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Sample records for dominant nephrogenic diabetes

  1. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  2. Reversed polarized delivery of an aquaporin-2 mutant causes dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Bichet, D.G.; Konings, I.B.M.; Nivet, H.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F.; Os, C.H. van; Deen, P.M.T.

    2003-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates body water conservation by redistributing aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels from intracellular vesicles to the apical surface of renal collecting ducts, resulting in water reabsorption from urine. Mutations in AQP2 cause autosomal nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disease

  3. [Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Jones, Luis; Medeiros-Domingo, Mara

    The anti-diuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary and regulates water reabsorption in the principal cells of the kidney collecting duct. Binding of AVP to the arginine-vasopressin receptor type-2 in the basolateral membrane leads to translocation of aquaporin-2 water channels to the apical membrane of the principal cells of the collecting duct, inducing water permeability of the membrane. This results in water reabsorption in the collecting duct of the nephron following an osmotic gradient. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by partial or complete renal resistance to the effects of AVP. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a disorder associated with mutations in either the AVPR2 or AQP2 gene, causing the inability of patients to concentrate their urine. Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be caused by electrolyte imbalances (e.g., hypercalcemia, hypokalemia), renal/extra-renal diseases and drugs (e.g., lithium toxicity). This article reviews the causes, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Based on more in-depth mechanistic understanding, new therapeutic strategies are current being explored. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus produce too much urine (polyuria), which causes them to be excessively thirsty (polydipsia). ... gene have features of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus , including polyuria and polydipsia. A characteristic of X-linked inheritance ...

  5. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, D; Bichet, Daniel G

    2017-04-01

    In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), the kidney is unable to concentrate urine despite elevated concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin. In congenital NDI, polyuria and polydipsia are present from birth and should be immediately recognized to avoid severe episodes of dehydration. Unfortunately, NDI is still often recognized late after a 'diagnostic odyssey' involving false leads and dangerous treatments.Once diagnosed, appropriate treatment can be started. Moreover, laboratory studies have identified promising new compounds, which may help achieve urinary concentration independent of vasopressin. MAGED2 mutations caused X-linked polyhydramnios with prematurity and a severe but transient form of antenatal Bartter's syndrome.We distinguish two types of hereditary NDI: a 'pure' type with loss of water only and a complex type with loss of water and ions. Mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2 genes, encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor and the water channel Aquaporin2, respectively, lead to a 'pure' NDI with loss of water but normal conservation of ions. Mutations in genes that encode membrane proteins involved in sodium chloride reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop lead to Bartter syndrome, a complex polyuric-polydipsic disorder often presenting with polyhydramnios. A new variant of this was recently identified: seven families were described with transient antenatal Bartter's syndrome, polyhydramnios and MAGED2 mutations.Multiple compounds have been identified experimentally that may stimulate urinary concentration independently of the vasopressin V2 receptor. These compounds may provide new treatments for patients with X-linked NDI. A plea for early consideration of the diagnosis of NDI, confirmation by phenotypic and/or genetic testing and appropriate adjustment of treatment in affected patients.

  6. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, Nine V A M; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a disorder associated with mutations in either the AVP2R or AQP2 gene, causing the inability of patients to concentrate their pro-urine, which leads to a high risk of dehydration. In this chapter, the clinical aspects as well as the current

  7. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bendamustine-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Benjamin A; Jain, Milli; McAninch, Elizabeth A; Gashti, Casey

    2017-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with polyuria and polydipsia immediately following his sixth cycle of rituximab and bendamustine for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He initially compensated by increasing his oral fluid intake at home, but later developed septic shock and was admitted with orders to be kept nil per os (NPO). This prompted an episode of acute hypernatremia during which he exhibited continued polyuria with inappropriately dilute urine. Desmopressin challenge yielded no response in the urine osmolality, indicating a nephrogenic source of his diabetes insipidus (DI). He had no known exposure to other causative agents and had demonstrated a robust response to chemotherapy. The patient became eunatremic once oral intake was resumed and his infection was treated. Two months after presentation, he remained symptomatic. A trial with hydrochlorothiazide resulted in a significant increase in urine osmolality and subsequent decrease in urine output. To our knowledge, this is the first case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus after rituximab and bendamustine exposure. We propose that bendamustine, similar to the alkylating agent ifosfamide, is toxic to the glomerulus and proximal tubule cells and is the most likely cause of the patient's nephrogenic DI.
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  9. [Vasopressin V2 receptor-related pathologies: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic syndrome of inappropiate antidiuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare hereditary disease with mainly an X-linked inheritance (90% of the cases) but there are also autosomal recessive and dominant forms. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a resistance of the renal collecting duct to the action of the arginine vasopressin hormone responsible for the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine. The X-linked form is due to inactivating mutations of the vasopressin 2 receptor gene leading to a loss of function of the mutated receptors. Affected males are often symptomatic in the neonatal period with a lack of weight gain, dehydration and hypernatremia but mild phenotypes may also occur. Females carrying the mutation may be asymptomatic but, sometimes, severe polyuria is found due to the random X chromosome inactivation. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms, occurring in both genders, are linked to mutations in the aquaporin-2 gene. The treatment remains difficult, especially in infants, and is based on a low osmotic diet with increased water intake and the use of thiazides and indomethacin. The main goal is to avoid hypernatremic episodes and maintain a good hydration state. Potentially, specific treatment, in some cases of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with pharmacological chaperones such as non-peptide vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists will be available in the future. Conversely, the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is linked to a constitutive activation of the V(2)-receptor due to activating mutations with clinical and biological features of inappropriate antidiuresis but with low or undetectable plasma arginine vasopressin hormone levels. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: about a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselmani, Hicham; Yassine, Asmaa; Bouabdellah, Mounya; Benchekroun, Laila; Handor, Najat; Elalami, Sanae; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2013-01-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare, hereditary in nature, characterized by an inability of the kidney to concentrate urine, secondary to the manifold resistance to the action of vasopressin. X-linked forms of transmission (90%) are expressed in boys, from the neonatal period in general, by polyuria and polydipsia. Symptomatology in transmissive girls is variable but can sometimes be quite marked. These forms are secondary to mutations in the gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor, located at position Xq28, responsible for a loss of function of this receptor. Some of these mutations may cause a partial phenotype, less severe. Forms of autosomal, recessive or dominant are more rare (10%). Treatment is symptomatic, sometimes difficult in infants. It aims to avoid episodes of dehydration. It is based on a conventional diet hypo-osmotic and administration of hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin. We report here the case of a child with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus hospitalized at Children's Hospital of Rabat and throughout this case we review the pathophysiology and clinical and biological characteristics of the disease and including importance of contribution of clinical biochemistry laboratory in the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease.

  11. V2R mutations and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria, with hyposthenuria, and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. Nephrogenic failure to concentrate urine maximally may be due to a defect in vasopressin-induced water permeability of the distal tubules and collecting ducts, to insufficient buildup of the corticopapillary interstitial osmotic gradient, or to a combination of these two factors. Thus, the broadest definition of the term NDI embraces any antidiuretic hormone-resistant urinary-concentrating defect, including medullary disease with low interstitial osmolality, renal failure, and osmotic diuresis. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked recessive NDI (OMIM 304800)(1) and have mutations in the AVP receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene that codes for the vasopressin V(2) receptor; the gene is located in chromosome region Xq28. In about 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance (OMIM 222000 and 125800)(1). Mutations have been identified in the aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2, OMIM 107777)(1), which is located in chromosome region 12q13 and codes for the vasopressin-sensitive water channel. NDI is clinically distinguishable from neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (OMIM 125700(1); also referred to as central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus) by a lack of response to exogenous AVP and by plasma levels of AVP that rise normally with increase in plasma osmolality. Hereditary neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is secondary to mutations in the gene encoding AVP (OMIM 192340)(1). Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is also a component of autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome 1 or DIDMOAD syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) (OMIM

  12. Lithium-associated primary hyperparathyroidism complicated by nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakal, Nihat; Erçetin, Candaş; Özçınar, Beyza; Aral, Ferihan; Erbil, Yeşim

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-associated hyperparathyroidism is the leading cause of hypercalcemia in lithium-treated patients. Lithium may lead to exacerbation of pre-existing primary hyperparathyroidism or cause an increased set-point of calcium for parathyroid hormone suppression, leading to parathyroid hyperplasia. Lithium may cause renal tubular concentration defects directly by the development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus or indirectly by the effects of hypercalcemia. In this study, we present a female patient on long-term lithium treatment who was evaluated for hypercalcemia. Preoperative imaging studies indicated parathyroid adenoma and multinodular goiter. Parathyroidectomy and thyroidectomy were planned. During the postoperative course, prolonged intubation was necessary because of agitation and delirium. During this period, polyuria, severe dehydration, and hypernatremia developed, which responded to controlled hypotonic fluid infusions and was unresponsive to parenteral desmopressin. A diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was apparent. A parathyroid adenoma and multifocal papillary thyroid cancer were detected on histopathological examination. It was thought that nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was masked by hypercalcemia preoperatively. A patient on lithium treatment should be carefully followed up during or after surgery to prevent life-threatening complications of previously unrecognized nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and the possibility of renal concentrating defects on long-term lithium use should be sought, particularly in patients with impaired consciousness.

  13. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesche, Daniel; Deen, Peter M T; Knoers, Nine V A M

    2012-12-01

    The anti-diuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary upon hypovolemia or hypernatremia, and regulates water reabsorption in the renal collecting duct principal cells. Binding of AVP to the arginine vasopressin receptor type 2 (AVPR2) in the basolateral membrane leads to translocation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) water channels to the apical membrane of the collecting duct principal cells, inducing water permeability of the membrane. This results in water reabsorption from the pro-urine into the medullary interstitium following an osmotic gradient. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a disorder associated with mutations in either the AVPR2 or AQP2 gene, causing the inability of patients to concentrate their pro-urine, which leads to a high risk of dehydration. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the cell biological aspects of congenital X-linked, autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant NDI while specifically addressing the latest developments in the field. Based on deepened mechanistic understanding, new therapeutic strategies are currently being explored, which we also discuss here.

  14. Aldose Reductase-Deficient Mice Develop Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Horace T. B.; Chung, Sookja K.; Law, Janice W. S.; Ko, Ben C. B.; Tam, Sidney C. F.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Knepper, Mark A.; Chung, Stephen S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases associated with diabetes mellitus, such as cataract, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. However, its physiological functions are not well understood. We developed mice deficient in this enzyme and found that they had no apparent developmental or reproductive abnormality except that they drank and urinated significantly more than their wild-type littermates. These ALR2-deficient mice exhibited a partially defective urine-concentrating ability, having a phenotype resembling that of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:10913167

  15. Bendamustine-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in a Patient With AL Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwumugambi, Nsabimana A; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Shelton, Anthony C; Stern, Lauren; Gordon, Craig E

    2017-02-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a condition characterized by polyuria with dilute urine due to the inability of the principal cells of the renal collecting ducts to respond to antidiuretic hormone and concentrate urine. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be drug induced, and several chemotherapeutic agents have been reported to cause it. Bendamustine is a traditional chemotherapeutic agent being studied for treatment for relapsed systemic AL amyloidosis. We report a case of a 59-year-old man with AL amyloidosis who developed partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus after receiving bendamustine for treatment of AL amyloidosis. The nephrogenic diabetes insipidus responded well to sodium restriction, hydrochlorothiazide, and desmopressin treatment, allowing the patient to receive subsequent bendamustine cycles without polyuria. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus resolved shortly after completion of bendamustine therapy. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Central pontine myelinolysis secondary to hypokalaemic nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, C

    2010-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) has been described in alcoholic patients and in the aftermath of rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. We describe a case of CPM occurring secondary to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (DI), which developed as a consequence of severe hypokalaemia. A 63-year-old man with alcohol dependence was admitted to hospital with severe pulmonary sepsis and type 1 respiratory failure. On admission, he had euvolaemic hyponatraemia of 127 mmol\\/L, consistent with a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secondary to his pneumonia. Following admission, his plasma potassium dropped from 3.2 to a nadir of 2.3 mmol\\/L. Mineralocorticoid excess, ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone production and other causes of hypokalaemia were excluded. The hypokalaemia provoked significant hypotonic polyuria and a slow rise in plasma sodium to 161 mmol\\/L over several days. Plasma glucose, calcium and creatinine were normal. The polyuria did not respond to desmopressin, and subsequent correction of his polyuria and hypernatraemia after normalization of plasma potassium confirmed the diagnosis of nephrogenic DI due to hypokalaemia. The patient remained obtunded, and the clinical suspicion of osmotic demyelination was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient remained comatose and passed away 10 days later. This is the first reported case of nephrogenic DI resulting in the development of CPM, despite a relatively slow rise in plasma sodium of less than 12 mmol\\/L\\/24 h. Coexisting alcohol abuse, hypoxaemia and hypokalaemia may have contributed significantly to the development of CPM in this patient.

  17. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: A Rare Presentation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of multiple myeloma that presented with anorexia, fatigue, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, bone marrow plasmacytosis of more than 30%, polyuria,and low urine specific gravity. This unusual presentation was diagnosed as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus secondary to a proximal tubular dysfunction. The tubular functional disturbance appeared to be related to thepresence of lambda-type light chains. The patient was treated withdesmopressine without response. After one month of treatment with thalidomide and dexamethasone for myeloma there was a dramatic response with decreased urine output.

  18. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vergine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome (BS type 1 (OMIM #601678 is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  19. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergine, Gianluca; Fabbri, Elena; Pedini, Annalisa; Tedeschi, Silvana; Borsa, Niccolò

    2018-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 (OMIM #601678) is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  20. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Gerbino, Andrea; Svelto, Maria; Procino, Giuseppe

    2017-11-10

    Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2) is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression.

  1. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Milano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2 is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2 at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression.

  2. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Gerbino, Andrea; Svelto, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2) is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression. PMID:29125546

  3. Use of acetazolamide in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macau, Ricardo A; da Silva, Tiago Nunes; Silva, Joana Rego; Ferreira, Ana Gonçalves; Bravo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (Li-NDI) is a rare and difficult-to-treat condition. A study in mice and two recent papers describe the use of acetazolamide in Li-NDI in 7 patients (a case report and a 6 patient series). We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with bipolar disorder treated with lithium and no previous history of diabetes insipidus. She was hospitalized due to a bowel obstruction and developed severe dehydration after surgery when she was water deprived. After desmopressin administration and unsuccessful thiazide and amiloride treatment, acetazolamide was administrated to control polyuria and hydroelectrolytic disorders without significant side effects. To our knowledge, this is the third publication on acetazolamide use in Li-NDI patients. Treatment of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus might be challenging.Vasopressin, amiloride and thiazide diuretics have been used in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus treatment.Acetazolamide might be an option to treat lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus patients who fail to respond to standard treatment.The use of acetazolamide in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus must be monitored, including its effects on glomerular filtration rate.

  4. Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma precipitated by lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, H.; Newton, R. W.; Morris, A. D.; Thompson, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    A 45-year-old man, with a 10-year history of manic depression treated with lithium, was admitted with hyperosmolar, nonketotic coma. He gave a five-year history of polyuria and polydipsia, during which time urinalysis had been negative for glucose. After recovery from hyperglycaemia, he remained polyuric despite normal blood glucose concentrations; water deprivation testing indicated nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, likely to be lithium-induced. We hypothesize that when this man developed type 2 diabetes, chronic polyuria due to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was sufficient to precipitate hyperosmolar dehydration. PMID:9538487

  5. A case of primary aldosteronism combined with acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitae Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma can induce various clinical manifestations as a result of chronic exposure to aldosterone. We report a rare case of a 37-year-old man who complained of general weakness and polyuria. He was diagnosed with aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Aldosterone enhances the secretion of potassium in the collecting duct, which can lead to hypokalemia. By contrast, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which manifests as polyuria and polydipsia, can occur in several clinical conditions such as acquired tubular disease and those attributed to toxins and congenital causes. Among them, hypokalemia can also damage tubular structures in response to vasopressin. The patient’s urine output was >3 L/d and was diluted. Owing to the ineffectiveness of vasopressin, we eventually made a diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy and intraoperative kidney biopsy were subsequently performed. The pathologic finding of kidney biopsy revealed a decrease in aquaporin-2 on immunohistochemical stain.

  6. Amiloride blocks lithium entry through the sodium channel thereby attenuating the resultant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortenoeven, M.L.A.; Li, Y.; Shaw, S.M.; Gaeggeler, H.P.; Rossier, B.C.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium therapy frequently induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; amiloride appears to prevent its occurrence in some clinical cases. Amiloride blocks the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) located in the apical membrane of principal cells; hence one possibility is that ENaC is the main entry site

  7. Efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors in a case of congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soylu, A.; Kasap, B.; Ogun, N.; Ozturk, Y.; Turkmen, M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Kavukcu, S.

    2005-01-01

    A 17-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive, polyuria, and vomiting. He had been diagnosed clinically with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and treated by amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide combination without a satisfactory outcome at another center since 1 year of age. The diagnosis was

  8. alphaENaC-mediated lithium absorption promotes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, B.M.; Zuber, A.M.; Loffing, J.; Stehle, J.C.; Deen, P.M.T.; Rossier, B.C.; Hummler, E.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is accompanied by polyuria, downregulation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2), and cellular remodeling of the collecting duct (CD). The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a likely candidate for lithium entry. Here, we subjected transgenic

  9. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome...... of inappropriate antidiuresis or congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We present a novel mutation in codon 137 within AVPR2 with substitution of glycine for arginine in male dizygotic twins. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated by water deprivation test and resistance to vasopressin...

