, it manifests as neurocognitive and behavioral deficits with oxidative stress and inflammatory impairment as its pathophysiological basis, which are mediated by microglia at the cellular level. Microglia are dominant proinflammatory cells in the CNS. They induce CNS oxidative stress and inflammation, mainly through mitochondria, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the release of excitatory toxic neurotransmitters. The balance between neurotoxic versus protective and anti- versus proinflammatory microglial factors might determine the final roles of microglia after IH exposure from OSA. Microglia inflammatory impairments will continue and cascade persistently upon activation, ultimately resulting in clinically significant neuron damage and dysfunction in the CNS. In this review article, we summarize the mechanisms of structural neuron damage in the CNS and its concomitant dysfunction due to IH from OSA, and the potential roles played by microglia in this process. Keywords: intermittent hypoxia, obstructive sleep apnea, microglia, inflammation, apoptosis

  3. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... of the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic encephalopathy...

  4. Pharmacological characterization of dopamine receptors in the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wu, Shun-Fan; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Ye, Gong-Yin; Huang, Jia

    2017-04-01

    Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in both vertebrates and invertebrates and is the most abundant monoamine present in the central nervous system of insects. A complement of functionally distinct dopamine receptors mediate the signal transduction of dopamine by modifying intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP levels. In the present study, we pharmacologically characterized three types of dopamine receptors, CsDOP1, CsDOP2 and CsDOP3, from the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. All three receptors show considerable sequence identity with orthologous dopamine receptors. The phylogenetic analysis also clusters the receptors within their respective groups. Transcript levels of CsDOP1, CsDOP2 and CsDOP3 were all expressed at high levels in the central nervous system, indicating their important roles in neural processes. After heterologous expression in HEK 293 cells, CsDOP1, CsDOP2 and CsDOP3 were dose-dependently activated by dopamine and synthetic dopamine receptor agonists. They can also be blocked by different series of antagonists. This study offers important information on three dopamine receptors from C. suppressalis that will provide the basis for forthcoming studies investigating their roles in behaviors and physiology, and facilitate the development of new insecticides for pest control.

  5. Reward-based hypertension control by a synthetic brain-dopamine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-11-05

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of synthetic trigger-controlled devices that can reprogram mammalian cells to interface with complex metabolic activities. In the brain, the neurotransmitter dopamine coordinates communication with target neurons via a set of dopamine receptors that control behavior associated with reward-driven learning. This dopamine transmission has recently been suggested to increase central sympathetic outflow, resulting in plasma dopamine levels that correlate with corresponding brain activities. By functionally rewiring the human dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) via the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to synthetic promoters containing cAMP response element-binding protein 1(CREB1)-specific cAMP-responsive operator modules, we have designed a synthetic dopamine-sensitive transcription controller that reversibly fine-tunes specific target gene expression at physiologically relevant brain-derived plasma dopamine levels. Following implantation of circuit-transgenic human cell lines insulated by semipermeable immunoprotective microcontainers into mice, the designer device interfaced with dopamine-specific brain activities and produced a systemic expression response when the animal's reward system was stimulated by food, sexual arousal, or addictive drugs. Reward-triggered brain activities were able to remotely program peripheral therapeutic implants to produce sufficient amounts of the atrial natriuretic peptide, which reduced the blood pressure of hypertensive mice to the normal physiologic range. Seamless control of therapeutic transgenes by subconscious behavior may provide opportunities for treatment strategies of the future.

  6. Conformation and interactions of dopamine hydrochloride in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callear, Samantha K.; Imberti, Silvia [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Johnston, Andrew; McLain, Sylvia E. [Biochemistry Department, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-07

    The aqueous solution of dopamine hydrochloride has been investigated using neutron and X-ray total scattering data together with Monte-Carlo based modelling using Empirical Potential Structure Refinement. The conformation of the protonated dopamine molecule is presented and the results compared to the conformations found in crystal structures, dopamine-complexed protein crystal structures and predicted from theoretical calculations and pharmacophoric models. It is found that protonated dopamine adopts a range of conformations in solution, highlighting the low rotational energy barrier between different conformations, with the preferred conformation being trans-perpendicular. The interactions between each of the species present (protonated dopamine molecules, water molecules, and chloride anions) have been determined and are discussed with reference to interactions observed in similar systems both in the liquid and crystalline state, and predicted from theoretical calculations. The expected strong hydrogen bonds between the strong hydrogen bond donors and acceptors are observed, together with evidence of weaker CH hydrogen bonds and π interactions also playing a significant role in determining the arrangement of adjacent molecules.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of renal dopamine D1 receptor function during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees A; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2015-05-01

    There exists a strong link between oxidative stress, renal dopaminergic system, and hypertension. It is reported that reactive oxygen species attenuate renal proximal tubular dopamine receptor (D1R) function, which disrupts sodium regulation and leads to hypertension. However, the mechanisms for renal D1R dysfunction are not clear. We investigated the role of redox-sensitive transcription factors AP1 and SP3 in transcriptional suppression of D1R gene and subsequent D1R signaling. Human kidney proximal tubular cells were treated with a pro-oxidant l-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) with and without an antioxidant tempol. In human kidney cells, BSO caused oxidative stress and reduced D1R mRNA and membrane receptor expression. Incubation of human kidney cells with SKF38393, a D1R agonist, caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of Na/K-ATPase. However, SKF38393 failed to inhibit Na/K-ATPase in BSO-treated cells. BSO increased AP1 and SP3 nuclear expression. Transfection with AP1- or SP3-specific siRNA abolished BSO-induced D1R downregulation. Treatment of rats with BSO for 4 weeks increased oxidative stress and SP3-AP1 expression and reduced D1R numbers in renal proximal tubules. These rats exhibited high blood pressure, and SKF38393 failed to inhibit proximal tubular Na/K-ATPase activity. Control rats were kept on tap water. Tempol per se had no effect on D1R expression or other signaling molecules but prevented BSO-induced oxidative stress, SP3-AP1 upregulation, and D1R dysfunction in both human kidney cells and rats. These data show that oxidative stress via AP1-SP3 activation suppresses D1R transcription and function. Tempol mitigates oxidative stress, blocks AP1-SP3 activation, and prevents D1R dysfunction and hypertension.