  10. Partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by a novel mutation in the AVPR2 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Mia; Christensen, Jane H; Corydon, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    and polyuria since infancy. Initial clinical testing confirmed a diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI). Urine osmolarity rose during fluid deprivation and after 20 microg of intranasal desmopressin [1-deamino-8-d-arginine-vasopressin (dDAVP)]. A similar DI phenotype was found in his brother. Methods The coding......Objective To identify the molecular basis and clinical characteristics of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) presenting with an unusual phenotype characterized by partial resistance to AVP. Subjects The proband was admitted at the age of 4 years with a history of polydipsia...

  11. Functional characterization of AVPR2 mutants found in Turkish patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Beril; Schulz, Angela; Saglar, Emel; Deniz, Ferhat; Schöneberg, Torsten; Mergen, Hatice

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder characterized by an impairment in water balance because of the inability to concentrate urine. While central diabetes insipidus is caused by mutations in the AVP , the reason for genetically determined nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be mutations in AQP2 or AVPR2 After release of AVP from posterior pituitary into blood stream, it binds to AVPR2, which is one of the receptors for AVP and is mainly expressed in principal cells of collecting ducts of kidney. Receptor activation increases cAMP levels in principal cells, resulting in the incorporation of AQP2 into the membrane, finally increasing water reabsorption. This pathway can be altered by mutations in AVPR2 causing nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In this study, we functionally characterize four mutations (R68W, ΔR67-G69/G107W, V162A and T273M) in AVPR2, which were found in Turkish patients. Upon AVP stimulation, R68W, ΔR67-G69/G107W and T273M showed a significantly reduced maximum in cAMP response compared to wild-type receptor. All mutant receptor proteins were expressed at the protein level; however, R68W, ΔR67-G69/G107W and T273M were partially retained in the cellular interior. Immunofluorescence studies showed that these mutant receptors were trapped in ER and Golgi apparatus. The function of V162A was indistinguishable from the indicating other defects causing disease. The results are important for understanding the influence of mutations on receptor function and cellular trafficking. Therefore, characterization of these mutations provides useful information for further studies addressing treatment of intracellularly trapped receptors with cell-permeable antagonists to restore receptor function in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. © 2018 The authors.

  12. Novel mutations associated with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. A clinical-genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Castaño, Alejandro; Pérez de Nanclares, Gustavo; Madariaga, Leire; Aguirre, Mireia; Chocron, Sara; Madrid, Alvaro; Lafita Tejedor, Francisco Javier; Gil Campos, Mercedes; Sánchez Del Pozo, Jaime; Ruiz Cano, Rafael; Espino, Mar; Gomez Vida, Jose Maria; Santos, Fernando; García Nieto, Victor Manuel; Loza, Reyner; Rodríguez, Luis Miguel; Hidalgo Barquero, Emilia; Printza, Nikoleta; Camacho, Juan Antonio; Castaño, Luis; Ariceta, Gema

    2015-10-01

    Molecular diagnosis is a useful diagnostic tool in primary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), an inherited disease characterized by renal inability to concentrate urine. The AVPR2 and AQP2 genes were screened for mutations in a cohort of 25 patients with clinical diagnosis of NDI. Patients presented with dehydration, polyuria-polydipsia, failure to thrive (mean ± SD; Z-height -1.9 ± 2.1 and Z-weight -2.4 ± 1.7), severe hypernatremia (mean ± SD; Na 150 ± 10 mEq/L), increased plasma osmolality (mean ± SD; 311 ± 18 mOsm/Kg), but normal glomerular filtration rate. Genetic diagnosis revealed that 24 male patients were hemizygous for 17 different putative disease-causing mutations in the AVPR2 gene (each one in a different family). Of those, nine had not been previously reported, and eight were recurrent. Moreover, we found those same AVPR2 changes in 12 relatives who were heterozygous carriers. Further, in one female patient, AVPR2 gene study turned out to be negative and she was found to be homozygous for the novel AQP2 p.Ala86Val alteration. Genetic analysis presumably confirmed the diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in every patient of the studied cohort. We emphasize that we detected a high presence (50 %) of heterozygous females with clinical NDI symptoms. • In most cases (90 %), inherited nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is an X-linked disease, caused by mutations in the AVPR2 gene. • In rare occasions (10 %), it is caused by mutations in the AQP2 gene. What is new: • In this study, we report 10 novel mutations associated with NDI. • We have detected a high presence (50 %) of heterozygous carriers with clinical NDI symptoms.

  13. Intracranical calcification in siblings with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, J.; Inagaki, M.; Koeda, T.; Ohno, K.; Takeshita, K.

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to examine three male siblings with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). The two elder brothers had varying degrees of unusual intracranial calcification; the eldest also showed involvement of the cerebral white matter on MRI. The severity of intracranial calcification was related to the time before initiation of treatment and inversely to mental ability. Brain damage and mental retardation in NDI may be caused by a delay in initiating treatment; early detection and treatment are important to prevent brain damage. (orig.)

  14. Value of Renal Biopsy in Diagnosing Infantile Nephropathic Cystinosis Associated With Secondary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emily; Ho, Jacqueline; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Salgado, Cláudia M; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Cystinosis is the most common cause of inherited renal Fanconi syndrome in young children, and typically presents with laboratory findings of a proximal tubulopathy and corneal crystals by one year of age. We describe here renal biopsy findings in a 20-month-old patient with an atypical presentation of distal renal tubular acidosis, diabetes insipidus, and the absence of corneal crystals. Although renal biopsy is usually not necessary to establish the diagnosis of cystinosis, when the patient presents with atypical signs and symptoms, a renal biopsy may be extremely valuable. A 20-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive, polyuria, polydipsia, and rickets. He initially showed evidence of a renal tubular acidosis, mild renal insufficiency, and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. His initial ophthalmologic examination did not demonstrate corneal crystals. His subsequent workup revealed phosphaturia, suggesting a partial proximal tubulopathy. Concomitantly, a renal biopsy revealed prominent podocytes with an immature glomerular appearance, and electron microscopy analysis showed numerous intracellular crystals within tubular epithelial cells. Subsequent laboratory and genetic testing confirmed a diagnosis of infantile nephropathic cystinosis. This case highlights the variability in the clinical presentation of cystinosis, resulting in an uncommon clinical picture of a rare disease. Given that treatment is available to prolong renal function and minimize the extra-renal manifestations of this disorder, early diagnosis is essential. It is important to raise the index of suspicion of cystinosis by recognizing its subtle morphological changes in young patients, and that nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be secondary to this disorder.

  15. X-Linked Recessive Form of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in A 7-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janchevska A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is caused by the inability of renal collecting duct cells to respond to arginine vasopressin (AVP/antidiuretic hormone (ADH. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy with a history of excretion of large amounts of dilute urine and polydipsia since infancy. The boy had several vomiting episodes with mild dehydration during the first 3 years of life. There was no evidence of headaches, dizziness or visual problems. He drinks between 2 and 3 L/day and has 24-hour diuresis of 2 liters, now. He has prepubertal appearance with appropriate weight [+0.85 standard deviation score (SDS] and height (+0.15 SDS for his age. His intelligence was also normal. The water deprivation test showed low urine osmolality after 8 hours of dehydration. After desmopressin administration, urine osmolality remained low. Serum osmolality was in the normal range for sex and age before and after desmopressin administration. This indicated a nephrogenic form of diabetes insipidus. Molecular analyses revealed a P286L [p.Pro(CCC286Leu(CTC] mutation in the AVPR2 gene, that was inherited from his mother. This patient is the first case with genetically confirmed X-linked inherited form of NDI in the Republic of Macedonia. Molecular analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis and enabled genetic advice for this family.

  16. Vasopressin increases S261 phosphorylation in AQP2-P262L, a mutant in recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimpert, C.; van den Berg, D.T.; Fenton, R.A.; Klussmann, E.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a renal disorder characterized by polyuria due to a lacking antidiuretic response to vasopressin. While most AQP2 mutants in recessive NDI are misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum,

  17. Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Presented With Bilateral Hydronephrosis and Urinary Infection: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kewen; Xie, Yi; Li, Hanzhong

    2016-05-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a condition resulting from the kidney's impaired response to circulating antidiuretic hormone (ADH), leading to polydipsia and polyuria. Urinary tract dilatation caused by NDI is a rare situation. Here, we report a case of congenital NDI presented with bilateral hydronephrosis.A 15-year-old boy complaining a history of intermittent fever was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital. He voided 10 to 15 L of urine daily. Radiographic examination revealed severe dilatation of bilateral renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder. Urinalysis shows hyposthenuria.He was diagnosed NDI since born. Transient insertion of a urethral catheter helped to relieve fever. Medical therapy of hydrochlorothiazide and amiloride was prescribed and effective.Dilatation of urinary tract caused by diabetes insipidus is rare, but may be present in severe condition. Therefore, it is crucial for clinicians to perform early treatment to avoid impairment of renal function.

  18. Use of acetazolamide in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Macau

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (Li-NDI is a rare and difficult-to-treat condition. A study in mice and two recent papers describe the use of acetazolamide in Li-NDI in 7 patients (a case report and a 6 patient series. We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with bipolar disorder treated with lithium and no previous history of diabetes insipidus. She was hospitalized due to a bowel obstruction and developed severe dehydration after surgery when she was water deprived. After desmopressin administration and unsuccessful thiazide and amiloride treatment, acetazolamide was administrated to control polyuria and hydroelectrolytic disorders without significant side effects. To our knowledge, this is the third publication on acetazolamide use in Li-NDI patients.

  19. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-10-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycaemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Whereas diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. Though all the cases published till date were secondary to drugs, myeloma, hematological disorders, etc., we are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to of severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  20. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with intracranial calcification in a child with thalassemia minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimple, Jain; Alka, Jadhav; Mona, Gajre; Atul, Deshmukh

    2013-09-01

    There are numerous causes for intracranial calcification in children. We describe an unusual cause of intracranial calcification in a child, namely, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). A 12-year-old boy presented with seizures and developmental delay. MRI of the brain revealed intracranial calcification. Evaluation showed findings suggestive of NDI. The lack of evidence of any other metabolic defect suggests that these calcifications were secondary to NDI. He also had anemia for which he was investigated and diagnosed as thalassemia minor. Detailed literature review failed to reveal any reported association between NDI and thalassemia minor. We report this case to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of NDI to prevent organic brain damage.

  1. Hyperactivation of Nrf2 in early tubular development induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Seki, Shiori; Hiramoto, Keiichiro; Naganuma, Eriko; Kobayashi, Eri H.; Yamaoka, Ayaka; Baird, Liam; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sato, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) regulates cellular responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Loss of Keap1 increases Nrf2 protein levels, and Keap1-null mice die of oesophageal hyperkeratosis because of Nrf2 hyperactivation. Here we show that deletion of oesophageal Nrf2 in Keap1-null mice allows survival until adulthood, but the animals develop polyuria with low osmolality and bilateral hydronephrosis. This phenotype is caused by defects in water reabsorption that are the result of reduced aquaporin 2 levels in the kidney. Renal tubular deletion of Keap1 promotes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus features, confirming that Nrf2 activation in developing tubular cells causes a water reabsorption defect. These findings suggest that Nrf2 activity should be tightly controlled during development in order to maintain renal homeostasis. In addition, tissue-specific ablation of Nrf2 in Keap1-null mice might create useful animal models to uncover novel physiological functions of Nrf2. PMID:28233855

  2. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI: clinical, laboratory and genetic characterization of five Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a lack of response in the distal nephron to the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin. Manifestations include polyuria, polydipsia, hyposthenuria, recurrent episodes of dehydration and fever and growth failure. Most cases are caused by mutations in the AVPR2 gene. The mutant receptors are trapped intracellularly. METHOD: We studied five boys using clinical, laboratory and molecular data. The mean age at diagnosis was 14.6 months (range 6 to 24 and 12.2 years (7.8 to 19 after the follow-up period. The mean period of follow-up was 132.2 ± 50.9 months. RESULTS: The geometric means of the z-scores of weight and stature were -4.5 and -3.6, respectively, at diagnosis. At the last medical appointment, the z-scores of weight and stature were -0.3 and -0.9, respectively. Three patients were diagnosed with ureterohydronephrosis and exhibited increased post-void urine volume. Mutations in the AVPR2 gene were found in all patients, and the carrier status was confirmed in four of five cases. Two unrelated children presented identical mutations (S167L in arginine vasopressin R2. Two of the patients had a mutation that has already been described in other Brazilian families (R337X, and one patient showed a de novo mutation (Y128D in arginine vasopressin R2, since his mother's molecular analysis was normal. The recurrence risk for this family was significantly reduced. CONCLUSION: This study reports the clinical and laboratory characterization of Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and reiterates the importance of the genetic basis that underlies the disease diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  3. An unusual case of hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (HNDI) affecting mother and daughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Dinesh; Hart, Rachel; Jones, Caroline; Ellis, Ian; Ramakrishnan, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes iInsipidus (HNDI) is an uncommon disorder due to a resistance to anti-diuretic hormone leading to a reduced urinary concentrating ability. The X-linked form is fully expressed in hemizygous male patients, but diabetes insipidus may also present in heterozygous females where it must be distinguished from autosomal and other secondary causes. We report a mother and daughter in the same family with HNDI due to a heterozygous deletion in exon 1 of the AVPR2 gene, not previously described in the literature. A 5-year-old girl was referred for investigation of polyuria and polydipsia. The patient had a water deprivation test elsewhere at the age of 3 that was inconclusive. A degree of water restriction was imposed leading to headaches. The thyroid, cortisol, renal, and calcium profiles were normal. Her mother showed similar symptoms that had not been previously investigated. AQP2 (Aquaporin) and initial AVPR2 gene sequencing had not identified a mutation, but subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a heterozygous large exon 1 deletion of the AVPR2 gene. The same deletion was also found in the child's mother. The patient's symptoms have significantly improved on appropriate treatment. Further analysis revealed skewed X inactivation in mother and daughter.

  4. Fanconi's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an adult treated with ifosfamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemi, Amanda I; Bota, Vasile M; Peguero, Anyeri; Charpentier, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a serious condition characterized by type II proximal renal tubular dysfunction, with urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, phosphate, bicarbonate, and potassium. Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome is reported in about 1.4-5% of children being treated for solid tumors, yet only a few cases have been reported in adults. We describe a 54-year-old man who came to the hospital with symptoms of neutropenic fever 4 days after his fourth cycle of ifosfamide and doxorubicin treatment for recurrent sarcoma with metastases to the lung. During admission, he was noted to have severe renal tubular dysfunction; ifosfamide-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome were suspected. He received supportive therapy that resulted in incomplete resolution of signs and symptoms. The patient was discharged after a 5-day hospital stay when his white blood cell count increased from 0.1-2.5 × 10(3) /mm(3) and his fever had resolved. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's development of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome and his use of ifosfamide. This dual diagnosis of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome in an adult makes this case unusual, as well as therapeutically challenging. We conducted a review of the existing literature regarding ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome and describe the proposed mechanisms and therapeutic options. This case suggests that patients treated with ifosfamide should be monitored closely for renal function to identify, and perhaps prevent, these rare adverse events. Preliminary animal models show promise for adding N-acetylcysteine to ifosfamide treatment, but more research is necessary before using this drug as a therapeutic option. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  5. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Essential Insights into the Molecular Background and Potential Therapies for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittig, Søren

    2013-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2), expressed in the kidney collecting ducts, plays a pivotal role in maintaining body water balance. The channel is regulated by the peptide hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP), which exerts its effects through the type 2 vasopressin receptor (AVPR2). Disrupted function or regulation of AQP2 or the AVPR2 results in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a common clinical condition of renal origin characterized by polydipsia and polyuria. Over several years, major research efforts have advanced our understanding of NDI at the genetic, cellular, molecular, and biological levels. NDI is commonly characterized as hereditary (congenital) NDI, arising from genetic mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2; or acquired NDI, due to for exmple medical treatment or electrolyte disturbances. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic, cell biological, and pathophysiological causes of NDI, with emphasis on the congenital forms and the acquired forms arising from lithium and other drug therapies, acute and chronic renal failure, and disturbed levels of calcium and potassium. Additionally, we provide an overview of the exciting new treatment strategies that have been recently proposed for alleviating the symptoms of some forms of the disease and for bypassing G protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:23360744

  6. Membrane Protein Stability Analyses by Means of Protein Energy Profiles in Case of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heinke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI is a rare endocrine, inheritable disorder with low incidences in an estimated one per 25,000–30,000 live births. This disease is characterized by polyuria and compensatory polydypsia. The diverse underlying causes of DI can be central defects, in which no functional arginine vasopressin (AVP is released from the pituitary or can be a result of defects in the kidney (nephrogenic DI, NDI. NDI is a disorder in which patients are unable to concentrate their urine despite the presence of AVP. This antidiuretic hormone regulates the process of water reabsorption from the prourine that is formed in the kidney. It binds to its type-2 receptor (V2R in the kidney induces a cAMP-driven cascade, which leads to the insertion of aquaporin-2 water channels into the apical membrane. Mutations in the genes of V2R and aquaporin-2 often lead to NDI. We investigated a structure model of V2R in its bound and unbound state regarding protein stability using a novel protein energy profile approach. Furthermore, these techniques were applied to the wild-type and selected mutations of aquaporin-2. We show that our results correspond well to experimental water ux analysis, which confirms the applicability of our theoretical approach to equivalent problems.