  8. Intrinsic vascular dopamine - a key modulator of hypoxia-induced vasodilatation in splanchnic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Uwe; Kuncova, Jitka; Brüggmann, Doerthe; Paddenberg, Renate; Rafiq, Amir; Henrich, Michael; Weigand, Markus A; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Mewe, Marco; Middendorff, Ralf; Slavikova, Jana; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2014-04-15

    Dopamine not only is a precursor of the catecholamines noradrenaline and adrenaline but also serves as an independent neurotransmitter and paracrine hormone. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and is a potent vasodilator in many mammalian systemic arteries, strongly suggesting an endogenous source of dopamine in the vascular wall. Here we demonstrated dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline in rat aorta and superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) by radioimmunoassay. Chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine showed a significant reduction of noradrenaline and adrenaline, while dopamine levels remained unaffected. Isolated endothelial cells were able to synthesize and release dopamine upon cAMP stimulation. Consistent with these data, mRNAs coding for catecholamine synthesizing enzymes, i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, and dopamine-β-hydroxylase were detected by RT-PCR in cultured endothelial cells from SMA. TH protein was detected by immunohistochemisty and Western blot. Exposure of endothelial cells to hypoxia (1% O2) increased TH mRNA. Vascular smooth muscle cells partially expressed catecholaminergic traits. A physiological role of endogenous vascular dopamine was shown in SMA, where D1 dopamine receptor blockade abrogated hypoxic vasodilatation. Experiments on SMA with endothelial denudation revealed a significant contribution of the endothelium, although subendothelial dopamine release dominated. From these results we conclude that endothelial cells and cells of the underlying vascular wall synthesize and release dopamine in an oxygen-regulated manner. In the splanchnic vasculature, this intrinsic non-neuronal dopamine is the dominating vasodilator released upon lowering of oxygen tension.

  9. Effect of mesenchymal precursor cells on the systemic inflammatory response and endothelial dysfunction in an ovine model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Dooley

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model.Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction.Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls, and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study demonstrated that MPCs

  10. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions.

  11. The link between dopamine function and apathy in cannabis users: an [18F]-DOPA PET imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Michael A P; Morgan, Celia J A; Kapur, Shitij; Curran, H Valerie; Howes, Oliver D

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world, and regular use has been associated with reduced motivation, i.e. apathy. Regular long-term cannabis use has been associated with reduced dopamine synthesis capacity. The mesolimbic dopaminergic system mediates the processing of incentive stimuli by modifying their motivational value, which in turn is modulated by endocannabinoid signalling. Thus, it has been proposed that dopaminergic dysfunction underlies the apathy associated with chronic cannabis use. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dopaminergic function and subjective apathy in cannabis users. We measured dopamine synthesis capacity (indexed as the influx rate constant K i(cer)) via 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[(18)F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine positron emission tomography and subjective apathy using the self-rated Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S) in 14 regular cannabis users. All subjects scored in excess of 34 points on the AES-S (median [interquartile range] 59.5 [7.5]), indicative of significant apathy based on normative data. K i (cer) was inversely correlated to AES-S score in the whole striatum and its associative functional subdivision (Spearman's rho = -0.64, p = 0.015 [whole striatum]; rho = -0.69, p = 0.006 [associative]) but not in the limbic or sensorimotor striatal subdivisions. There were no significant relationships between AES-S and current cannabis consumption (rho = 0.28, p = 0.34) or age of first cannabis use (rho = 0.25, p = 0.40). These findings indicate that the reduction in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity associated with chronic cannabis use may underlie reduced reward sensitivity and a motivation associated with chronic cannabis use.

  12. The involvement of dopaminergic system on LH secretion Nelore heifers Sistema dopaminérgico na secreção de LH de novilhas Nelore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Venturoli Perri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of sulpiride administration (dopamine D2 antagonist, 0.59 m/kg body weight, s.c. and blood collected every 15 min for 10 h thereafter on Luteinizing Hormone (LH secretion in B. indicus pre-pubertal heifers at 8, 12 and 16 month of age. LH was quantified by RIA, sensitivity (0.039 ng/ml and CV (15.51%. In heifers given sulpiride treatment didn’t differ (P≥0.05 in LH concentration, total secretion area, peak total area, number of peaks, area of highest secretion peak and time to highest peak occurrence and maximum LH secretion, from control group. The results suggest absence of dopamine D2 antagonist effect on LH secretion in pre-pubertal Nellore heifers, didn’t neurotransmitter participating on sexual maturation.O presente trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de investigar a variação na secreção do Hormônio Luteinizante (LH em resposta ao tratamento com sulpiride, antagonista de receptor (D2 dopaminérgico, com administração de 0,59mg/kg, s.c. e colheita de amostras de sangue a cada 15min, por 10h. Foram utilizadas 10 novilhas da raça Nelore pré-púberes, aos 8, 12 e 16 meses de idade. A concentração de LH foi quantificada por radioimunoensaio, e o coeficiente de variação intra, o interensaio e a sensibilidade dos ensaios de LH foram respectivamente de: 11,86%; 15,51%; 0,039ng/mL. O tratamento com sulpiride não diferiu na concentração média de LH, área total de secreção de LH e picos, número de picos, área do maior pico, tempo necessário ao aparecimento do maior pico de secreção de LH e amplitude máxima de LH, em comparação ao grupo controle. Os resultados indicam ausência de efeito da dopamina, através de receptores D2, durante a fase pré-púbere, em novilhas da raça Nelore, o que sinaliza a não participação como neurotransmissora na secreção de LH durante o processo de maturação sexual.

  13. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate communication is at the heart of successful, healthy social interactions in humans. Deficits in social communication are a hallmark of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, very little research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying these issues. It has been suggested that dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter system involved in stimulating communication in individuals that are not highly motivated to communicate. A typical model to study dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans is represented by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, who show motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of social communication on actions in non-demented PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the communicative intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. In two main conditions, participants were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either simply lift it (individual condition) or lift it with the intent to communicate a meaning to a partner (communicative condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to communicative intention and that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating communicative intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients. Although the to-be-grasped object remained the same both the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'individual' and the 'communication' conditions. The PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. We contend that social and communicative impairments are associated with abnormalities in

  14. Dopamine-dependent effects on basal and glutamate stimulated network dynamics in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Conant, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    Oscillatory activity occurs in cortical and hippocampal networks with specific frequency ranges thought to be critical to working memory, attention, differentiation of neuronal precursors, and memory trace replay. Synchronized activity within relatively large neuronal populations is influenced by firing and bursting frequency within individual cells, and the latter is modulated by changes in intrinsic membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. Published work suggests that dopamine, a potent modulator of learning and memory, acts on dopamine receptor 1-like dopamine receptors to influence the phosphorylation and trafficking of glutamate receptor subunits, along with long-term potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Prior studies also suggest that dopamine can influence voltage gated ion channel function and membrane excitability in these regions. Fewer studies have examined dopamine's effect on related endpoints in hippocampus, or potential consequences in terms of network burst dynamics. In this study, we record action potential activity using a microelectrode array system to examine the ability of dopamine to modulate baseline and glutamate-stimulated bursting activity in an in vitro network of cultured murine hippocampal neurons. We show that dopamine stimulates a dopamine type-1 receptor-dependent increase in number of overall bursts within minutes of its application. Notably, however, at the concentration used herein, dopamine did not increase the overall synchrony of bursts between electrodes. Although the number of bursts normalizes by 40 min, bursting in response to a subsequent glutamate challenge is enhanced by dopamine pretreatment. Dopamine-dependent potentiation of glutamate-stimulated bursting was not observed when the two modulators were administered concurrently. In parallel, pretreatment of murine hippocampal cultures with dopamine stimulated lasting increases in the phosphorylation of the

  15. Assessing the Role of Dopamine in Limb and Cranial-Oromotor Control in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jacqueline R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Jacobs, Amber N.; Tews, Nathan; Russell, John A.; Ahrens, Allison M.; Ma, Sean T.; Britt, Joshua M.; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Schallert, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder primarily characterized by sensorimotor dysfunction. The neuropathology of PD includes a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Classic signs of the disease include rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. However, as many as 90% of patients also experience…

  16. A choreography of nicotinic receptors directs the dopamine neuron routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungless, Mark A; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2006-06-15

    Modulation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is thought to play an important role in both health and addiction. However, a clear understanding of how these receptors regulate in vivo firing activity has been elusive. In this issue of Neuron, Mameli-Engvall and colleagues report an impressive and thought-provoking series of in vivo experiments combining single-unit recordings from dopamine neurons with nAChR subunit deletions and region-specific lentiviral subunit re-expression.

  17. Preclinical characterization of toluene as a non-classical hallucinogen drug in rats: participation of 5-HT, dopamine and glutamate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-García, María Teresa; López-Rubalcava, Carolina; Cruz, Silvia L

    2015-10-01

    Toluene is a misused inhalant with hallucinogenic properties and complex effects. Toluene blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, releases dopamine (DA), and modifies several neurotransmitter levels; nonetheless, the mechanism by which it produces hallucinations is not well characterized. This study aims (a) to study toluene's effects on the 5-HT2A-mediated head-twitch response (HTR), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) tissue levels in discrete brain regions; (b) to compare the actions of toluene, ketamine, and 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) on HTR; and (c) to study the pharmacological blockade of toluene's and ketamine's effects by selective drugs. Independent groups of rats inhaled toluene (500-12,000 ppm) for 30 min during which the occurrence of serotonergic signs was analyzed. Brains were obtained after exposure to determine DA and 5-HT levels by HPLC. Toluene concentration-dependently induced HTR. Other serotonin syndrome signs were evident at high concentrations. Toluene (4000 and 8000 ppm), and ketamine (3 and 10 mg/kg), significantly increased 5-HT levels in the frontal cortex (FC) striatum, hippocampus, and brain stem, as well as DA levels in the striatum and FC. Pretreatment with ketanserin (5HT2A/2C receptor antagonist), M100907 (selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist), D-serine (co-agonist of the NMDA receptor glycine site), and haloperidol (D2 receptor antagonist) significantly decreased toluene's and ketamine's actions. The 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 had no effect. Toluene stimulates 5HT2A and 5HT2C receptors, and increases 5-HT and DA levels. These actions are similar to those produced by ketamine and involve activation of a complex neurotransmitter network that includes NMDA receptor antagonism.

  18. A kinetic model of dopamine- and calcium-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity.

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    Takashi Nakano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal synapse plasticity of medium spiny neurons is regulated by glutamate input from the cortex and dopamine input from the substantia nigra. While cortical stimulation alone results in long-term depression (LTD, the combination with dopamine switches LTD to long-term potentiation (LTP, which is known as dopamine-dependent plasticity. LTP is also induced by cortical stimulation in magnesium-free solution, which leads to massive calcium influx through NMDA-type receptors and is regarded as calcium-dependent plasticity. Signaling cascades in the corticostriatal spines are currently under investigation. However, because of the existence of multiple excitatory and inhibitory pathways with loops, the mechanisms regulating the two types of plasticity remain poorly understood. A signaling pathway model of spines that express D1-type dopamine receptors was constructed to analyze the dynamic mechanisms of dopamine- and calcium-dependent plasticity. The model incorporated all major signaling molecules, including dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein with a molecular weight of 32 kDa (DARPP32, as well as AMPA receptor trafficking in the post-synaptic membrane. Simulations with dopamine and calcium inputs reproduced dopamine- and calcium-dependent plasticity. Further in silico experiments revealed that the positive feedback loop consisted of protein kinase A (PKA, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the phosphorylation site at threonine 75 of DARPP-32 (Thr75 served as the major switch for inducing LTD and LTP. Calcium input modulated this loop through the PP2B (phosphatase 2B-CK1 (casein kinase 1-Cdk5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5-Thr75 pathway and PP2A, whereas calcium and dopamine input activated the loop via PKA activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP. The positive feedback loop displayed robust bi-stable responses following changes in the reaction parameters. Increased basal dopamine levels disrupted this dopamine-dependent plasticity. The

  19. Midbrain dopamine function in schizophrenia and depression: a post-mortem and positron emission tomographic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Oliver D; Williams, Matthew; Ibrahim, Kemal; Leung, Garret; Egerton, Alice; McGuire, Philip K; Turkheimer, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Elevated in vivo markers of presynaptic striatal dopamine activity have been a consistent finding in schizophrenia, and include a large effect size elevation in dopamine synthesis capacity. However, it is not known if the dopaminergic dysfunction is limited to the striatal terminals of dopamine neurons, or is also evident in the dopamine neuron cell bodies, which mostly originate in the substantia nigra. The aim of our studies was therefore to determine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is altered in the substantia nigra of people with schizophrenia, and how this relates to symptoms. In a post-mortem study, a semi-quantitative analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase staining was conducted in nigral dopaminergic cells from post-mortem tissue from patients with schizophrenia (n = 12), major depressive disorder (n = 13) and matched control subjects (n = 13). In an in vivo imaging study, nigral and striatal dopaminergic function was measured in patients with schizophrenia (n = 29) and matched healthy control subjects (n = 29) using (18)F-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine ((18)F-DOPA) positron emission tomography. In the post-mortem study we found that tyrosine hydroxylase staining was significantly increased in nigral dopaminergic neurons in schizophrenia compared with both control subjects (P dopamine synthesis capacity is seen in the nigral origin of dopamine neurons as well as their striatal terminals in schizophrenia, and is linked to symptom severity in patients.