  7. Effect of embelin on lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish K Sahu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the nephroprotective and anti-polyuric role of embelin on lithium induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI in albino rats. Methods: NDI induced by lithium chloride (4 meq/kg/day, i.p. for 6 days which leads to huge amount of urine excretion. After induction of NDI, embelin (50 and 100mg/kg was administered orally, once daily for 21 day in rats and N-acetyl cysteine (10mg/kg, twice daily, i.p. was used as a standard drug for treatment of NDI. The body weight, urine protein, urine creatinine, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen were assessed at 0, 7, 14 and 21 day. At the end of the study glutathione (GSH content in kidney was assessed and histopathology of kidney was performed. Results: Embelin 50 and 100 mg/ kg showed increase in the body weight and decrease in plasma and urine creatinine, blood urea nitrogen levels, and urine protein level. Embelin acts as a potent antioxidant; it increases the level of glutathione in kidney. Histopathological examination of the kidney indicated that embelin 50 and 100 mg/kg were reduced the vascular degeneration of tubules as well as slight degeneration and dilatation of renal tubules, however N-actyl cysteine (NAC treated rats showed normal glomeruli and renal tubule with slight degeneration. Conclusions: Embelin seemed to be effective in NDI by its predominant effect on promoting antioxidant status and decrease the urine excretion may be due to the blocking of sodium channels.

  8. Pre- and post-treatment urinary tract findings in children with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caletti, María Gracia; Balestracci, Alejandro; Di Pinto, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by the kidney's inability to concentrate urine, which causes intense polyuria that may lead to urinary tract dilation. We report the morphological findings of the urinary tract in ten boys with NDI specifically addressing the presence and changes of urinary tract dilation during treatment. Patients were diagnosed at a median age of 1.6 years (range, 0.16-6.33 years) and treated with a low osmotic diet, hydrochlorothiazide-amiloride and indomethacin, which decreased the diuresis from a median of 10.5 ml/kg/h to 4.4 ml/kg/h (p < 0.001). Three patients showed normal renal ultrasound before treatment until last control, while the remaining seven showed urinary tract dilation. In this second group, dilation was reduced with treatment in four patients and disappeared in the remaining three. Children without dilation or in whom the dilation disappeared were diagnosed and treated earlier than those with persistent dilation (median 1.66 versus 4.45 years, respectively). After a median of 10.4 (range, 2.3-20.3) years of follow-up, no patients showed urological complications. Medical treatment of the disease improved the dilation in all cases, preventing its potential complications. Regardless of the good outcome of our patients, periodic urologic follow-up is recommended in NDI patients.

  9. Autophagic degradation of aquaporin-2 is an early event in hypokalemia-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khositseth, Sookkasem; Uawithya, Panapat; Somparn, Poorichaya; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Thippamom, Nattakan; Hoffert, Jason D; Saeed, Fahad; Michael Payne, D; Chen, Shu-Hui; Fenton, Robert A; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2015-12-17

    Hypokalemia (low serum potassium level) is a common electrolyte imbalance that can cause a defect in urinary concentrating ability, i.e., nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We employed proteomic analysis of inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) from rats fed with a potassium-free diet for 1 day. IMCD protein quantification was performed by mass spectrometry using a label-free methodology. A total of 131 proteins, including the water channel AQP2, exhibited significant changes in abundance, most of which were decreased. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that many of the down-regulated proteins were associated with the biological processes of generation of precursor metabolites and energy, actin cytoskeleton organization, and cell-cell adhesion. Targeted LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting studies further confirmed the down regulation of 18 selected proteins. Electron microscopy showed autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes in the IMCD cells of rats deprived of potassium for only 1 day. An increased number of autophagosomes was also confirmed by immunofluorescence, demonstrating co-localization of LC3 and Lamp1 with AQP2 and several other down-regulated proteins in IMCD cells. AQP2 was also detected in autophagosomes in IMCD cells of potassium-deprived rats by immunogold electron microscopy. Thus, enhanced autophagic degradation of proteins, most notably including AQP2, is an early event in hypokalemia-induced NDI.

  10. Aliskiren increases aquaporin-2 expression and attenuates lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Tiezheng; Feng, Pinning; Qiu, Miaojuan; Liu, Qiaojuan; Li, Suchun; Zheng, Peili; Kong, Yonglun; Levi, Moshe; Li, Chunling; Wang, Weidong

    2017-10-01

    The direct renin inhibitor aliskiren has been shown to be retained and persist in medullary collecting ducts even after treatment is discontinued, suggesting a new mechanism of action for this drug. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether aliskiren regulates renal aquaporin expression in the collecting ducts and improves urinary concentrating defect induced by lithium in mice. The mice were fed with either normal chow or LiCl diet (40 mmol·kg dry food -1 ·day -1 for 4 days and 20 mmol·kg dry food -1 ·day -1 for the last 3 days) for 7 days. Some mice were intraperitoneally injected with aliskiren (50 mg·kg body wt -1 ·day -1 in saline). Aliskiren significantly increased protein abundance of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in the kidney inner medulla in mice. In inner medulla collecting duct cell suspension, aliskiren markedly increased AQP2 and phosphorylated AQP2 at serine 256 (pS256-AQP2) protein abundance, which was significantly inhibited both by adenylyl cyclase inhibitor MDL-12330A and by PKA inhibitor H89, indicating an involvement of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in aliskiren-induced increased AQP2 expression. Aliskiren treatment improved urinary concentrating defect in lithium-treated mice and partially prevented the decrease of AQP2 and pS256-AQP2 protein abundance in the inner medulla of the kidney. In conclusion, the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren upregulates AQP2 protein expression in inner medullary collecting duct principal cells and prevents lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus likely via cAMP-PKA pathways. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Prasugrel suppresses development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Brandes, Anna U; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we localized ADP-activated P2Y 12 receptor (R) in rodent kidney and showed that its blockade by clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD) attenuates lithium (Li)-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Here, we evaluated the effect of prasugrel (PRSG) administration on Li-induced NDI in mice. Both CLPD and PRSG belong to the thienopyridine class of ADP receptor antagonists. Groups of age-matched adult male B6D2 mice (N = 5/group) were fed either regular rodent chow (CNT), or with added LiCl (40 mmol/kg chow) or PRSG in drinking water (10 mg/kg bw/day) or a combination of LiCl and PRSG for 14 days and then euthanized. Water intake and urine output were determined and blood and kidney tissues were collected and analyzed. PRSG administration completely suppressed Li-induced polydipsia and polyuria and significantly prevented Li-induced decreases in AQP2 protein abundance in renal cortex and medulla. However, PRSG either alone or in combination with Li did not have a significant effect on the protein abundances of NKCC2 or NCC in the cortex and/or medulla. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that PRSG administration prevented Li-induced alterations in cellular disposition of AQP2 protein in medullary collecting ducts. Serum Li, Na, and osmolality were not affected by the administration of PRSG. Similar to CLPD, PRSG administration had no effect on Li-induced increase in urinary Na excretion. However, unlike CLPD, PRSG did not augment Li-induced increase in urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) excretion. Taken together, these data suggest that the pharmacological inhibition of P2Y 12 -R by the thienopyridine group of drugs may potentially offer therapeutic benefits in Li-induced NDI.

  12. Repulsion between Lys258 and upstream arginines explains the missorting of the AQP2 mutant p.Glu258Lys in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Stoffels, M.; Tamma, G.; Siemerink-Konings, I.B.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of body water homeostasis occurs by the vasopressin-dependent sorting of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels to and from the apical membrane of renal principal cells. Mutations in AQP2 cause autosomal nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disease that renders the kidney unresponsive to

  13. A novel AVPR2 splice site mutation leads to partial X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Adams, David; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Raygada, Margarita; Golas, Gretchen; Faucz, Fabio R; Nilsson, Ola; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dileepan, Kavitha; Lodish, Maya; Lee, Paul; Tifft, Cynthia; Markello, Thomas; Gahl, William; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI, OMIM#304800) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP, OMIM*192340) receptor type 2 (AVPR2, OMIM*300538) gene. A 20-month-old boy and his 8-year-old brother presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and failure to thrive. Both boys demonstrated partial DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D AVP or desmopressin) responses; thus, NDI diagnosis was delayed. While routine sequencing of AVPR2 showed a potential splice site variant, it was not until exome sequencing confirmed the AVPR2 splice site variant and did not reveal any more likely candidates that the patients' diagnosis was made and proper treatment was instituted. Both patients were hemizygous for two AVPR2 variants predicted in silico to affect AVPR2 messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. A minigene assay revealed that the novel AVPR2 c.276A>G mutation creates a novel splice acceptor site leading to 5' truncation of AVPR2 exon 2 in HEK293 human kidney cells. Both patients have been treated with high-dose DDAVP with a remarkable improvement of their symptoms and accelerated linear growth and weight gain. We present here a unique case of partial X-linked NDI due to an AVPR2 splice site mutation; patients with diabetes insipidus of unknown etiology may harbor splice site mutations that are initially underestimated in their pathogenicity on sequence analysis. • X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by AVPR2 mutations, and disease severity can vary depending on the functional effect of the mutation. What is New: • We demonstrate here that a splice site mutation in AVPR2 leads to partial X-linked NDI in two brothers. • Treatment with high-dose DDAVP led to improvement of polyuria and polydipsia, weight gain, and growth.

  14. Idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets--a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium and magnesium. Diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and a child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. We report the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction. The child was treated for hypophosphatemic rickets with severe metabolic acidosis and the treatment for NDI was also given. Now he has healed rickets and normal blood pH, sodium and osmolarity.

  15. A case report of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome in a child who presented with vitamin D resistant rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2014-05-01

    Fanconi syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells, occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium and magnesium. Diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and children mainly present with dehydration and hypernatremia. We are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us with vitamin D resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to to severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  16. A novel AVPR2 gene mutation of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an Asian pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei-Hong; Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Yan; Qu, Hui-Qi; Zhu, Mei

    2016-10-01

    Polyuria and polydipsia are the characteristics of congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI). Approximately 90% of all patients with CNDI have X-linked hereditary disease, which is due to a mutation of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 ( AVPR2) gene. This case report describes a 54-year-old male with polyuria and polydipsia and several male members of his pedigree who had the same symptoms. The proband was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus using a water-deprivation and arginine vasopressin stimulation test. Genomic DNA from the patient and his family members was extracted and the AVPR2 gene was sequenced. A novel missense mutation of a cytosine to guanine transition at position 972 (c.972C > G) was found, which resulted in the substitution of isoleucine for methionine at amino acid position 324 (p.I324M) in the seventh transmembrane domain of the protein. The proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous for this mutation. The novel mutation of the AVPR2 gene further broadens the phenotypic spectrum of the AVPR2 gene.

  17. Combination of secretin and fluvastatin ameliorates the polyuria associated with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Barbieri, Claudia; Nicoletti, Maria C; Li, Jian H; Wess, Jürgen; Svelto, Maria

    2014-07-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (X-NDI) is a disease caused by inactivating mutations of the vasopressin (AVP) type 2 receptor (V2R) gene. Loss of V2R function prevents plasma membrane expression of the AQP2 water channel in the kidney collecting duct cells and impairs the kidney concentration ability. In an attempt to develop strategies to bypass V2R signaling in X-NDI, we evaluated the effects of secretin and fluvastatin, either alone or in combination, on kidney function in a mouse model of X-NDI. The secretin receptor was found to be functionally expressed in the kidney collecting duct cells. Based on this, X-NDI mice were infused with secretin for 14 days but urinary parameters were not altered by the infusion. Interestingly, secretin significantly increased AQP2 levels in the collecting duct but the protein primarily accumulated in the cytosol. Since we previously reported that fluvastatin treatment increased AQP2 plasma membrane expression in wild-type mice, secretin-infused X-NDI mice received a single injection of fluvastatin. Interestingly, urine production by X-NDI mice treated with secretin plus fluvastatin was reduced by nearly 90% and the urine osmolality was doubled. Immunostaining showed that secretin increased intracellular stores of AQP2 and the addition of fluvastatin promoted AQP2 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Taken together, these findings open new perspectives for the pharmacological treatment of X-NDI.

  18. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  19. A novel mutation in the AVPR2 gene (222delA) associated with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a boy with growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Ayhan; Wood, Kent; Demir, Korcan; Büyükgebiz, Atilla; Böber, Ece; Kopp, Peter

    2010-01-01

    To study the case of a 2 10/12-year-old boy who had growth failure and delayed bone maturation. We reviewed the history, which revealed that he had had polyuria, polydipsia, lack of weight gain, and frequent vomiting since the age of 5 months. On physical examination, his height was 86 cm (-1.93 standard deviation [SD]), his weight 10.5 kg (-2.67 SD), and he had motor and mental retardation. His maternal great-grandfather also had polyuria and polydipsia (but not diabetes mellitus), suggesting X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as the underlying cause. The patient underwent a water deprivation-desmopressin test. The coding region of the AVPR2 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and submitted to direct sequence analysis. The water deprivation test confirmed the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus, and administration of desmopressin did not diminish his water secretion. Direct sequencing of the AVPR2 gene revealed a novel deletion of adenine at position 222 (222delA) in exon 2. This mutation is predicted to lead to a frameshift beginning at amino acid 75 and a premature stop codon at position 115 (FS75>115X). His height and weight, as well as his motor skills, improved after initiation of therapy with hydrochlorothiazide and amiloride. Growth delay can be associated with diabetes insipidus. The X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in this boy is caused by a novel mutation in the AVPR2 gene that is predicted to truncate the receptor protein.

  20. Diabetic mice are protected from normally lethal nephrotoxicity of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC): role of nephrogenic tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Lock, Edward A.; Latendresse, John R.; Warbritton, Alan A.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2006-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (DB) rats are protected from nephrotoxicity of gentamicin, cisplatin and mercuric chloride, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Ninety percent of DB mice receiving a LD90 dose (75 mg/kg, ip) of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC) survived in contrast to only 10% of the nondiabetic (NDB) mice surviving the same dose. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of protection is upregulated tissue repair. In the NDB mice, DCVC produced steep temporal increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma creatinine, which were associated with proximal tubular cell (PTC) necrosis, acute renal failure (ARF), and death within 48 h. In contrast, in the DB mice, BUN and creatinine increased less steeply, declining after 36 h to completely resolve by 96 h. HPLC analysis of plasma and urine revealed that DB did not alter the toxicokinetics of DCVC. Furthermore, activity of renal cysteine conjugate β-lyase, the enzyme that bioactivates DCVC, was unaltered in DB mice, undermining the possibility of lower bioactivation of DCVC leading to lower injury. [3H]-thymidine pulse labeling and PCNA analysis indicated an early onset and sustained nephrogenic tissue repair in DCVC-treated DB mice. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed a fourfold increase in the number of cells in S-phase in the DB kidneys even without exposure to DCVC. Blocking the entry of cells into S-phase by antimitotic intervention using colchicine abolished stimulated nephrogenic tissue repair and nephroprotection. These findings suggest that preplacement of S-phase cells in the kidney due to diabetes is critical in mitigating the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury by upregulation of tissue repair, leading to survival of the DB mice by avoiding acute renal failure

  1. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with L1 syndrome: a new report of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome including L1CAM and AVPR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Noël B B; Bos, Krista K; Kerstjens, Mieke; van Dael, Karin; Vos, Yvonne J

    2008-07-15

    We report on an infant boy with congenital hydrocephalus due to L1 syndrome and polyuria due to diabetes insipidus. We initially believed his excessive urine loss was from central diabetes insipidus and that the cerebral malformation caused a secondary insufficient pituitary vasopressin release. However, he failed to respond to treatment with a vasopressin analogue, which pointed to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). L1 syndrome and X-linked NDI are distinct clinical disorders caused by mutations in the L1CAM and AVPR2 genes, respectively, located in adjacent positions in Xq28. In this boy we found a deletion of 61,577 basepairs encompassing the entire L1CAM and AVPR2 genes and extending into intron 7 of the ARHGAP4 gene. To our knowledge this is the first description of a patient with a deletion of these three genes. He is the second patient to be described with L1 syndrome and NDI. During follow-up he manifested complications from the hydrocephalus and NDI including global developmental delay and growth failure with low IGF-1 and hypothyroidism. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Contiguous 22.1-kb deletion embracing AVPR2 and ARHGAP4 genes at novel breakpoints leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Chinese pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying; Chen, Yibing; Kong, Xiangdong

    2018-02-02

    It has been reported that mutations in arginine vasopressin type 2 receptor (AVPR2) cause congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). However, only a few cases of AVPR2 deletion have been documented in China. An NDI pedigree was included in this study, including the proband and his mother. All NDI patients had polyuria, polydipsia, and growth retardation. PCR mapping, long range PCR and sanger sequencing were used to identify genetic causes of NDI. A novel 22,110 bp deletion comprising AVPR2 and ARH4GAP4 genes was identified by PCR mapping, long range PCR and sanger sequencing. The deletion happened perhaps due to the 4-bp homologous sequence (TTTT) at the junctions of both 5' and 3' breakpoints. The gross deletion co-segregates with NDI. After analyzing available data of putative clinical signs of AVPR2 and ARH4GAP4 deletion, we reconsider the potential role of AVPR2 deletion in short stature. We identified a novel 22.1-kb deletion leading to X-linked NDI in a Chinese pedigree, which would increase the current knowledge in AVPR2 mutation.

  3. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated....... Increasingly poor renal function, aberrations in calcium-phosphate metabolism and erythropoietin treatment seem to increase the risk of the disease and its severity. Up to 25-30% of patients with renal failure exposed to gadolinium-based contrast agents may develop nephrogenic systemic disease. The figure...... that gadolinium-containing contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging have an essential causative role in most, if not all, cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. One particular agent, gadodiamide, caused the majority of cases, but gadopentetate dimeglumine has also been implicated in several cases...

  4. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Peter; Skov, Lone; Rossen, Kristian

    2006-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a new, rare disease of unknown cause that affects patients with renal failure. Single cases led to the suspicion of a causative role of gadodiamide that is used for magnetic resonance imaging. This study therefore reviewed all of the authors' confirmed cases...... of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (n = 13) with respect to clinical characteristics, gadodiamide exposure, and subsequent clinical course. It was found that all had been exposed to gadodiamide before the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The delay from exposure to first sign of the disease was 2 to 75...... d (median 25 d). Odds ratio for acquiring the disease when gadodiamide exposed was 32.5 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 549.2; P

  5. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khurram, Misbah; Skov, Lone; Rossen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a fibrotic disease seen in renal failure patients that may lead to severe physical disability. It has been demonstrated in recent studies that NSF can be caused by some gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents. In this report we present one of a total of 26...

  6. Two novel types of contiguous gene deletion of the AVPR2 and ARHGAP4 genes in unrelated Japanese kindreds with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Masashi; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Yoneda, Takashi; Furukawa, Kenji; Usukura, Mikiya; Itoh, Yuji; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Study of two families containing individuals with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) indicated different types of 21.3 kb and 26.3 kb deletions involving the AVPR2 and ARHGAP4 (RhoGAP C1) genes. In the case of the 21.3 kb deletion, the deletion consensus motif (5'-TGAAGG-3') and polypurine runs, known as the arrest site of polymerase alpha, were detected in the vicinity of the deletion junction. Inverted repeats (7/8 matches), believed to potentiate DNA loop formation, flank the deletion breakpoint. We propose this deletion to be the result of slipped mispairing during DNA replication. In the case of the 26.3 kb deletion, the 12,945 bp inverted region with the 10,003 bp internal deletion was accompanied with the 2,509 bp deletion in the 5'-side and the 13,785 bp deletion in the 3'-side. We defined three deletion junctions in this rearrangement (DJ1, DJ2, and DJ3) from the 5'-side. The surrounding sequence of DJ1 (5'-CCC-3') closely resembled that of DJ3 (5'-AGGG-3') (DJ1; 5'-cCCCgaggg-3', DJ3; 5'-ccccAGGG-3'), and DJ1 was located in the 5'-side of DJ3 without any overlapping in sequence. The immunoglobulin class switch (ICS) motif (5'-TGGGG-3') was found around the complementary sequence of DJ3. There was a 10-base palindrome (5'-aGACAtgtct-3') in the alignment of the DJ2 (5'-GACA-3') region. From these findings, we propose a novel mutation process with the rearrangement probably resulting from stem-loop induced non-homologous recombination in an ICS-like fashion. Both patients, despite lacking ARHGAP4, had no morphological, clinical, or laboratory abnormalities except for those usually found in patients with NDI. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. P2Y12 Receptor Localizes in the Renal Collecting Duct and Its Blockade Augments Arginine Vasopressin Action and Alleviates Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Müller, Christa E; Carlson, Noel G; Baqi, Younis; Strasburg, David L; Heiney, Kristina M; Villanueva, Karie; Kohan, Donald E; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12-R) signaling is mediated through Gi, ultimately reducing cellular cAMP levels. Because cAMP is a central modulator of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced water transport in the renal collecting duct (CD), we hypothesized that if expressed in the CD, P2Y12-R may play a role in renal handling of water in health and in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We found P2Y12-R mRNA expression in rat kidney, and immunolocalized its protein and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in CD principal cells. Administration of clopidogrel bisulfate, an irreversible inhibitor of P2Y12-R, significantly increased urine concentration and AQP2 protein in the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats. Notably, clopidogrel did not alter urine concentration in Brattleboro rats that lack AVP. Clopidogrel administration also significantly ameliorated lithium-induced polyuria, improved urine concentrating ability and AQP2 protein abundance, and reversed the lithium-induced increase in free-water excretion, without decreasing blood or kidney tissue lithium levels. Clopidogrel administration also augmented the lithium-induced increase in urinary AVP excretion and suppressed the lithium-induced increase in urinary nitrates/nitrites (nitric oxide production) and 8-isoprostane (oxidative stress). Furthermore, selective blockade of P2Y12-R by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 in primary cultures of rat inner medullary CD cells potentiated the expression of AQP2 and AQP3 mRNA, and cAMP production induced by dDAVP (desmopressin). In conclusion, pharmacologic blockade of renal P2Y12-R increases urinary concentrating ability by augmenting the effect of AVP on the kidney and ameliorates lithium-induced NDI by potentiating the action of AVP on the CD. This strategy may offer a novel and effective therapy for lithium-induced NDI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samtleben, W.

    2007-01-01

    A scleromyxedema-like disease was recognized in 1997. In 2000 this disorder was first published and termed nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy because all patients had advanced renal failure. In 2006 it was discovered that the patients had a history of a preceding contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients had acute or chronic severe renal insufficiency with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 2 . So far a total of about 215 patients with this new skin disorder have been reported to international registries. The skin thickening has a typical histology and begins in the peripheral extremities and progresses proximally, including also the abdominal wall and the head in some patients. NSF involves not only the skin, but also the muscles and other organs (e.g., lungs, heart, eyes) in some patients. Therefore the term nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was introduced. Skin fibrosis and sclerosis are usually progressive with disabling contractures of involved joints (knees, hands, feet). NSF may be lethal in up to 28% of patients. Spontaneous remissions are rare. No generally accepted treatment is available. So far, the pathogenesis is not well understood. One hypothesis supposes a role of gadolinium liberated from the contrast agents. As patients with acute or chronic advanced renal failure (GFR 2 ) including those with hepatorenal dysfunctions are at high risk to develop NSF after exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents, contrast-enhanced MRI should be avoided in this group and alternative diagnostic procedures should be used whenever possible. (orig.) [de

  9. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: epidemiology update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. Recent findings Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated....... Increasingly poor renal function, aberrations in calcium-phosphate metabolism and erythropoietin treatment seem to increase the risk of the disease and its severity. Up to 25-30% of patients with renal failure exposed to gadolinium-based contrast agents may develop nephrogenic systemic disease. The figure...... that gadolinium-containing contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging have an essential causative role in most, if not all, cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. One particular agent, gadodiamide, caused the majority of cases, but gadopentetate dimeglumine has also been implicated in several cases...

  10. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Madke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF is a relatively new fibrosing disorder which has caught the attention of various specialities in the past decade. NSF is an extremely disabling and often painful condition, affecting up to 13% of the individuals with chronic kidney disease. The administration of a gadolinium chelate contrast agent has been reported to induce the development of NSF, particularly in patients who have acute or chronic renal disease with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR lower than 30-mL/min/1.73 m 2 and in those with acute renal insufficiency. Mass spectroscopy studies have demonstrated particles of gadolinium in the lesional tissue. The exact pathogenesis of this curious sclerosing condition is unknown. The role of the aberrant targeting of ′circulating fibrocytes′ to the peripheral tissues and viscera has been hypothesized. NSF has distinct clinicopathological features in the setting of renal failure and needs to be looked upon as a new entity on the block. The condition is characterized by irregular indurated plaques, with amoeba-like projections and islands of sparing, chiefly on the trunk and extremities. Flexion contractures of fingers, knees, and elbow joints are known to occur in advanced cases of NSF. The course is frequently associated with painful episodes and loss of ambulation. Histopathology shows haphazard arrangement of thickened bundles of collagen, varying amount of mucin, and increased population of fibroblast-like cells in the dermis. Immunohistochemistry shows increased deposition of type-I procollagen and CD 34+ cells having fibroblastic activity. The condition is refractory to treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. Various modalities of therapy such as UVA1 phototherapy, imatinib mesylate, photodynamic therapy, plasmapheresis, extracorporeal photochemotherapy, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin have shown a moderate degree of improvement in skin thickness scores. A prudent

  11. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Tina Rask; Olesen, Anne; J�rgensen, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a debilitating and painful disorder with an increased stimulation of the connective tissue in the skin and systemic tissues. The disease is associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging in patients with renal...

  12. Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and diabetes mellitus due to dominant ABCC8/KCNJ11 mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kapoor, R R

    2011-10-01

    Dominantly acting loss-of-function mutations in the ABCC8\\/KCNJ11 genes can cause mild medically responsive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH). As controversy exists over whether these mutations predispose to diabetes in adulthood we investigated the prevalence of diabetes in families with dominantly inherited ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel mutations causing HH in the proband.

  13. Nephrogenic adenoma of the ureter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Burak Hoscan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic adenoma (NA is an uncommon benign lesion of the urothelial tract. The diagnostic features that are useful in the recognition of this benign entity are: the characteristic mixture of various architectural patterns, associated stromal edema and inflammation, hyaline sheath around tubules, and lack of mitotic activity. Although NA appears with hematuria or obstruction, frequently found incidentally in endoscopy or imaging modalities.

  14. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R.; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  15. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  16. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with L1 syndrome : A new report of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome including L1CAM and AVPR2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, Noel B. B.; Bos, Krista K.; Kerstjens, Mieke; van Dael, Karin; Vos, Yvonne J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on.in infant boy \\vitli congenital hydrocephatLis CILle to 1.1 syndrorne and p0lyUria dne to diabetes itisipidtis. We initially believed Ins excessive Lirine loss was froin central diabetes insipidLIS and diat the cerebral inalforniation caused a secondary insufficient pitnitary

  17. Lack of arginine vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of aquaporin-2 mutant AQP2-R254L explains dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattia, F.P. de; Savelkoul, P.J.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Konings, I.B.M.; Sluijs, P. van der; Mallmann, R.; Oksche, A.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2005-01-01

    Water homeostasis in humans is regulated by vasopressin, which induces the translocation of homotetrameric aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels from intracellular vesicles to the apical membrane of renal principal cells. For this process, phosphorylation of AQP2 at S256 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

  18. Nephrogenic adenoma. Reports of two cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Starklint, H

    1989-01-01

    Nephrogenic adenoma is a rare lesion of the urinary tract. Two cases in the urinary bladder are described. Histologically the tumor consists of cystic and tubular structures resembling the distal part of the nephron. The etiology and pathogenesis are discussed and a new etiologic theory is presen...

  19. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: history and epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2009-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a new disease; the first case was diagnosed in 1997. It took 9 years before an association between NSF and gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CAs) was identified. Gadolinium has several advantages for use in relation to enhanced MRI, but it is also a toxic...... that the real number of patients who have NSF has not been accurately totaled; the disease seems to be underdiagnosed for various reasons....

  20. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: risk factors suggested from Japanese published cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Y; Kanal, E; Thomsen, H S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the published cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in Japan. The Japanese medical literature database and MedLine were searched using the keywords NSF and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (January 2000 to March 2009). Reports in peer-reviewed journals ...

  1. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S.; Argani, Pedram; Gearhart, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  2. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Waikhom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder of the skin that develops in patients with advanced renal failure. It mostly presents with progressive hardening or induration of the skin of the extremities. Systemic involvement is also known to occur in this entity. Exposure to gadolinium contrast for radiological evaluation has been identified as the offending agent. The condition is progressive and can be seriously disabling. Therapeutic options are limited and not rewarding in majority of the cases. Awareness of this entity is important so that proper precautionary measures can be taken at the earliest to ameliorate the condition.

  3. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: late skin manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Marckmann, Peter; Rossen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists...... and nephrologists recognize the disease. OBSERVATIONS: We studied 17 patients with NSF late in the disease. All patients showed epidermal atrophy and hairlessness of the affected regions, primarily the lower legs. Affected areas were symmetrically distributed and hyperpigmented in most cases. Eleven patients showed......: This descriptive case series of patients with NSF gives a detailed clinical picture of the skin manifestations late in the disease. It demonstrates that the clinical picture in the late stage has a varied presentation and that NSF has a significant effect on the quality of life....

  4. Current status of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daftari Besheli, L.; Aran, S.; Shaqdan, K.; Kay, J.; Abujudeh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) occurs in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or acute renal failure, most commonly following exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). NSF can be debilitating and associated with increased mortality. The putative association of NSF with GBCAs prompted the development of guidelines to limit the use of these contrast agents in at-risk patients. Indeed, the incidence of NSF has decreased dramatically following application of these guidelines, which appears to be the only effective means of decreasing NSF incidence. Thus, increasing clinician awareness of these updated guidelines is important. The present review introduces and compares updated guidelines for GBCA use and discusses the latest advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and treatment of NSF

  5. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  6. Impaired Cleavage of Preproinsulin Signal Peptide Linked to Autosomal-Dominant Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Lara-Lemus, Roberto; Shan, Shu-ou; Wright, Jordan; Haataja, Leena; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Guo, Huan; Larkin, Dennis; Arvan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recently, missense mutations upstream of preproinsulin’s signal peptide (SP) cleavage site were reported to cause mutant INS gene-induced diabetes of youth (MIDY). Our objective was to understand the molecular pathogenesis using metabolic labeling and assays of proinsulin export and insulin and C-peptide production to examine the earliest events of insulin biosynthesis, highlighting molecular mechanisms underlying β-cell failure plus a novel strategy that might ameliorate the MIDY syndrome. We find that whereas preproinsulin-A(SP23)S is efficiently cleaved, producing authentic proinsulin and insulin, preproinsulin-A(SP24)D is inefficiently cleaved at an improper site, producing two subpopulations of molecules. Both show impaired oxidative folding and are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Preproinsulin-A(SP24)D also blocks ER exit of coexpressed wild-type proinsulin, accounting for its dominant-negative behavior. Upon increased expression of ER–oxidoreductin-1, preproinsulin-A(SP24)D remains blocked but oxidative folding of wild-type proinsulin improves, accelerating its ER export and increasing wild-type insulin production. We conclude that the efficiency of SP cleavage is linked to the oxidation of (pre)proinsulin. In turn, impaired (pre)proinsulin oxidation affects ER export of the mutant as well as that of coexpressed wild-type proinsulin. Improving oxidative folding of wild-type proinsulin may provide a feasible way to rescue insulin production in patients with MIDY. PMID:22357960

  7. Genetics of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Stratakis, Constantine A; Luger, Anton

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to inadequate release of arginine vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus) or due to arginine vasopressin insensitivity by the renal distal tubule, leading to a deficiency in tubular water reabsorption (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). This article reviews the genetics of diabetes insipidus in the context of its diagnosis, clinical presentation, and therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K; Almén, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To update the guidelines of the Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media. AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the history, clinical features and prevalence of neph...... guidelines regarding gadolinium contrast agents minimises the risk of NSF • Potential long-term harm from gadolinium accumulation in the body is discussed.......PURPOSE: To update the guidelines of the Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media. AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the history, clinical features and prevalence...... of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and the current understanding of its pathophysiology. The risk factors for NSF are discussed and prophylactic measures are recommended. The stability of the different gadolinium-based contrast media and the potential long-term effects of gadolinium in the body have also been...

  9. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: risk factors suggested from Japanese published cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Y; Kanal, E; Thomsen, H S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the published cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in Japan. The Japanese medical literature database and MedLine were searched using the keywords NSF and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (January 2000 to March 2009). Reports in peer-reviewed journals...... and meeting abstracts were included, and cases with biopsy confirmation were selected. 14 biopsy-verified NSF cases were found. In seven of eight patients reported after the association between gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) and NSF was proposed, GBCA administration was documented: five received only...

  10. A moderate response to plasmapheresis in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Ustuner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF is a recently identified idiopathic cutaneous fibrosing disorder that occurs in the setting of renal failure. The disease initially called nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy is closely linked to exposure to gadolinium-based contrast media used during magnetic resonance imaging in patients with renal insufficiency. Although little is known about the pathogenesis of this disease, the increased expression of transforming growth factor-beta has been demonstrated recently. Herein, we present a case of NSF was partially treated due to a moderate and temporary response to plasmapheresis with no recurrence for 6 months, but returned at the end of 6th month.

  11. Diffuse glomerular nodular lesions in diabetic pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha, an inheritant diabetic gene in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hara

    Full Text Available Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3 gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI with advanced glycation end-product (AGE and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicating that mutant HNF1α did not directly contribute to glomerular nodular formation in diabetic pigs. In conclusion, pigs harboring the dominant-negative mutant human MODY3 gene showed reproducible and distinct glomerular nodules, possibly due to AGE- and CML-based collagen accumulation. Although the pathology differed in several respects from that of human glomerular nodular lesions, the

  12. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) and gadolinium-based contrast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), unknown before March 1997 and first described in 2000, is a systemic disorder characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. The first known case occurred in 1997, after the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) at high doses in patients with renal failure had become routine.

  13. Clinical and histological findings in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowper, Shawn E.; Rabach, Morgan; Girardi, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a relative newcomer to the world of medicine. NSF was introduced just over 10 years ago as nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy, but with further investigation, its systemic nature was determined. The strict adherence to a definition requiring both clinical and pathological concordance has allowed for careful separation of this entity from other fibrosing disorders, leading eventually to the realization that gadolinium-based contrast agents were closely associated with its onset. As planned prospective studies get underway, it is of paramount importance that researchers and clinicians realize that NSF remains a very challenging diagnosis, and that both clinical and histopathological criteria must be employed to reach the most accurate diagnosis possible

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of posterior pituitary for evaluation of the neurohypophyseal function in idiopathic and autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozata, M.; Tayfun, C.; Kurtaran, K.; Yetkin, I.; Beyhan, Z.; Corakci, A.; Caglayan, S.; Alemdaroglu, A.; Guendogan, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the role of MR imaging for evaluation of the functional status of the neurohypophyseal system in both idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (DI) and familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal DI. The patients and family with DI were analyzed retrospectively for the presence or absence of posterior pituitary gland hyperintense signal on MR images. A total of 19 adult patients with idiopathic central DI, 7 members of a family with autosomal dominant DI and 20 control subjects were included in the study. Diagnosis of idiopathic DI was based on the presence of central DI in the absence of any alteration that is known to be responsible for DI. The patients were studied retrospectively and the morphology and intensity of the posterior lobe by MR imaging was assessed by blinded reading. In all patients with idiopathic central DI and the affected members of the family, the posterior bright signal was absent while the stalk was normal on MR images. In contrast, normal posterior pituitary bright signal and stalk were found in unaffected members of the family and all control subjects. We conclude that MR imaging of the posterior pituitary lobe can be used to evaluate the functional status of the neurohypophyseal system in idiopathic central DI and familial autosomal dominant DI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, William M

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon condition with various aetiologies. Recent research has uncovered new mechanisms underlying the syndrome. Careful attention to management is essential in pregnant women to avoid serious complications. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy may be due to relative reduction in secretion of AVP from the posterior pituitary (cranial DI), increase in breakdown of AVP by placental cystine aminopeptidase with vasopressinase activity, or resistance of the rental tubules to AVP (nephrogenic DI). PMID:27579058

  16. Type III Bartter-like syndrome in an infant boy with Gitelman syndrome and autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Milena; Gaudino, Rossella; Tedeschi, Silvana; Syrèn, Marie-Louise; Perrotta, Silverio; Maines, Evelina; Zaffanello, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of an infant boy with polyuria and a familial history of central diabetes insipidus. Laboratory blood tests disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism. Plasma magnesium concentration was slightly low. Urine analysis showed hypercalciuria, hyposthenuria, and high excretion of potassium. Such findings oriented toward type III Bartter syndrome (BSIII). Direct sequencing of the CLCNKB gene revealed no disease-causing mutations. The water deprivation test was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lack of posterior pituitary hyperintensity. Finally, direct sequencing of the AVP-NPII gene showed a point mutation (c.1884G>A) in a heterozygous state, confirming an autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI). This condition did not explain the patient's phenotype; thus, we investigated for Gitelman syndrome (GS). A direct sequencing of the SLC12A3 gene showed c.269A>C and c.1205C>A new mutations. In conclusion, the patient had a genetic combination of GS and adFNDI with a BSIII-like phenotype.