  20. Dopamine Dynamics during Continuous Intracranial Self-Stimulation: Effect of Waveform on Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeberg, Nathan T; Johnson, Justin A; Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2016-11-16

    The neurotransmitter dopamine is heavily implicated in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Many drugs of abuse that affect ICSS behavior target the dopaminergic system, and optogenetic activation of dopamine neurons is sufficient to support self-stimulation. However, the patterns of phasic dopamine release during ICSS remain unclear. Early ICSS studies using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) rarely observed phasic dopamine release, which led to the surprising conclusion that it is dissociated from ICSS. However, several advances in the sensitivity (i.e., the use of waveforms with extended anodic limits) and analysis (i.e., principal component regression) of FSCV measurements have made it possible to detect smaller, yet physiologically relevant, dopamine release events. Therefore, this study revisits phasic dopamine release during ICSS using these tools. It was found that the anodic limit of the voltammetric waveform has a substantial effect on the patterns of dopamine release observed during continuous ICSS. While data collected with low anodic limits (i.e., +1.0 V) support the disappearance of phasic dopamine release observed in previous investigation, the use of high anodic limits (+1.3 V, +1.4 V) allows for continual detection of dopamine release throughout ICSS. However, the +1.4 V waveform lacks the ability to resolve narrowly spaced events, with the best balance of temporal resolution and sensitivity provided by the +1.3 V waveform. Ultimately, it is revealed that the amplitude of phasic dopamine release decays but does not fully disappear during continuous ICSS.

  1. ROLE OF D2 DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ON MODULATION OF THE LEUKOCYTE FORMULA IN RESTRAINT STRESSED RATS

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    Lucian Hritcu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a monoamine neurotransmitter of both central and peripheral nervous system. Its role in the neural-immune communication has been discussed in the present study. Results reveal that in vivo blockade of D2 dopamine receptor by means of sulpiride, a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptor produce changes in functional activities of the immune effector cells. Adults rats pretreated once with LPS (a bacterial product (25µg/250µl, i.p., produce an immune response, were subjected to i.p. injection with sulpiride (4 mg/kg b.w., i.p., a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptors, after 3 days postimmunization. After 18 days later, we assessed the total leukocyte number, neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils number. In summary, we provide that D2 dopamine receptor blockade suppress or enhance the immune effector cells number in restraint stress.

  2. Ih current is necessary to maintain normal dopamine fluctuations and sleep consolidation in Drosophila.

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    Alicia Gonzalo-Gomez

    Full Text Available HCN channels are becoming pharmacological targets mainly in cardiac diseases. But apart from their well-known role in heart pacemaking, these channels are widely expressed in the nervous system where they contribute to the neuron firing pattern. Consequently, abolishing Ih current might have detrimental consequences in a big repertoire of behavioral traits. Several studies in mammals have identified the Ih current as an important determinant of the firing activity of dopaminergic neurons, and recent evidences link alterations in this current to various dopamine-related disorders. We used the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to investigate how lack of Ih current affects dopamine levels and the behavioral consequences in the sleep:activity pattern. Unlike mammals, in Drosophila there is only one gene encoding HCN channels. We generated a deficiency of the DmIh core gene region and measured, by HPLC, levels of dopamine. Our data demonstrate daily variations of dopamine in wild-type fly heads. Lack of Ih current dramatically alters dopamine pattern, but different mechanisms seem to operate during light and dark conditions. Behaviorally, DmIh mutant flies display alterations in the rest:activity pattern, and altered circadian rhythms. Our data strongly suggest that Ih current is necessary to prevent dopamine overproduction at dark, while light input allows cycling of dopamine in an Ih current dependent manner. Moreover, lack of Ih current results in behavioral defects that are consistent with altered dopamine levels.

  3. Dopamine function in cigarette smokers: an [¹⁸F]-DOPA PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Michael A P; Pepper, Fiona; Egerton, Alice; Demjaha, Arsime; Tomasi, Gianpaolo; Mouchlianitis, Elias; Maximen, Levi; Veronese, Mattia; Turkheimer, Federico; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Howes, Oliver D

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco addiction is a global public health problem. Addiction to tobacco is thought to involve the effects of nicotine on the dopaminergic system. Only one study has previously investigated dopamine synthesis capacity in cigarette smokers. This study, exclusively in male volunteers, reported increased dopamine synthesis capacity in heavy smokers compared with non-smokers. We sought to determine whether dopamine synthesis capacity was elevated in a larger sample of cigarette smokers that included females. Dopamine synthesis capacity was measured in 15 daily moderate smokers with 15 sex- and age-matched control subjects who had never smoked tobacco. Dopamine synthesis capacity (indexed as the influx rate constant K(i)(cer)) was measured with positron emission tomography and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[(18)F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine. There was no significant group difference in dopamine synthesis capacity between smokers and non-smoker controls in the whole striatum (t28=0.64, p=0.53) or any of its functional subdivisions. In smokers, there were no significant relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and dopamine synthesis capacity in the whole striatum (r=-0.23, p=0.41) or any striatal subdivision. These findings indicate that moderate smoking is not associated with altered striatal dopamine synthesis capacity.

  4. Real-time electrochemical recording of dopamine release under optogenetic stimulation.

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    Wen-Tai Chiu

    Full Text Available Dopaminergic PC12 cells can synthesize and release dopamine, providing a good cellular model for investigating dopamine regulation. Optogenetic stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 provides high spatial and temporal precision for selective stimulation as a powerful neuromodulation tool for neuroscience studies. The aim of this study is to measure dopamine release from dopaminergic PC12 cells under optogenetic stimulation using electrochemical recording of self-assembled monolayers modified microelectrode with amperometric measurement in real time. The activation of PC12 cells under various optogenetic stimulation schemes are characterized by measuring single-cell Ca(2+ imaging. After 10 seconds of optogenetic stimulation, the evoked intracellular Ca(2+ level and dopamine current of channelrhodopsin-2-transfected PC12 cells were 1.6- and 3.5-fold higher than those of the control cells. The optogenetic stimulation effects on Ca(2+ influx and dopamine release were 81% and 63% inhibition by using a Ca(2+ channel antagonist Nifedipine. The results indicate that optogenetic stimulation can evoke voltage-gated Ca(2+ channel-dependent dopamine exocytosis from PC12 cells in a cell specific, temporally precise and dose-dependent manner. This proposed dopamine recording system can be developed to be a good cell model for dopamine regulation and drug screening in vitro, or dopaminergic cell implantation therapy in vivo using optogenetic stimulation in a precise and convenient way.