  17. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a mutation in the arginine-vasopressin II gene in four generations of a Korean family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myo-Jing Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a rare form of central diabetes insipidus that is caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII gene. It is characterized by persistent polydipsia and polyuria induced by deficient or absent secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP. Here we report a case of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in four generations of a Korean family, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene (c.286G>T. This is the first report of such a case in Korea.

  18. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Argani, Pedram [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gearhart, John P. [Department of Pediatric Urology, Brady Urologic Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  19. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis symptoms alleviated by renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Melchior

    2011-01-01

    are limited. Anecdotal reports have shown partial or complete resolution of NSF following successful renal transplantation early in the course of NSF. In this report, we describe alleviation of NSF symptoms in two women following successful renal transplantation more than 3 years after onset of NSF.......Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare, serious, and life-threatening disease of patients with severe renal impairment. Gadolinium-containing contrast agents have been shown to be the crucial trigger. There is no proven medical cure for the disease, and symptomatic treatment options...

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a variant in the AVP gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup, Lise Bols; Zhou, Yan; Kvistgaard, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is caused by variants in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a 42-year-old man carrying an adFNDI causing variant in exon 1 of the AVP gene using...

  1. [Growth in children with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morla Báez, E; Dorantes Alvarez, L M; Chavarría Bonequi, C

    1980-01-01

    Commercial preparations of vasopressin for the treatment of diabetes insipidus are not available in Mexico. Besides, the hormone is useless in the nephrogenic variety. In the department of Endocrinology at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico, a preparation containing hydrochlorothiazide, aminopyrine and potassium chloride, which reduces urinary volumes in about two thirds, is employed in all varieties of the disease. Growth in stature was investigated in 44 patients under treatment, attending the Endocrine Outpatient Clinic since 1967 for a period of 2 to 12 years. Clinical material included 29 males and 15 females. There were 23 idiopathic, 7 histiocytosis, 5 nephrogenic, 4 craniopharyngiomas, 2 psychogenic polydipsia, 2 traumatic and 1, as a sequel of tuberculous meningoencephalitis. Six idiopathic, 2 nephrogenic, 2 traumatic, 1 histiocytosis, and 1 psychogenic proceeded between percentiles 3 and 97, parallel to the nearest line of reference along the whole period of study. Two nephrogenic, 2 histiocytosis, 1 psychogenic, 1 post-meningoencephalitis and 14 idiopathic, grew below the third percentile, but parallel to it. One nephrogenic, 4 histiocytosis, 4 craniopharyngioma and 3 idiopathic progressively departed from the initial centile. Two of the latter had growth hormone deficiency, and 1 had been very irregularly treated. It is concluded that the therapy employed limits stature impairment but does not produce catch-up growth. Accordingly, it is proposed that the treatment of diabetes insipidus should be started as early as possible, and that if progress in stature is appreciably deteriorated, the presence of additional pathology should be suspected.

  2. An epidemic outbreak of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in a Danish hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The nephrological department of Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev experienced an epidemic accumulation of patients developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in the period 2002-2006. Systematic studies of these patients revealed that they all had a gadodiamide-enhanced magnetic resonance examination prior to their symptoms, and that they all had severe renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease stage 5) at the time of their exposure to gadodiamide. Besides exposure to gadodiamide, our analyses indicated that increasing cumulative gadodiamide exposure (i.e. repeated exposures), and higher serum concentrations of ionized calcium and phosphate were cofactors that raised the risk of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Higher cumulative gadodiamide exposure, higher prescribed erythropoietin dosage at exposure, and being hemodialysis patient were three factors associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in its most severe form. Retrospective reviews of patients records and patient interviews revealed the large variability in symptoms and clinical course of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, but also highlighted that the typical initial symptoms were symmetric swelling, discoloration and pain of lower legs, whereas the typical late symptoms of severely affected patients were skin thickening, stiffness, contractures, and debilitating disabilities. In conclusion, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a serious iatrogenic disease of patients with renal insufficiency caused by some Gd-containing contrast agents, in particular gadodiamide. Unfortunately, there is no proven curative treatment. It is therefore essential that future cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis are prevented

  3. Recurrent nephrogenic adenoma in a 10-year-old boy with prune belly syndrome : a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulakonda, Vijaya M; Kopp, Ryan P; Sorensen, Mathew D; Grady, Richard W

    2008-05-01

    Nephrogenic adenoma is a rare benign lesion of the urinary tract that is associated with a history of irritation or injury of the urothelium. Predisposing factors include infection, calculi, surgery, trauma, and renal transplantation. Nephrogenic adenoma commonly presents with lower urinary tract symptoms or hematuria. We present the case of recurrent nephrogenic adenoma in a 10-year-old boy with a history of prune belly syndrome and discuss management of this disease in the pediatric population. To our knowledge this represents the first reported case of recurrent nephrogenic adenoma associated with prune belly syndrome.

  4. Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H A Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of water and electrolyte balance is frequently encountered in clinical medicine. Regulating water metabolism is critically important. Diabetes insipidus (DI) presented with excessive water loss from the kidney is a major disorder of water metabolism. To understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of DI and rationales of clinical management of DI is important for both research and clinical practice. This chapter will first review various forms of DI focusing on central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI ) . This is followed by a discussion of regulatory mechanisms underlying CDI and NDI , with a focus on the regulatory axis of vasopressin, vasopressin receptor 2 (V2R ) and the water channel molecule, aquaporin 2 (AQP2 ). The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various forms of DI will also be discussed with highlights of some of the latest therapeutic strategies that are developed from in vitro experiments and animal studies.

  5. Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication of pregnancy. It is usually transient, being due to increased placental production of vasopressinase that inactivates circulating vasopressin. Gestational, transient DI occurs late in pregnancy and disappears few days after delivery. Acquired central DI can also occur during pregnancy, for example in a patient with hypophysitis or neuroinfundibulitis during late pregnancy or postpartum. Finally, pre-existing central or nephrogenic DI may occasionally be unmasked by pregnancy. Treatment with dDAVP (desmopressin, Minirin(®)) is very effective on transient DI of pregnancy and also on pre-existing or acquired central DI. Contrary to vasopressin, dDAVP is not degraded by vasopressinase. Nephrogenic DI is insensitive to dDAVP and is therefore more difficult to treat during pregnancy if fluid intake needs to be restricted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Case-control study of gadodiamide-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Peter; Skov, Lone; Rossen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    exposed to gadodiamide develop nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 19 histologically verified cases and 19 sex- and age-matched controls. All subjects had chronic renal failure when exposed to gadodiamide. Clinical, biochemical and pharmacological data were.......02). CONCLUSIONS: Increasing cumulative gadodiamide exposure, high-dose epoietin-beta treatment, and higher serum concentrations of ionized calcium and phosphate increase the risk of gadodiamide-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in renal failure patients. Severe cases seem to develop primarily among patients......BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis may be caused by gadolinium (Gd)-containing magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Most reported cases were associated with one particular agent, gadodiamide. Yet, unidentified cofactors might explain why only a minority of renal failure patients...

  7. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: Review of 408 biopsy-confirmed cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitong Zou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF has now been virtually eliminated by the discovery of its association with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs and the consequent reduced use of GBCA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in severe renal failure patients. This review of 408 biopsy-confirmed cases shows how to minimize NSF risk when performing GBCA-enhanced MRI or magnetic resonance angiography. The absence of any NSF cases in patients less than 8 years old or greater than 87 years old suggests that infants and elderly patients are already protected. Limiting GBCA dose to a maximum of 0.1 mMol/kg, dialyzing dialysis patients quickly following GBCA administration, delaying administration of GBCA in acute renal failure until after renal function returns or dialysis is initiated, and avoiding nonionic linear GBCA in renal failure patients, especially when there are pro-inflammatory conditions, appear to have reduced NSF risk to the point where safe GBCA-enhanced MRI is possible in most patients.

  8. The burden of gestational diabetes mellitus in Jamaican women with a family history of autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes La carga de la diabetes mellitus gestacional en mujeres de Jamaica con antecedentes familiares de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael R. Irving

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine if Jamaican women of African descent with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes have greater odds of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM than those without a family history of the disease. METHODS: A comparative study was conducted of two groups of pregnant Jamaican women: the first with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes; the second with no history of the disease. Incidence, odds for developing GDM, and metabolic profiles in first and second trimesters were assessed using SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States. RESULTS: The incidence of GDM was 12.0 % in women with a family history of early onset autosomal dominant type 2 diabetes and 1.5% in women without a family history of the disease (P OBJETIVOS: Determinar si las mujeres jamaicanas de ascendencia africana con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 tienen mayor probabilidad de desarrollar diabetes mellitus gestacional (DMG que las que no tienen esos antecedentes familiares. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio comparativo con dos grupos de mujeres jamaicanas embarazadas: el primero con mujeres que tenían antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y el segundo con mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad. Se empleó el programa SPSS v. 11.5 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, Estados Unidos de América para analizar los resultados y calcular la incidencia, la probabilidad de desarrollar DMG y los perfiles metabólicos en el primer y el segundo trimestres de gestación. RESULTADOS: La incidencia de DMG fue de 12,0% en las mujeres con antecedentes familiares de inicio temprano de diabetes autosómica dominante tipo 2 y de 1,5% en las mujeres sin antecedentes familiares de esa enfermedad (P < 0,05. Las mujeres del primer grupo tuvieron nueve veces más probabilidades de desarrollar DMG que las

  9. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy: how to advice the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refardt, Julie; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2018-02-19

    Diabetes insipidus, characterized by polyuria and polydipsia, is a rare disease during pregnancy. Nevertheless, its recognition is important to avoid complications due to dehydration and hypernatremia. Its manifestation during pregnancy ranges from exacerbation of pre-existing central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus to transient pregnancy-induced diabetes insipidus due to the increased metabolism of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin by the placental vasopressinase. Diagnosis can be challenging, as urinary frequency is common during pregnancy and primary polydipsia also needs to be excluded. Also the standard water deprivation test is not recommended during pregnancy due to the increased risk of complications. Treatment depends upon the final diagnosis, with desmopressin (DDAVP) being the medication of choice in AVP-deficient diabetes insipidus, whereas nephrogenic diabetes insipidus requires treatment of the underlying disease and supportive measures.

  10. Reading First Coordinates from the Nephrogenic Zone in Human Fetal Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuth, Will W

    2018-01-01

    While substantial information is available on organ anlage and the primary formation of nephrons, molecular mechanisms acting during the late development of the human kidney have received an astonishing lack of attention. In healthy newborn babies, nephrogenesis takes place unnoticed until birth. Upon delivery, morphogenetic activity in the nephrogenic zone decreases, and the stem cell niches aligned beyond the organ capsule vanish by an unknown signal. However, this signal also plays a key role in preterm and low birth weight babies. Although they are born in a phase of active nephrogenesis, pathological findings illustrate that they evolve to a high incidence oligonephropathy and prematurity of renal parenchyma. Different extra- and intrauterine influences seem to be responsible, but independent from chemical nature, all of them culminate in the nephrogenic zone. One assumes that the marred development is caused either by an overshoot of metabolites, misleading signaling of morphogens, unbalanced synthesis of extracellular matrix or restricted contact between mesenchymal and epithelial stem cells. Even more surprising is that there is only a few vague morphological information of the nephrogenic zone in the human fetal kidney available and ultrastructural data is severely lacking. On this account, the first coordinates were determined by optical microscopy and morphometry. Without claiming to be complete, generated results made it possible to create schematic illustrations true to scale for orientation. It will help graduating students, young pediatricians, pathologists, and scientists working in the field of biomedicine to interpret professionally the nephrogenic zone and contained niches. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a variant in the AVP gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Bols Toustrup

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI is caused by variants in the arginine vasopressin (AVP gene. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a 42-year-old man carrying an adFNDI causing variant in exon 1 of the AVP gene using lentivirus-mediated nuclear reprogramming. The iPSCs carried the expected variant in the AVP gene. Furthermore, the iPSCs expressed pluripotency markers; displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers and had a normal karyotype consistent with the original fibroblasts. This iPSC line is useful in future studies focusing on the pathogenesis of adFNDI.

  12. Apoptosis of purified CD4+ T cell subsets is dominated by cytokine deprivation and absence of other cells in new onset diabetic NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Kaminitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg play a significant role in immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Excessive sensitivity of isolated Treg to apoptosis has been demonstrated in NOD mice and humans suffering of type 1 diabetes, suggesting a possible role in the immune dysfunction that underlies autoimmune insulitis. In this study the sensitivity to apoptosis was measured in T cells from new onset diabetic NOD females, comparing purified subsets to mixed cultures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apoptotic cells are short lived in vivo and death occurs primarily during isolation, manipulation and culture. Excessive susceptibility of CD25(+ T cells to spontaneous apoptosis is characteristic of isolated subsets, however disappears when death is measured in mixed splenocyte cultures. In variance, CD25(- T cells display balanced sensitivity to apoptosis under both conditions. The isolation procedure removes soluble factors, IL-2 playing a significant role in sustaining Treg viability. In addition, pro- and anti-apoptotic signals are transduced by cell-to-cell interactions: CD3 and CD28 protect CD25(+ T cells from apoptosis, and in parallel sensitize naïve effector cells to apoptosis. Treg viability is modulated both by other T cells and other subsets within mixed splenocyte cultures. Variations in sensitivity to apoptosis are often hindered by fast proliferation of viable cells, therefore cycling rates are mandatory to adequate interpretation of cell death assays. CONCLUSIONS: The sensitivity of purified Treg to apoptosis is dominated by cytokine deprivation and absence of cell-to-cell interactions, and deviate significantly from measurements in mixed populations. Balanced sensitivity of naïve/effector and regulatory T cells to apoptosis in NOD mice argues against the concept that differential susceptibility affects disease evolution and progression.

  13. Visceral fat dominant distribution in male type 2 diabetic patients is closely related to hepatic insulin resistance, irrespective of body type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki Yoshinori

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All previous studies that investigated the association between abdominal fat distribution and insulin resistance evaluated subcutaneous and visceral fat area and/or volume, but these values were not related to the body type of each subject. In the present study we have examined the association between abdominal fat distribution and peripheral (muscle/hepatic sensitivity to insulin using the visceral to abdominal subcutaneous fat area ratio (VF/SF ratio in male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This ratio defines the predominancy of visceral or subcutaneous abdominal adiposity, independent of the body type of each individual. Methods Thirty-six type 2 diabetic male patients underwent a euglycemic insulin clamp (insulin infusion rate = 40 mU/m2·min with 3-3H-glucose to measure insulin-mediated total body (primarily reflects muscle glucose disposal (TGD and suppression of endogenous (primarily reflects liver glucose production (EGP in response to a physiologic increase in plasma insulin concentration. Abdominal subcutaneous (SF and intraabdominal visceral fat (VF areas were quantitated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at the level of L4–5. Results TGD and TGD divided by steady state plasma insulin concentration during the insulin clamp (TGD/SSPI correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI, total fat mass (FM measured by 3H2O, SF and VF areas, while VF/SF ratio displayed no significant relationship with TGD or TGD/SSPI. In contrast, EGP and the product of EGP and SSPI during the insulin clamp (an index hepatic insulin resistance correlated positively with VF/SF ratio, but not with BMI, FM, VF or SF. Conclusion We conclude that, independent of the individual's body type, visceral fat dominant accumulation as opposed to subcutaneous fat accumulation is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, whereas peripheral (muscle insulin resistance is more closely related to general obesity (i.e. higher BMI and total FM

  14. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  15. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  16. Microdissecting the Genetic Events in Nephrogenic Rests and Wilms’ Tumor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Adrian K.; Brown, Keith W.; Berry, P. Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Nephrogenic rests are precursor lesions associated with about 40% of Wilms’ tumors. This study identifies genetic steps occurring in the development of Wilms’ tumor. Thirty-four Wilms’ tumors with nephrogenic rests and/or areas of anaplasia were microdissected from paraffin sections to determine whether and at what stage loss of heterozygosity (LOH) occurred, using polymerase chain reaction-based polymorphic markers at 11p13, 11p15, and 16q. LOH at these loci have been identified in Wilms’ tumors and are associated with identified or putative tumor suppressor genes. Three cystic nephromas/cystic partially differentiated nephroblastomas were also examined. LOH was detected in six cases at 11p13 and in six cases at 11p15, and two of these cases had LOH at both loci. All intralobar rests showing LOH also showed LOH in the tumor. A case with a small perilobar rest showed LOH of 11p13 only in the tumor. Five cases showing LOH at 16q were identified (this was identified only in the tumor, and not in the associated rest), and three of these had recurrence of the tumor. Two cases had a WT1 mutation (one germline and the other somatic), as well as LOH in both the intralobar rest and the tumor. A cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma showed loss at 11p13 and 11p15, as well as at 16q. This study suggests that LOH at 11p13 and 11p15 and WT1 mutations are early events but that LOH at 16q occurs late in the pathogenesis of Wilms’ tumor. Intralobar and perilobar nephrogenic rests are known to have different biological behaviors, and this study suggests that they are genetically different. A multistep model of Wilms’ tumor pathogenesis is supported by these findings. PMID:9736048

  17. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis associated with gadolinium based contrast agents: A summary of the medical literature reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, Dale R.

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder that principally affects the skin, but can involve virtually any tissue in the human body and result in significant disability and even death. Since 2006 numerous retrospective case reports and case series have reported a very strong association of this disease with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) for MR imaging in the setting of severe or end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this report is to summarize the medical literature reporting of biopsy-proven NSF cases in which the authors specifically investigated patient exposure to Gd-CA. A Pub Med MEDLINE search was performed using the key words-nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy. All case reports and case series of NSF were reviewed to determine if patients had a preceding exposure to Gd-CA and which specific Gd-CA was involved. If the original reports did not clarify the specific Gd-CA, I reviewed follow-up letters to the editors or contacted the authors to clarify which specific Gd-CA were linked to the NSF cases. If several reports originated from the same institution, clarification was also obtained to avoid redundant reporting. As of February 1, 2008 there have been 190 biopsy-proven cases of NSF published in the peer-reviewed literature with the following associations: 157 gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE Healthcare), 8 gadopentetate (Magnevist, Bayer Healthcare), 3 gadoversetamide (OptiMARK, Covidien), and 18 unspecified Gd-CA, and 4 confounded cases with more than one Gd-CA. Five cases of NSF were unassociated with Gd-CA

  18. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  19. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  20. Diabetes Insipidus in Mice with a Mutation in Aquaporin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a disease characterized by failure of the kidney to concentrate urine in response to vasopressin. Human kindreds with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus have been found to harbor mutations in the vasopressin receptor 2 (Avpr2 gene or the vasopressin-sensitive water channel aquaporin-2 (Aqp2 gene. Development of a treatment is rendered difficult due to the lack of a viable animal model. Through forward genetic screening of ethylnitrosourea-mutagenized mice, we report the identification and characterization of a mouse model of NDI, with an F204V mutation in the Aqp2 gene. Unlike previously attempted murine models of NDI, our mice survive to adulthood and more exactly recapitulate the human disorder. Previous in vitro experiments using renal cell lines suggest recessive Aqp2 mutations result in improper trafficking of the mutant water pore. Using these animals, we have directly proven this hypothesis of improper AQP2 translocation as the molecular defect in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in the intact organism. Additionally, using a renal cell line we show that the mutated protein, AQP2-F204V, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and that this abnormal localization can be rescued by wild-type protein. This novel mouse model allows for further mechanistic studies as well as testing of pharmacological and gene therapies for NDI.

  1. The water deprivation test and a potential role for the arginine vasopressin precursor copeptin to differentiate diabetes insipidus from primary polydipsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fost, M.; Oussaada, S. M.; Endert, E.; Linthorst, G. E.; Serlie, M. J.; Soeters, M. R.; DeVries, J. H.; Bisschop, P. H.; Fliers, E.

    2015-01-01

    The water deprivation test is the gold standard test to differentiate central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) from primary polydipsia (PP) in patients with polyuria and polydipsia. Few studies have addressed the diagnostic performance of this test. The aim of this retrospective cohort study

  2. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  3. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  4. Role of adenylyl cyclase 6 in the development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Kristensen, Tina Bøgelund; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2017-01-01

    knockout (AC6(loxloxCre)) mice had approximately 50% lower urine osmolality and doubled water intake under baseline conditions compared with controls. Dietary Li(+) administration increased water intake and reduced urine osmolality in control, AC6(-/-), and AC6(loxloxCre) mice. Consistent with AC6......(-/-) mice, medullary AQP2 and pS256-AQP2 abundances were lower in AC6(loxloxCre) mice compared with controls under standard conditions, and levels were further reduced after Li(+) administration. AC6(loxloxCre) and control mice had a similar increase in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen......-positive cells in response to Li(+). However, AC6(loxloxCre) mice had a higher number of H(+)-ATPase B1 subunit-positive cells under standard conditions and after Li(+) administration. Collectively, AC6 has a minor role in Li-NDI development but may be important for determining the intercalated cell...

  5. [Nursing care of a patient with bipolar disorder and lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de la Orden, Lucía; García Carretero, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is one of the most common, severe and persistent mental disorders. The evaluation of all data and variables related to bipolar disorder is a difficult task, because there is no clear agreement on what should be included in this category. One of the traditional treatments for this disease is the lithium metal that is administered in the form of lithium salt. Lithium has a narrow therapeutic window and there is a significant risk of complications arising from its use, mainly neurological and renal. In the case presented, the preparation of a care plan is described for a patient diagnosed with bipolar disorder who suffered a complication with lithium treatment. To do this, it was decided to use a standardized care plan and later completed it with diagnostic, objectives and interventions to the specific needs of the patient, aimed at achieving optimal levels of independence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Tamoxifen attenuates development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tingskov, Stine Julie; Hu, Shan; Frøkiær, Jorgen

    2018-01-01

    of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), which are essential for water reabsorption of tubular fluid in the collecting duct. Sex hormones have previously been shown to affect the regulation of AQP2, so we tested whether tamoxifen (TAM), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, would attenuate lithium-induced alterations...... on renal water homeostasis. Rats were treated for 14 days with lithium and TAM treatment was initiated one week after onset of lithium administration. Lithium treatment resulted in severe polyuria and reduced AQP2 expression, which was ameliorated by TAM. Consistent with this, TAM attenuated downregulation...... of AQP2 and increased phosphorylation of the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), which induced AQP2 expression, in freshly isolated inner medullary collecting duct suspension prepared from lithium-treated rats. In conclusion, TAM attenuated dose-dependently polyuria, impaired urine...

  7. Genetic basis of early-onset, MODY-like diabetes in Japan and features of patients without mutations in the major MODY genes: dominance of maternal inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Tohru; Higuchi, Shinji; Kawakita, Rie; Hosokawa, Yuki; Aoyama, Takane; Murakami, Akiko; Kawae, Yoshiko; Hatake, Kazue; Nagasaka, Hironori; Tamagawa, Nobuyoshi

    2018-06-21

    Causative mutations cannot be identified in the majority of Asian patients with suspected maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). To elucidate the genetic basis of Japanese patients with MODY-like diabetes and gain insight into the etiology of patients without mutations in the major MODY genes. 263 Japanese patients with early-onset, nonobese, MODY-like diabetes mellitus referred to Osaka City General Hospital for diagnosis. Mutational analysis of the four major MODY genes (GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A, HNF1B) by Sanger sequencing. Mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients were further analyzed for clinical features. Mutations were identified in 103 (39.2%) patients; 57 mutations in GCK; 29, HNF1A; 7, HNF4A; and 10, HNF1B. Contrary to conventional diagnostic criteria, 18.4% of mutation-positive patients did not have affected parents and 8.2% were in the overweight range (BMI >85 th percentile). HOMA-IR at diagnosis was elevated (>2) in 15 of 66 (22.7%) mutation-positive patients. Compared with mutation-positive patients, mutation-negative patients were significantly older (p = 0.003), and had higher BMI percentile at diagnosis (p = 0.0006). Interestingly, maternal inheritance of diabetes was significantly more common in mutation-negative patients (p = 0.0332) and these patients had significantly higher BMI percentile as compared with mutation-negative patients with paternal inheritance (p = 0.0106). Contrary to the conventional diagnostic criteria, de novo diabetes, overweight, and insulin-resistance are common in Japanese patients with mutation-positive MODY. A significant fraction of mutation-negative patients had features of early-onset type 2 diabetes common in Japanese, and non-Mendelian inheritance needs to be considered for these patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutant INS-gene induced diabetes of youth: proinsulin cysteine residues impose dominant-negative inhibition on wild-type proinsulin transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a syndrome of Mutant INS-gene-induced Diabetes of Youth (MIDY, derived from one of 26 distinct mutations has been identified as a cause of insulin-deficient diabetes, resulting from expression of a misfolded mutant proinsulin protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Genetic deletion of one, two, or even three alleles encoding insulin in mice does not necessarily lead to diabetes. Yet MIDY patients are INS-gene heterozygotes; inheritance of even one MIDY allele, causes diabetes. Although a favored explanation for the onset of diabetes is that insurmountable ER stress and ER stress response from the mutant proinsulin causes a net loss of beta cells, in this report we present three surprising and interlinked discoveries. First, in the presence of MIDY mutants, an increased fraction of wild-type proinsulin becomes recruited into nonnative disulfide-linked protein complexes. Second, regardless of whether MIDY mutations result in the loss, or creation, of an extra unpaired cysteine within proinsulin, Cys residues in the mutant protein are nevertheless essential in causing intracellular entrapment of co-expressed wild-type proinsulin, blocking insulin production. Third, while each of the MIDY mutants induces ER stress and ER stress response; ER stress and ER stress response alone appear insufficient to account for blockade of wild-type proinsulin. While there is general agreement that ultimately, as diabetes progresses, a significant loss of beta cell mass occurs, the early events described herein precede cell death and loss of beta cell mass. We conclude that the molecular pathogenesis of MIDY is initiated by perturbation of the disulfide-coupled folding pathway of wild-type proinsulin.

  9. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after application of gadolinium-based contrast agents - a status paper; Nephrogene systemische Fibrose nach Anwendung gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel - ein Statuspapier zum aktuellen Stand des Wissens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, M.; Uder, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2007-06-15

    Recently the association of a rare disease named ''nephrogenic systemic fibrosis'' (NSF) with the administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media, especially gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE-Healthcare), was described. NSF is a scleroderma-like disease characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. Until now, NSF cases were observed only in patients with kidney disease. Almost all patients were suffering from chronic renal insufficiency, 90 % of them required renal replacement therapy. The true incidence of the disease is unknown. First retrospective analyses of selected collectives of patients with end-stage renal disease showed 2 - 5 % cases of NSF after administration of Gadolinium-containing contrast agents with an odds ratio of 20 - 50 in comparison to non-exposed controls. NSF is a serious adverse reaction, which may result in severe disabilities and even death. Therefore all radiologists applying gadolinium-based contrast agents should be informed about this disease and the recent recommendations for its prevention. On the basis of the published data, Omniscan should not be used in patients with severe renal impairment (GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) and those who have had or are undergoing liver transplantation. In neonates and infants up to 1 year of age, Omniscan should only be used after careful consideration. Also the other gadolinium-based contrast agents should be used in high-risk patients only after careful consideration using the lowest dose possible.

  10. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  11. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hi Cho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  12. Long-Term Outcomes in a Family with Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a familial case of the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD, including 30-year followup data on two patients. The proband and one maternal uncle presented in their infancy with severe recurrent hyponatremia, and clinical pictures consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH in the absence of an elevated ADH level. They were both confirmed to be hemizygous for the R137C mutation on the V2R gene (AVPR2, the same locus of the gain of function mutation demonstrated in the original reports of this condition. The proband's mother was identified as an asymptomatic carrier of this X-linked condition. Our case describes a favourable long-term outcome for NSIAD, in particular, successful treatment with oral urea during the infancy period, and with self-regulated precautions on fluid intake into adult life.

  13. Gadolinium-induced nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: the rise and fall of an iatrogenic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Charles L; Qureshi, Zaina P; Sartor, A Oliver

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: In 2006, nephrologists in Denmark unexpectedly identified chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with a new syndrome, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Subsequently, 1603 NSF patients were reported to the Food and Drug Administration. Sixty hospitals in the USA account for 93......% of these cases, and two hospitals in Denmark account for 4% of these reports. We review Denmark's identification and subsequent rapid eradication of NSF. METHODS.: NSF reports from clinicians, the Danish Medicines Agency (DMA) and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) manufacturers were reviewed (2002...... at Skejby Hospital and Herlev Hospital, respectively, began performing gadodiamide-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography scans (0.3 mmol/kg) of CKD patients. In 2005, Herlev clinicians requested assistance in evaluating etiological causes of NSF occurring among 10 CKD patients who had developed NSF...

  14. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  15. Diabetes insipidus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) in pregnancy is a heterogeneous syndrome, most classically presenting with polyuria and polydipsia that can complicate approximately 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. The presentation can involve exacerbation of central or nephrogenic DI during pregnancy, which may have been either overt or subclinical prior to pregnancy. Women without preexisting DI can also be affected by the actions of placental vasopressinase which increases in activity between the 4th and 38th weeks of gestation, leading to accelerated metabolism of AVP and causing a transient form of DI of pregnancy. This type of DI may be associated with certain complications during pregnancy and delivery, such as preeclampsia. Management of DI of pregnancy depends on the pathophysiology of the disease; forms of DI that lack AVP can be treated with desmopressin (DDAVP), while forms of DI that involve resistance to AVP require evaluation of the underlying causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Water homeostasis and diabetes insipidus in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Harold C

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disorder of horses characterized by profound polyuria and polydipsia (PU/PD), which can be caused by loss of production of arginine vasopressin (AVP). This condition is termed neurogenic or central DI. DI may also develop with absence or loss of AVP receptors or activity on the basolateral membrane of collecting-duct epithelial cells. This condition is termed nephrogenic DI. Equine clinicians may differentiate true DI from more common causes of PU/PD by a systematic diagnostic approach. DI may not be a correctable disorder, and supportive care of affected horses requires an adequate water source. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bloom syndrome in sibs: first reports of hepatocellular carcinoma and Wilms tumor with documented anaplasia and nephrogenic rests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, D; Hui, P; McNamara, J; Schwartz, D; German, J; Reyes-Múgica, M

    2001-01-01

    The triad of small body size, immunodeficiency, and sun-sensitive facial erythema characterizes the phenotype Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a striking predisposition to multiple types of cancers that arise earlier than expected in the general population. Here we report two sibs with BS. The older, a 15-year-old-girl, developed a hepatocellular carcinoma, a neoplasm not yet reported in association with BS. Her younger brother developed an anaplastic Wilms tumor (WT) associated with nephrogenic rests at the age of 31/2 years, and this was followed by a myelodysplastic syndrome. Complex cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in all three neoplasms. These examples expand the spectrum of malignancies occurring in BS to include liver cell neoplasms, and confirm the association of nephrogenic rests with WT, even in the setting of BS.

  18. Nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder in a prune belly syndrome patient: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, Justine S; Steelman, Charlotte K; Broecker, Bruce H; Shehata, Bahig M

    2011-01-01

    Nephrogenic adenoma (NA) is a rare lesion of the urinary tract widely considered to be a metaplastic response to urothelial injury. Herein, we present the case of an 8-year-old male with prune belly syndrome who presented with gross hematuria. Investigation revealed a bladder mass; however, upon cystoscopic examination, multiple polypoid lesions were identified. Microscopic examination revealed NA of the bladder. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of NA of the bladder in association with prune belly syndrome.

  19. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  20. Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs | Henning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs. Michael A Henning, Sinclair A Marcon. Abstract. A dominating set in a graph G is a set S of vertices of G such that every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex of S. The domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G. For a positive integer b, ...

  1. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  2. Adult female with symptomatic AVPR2-related nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hague

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in AVPR2 are associated with nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD. NSIAD causes hyponatremia, decreased serum osmolality and clinical symptoms, which may present from birth or in infancy and include hypotonia, irritability, vomiting and/or seizures. Symptoms in later life are often less specific and include malaise, dizziness, confusion, tiredness and headache. NSIAD is a rare X-linked condition, which is associated with a variable phenotype in males, of whom some present in infancy but others do not become symptomatic until adulthood, or occasionally, never. Female carriers may present with episodes of hyponatremia, usually found incidentally. Literature in this field is limited; namely, two clinical reports describing a female proband, both diagnosed in infancy. We describe, for the first time, the case of an adult female proband with NSIAD, who had longstanding associated symptoms of tiredness, headache, temporary memory loss and mood changes as well as hyponatremia and decreased serum osmolality. A water load test demonstrated an inability to dilute urine and gene sequencing confirmed a recurrent activating mutation in AVPR2. The variant was inherited from the proband’s mother who had had longstanding episodes of transient asymptomatic hyponatremia. This is the third report of a female proband with NSIAD and is the first female reported who sought medical treatment for chronic symptoms from adulthood. This case acts as a reminder of the importance of considering NSIAD as a diagnosis in females of all ages with unexplained hyponatremia.

  3. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: chronic imaging findings and review of the medical literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigle, Jeffrey P.; Broome, Dale R.

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder which has been strongly associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast media (GBCM) in the setting of renal insufficiency. Although this disorder primarily affects the skin, it can result in severe joint contractures, disabilities and even death. However, to date, there have been no published studies reporting chronic imaging findings of NSF. In this report we present three biopsy-proven cases of NSF with the associated chronic MRI, radiographic and bone scintigraphy findings. Two of the patients had been exposed to gadodiamide, and one had been exposed to gadopentetate dimeglumine prior to the onset of NSF. Two are newly reported cases. One patient's subacute imaging findings have previously been reported, but significant chronic images will now be presented. This patient became severely disabled from contractures and developed long bone smooth periosteal reaction, extensive intra-articular and periarticular calcifications, musculotendinous heterotopic ossification and ankylosis of several joints. One of the patients underwent renal transplantation 6 months after GBCM exposure, with near complete resolution of the skin fibrosis. The third patient had persistent MRI findings of skin thickening, with low T1 and high T2 signal intensity 5 years after exposure to gadodiamide. A review of the medical literature is provided, emphasizing the association of NSF with various GBCM. These cases broaden our understanding of the long-term imaging findings and complications of NSF and the stratified risk of NSF with various GBCM. (orig.)