  5. Real-time electrochemical recording of dopamine release under optogenetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lin, Che-Ming; Tsai, Tien-Chun; Wu, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic PC12 cells can synthesize and release dopamine, providing a good cellular model for investigating dopamine regulation. Optogenetic stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 provides high spatial and temporal precision for selective stimulation as a powerful neuromodulation tool for neuroscience studies. The aim of this study is to measure dopamine release from dopaminergic PC12 cells under optogenetic stimulation using electrochemical recording of self-assembled monolayers modified microelectrode with amperometric measurement in real time. The activation of PC12 cells under various optogenetic stimulation schemes are characterized by measuring single-cell Ca(2+) imaging. After 10 seconds of optogenetic stimulation, the evoked intracellular Ca(2+) level and dopamine current of channelrhodopsin-2-transfected PC12 cells were 1.6- and 3.5-fold higher than those of the control cells. The optogenetic stimulation effects on Ca(2+) influx and dopamine release were 81% and 63% inhibition by using a Ca(2+) channel antagonist Nifedipine. The results indicate that optogenetic stimulation can evoke voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel-dependent dopamine exocytosis from PC12 cells in a cell specific, temporally precise and dose-dependent manner. This proposed dopamine recording system can be developed to be a good cell model for dopamine regulation and drug screening in vitro, or dopaminergic cell implantation therapy in vivo using optogenetic stimulation in a precise and convenient way.

  6. Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Daniel S; MacKie, Palmer J; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Chumin, Evgeny J; Christian, Bradley T; Yoder, Karmen K

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a "2-back" task, and one while performing a "0-back" (attentional control, "baseline") task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain.

  7. Dopamine receptor ligands. Part 18: (1) modification of the structural skeleton of indolobenzazecine-type dopamine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaa, Dina; Enzensperger, Christoph; Abul Azm, Shams El Din; El Khawass, El Sayeda; El Sayed, Ola; Lehmann, Jochen

    2010-03-25

    On the basis of the D(1/5)-selective dopamine antagonist LE 300 (1), an indolo[3,2-f]benzazecine derivative, we changed the annulation pattern of the heterocycles. The target compounds represent novel heterocyclic ring systems. The most constrained indolo[4,3a,3-ef]benzazecine 2 was inactive, but the indolo[4,3a,3-fg]benzazacycloundecene 3 showed antagonistic properties (functional Ca(2+) assay) with nanomolar affinities (radioligand binding) for all dopamine receptor subtypes, whereas the indolo[2,3-f]benzazecine 4 displayed a selectivity profile similar to 3 but with decreased affinities.

  8. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

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    .org Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Page ( 1 ) Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle. It occurs when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the ...

  9. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Female Sexual Dysfunction February 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Resources Mayo Clinic Cleveland Clinic What is female sexual dysfunction (FSD)? Many women have a low sex ...

  10. Dopamine Receptor Availability in ADHD

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal dopamine (D2 receptor availability was determined by iodobenzamide brain SPECT, before and 3 months after methylphenidate (MPH therapy, in 9 children (mean age, 9.8 years with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD examined at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.

  11. Stress affects a gastrin-releasing peptide system in the spinal cord that mediates sexual function: implications for psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

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    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many men suffering from stress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, report sexual dysfunction, which is traditionally treated via psychological counseling. Recently, we identified a gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP system in the lumbar spinal cord that is a primary mediator for male reproductive functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To ask whether an acute severe stress could alter the male specific GRP system, we used a single-prolonged stress (SPS, a putative rat model for PTSD in the present study. Exposure of SPS to male rats decreases both the local content and axonal distribution of GRP in the lower lumbar spinal cord and results in an attenuation of penile reflexes in vivo. Remarkably, pharmacological stimulation of GRP receptors restores penile reflexes in SPS-exposed males, and induces spontaneous ejaculation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, although the level of plasma testosterone is normal 7 days after SPS exposure, we found a significant decrease in the expression of androgen receptor protein in this spinal center. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the spinal GRP system appears to be a stress-vulnerable center for male reproductive functions, which may provide new insight into a clinical target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction triggered by stress and psychiatric disorders.

  12. Imaging of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations

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    Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Technological advances in molecular imaging made it possible to image synaptic neurotransmitter concentration in living human brain. The dopaminergic system has been most intensively studied because of its importance in neurological as well as psychiatric disorders. This paper provides a brief overview of recent progress in imaging studies of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations.

  13. Dopamine-induced silica-polydopamine hybrids with controllable morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chia-Che; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-04-01

    Novel silica-polydopamine hybrids, with controllable morphology, are facilely fabricated in an emulsion system consisting of tetraethyl orthosilicate, dopamine, water, and NaOH under weakly basic conditions (pH 8.5-10). An increase in initial pH favors the formation of nano-structured spherical silica-PDA hybrids from a flocculated structure.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  15. Analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples of hospital patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ferrer, Daniel; García García, Aurelio; Peris-Vicente, Juan; Gimeno-Adelantado, José Vicente; Esteve-Romero, Josep

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method based on micellar liquid chromatography was developed to determine the concentration of three catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine) in urine. The detection of these compounds in urine can be useful to diagnose several diseases, related to stress and sympathoadrenal system dysfunction, using a non-invasive collection procedure. The sample pretreatment was a simple dilution in a micellar solution, filtration, and direct injection, thus avoiding time-consuming and tedious extraction steps. Therefore, there is no need to use an internal standard. The three catecholamines were eluted using a C18 column and a mobile phase of 0.055 M sodium dodecyl sulfate-1.5% methanol buffered at pH 3.8 running at 1.5 mL/min under isocratic mode in less than 25 min. The detection was performed by amperometry applying a constant potential of +0.5 V. The procedure was validated following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency in terms of the following: calibration range (0.09-5 μg/mL), linearity (r(2) > 0.9995), limit of detection (0.02 μg/mL), within- and between-run accuracy (-6.5 to +8.4%) and precision (<10.2%), dilution integrity, matrix effect, robustness (<8.4), and stability. The obtained values were below those required by the guide. The method was rapid, easy-to-handle, eco-friendly, and safe and provides reliable quantitative data, and is thus useful for routine analysis. The procedure was applied to the analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples from patients of a local hospital.