  4. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after application of gadolinium-based contrast agents - a status paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, M.; Uder, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently the association of a rare disease named ''nephrogenic systemic fibrosis'' (NSF) with the administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media, especially gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE-Healthcare), was described. NSF is a scleroderma-like disease characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. Until now, NSF cases were observed only in patients with kidney disease. Almost all patients were suffering from chronic renal insufficiency, 90 % of them required renal replacement therapy. The true incidence of the disease is unknown. First retrospective analyses of selected collectives of patients with end-stage renal disease showed 2 - 5 % cases of NSF after administration of Gadolinium-containing contrast agents with an odds ratio of 20 - 50 in comparison to non-exposed controls. NSF is a serious adverse reaction, which may result in severe disabilities and even death. Therefore all radiologists applying gadolinium-based contrast agents should be informed about this disease and the recent recommendations for its prevention. On the basis of the published data, Omniscan should not be used in patients with severe renal impairment (GFR 2 ) and those who have had or are undergoing liver transplantation. In neonates and infants up to 1 year of age, Omniscan should only be used after careful consideration. Also the other gadolinium-based contrast agents should be used in high-risk patients only after careful consideration using the lowest dose possible

  5. Possible involvement of gadolinium chelates in the pathophysiology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idee, Jean-Marc; Port, Marc; Medina, Christelle; Lancelot, Eric; Fayoux, Emmanuelle; Ballet, Sebastien; Corot, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a recently described, highly debilitating scleroderma-like disease occurring in patients with severe or end-stage renal failure. NSF is characterized by cutaneous papules and coalescing plaques ('peau d'orange' appearance) and a wooden consistency. It may ultimately cause disabling contractures of several joints, thus making many patients wheelchair-dependent. NSF has been associated to prior administration of gadolinium chelates (GC) used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The best available treatment option at the present time is renal transplantation. The mechanism of NSF has not been fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been proposed so far and are critically discussed in the present review article. Gadolinium has been found in skin biopsy samples of patients. The most widely accepted hypothesis is related to dechelation of less stable GC, progressively releasing free Gd 3+ which may subsequently lead to the attraction of CD34+, CD45+, pro-collagen+ circulating fibrocytes via the release of chemokines, thereby inducing systemic fibrosing disorders. Pre-existing renal failure may facilitate the process by delaying the excretion of GC. A complex interplay between gadolinium and co-factors (pro-inflammatory status, vascular injury, high dose of erythropoietin, high levels of calcium, phosphorus, etc.) may occur in patients with impaired renal function. This and other hypotheses remain to be investigated, as well as the role and independence of co-factors

  6. [Central diabetes insipidus: diagnostic difficulties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoussi, N; Aissa, K; Fitouri, Z; Hajji, M; Makni, S; Bellagha, I; Ben Becher, S

    2008-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is rare in children. Characteristic features include polyuria and polydipsia due to arginine vasopressin deficiency. The differential diagnosis of polyuric states may be difficult. Etiologic diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus may be an equally difficult task. To specify the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and to point out features of the etiologic work-up and of long-term follow-up of children with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. A retrospective study of 12 children admitted with a polyuria/polydipsia syndrome to the pediatric - consultation and emergency unit of the children's hospital of Tunis between 1988 and 2005. Children with acquired nephrogenic central diabetes insipidus were excluded. Fourteen-hour fluid restriction test and/or desmopressin test were used without plasma vasopressin measurement. Eight patients were classified as having central diabetes insipidus, which was severe in seven children and partial in one girl. One patient was classified as having primary polydipsia. The diagnosis remains unclear in three patients. The etiological work-up in eight patients with central diabetes insipidus enabled the identification of Langerhan's-cell histiocytosis in two patients and neurosurgical trauma in one. The cause was considered idiopathic in five patients. The median follow-up of the five patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus was five years two months plus or minus six years seven months (range five months, 14.5 years). During this follow-up, neither brain magnetic resonance imaging scans findings nor anterior pituitary function have changed. Fluid restriction and desmopressin tests did not enable an accurate distinction between partial diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia. Regular surveillance is warranted in patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus to identify potential etiologies.

  7. COX2 inhibition during nephrogenic period induces ANG II hypertension and sex-dependent changes in renal function during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverte, Virginia; Tapia, Antonio; Loria, Analia; Salazar, Francisco; Llinas, M Teresa; Salazar, F Javier

    2014-03-01

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that ANG II contributes to the hypertension and renal functional alterations induced by a decrease of COX2 activity during the nephrogenic period. It was also examined whether renal functional reserve and renal response to volume overload and high sodium intake are reduced in 3-4- and 9-11-mo-old male and female rats treated with vehicle or a COX2 inhibitor during nephrogenic period (COX2np). Our data show that this COX2 inhibition induces an ANG II-dependent hypertension that is similar in male and female rats. Renal functional reserve is reduced in COX2np-treated rats since their renal response to an increase in plasma amino acids levels is abolished, and their renal ability to eliminate a sodium load is impaired (P renal excretory ability is similar in both sexes during aging but does not induce the development of a sodium-sensitive hypertension. However, the prolonged high-sodium intake at 9-11 mo of age leads to a greater proteinuria in male than in female (114 ± 12 μg/min vs. 72 ± 8 μg/min; P Renal hemodynamic sensitivity to acute increments in ANG II is unaltered in both sexes and at both ages in COX2np-treated rats. In summary, these results indicate that the reduction of COX2 activity during nephrogenic period programs for the development of an ANG II-dependent hypertension, reduces renal functional reserve to a similar extent in both sexes, and increases proteinuria in males but not in females when there is a prolonged increment in sodium intake.

  8. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  9. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: UK survey of the use of gadolinium-based contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, O.; Agarwal, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To identify the current practice of administration of gadolinium-based contrast media (Gd-CM) within the UK with respect to the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) guidelines on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty-two institutions were contacted to request details regarding the use of Gd-CM at their institution, their awareness of NSF, and of the ESUR guidelines, and their departmental policy on the administration of Gd-CM agents associated with NSF (high-risk agents) in patients with diminished renal function. Results: Of the 100 institutions that replied, 72% used a cyclic agent as a first-line Gd-CM. The majority of institutions used more than one Gd-CM, and 57% used a high-risk Gd-CM. Seventy percent were aware of the ESUR guidelines, and of the 57% that used a high-risk Gd-CM, 9% did not check renal function at all prior to administration. The course of action of the remaining 48% was varied in patients with diminished renal function with some changing to a low-risk Gd-CM and others electing not to use Gd-CM at all. Five percent continued to use a high-risk Gd-CM with an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min. Conclusion: The present survey shows that the majority of institutions use a low-risk Gd-CM as a first-line agent; however, a number of institutions do use a high-risk Gd-CM and their course of action for patients with diminished renal function is varied. Given current evidence, it is advisable to use a low-risk Gd-CM, such as a cyclic agent, in patients with diminished renal function.

  10. High prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in chronic renal failure patients exposed to gadodiamide, a gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance contrast agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydahl, Casper; Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease affecting renal failure patients. It may be caused by some gadolinium (Gd)-containing contrast agents, including gadodiamide. The study aimed at estimating the prevalence of NSF after gadodiamide exposure for patients with chronic...

  11. Diabetes insipidus in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Elizabeth; Kadakia, Rachel; Zimmerman, Donald

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus, the inability to concentrate urine resulting in polyuria and polydipsia, can have different manifestations and management considerations in infants and children compared to adults. Central diabetes insipidus, secondary to lack of vasopressin production, is more common in children than is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the inability to respond appropriately to vasopressin. The goal of treatment in both forms of diabetes insipidus is to decrease urine output and thirst while allowing for appropriate fluid balance, normonatremia and ensuring an acceptable quality of life for each patient. An infant's obligate need to consume calories as liquid and the need for readjustment of medication dosing in growing children both present unique challenges for diabetes insipidus management in the pediatric population. Treatment modalities typically include vasopressin or thiazide diuretics. Special consideration must be given when managing diabetes insipidus in the adipsic patient, post-surgical patient, and in those undergoing chemotherapy or receiving medications that alter free water clearance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Low vascularization of the nephrogenic zone of the fetal kidney suggests a major role for hypoxia in human nephrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, C; Fanni, D; Faa, A; Van Eyken, P; Ravarino, A; Fanos, V; Faa, G

    2017-09-01

    CD31 reactivity is generally utilized as a marker of endothelial cells. CD31 immunoreactivity in the developing human kidney revealed that fetal glomerular capillary endothelial cells change their immunohistochemical phenotype during maturation. The aim of this study was to analyze CD31 reactivity in the fetal human kidney in the different stages of intrauterine development: We observed different distribution of CD31-reactive vascular progenitors in the different areas of the developing kidney. In particular, the nephrogenic zone and the renal capsule were characterized by a scarcity of CD31-reactive cells at all gestational ages. These data suggest the hypothesis that nephrogenesis does not need high oxygen levels and confirms a major role of hypoxia in nephrogenesis.

  13. Dermal inorganic gadolinium concentrations: evidence for in vivo transmetallation and long-term persistence in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abraham, J L; Thakral, C; Skov, L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gadolinium (Gd)-based magnetic resonance contrast agents (GBMCA), including gadodiamide, have been identified as the probable causative agents of the serious disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). OBJECTIVES: To investigate retained Gd-containing deposits in skin biopsies from...... patients with NSF and to determine their relative concentrations over time from administration of GBMCA. METHODS: An investigator-blinded retrospective study, analysing 43 skin biopsies from 20 patients with gadodiamide-related NSF and one NSF-negative gadodiamide-exposed dialysis patient, ranging from 16...... days to 1991 days after Gd contrast dose. Utilizing automated quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy we determined the concentration of Gd and associated elements present as insoluble deposits in situ in the tissues. RESULTS: We detected Gd in skin lesions of all...

  14. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and class labeling of gadolinium-based contrast agents by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lucie; Krefting, Ira; Gorovets, Alex; Marzella, Louis; Kaiser, James; Boucher, Robert; Rieves, Dwaine

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers of all approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), drugs widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, use nearly identical text in their product labeling to describe the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Accumulating information about NSF risks led to revision of the labeling text for all of these drugs in 2010. The present report summarizes the basis and purpose of this class-labeling approach and describes some of the related challenges, given the evolutionary nature of the NSF risk evidence. The class-labeling approach for presentation of product risk is designed to decrease the occurrence of NSF and to enhance the safe use of GBCAs in radiologic practice. © RSNA, 2012.

  15. Diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  16. Diabetes insipidus: celebrating a century of vasopressin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sana; Galiveeti, Sneha; Bichet, Daniel G; Roth, Jesse

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus, widely known to the ancients for polyuria and glycosuria, budded off diabetes insipidus (DI) about 200 years ago, based on the glucose-free polyuria that characterized a subset of patients. In the late 19th century, clinicians identified the posterior pituitary as the site of pathology, and pharmacologists found multiple bioactivities there. Early in the 20th century, the amelioration of the polyuria with extracts of the posterior pituitary inaugurated a new era in therapy and advanced the hypothesis that DI was due to a hormone deficiency. Decades later, a subset of patients with polyuria unresponsive to therapy were recognized, leading to the distinction between central DI and nephrogenic DI, an early example of a hormone-resistant condition. Recognition that the posterior pituitary had 2 hormones was followed by du Vigneaud's Nobel Prize winning isolation, sequencing, and chemical synthesis of oxytocin and vasopressin. The pure hormones accelerated the development of bioassays and immunoassays that confirmed the hormone deficiency in vasopressin-sensitive DI and abundant levels of hormone in patients with the nephrogenic disorder. With both forms of the disease, acquired and inborn defects were recognized. Emerging concepts of receptors and of genetic analysis led to the recognition of patients with mutations in the genes for 1) arginine vasopressin (AVP), 2) the AVP receptor 2 (AVPR2), and 3) the aquaporin 2 water channel (AQP2). We recount here the multiple skeins of clinical and laboratory research that intersected frequently over the centuries since the first recognition of DI.

  17. Effect of the cGMP pathway on AQP2 expression and translocation: potential implications for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.; Kortenoeven, M.L.A.; Robben, J.H.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arginine vasopressin (AVP) binding to the V2 receptor (V2R) in renal collecting duct principal cells induces a cAMP signalling cascade resulting in the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), translocation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) to the apical membrane and an increase in AQP2 expression.

  18. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  19. Dominance in domestic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Van Der J.A.M.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Vinke, C.M.; Vries, De Han; Petit, Odile

    2015-01-01

    A dominance hierarchy is an important feature of the social organisation of group living animals. Although formal and/or agonistic dominance has been found in captive wolves and free-ranging dogs, applicability of the dominance concept in domestic dogs is highly debated, and quantitative data are

  20. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  1. Familial forms of diabetes insipidus: clinical and molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Muriel; Kopp, Peter; Robertson, Gary L

    2011-07-05

    Over the past two decades, the genetic and molecular basis of familial forms of diabetes insipidus has been elucidated. Diabetes insipidus is a clinical syndrome characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The most common type of diabetes insipidus is caused by lack of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (vasopressin), which is produced in the hypothalamus and secreted by the neurohypophysis. This type of diabetes insipidus is referred to here as neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. The syndrome can also result from resistance to the antidiuretic effects of vasopressin on the kidney, either at the level of the vasopressin 2 receptor or the aquaporin 2 water channel (which mediates the re-absorption of water from urine), and is referred to as renal or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Differentiation between these two types of diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia can be difficult owing to the existence of partial as well as complete forms of vasopressin deficiency or resistance. Seven different familial forms of diabetes insipidus are known to exist. The clinical presentation, genetic basis and cellular mechanisms responsible for them vary considerably. This information has led to improved methods of differential diagnosis and could provide the basis of new forms of therapy.

  2. The social dominance paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jennifer Louise; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Heyes, Cecilia M; Cools, Roshan

    2014-12-01

    Dominant individuals report high levels of self-sufficiency, self-esteem, and authoritarianism. The lay stereotype suggests that such individuals ignore information from others, preferring to make their own choices. However, the nonhuman animal literature presents a conflicting view, suggesting that dominant individuals are avid social learners, whereas subordinates focus on learning from private experience. Whether dominant humans are best characterized by the lay stereotype or the animal view is currently unknown. Here, we present a "social dominance paradox": using self-report scales and computerized tasks, we demonstrate that socially dominant people explicitly value independence, but, paradoxically, in a complex decision-making task, they show an enhanced reliance (relative to subordinate individuals) on social learning. More specifically, socially dominant people employed a strategy of copying other agents when the agents' responses had a history of being correct. However, in humans, two subtypes of dominance have been identified: aggressive and social. Aggressively dominant individuals, who are as likely to "get their own way" as socially dominant individuals but who do so through the use of aggressive or Machiavellian tactics, did not use social information, even when it was beneficial to do so. This paper presents the first study of dominance and social learning in humans and challenges the lay stereotype in which all dominant individuals ignore others' views. The more subtle perspective we offer could have important implications for decision making in both the boardroom and the classroom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relating 2-Rainbow Domination To Roman Domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarado José D.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For a graph G, let R(G and yr2(G denote the Roman domination number of G and the 2-rainbow domination number of G, respectively. It is known that yr2(G ≤ R(G ≤ 3/2yr2(G. Fujita and Furuya [Difference between 2-rainbow domination and Roman domination in graphs, Discrete Appl. Math. 161 (2013 806-812] present some kind of characterization of the graphs G for which R(G − yr2(G = k for some integer k. Unfortunately, their result does not lead to an algorithm that allows to recognize these graphs efficiently. We show that for every fixed non-negative integer k, the recognition of the connected K4-free graphs G with yR(G − yr2(G = k is NP-hard, which implies that there is most likely no good characterization of these graphs. We characterize the graphs G such that yr2(H = yR(H for every induced subgraph H of G, and collect several properties of the graphs G with R(G = 3/2yr2(G.

  4. VVER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (author)

  5. WWER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (Authors)

  6. Elitism and Stochastic Dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Bazen, Stephen; Moyes, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic dominance has typically been used with a special emphasis on risk and inequality reduction something captured by the concavity of the utility function in the expected utility model. We claim that the applicability of the stochastic dominance approach goes far beyond risk and inequality measurement provided suitable adpations be made. We apply in the paper the stochastic dominance approach to the measurment of elitism which may be considered the opposite of egalitarianism. While the...

  7. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  8. Authoritarianism, dominance and assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J J

    1981-08-01

    It is shown that there are definitions of the three constructs of authoritarianism, dominance and assertiveness which read very similarly; so much so that no distinction is immediately evident. It is proposed that authoritarianism might be conceived as aggressive dominance and at least some types of assertiveness as nonaggressive dominance. A new scale of Dominance suitable for general population use was produced, and compared with the existing Ray (1976) behavior inventory of authoritarianism. Both scales showed highly significant correlations with peer rated dominance and submission (the latter being negative in sign) but only the authoritarianism scale showed significant correlations with rated aggressiveness and rigidity. It was concluded that the new definitions could be operationalized into valid scales.