  16. PET neuroimaging of extrastriatal dopamine receptors and prefrontal cortex functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2013-12-01

    The role of prefrontal dopamine D1 receptors in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functions, including working memory, is widely investigated. However, human (healthy volunteers and schizophrenia patients) positron emission tomography (PET) studies about the relationship between prefrontal D1 receptors and PFC functions are somewhat inconsistent. We argued that several factors including an inverted U-shaped relationship between prefrontal D1 receptors and PFC functions might be responsible for these inconsistencies. In contrast to D1 receptors, relatively less attention has been paid to the role of D2 receptors in PFC functions. Several animal and human pharmacological studies have reported that the systemic administration of D2 receptor agonist/antagonist modulates PFC functions, although those studies do not tell us which region(s) is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, while prefrontal D1 receptors are primarily involved in working memory, other PFC functions such as set-shifting seem to be differentially modulated by dopamine. PET studies of extrastriatal D2 receptors including ours suggested that orchestration of prefrontal dopamine transmission and hippocampal dopamine transmission might be necessary for a broad range of normal PFC functions. In order to understand the complex effects of dopamine signaling on PFC functions, measuring a single index related to basic dopamine tone is not sufficient. For a better understanding of the meanings of PET indices related to neurotransmitters, comprehensive information (presynaptic, postsynaptic, and beyond receptor signaling) will be required. Still, an interdisciplinary approach combining molecular imaging techniques with cognitive neuroscience and clinical psychiatry will provide new perspectives for understanding the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and their innovative drug developments.

  17. Encoding of aversion by dopamine and the nucleus accumbens

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    James Edgar Mccutcheon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive motivated behavior requires rapid discrimination between beneficial and harmful stimuli. Such discrimination leads to the generation of either an approach or rejection response, as appropriate, and enables organisms to maximize reward and minimize punishment. Classically, the nucleus accumbens (NAc and the dopamine projection to it are considered an integral part of the brain’s reward circuit, i.e., they direct approach and consumption behaviors and underlie positive reinforcement. This reward-centered framing ignores important evidence about the role of this system in encoding aversive events. One reason for bias towards reward is the difficulty in designing experiments in which animals repeatedly experience punishments; another is the challenge in dissociating the response to an aversive stimulus itself from the reward/relief experienced when an aversive stimulus is terminated. Here, we review studies that employ techniques with sufficient time resolution to measure responses in ventral tegmental area (VTA and NAc to aversive stimuli as they are delivered. We also present novel findings showing that the same stimulus – intraoral infusion of sucrose – has differing effects on NAc shell dopamine release depending on the prior experience. Here, for some rats, sucrose was rendered aversive by explicitly pairing it with malaise in a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. Thereafter, sucrose infusions led to a suppression of dopamine with a similar magnitude and time course to intra-oral infusions of a bitter quinine solution. The results are discussed in the context of regional differences in dopamine signaling and the implications of a pause in phasic dopamine release within the NAc shell. Together with our data, the emerging literature suggests an important role for differential phasic dopamine signaling in aversion versus reward.

  18. Encoding of aversion by dopamine and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, James E; Ebner, Stephanie R; Loriaux, Amy L; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires rapid discrimination between beneficial and harmful stimuli. Such discrimination leads to the generation of either an approach or rejection response, as appropriate, and enables organisms to maximize reward and minimize punishment. Classically, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the dopamine projection to it are considered an integral part of the brain's reward circuit, i.e., they direct approach and consumption behaviors and underlie positive reinforcement. This reward-centered framing ignores important evidence about the role of this system in encoding aversive events. One reason for bias toward reward is the difficulty in designing experiments in which animals repeatedly experience punishments; another is the challenge in dissociating the response to an aversive stimulus itself from the reward/relief experienced when an aversive stimulus is terminated. Here, we review studies that employ techniques with sufficient time resolution to measure responses in ventral tegmental area and NAc to aversive stimuli as they are delivered. We also present novel findings showing that the same stimulus - intra-oral infusion of sucrose - has differing effects on NAc shell dopamine release depending on the prior experience. Here, for some rats, sucrose was rendered aversive by explicitly pairing it with malaise in a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. Thereafter, sucrose infusions led to a suppression of dopamine with a similar magnitude and time course to intra-oral infusions of a bitter quinine solution. The results are discussed in the context of regional differences in dopamine signaling and the implications of a pause in phasic dopamine release within the NAc shell. Together with our data, the emerging literature suggests an important role for differential phasic dopamine signaling in aversion vs. reward.

  19. Seasonal effects on human striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel P; Kohn, Philip D; Baller, Erica B; Bronstein, Joel A; Masdeu, Joseph C; Berman, Karen F

    2010-11-01

    Past studies in rodents have demonstrated circannual variation in central dopaminergic activity as well as a host of compelling interactions between melatonin--a scotoperiod-responsive neurohormone closely tied to seasonal adaptation--and dopamine in the striatum and in midbrain neuronal populations with striatal projections. In humans, seasonal effects have been described for dopaminergic markers in CSF and postmortem brain, and there exists a range of affective, psychotic, and substance abuse disorders that have been associated with both seasonal symptomatic fluctuations and dopamine neurotransmission abnormalities. Together, these data indirectly suggest a potentially crucial link between circannual biorhythms and central dopamine systems. However, seasonal effects on dopamine function in the living, healthy human brain have never been tested. For this study, 86 healthy adults underwent (18)F-DOPA positron emission tomography scanning, each at a different time throughout the year. Striatal regions of interest (ROIs) were evaluated for differences in presynaptic dopamine synthesis, measured by the kinetic rate constant, K(i), between fall-winter and spring-summer scans. Analyses comparing ROI average K(i) values showed significantly greater putamen (18)F-DOPA K(i) in the fall-winter relative to the spring-summer group (p = 0.038). Analyses comparing voxelwise K(i) values confirmed this finding and evidenced intrastriatal localization of seasonal effects to the caudal putamen (p rate corrected), a region that receives dopaminergic input predominantly from the substantia nigra. These data are the first to directly demonstrate a seasonal effect on striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis and merit future research aimed at elucidating underlying mechanisms and implications for neuropsychiatric disease and new treatment approaches.

  20. Mathematical model of dopamine autoreceptors and uptake inhibitors and their influence on tonic and phasic dopamine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kristoffer Kisbye; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) D2-like autoreceptors are an important component of the DA system, but their influence on postsynaptic DA signaling is not well understood. They are, directly or indirectly, involved in drug abuse and in treatment of schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactive disorder: DA...

  1. Genetic inhibition of neurotransmission reveals role of glutamatergic input to dopamine neurons in high-effort behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M A; Gu, X; Adrover, M F; Lee, M R; Hnasko, T S; Alvarez, V A; Lu, W

    2017-02-14

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are crucial for many behavioral and cognitive functions. As the major excitatory input, glutamatergic afferents are important for control of the activity and plasticity of dopamine neurons. However, the role of glutamatergic input as a whole onto dopamine neurons remains unclear. Here we developed a mouse line in which glutamatergic inputs onto dopamine neurons are specifically impaired, and utilized this genetic model to directly test the role of glutamatergic inputs in dopamine-related functions. We found that while motor coordination and reward learning were largely unchanged, these animals showed prominent deficits in effort-related behavioral tasks. These results provide genetic evidence that glutamatergic transmission onto dopaminergic neurons underlies incentive motivation, a willingness to exert high levels of effort to obtain reinforcers, and have important implications for understanding the normal function of the midbrain dopamine system.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.7.

  2. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling in the striatum as a potential modulator of dopamine transmission in cocaine dependence

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    Pierre eTrifilieff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the Positron Emission Tomography (PET imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development.

  3. The Neuromodulator of Exploration: A Unifying Theory of the Role of Dopamine in Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin G DeYoung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The neuromodulator dopamine is centrally involved in reward, approach behavior, exploration, and various aspects of cognition. Variations in dopaminergic function are assumed to be associated with variations in personality, but exactly which traits are influenced by dopamine remains an open question. This paper proposes a theory of the role of dopamine in personality that organizes and explains the diversity of findings, utilizing the division of the dopaminergic system into value coding and salience coding neurons (Bromberg-Martin, Matsumoto, and Hikosaka, 2010. The value coding system is proposed to be related primarily to Extraversion and the salience coding system to Openness/Intellect. Global levels of dopamine influence the higher order personality factor, Plasticity, which comprises the shared variance of Extraversion and Openness/Intellect. All other traits related to dopamine are linked to Plasticity or its subtraits. The general function of dopamine is to promote exploration, by facilitating engagement with cues of specific reward (value and cues of the reward value of information (salience. This theory constitutes an extension of the entropy model of uncertainty (EMU; Hirsh, Mar, & Peterson, 2012, enabling EMU to account for the fact that uncertainty is an innate incentive reward as well as an innate threat. The theory accounts for the association of dopamine with traits ranging from sensation and novelty seeking, to impulsivity and aggression, to achievement striving, creativity, and cognitive abilities, to the overinclusive thinking characteristic of schizotypy.

  4. Dopamine inhibits proliferation, induces differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qun; YUAN Lin-bo

    2007-01-01

    Background Dopamine exerts its effects mainly in nervous system through D1, D2 or D3 receptors. There are few reports dealing with the effects of dopamine on leukaemia cells. However, some dopamine agonists or antagonists do show biological effects on some types of leukaemia cells. Here, we report the effects of dopamine on the proliferation,differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells.Methods Proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell counting both in liquid and semisolid cultures.Differentiation was verified by morphology, benzidine staining and flow cytometry. Apoptosis was checked by Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry. The two groups were untreated group and treated group (dopamine 10-9 mol/L-10-4mol/L).Results In liquid culture, MTT assay and colony assay, dopamine inhibited proliferation of K562 cells. Inhibition rate was 29.28% at 10-6 mol/L and 36.10% at 10-5 mol/L after culture for 5 days in MTT assay. In benzidine staining and CD71 expression, dopamine induced K562 cells toward erythroid differentiation by increased 155% at 10-6 mol/L and by 171% at 10-5 mol/L after culture for 5 days in benzidine staining. In Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry,dopamine induced K562 cells toward apoptosis. The sub G1 peak stained by PI was 14.23% at 10-4 mol/L dopamine after culture for 3 days compared with the control (0.81%) in flow cytometry.Conclusion Dopamine inhibites proliferation and induces both differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells.

  5. Effects of dopamine antagonists on methamphetamine-induced dopamine release in high and low alcohol preference rats.

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    Nishiguchi, Minori; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasuda, Shogo; Takahashi, Montonori; Yamamura, Takehiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Ouchi, Harumi; Minami, Takako; Hishida, Shigeru; Nishio, Hajime

    2010-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that high alcohol preference rats (HAP) have a significantly higher sensitivity than low alcohol preference rats (LAP) for methamphetamine (MAP). In this study, changes in dopamine and serotonin release induced by MAP (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) after pre-treatment with D1 and D2 receptor antagonists were examined in the striatum of rats with different alcohol preferences to elucidate differences in receptor levels between the two rat strains. D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 or D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol were administrated intracerebroventricularly 10 min before MAP stimulation. This study investigated the effect of methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin release in striatum using microdialysis of freely moving rats coupled to ECD-HPLC. With haloperidol treatment both strains of rats showed a significantly greater maximum increase on MAP-induced dopamine release compared with respective control rats. However, after SCH23390 treatment only HAP rats showed a significantly greater increase in dopamine release compared with controls. SCH23390 blocks mainly D1 receptors only in the post-synaptic membrane, whereas haloperidol blocks D2 receptors in both the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic membranes. The MAP-induced increase in dopamine release following haloperidol pre-treatment was greater than SCH23390 pre-treatment in both strains. This result indicates that D2 receptors (autoreceptors) in the pre-synaptic membrane were blocked, leading to the elimination of the feedback function that regulates dopamine release. These data suggested that alcohol preference is associated with the action of MAP, and the dopaminergic mechanism, specifically the D1 system in the striatum, might have a different pathway dependent on alcohol preference.

  6. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain alters synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

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    Sui, Li; Song, Xiao-Jin; Ren, Jie; Ju, Li-Hua; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ouabain, a specific Na-K-ATPase inhibitor, in rats mimics the manic phenotypes of bipolar disorder and thus has been proposed as one of the best animal models of mania. Bipolar mania has been known to be associated with dysfunctions of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a brain area critically involved in mental functions; however, the exact mechanism underlying these dysfunctions is not yet clear. The present study investigated synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity, and dopamine release in Sprague-Dawley rat mPFC following ICV administration of ouabain (5 μl of 1 mM ouabain). The electrophysiological results demonstrated that ouabain depressed the short- and the long-term synaptic plasticity, represented by paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, respectively, in the mPFC. These ouabain-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity can be prevented by pre-treatment with lithium (intraperitoneal injection of 47.5 mg/kg lithium, twice a day, 7 days), which acts as an effective mood stabilizer in preventing mania. The electrochemical results demonstrated that ICV administration of ouabain enhanced dopamine release in the mPFC, which did not be affected by pre-treatment with lithium. These findings suggested that alterations in synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in the mPFC might underlie the dysfunctions of mPFC accompanied with ouabain administration-induced bipolar mania.

  7. Comparison of dopamine kinetics in the larval Drosophila ventral nerve cord and protocerebrum with improved optogenetic stimulation.

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    Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine release and uptake have been studied in the Drosophila larval ventral nerve cord (VNC) using optogenetics to stimulate endogenous release. However, other areas of the central nervous system remain uncharacterized. Here, we compare dopamine release in the VNC and protocerebrum of larval Drosophila. Stimulations were performed with CsChrimson, a new, improved, red light-activated channelrhodopsin. In both regions, dopamine release was observed after only a single, 4 ms duration light pulse. Michaelis-Menten modeling was used to understand release and uptake parameters for dopamine. The amount of dopamine released ([DA]p ) on the first stimulation pulse is higher than the average [DA]p released from subsequent pulses. The initial and average amount of dopamine released per stimulation pulse is smaller in the protocerebrum than in the VNC. The average Vmax of 0.08 μM/s in the protocerebrum was significantly higher than the Vmax of 0.05 μM/s in the VNC. The average Km of 0.11 μM in the protocerebrum was not significantly different from the Km of 0.10 μM in the VNC. When the competitive dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor nisoxetine was applied, the Km increased significantly in both regions while Vmax stayed the same. This work demonstrates regional differences in dopamine release and uptake kinetics, indicating important variation in the amount of dopamine available for neurotransmission and neuromodulation. We use a new optogenetic tool, red light activated CsChrimson, to stimulate the release of dopamine in the ventral nerve cord and medial protocerebrum of the larval Drosophila central nervous system. We monitored extracellular dopamine by fast scan cyclic voltammetry and used Michaelis-Menten modeling to probe the regulation of extracellular dopamine, discovering important similarities and differences in these two regions.

  8. Dimensional psychiatry: mental disorders as dysfunctions of basic learning mechanisms.

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    Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Beck, Anne; Wackerhagen, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    It has been questioned that the more than 300 mental disorders currently listed in international disease classification systems all have a distinct neurobiological correlate. Here, we support the idea that basic dimensions of mental dysfunctions, such as alterations in reinforcement learning, can be identified, which interact with individual vulnerability and psychosocial stress factors and, thus, contribute to syndromes of distress across traditional nosological boundaries. We further suggest that computational modeling of learning behavior can help to identify specific alterations in reinforcement-based decision-making and their associated neurobiological correlates. For example, attribution of salience to drug-related cues associated with dopamine dysfunction in addiction can increase habitual decision-making via promotion of Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer as indicated by computational modeling of the effect of Pavlovian-conditioned stimuli (here affectively positive or alcohol-related cues) on instrumental approach and avoidance behavior. In schizophrenia, reward prediction errors can be modeled computationally and associated with functional brain activation, thus revealing reduced encoding of such learning signals in the ventral striatum and compensatory activation in the frontal cortex. With respect to negative mood states, it has been shown that both reduced functional activation of the ventral striatum elicited by reward-predicting stimuli and stress-associated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in interaction with reduced serotonin transporter availability and increased amygdala activation by aversive cues contribute to clinical depression; altogether these observations support the notion that basic learning mechanisms, such as Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning and Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer, represent a basic dimension of mental disorders that can be mechanistically characterized using computational modeling and

  9. Dopamine D(3) receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced alterations in dopaminergic neuronal function: role of hyperthermia.

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    Baladi, Michelle G; Newman, Amy H; Nielsen, Shannon M; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2014-06-05

    Methamphetamine administration causes long-term deficits to dopaminergic systems that, in humans, are thought to be associated with motor slowing and memory impairment. Methamphetamine interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine that, in turn, binds to a number of dopamine receptor subtypes. Although the relative contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of methamphetamine is not fully known, non-selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists can attenuate methamphetamine-induced changes to dopamine systems. The present study extended these findings by testing the role of the dopamine D3 receptor subtype in mediating the long-term dopaminergic, and for comparison serotonergic, deficits caused by methamphetamine. Results indicate that the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist, PG01037, attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in striatal DAT, but not hippocampal serotonin (5HT) transporter (SERT), function, as assessed 7 days after treatment. However, PG01037 also attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. When methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was maintained by treating rats in a warm ambient environment, PG01037 failed to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT uptake. Furthermore, PG01037 did not attenuate methamphetamine-induced decreases in dopamine and 5HT content. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that dopamine D3 receptors mediate, in part, the long-term deficits in DAT function caused by methamphetamine, and that this effect likely involves an attenuation of methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Presynaptic D2 dopamine receptors control long-term depression expression and memory processes in the temporal hippocampus.

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    Rocchetti, Jill; Isingrini, Elsa; Dal Bo, Gregory; Sagheby, Sara; Menegaux, Aurore; Tronche, François; Levesque, Daniel; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain; Wong, Tak Pan; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Giros, Bruno

    2015-03-15

    Dysfunctional mesocorticolimbic dopamine signaling has been linked to alterations in motor and reward-based functions associated with psychiatric disorders. Converging evidence from patients with psychiatric disorders and use of antipsychotics suggests that imbalance of dopamine signaling deeply alters hippocampal functions. However, given the lack of full characterization of a functional mesohippocampal pathway, the precise role of dopamine transmission in memory deficits associated with these disorders and their dedicated therapies is unknown. In particular, the positive outcome of antipsychotic treatments, commonly antagonizing D2 dopamine receptors (D2Rs), on cognitive deficits and memory impairments remains questionable. Following pharmacologic and genetic manipulation of dopamine transmission, we performed anatomic, neurochemical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral investigations to uncover the role of D2Rs in hippocampal-dependent plasticity and learning. Naïve mice (n = 4-21) were used in the different procedures. Dopamine modulated both long-term potentiation and long-term depression in the temporal hippocampus as well as spatial and recognition learning and memory in mice through D2Rs. Although genetic deletion or pharmacologic blockade of D2Rs led to the loss of long-term potentiation expression, the specific genetic removal of presynaptic D2Rs impaired long-term depression and performances on spatial memory tasks. Presynaptic D2Rs in dopamine fibers of the temporal hippocampus tightly modulate long-term depression expression and play a major role in the regulation of hippocampal learning and memory. This direct role of mesohippocampal dopamine input as uncovered here adds a new dimension to dopamine involvement in the physiology underlying deficits associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.