  9. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk After Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gadoxetate Disodium in Patients With Moderate to Severe Renal Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Thomas; Ramirez-Garrido, Francisco; Kim, Young Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ricke, Jens; Phongkitkarun, Sith; Boettcher, Joachim; Gupta, Rajan T.; Korpraphong, Pornpim; Tanomkiat, Wiwatana; Furtner, Julia; Liu, Peter S.; Henry, Maren; Endrikat, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the risk of gadoxetate disodium in liver imaging for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label phase 4 study in 35 centers from May 2009 to July 2013. The study population consisted of patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for liver imaging with gadoxetate disodium. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of 0.025-mmol/kg body weight of liver-specific gadoxetate disodium. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 357 patients were included, with 85 patients with severe and 193 patients with moderate renal impairment, which were the clinically most relevant groups. The mean time period from diagnosis of renal disease to liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 1.53 and 5.46 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 101 patients (28%) underwent additional contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents within 12 months before the start of the study or in the follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF within the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions Gadoxetate disodium in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment did not raise any clinically significant safety concern. No NSF cases were observed. PMID:25756684

  10. Disease: H00252 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00252 Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) Nephrogenic diabetes insipi...HORS ... Linshaw MA ... TITLE ... Back to basics: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. ... JOURNAL ... Pediatr...lecular and cellular defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. ... JOURNAL ... Pediatr Nephrol 16:1146-52 (2001) DOI:10.1007/s004670100051

  11. Generalized Power Domination

    OpenAIRE

    Omerzel, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    The power domination problem is an optimization problem that has emerged together with the development of the power networks. It is important to control the voltage and current in all the nodes and links in a power network. Measuring devices are expensive, which is why there is a tendency to place a minimum number of devices in a power network so that the network remains fully supervised. The k-power domination is a generalization of the power domination. The thesis represents the rules of th...

  12. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Teresa W.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1 in a graph G = (V,E is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi ≥ deg(vi+1, where deg(vi denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a graph is at most half its order, and that the downhill domination number of a tree is at most one third its order. We characterize the graphs obtaining each of these bounds

  13. X-ray endovascular repair of the venous bed of the pyelonephritically contracted kidney in the treatment of nephrogenic and chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, E.V.; Gladkov, V.V.; Inozemtsev, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    For compensation for chronic ischemia of the pyelonephritically contracted kidney the X-ray endovascular venous revascularization was used for the first time. The surgical intervention was to stenosis the subsegmental veins of the diseased kidney resulting in recanalization of the arterial system. Outcomes of X-ray treatment were analyzed in 38 patients with chronic degree I-II renal failure and nephrogenic hypertension. In 35 (92.1 %) patients of them, there was improvement in the clinical picture of the underlying disease and in the filtrating and reabsorbing function of the kidney operated on, an increase in its sizes, and decrease in systemic blood pressure [ru

  14. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis versus contrast-induced nephropathy: risks and benefits of contrast-enhanced MR and CT in renally impaired patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Diego R; Semelka, Richard C; Chapman, Arlene

    2009-01-01

    -sectional imaging modality. Factors to consider include the relative risks of the contrast agent. Other factors include the relative procedural risks, including radiation risks and the relative expected diagnostic yield of the examination technique (12). In this review we describe both nephrogenic systemic fibrosis...... and contrast-induced nephropathy to compare the implications with regard to relative risks and benefits of contrast-enhanced MRI or CT in patients with impaired renal function. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2009;30:1350-1356. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  15. "Antifibrotic effect after low-dose imatinib mesylate treatment in patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: An open-label non-randomized, uncontrolled clinical trial"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Tina Rask; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2011-01-01

    Background Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a disease affecting the connective tissue of the skin and internal organs in patients with renal failure. No effective treatments are available. Objectives To investigate if the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate was effective in patients...... Imatinib mesylate may be an effective drug in the treatment of skin fibrosis in moderate to severe NSF cases, even at reduced doses. We found a positive clinical effect on the skin, but no convincing improvement of the joint mobility. Only few patients could be recruited limiting the interpretation...

  16. Persistent severe polyuria after renal transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Timothy; Laing, Chris; Ekong, Rosemary; Povey, Sue; Unwin, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Polydipsia and polyuria are common symptoms in patients with diabetes insipidus (DI), which can be due to inadequate vasopressin production (cranial DI) or vasopressin insensitivity (nephrogenic DI). Clinical diagnosis of the subtypes of DI can be tricky. We present a 44-year-old man with a strong family history of DI who had been diagnosed with autosomal dominant nephrogenic DI from infancy. At the age of 40, he had progressed to end-stage renal failure. When he experienced unresolving sever...

  17. Molecular biology of hereditary diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T Mary; Bichet, Daniel G

    2005-10-01

    The identification, characterization, and mutational analysis of three different genes-the arginine vasopressin gene (AVP), the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2), and the vasopressin-sensitive water channel gene (aquaporin 2 [AQP2])-provide the basis for understanding of three different hereditary forms of "pure" diabetes insipidus: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), and non-X-linked NDI, respectively. It is clinically useful to distinguish two types of hereditary NDI: A "pure" type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients who have congenital NDI and bear mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2 genes have a "pure" NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Patients who bear inactivating mutations in genes (SLC12A1, KCNJ1, CLCNKB, CLCNKA and CLCNKB in combination, or BSND) that encode the membrane proteins of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle have a complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. These advances provide diagnostic and clinical tools for physicians who care for these patients.

  18. Retrospective analysis of patients for development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis following conventional angiography using gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Spagnuolo, Sara; Froehlich, Johannes M; Nievergelt, Helga; Dinkel, Hans-Peter; Gretener, Silvia; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2010-03-01

    The purpose was to retrospectively review the data of 27 patients with renal insufficiency who underwent conventional angiography with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GDBCA) as alternative contrast agents and assess the occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) together with associated potential risk factors. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and informed consent was waived. Statistical analysis was performed for all available laboratory and clinical data, including dermatology reports. Type and amount of the GDBCA used were recorded for angiography and additional MRI studies, if applicable. Serum creatinine levels (SCr) pre- and post-angiography were recorded, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated. Ten female and 17 male patients who underwent angiography with GDBCA were included. The mean amount of GDBCA administered was 44 +/- 15.5 ml (range 15-60 ml) or 0.24 + 0.12 mmol/kg (range 0.1-0.53 mmol/kg). At the time of angiography all patients had renal insufficiency (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Mean eGFR pre-angiography was 26 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 33 ml/min/1.73 m(2) post-angiography. The mean follow-up period covers 28 months, range 1-84 months. Additional MRI studies with GDBCA administration were performed in 15 patients. One patient with typical skin lesions had developed biopsy-confirmed NSF. Conventional arterial angiography with GDBCA may play a role in the development of NSF in patients with renal insufficiency. Alternative contrast agents, such as CO(2) angiography or rather the use of low doses of iodinated contrast agents, should be considered in these patients.

  19. Retrospective analysis of patients for development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis following conventional angiography using gadolinium-based contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Spagnuolo, Sara; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Nievergelt, Helga; Dinkel, Hans-Peter; Gretener, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to retrospectively review the data of 27 patients with renal insufficiency who underwent conventional angiography with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GDBCA) as alternative contrast agents and assess the occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) together with associated potential risk factors. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and informed consent was waived. Statistical analysis was performed for all available laboratory and clinical data, including dermatology reports. Type and amount of the GDBCA used were recorded for angiography and additional MRI studies, if applicable. Serum creatinine levels (SCr) pre- and post-angiography were recorded, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated. Ten female and 17 male patients who underwent angiography with GDBCA were included. The mean amount of GDBCA administered was 44 ± 15.5 ml (range 15-60 ml) or 0.24 + 0.12 mmol/kg (range 0.1-0.53 mmol/kg). At the time of angiography all patients had renal insufficiency (eGFR 2 ). Mean eGFR pre-angiography was 26 ml/min/1.73 m 2 and 33 ml/min/1.73 m 2 post-angiography. The mean follow-up period covers 28 months, range 1-84 months. Additional MRI studies with GDBCA administration were performed in 15 patients. One patient with typical skin lesions had developed biopsy-confirmed NSF. Conventional arterial angiography with GDBCA may play a role in the development of NSF in patients with renal insufficiency. Alternative contrast agents, such as CO 2 angiography or rather the use of low doses of iodinated contrast agents, should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  20. Retrospective analysis of patients for development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis following conventional angiography using gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Spagnuolo, Sara; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Thoeny, Harriet C. [University Hospital Bern, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Nievergelt, Helga [University Hospital Bern, Clinic of Dermatology, Bern (Switzerland); Dinkel, Hans-Peter [Hospital Landshut, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Landshut (Germany); Gretener, Silvia [University Hospital of Bern, Division of Vascular Medicine, Swiss Cardiovascular Center, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose was to retrospectively review the data of 27 patients with renal insufficiency who underwent conventional angiography with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GDBCA) as alternative contrast agents and assess the occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) together with associated potential risk factors. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and informed consent was waived. Statistical analysis was performed for all available laboratory and clinical data, including dermatology reports. Type and amount of the GDBCA used were recorded for angiography and additional MRI studies, if applicable. Serum creatinine levels (SCr) pre- and post-angiography were recorded, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated. Ten female and 17 male patients who underwent angiography with GDBCA were included. The mean amount of GDBCA administered was 44 {+-} 15.5 ml (range 15-60 ml) or 0.24 + 0.12 mmol/kg (range 0.1-0.53 mmol/kg). At the time of angiography all patients had renal insufficiency (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}). Mean eGFR pre-angiography was 26 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 33 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} post-angiography. The mean follow-up period covers 28 months, range 1-84 months. Additional MRI studies with GDBCA administration were performed in 15 patients. One patient with typical skin lesions had developed biopsy-confirmed NSF. Conventional arterial angiography with GDBCA may play a role in the development of NSF in patients with renal insufficiency. Alternative contrast agents, such as CO{sub 2} angiography or rather the use of low doses of iodinated contrast agents, should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with moderate renal insufficiency administered gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, B.J.; Im, K.; Broome, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in stage 3 chronic kidney disease patients following intravenous exposure to gadobenate dimeglumine. Materials and methods: A prospective study was performed on 168 consecutive patients at a single institution with stage 3 chronic kidney disease who underwent clinically-indicated contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine from January 2007 to March 2008. All patients were contacted by phone by investigators 3 months after MRI to verify the presence or absence of NSF signs or symptoms. If signs or symptoms suggestive of NSF developed, dermatologic referral was made and confirmatory skin biopsy performed if indicated. Results: One hundred and eighty contrast-enhanced MRI examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine were performed on the 168 patients. Twenty patients were lost to follow-up, but 160 incidents of contrast medium exposure were followed up for 3-months and 105 incidents were followed up for 6 months. The mean contrast medium dose per weight was 0.093 mmol/kg (range 0.042-0.153 mmol/kg). The mean estimated creatinine clearance was 50.4 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (range from 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). Ten patients developed skin rashes during the 3-month follow-up period, but none were confirmed to represent NSF (0% prevalence rate). No other signs or symptoms of NSF were reported. Conclusion: Based on this limited study, NSF does not appear to occur in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease exposed to intravenous gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI at standard dosing of ∼0.1 mmol/kg.

  2. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  3. Bestsellers dominate the market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenemann, Detlef

    2010-07-01

    The strong market growth of the past years has led to certain turbine types achieving very high numbers of units sold. As a result, the leading manufacturers are becoming ever more dominant, and many smaller manufacturers are beng required to seek their success in market niches. (orig.)

  4. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  5. Searching for world domination

    CERN Multimedia

    Quillen, E

    2004-01-01

    "Optimists might believe Microsoft suffered a setback last week that will impede its progress toward world domination, but I suspect the company has already found a way to prevail. At issue before the European Union was Microsoft's bundling of its Windows Media Player with its operating system" (1 page)

  6. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  7. Public owners will dominate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Stein Arne

    2003-01-01

    In ten years there will still be a dominating public ownership in the energy supply sector in Norway. Statkraft will be the big actor. Norway will then be integrated in an European power market through more cables and the power price will be lower and more stable. The market will be important, but within frames set by the politicians. This article quotes the views of two central figures in the energy sector on the energy supply industry in 2014

  8. Autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in a patient with ureaplasma urealyticum infection and review on new triggers of immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Spanò, Francesca; Ferone, Diego; Albertelli, Manuela; Schenone, Angelo; Contatore, Miriam; Guastalla, Andrea; De Bellis, Annamaria; Garibotto, Giacomo; Puppo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease in which large volumes of dilute urine (polyuria) are excreted due to vasopressin (AVP) deficiency [central diabetes insipidus (CDI)] or to AVP resistance (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). In the majority of patients, the occurrence of CDI is related to the destruction or degeneration of neurons of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. The most common and well recognized causes include local inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, vascular disorders, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), sarcoidosis, tumors such as germinoma/craniopharyngioma or metastases, traumatic brain injuries, intracranial surgery, and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. Here we have the opportunity to describe an unusual case of female patient who developed autoimmune CDI following ureaplasma urealyticum infection and to review the literature on this uncommon feature. Moreover, we also discussed the potential mechanisms by which ureaplasma urealyticum might favor the development of autoimmune CDI.

  9. [Clinical case of the month. Renovascular arterial hypertension complicated by diabetes insipidus: report of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feloni, S; Radermacher, L; Remy, C; Jousten, J; Corman, V

    2013-01-01

    Mrs. A, a 62 year old patient with a history of hypertension, polyuria and polydipsia is hospitalized after a malaise. A severe hypokalemia, which is the cause of the polyuria and polydipsia, is discovered. The presence of hypertension and hypokalemia arises suspicion of a primary hyperaldosteronism and the plasma levels of renin and aldosterone are measured. Elevated aldosterone levels are combined with high plasma renin concentrations which permits to rule out primary hyperaldosteronism. Further explorations reveal a subocclusive ostial stenosis of the right renal artery. A treatment by sartan is instaured, which allows arterial pressure control and kalemia normalization. Chronic hypokalemia can be the cause of tubular nephropathy manifested by nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

  10. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  11. A Rare Case of Congenital Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi eRege

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a conformation disease resulting from protein misfolding. Ninety percent of mutations result from the inactivating mutations of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2 gene transmitted in an X-linked fashion, blocking the response to vasopressin, resulting in the inability to concentrate urine. Clinical features include polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and hypernatremia. They are generally more severely in affected males but present variably in females due to skewed inactivation of the X chromosome. We describe a case of a 40 year old woman with a history of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity who presents with debilitating polyuria since the age of five with no clear diagnosis. Interestingly, her son was subsequently diagnosed with NDI. Genetic testing revealed that she was heterozygous for the Val88Met mutation in the AVPR2 gene while her son was hemizygous for the same. The patient has since been successfully treated with diuretics and a low solute diet. We highlight that although X-linked NDI patients are mostly males, it should be considered in symptomatic females to prevent delays in the diagnosis. Conformational diseases such as NDI are presently the subject of research using pharmacological chaperones to restore proper receptor membrane localization and function.

  12. A Rare Case of Congenital Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Tanvi; Polsani, Srujana; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a conformation disease resulting from protein misfolding. Ninety percent of mutations result from the inactivating mutations of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene transmitted in an X-linked fashion, blocking the response to vasopressin, resulting in the inability to concentrate urine. Clinical features include polyuria, polydispsia, dehydration, and hypernatremia. They are generally more severely in affected males but present variably in females due to skewed inactivation of the X chromosome. We describe a case of a 40-year-old woman with a history of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, who presents with debilitating polyuria since the age of 5 with no clear diagnosis. Interestingly, her son was diagnosed with NDI. Genetic testing revealed that she was heterozygous for the Val88Met mutation in the AVPR2 gene while her son was hemizygous for the same. The patient has since been successfully treated with diuretics and a low solute diet. We highlight that although X-linked NDI patients are mostly males, it should be considered in symptomatic females to prevent delays in the diagnosis. Conformational diseases such as NDI are presently the subject of research using pharmacological chaperones to restore proper receptor membrane localization and function.

  13. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Adad, S; Estevão Barbosa, M; Fácio Luíz, J M; Furlan Rodrigues, M C; Iwamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    A 48-year-old male had autosomic dominant polycystic kidneys with dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, never previously reported; the right kidney weighed 15,100 g and measured 53 x 33 x 9cm and the left one 10.200 g and 46 x 21 x 7cm, with cysts measuring up to 14cm in diameter. Nephrectomy was done to control persistent hematuria and to relief disconfort caused by the large kidneys. The renal function is stable four years after transplantation.

  14. Diabetes Insipidus: A Challenging Diagnosis with New Drug Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifan, Chadi; Nasr, Rabih; Mehta, Suchita; Sharma Acharya, Pranab; Perrera, Isera; Faddoul, Giovanni; Nalluri, Nikhil; Kesavan, Mayurakhan; Azzi, Yorg; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is either due to deficient secretion of arginine vasopressin (central) or to tubular unresponsiveness (nephrogenic). Drug induced DI is a well-known entity with an extensive list of medications. Polyuria is generally defined as urine output exceeding 3 liters per day in adults. It is crucial to identify the cause of diabetes insipidus and to implement therapy as early as possible to prevent the electrolyte disturbances and the associated mortality and morbidity. It is very rare to have an idiosyncratic effect after a short use of a medication, and physicians should be aware of such a complication to avoid volume depletion. The diagnosis of diabetes insipidus is very challenging because it relies on laboratory values, urine output, and the physical examination of the patient. A high clinical suspicion of diabetes insipidus should be enough to initiate treatment. The complications related to DI are mostly related to the electrolyte imbalance that can affect the normal physiology of different organ systems. PMID:24977135

  15. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but can return later in life How are MODY and neonatal diabetes diagnosed? Because monogenic diabetes is rare, this diagnosis ... type 1 or type 2 diabetes and identify MODY or neonatal diabetes. Blood tests Blood tests of glucose levels, and ...

  16. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  17. The dominance of norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Rubin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to revisit the debate about rational choice theory from the legal cultural and historical perspectives. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena allowing to analyze them in their historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of subjective and objective factors this determines the choice of the research methods systemicstructural formallegal and comparative. Results The first part of this chapter will explain the way in which people in societies different from our own were subject to other motivations in situations where selfinterest would tend to dominate in our society. The reasoning is based on three examples one drawn from the history of Ancient Rome one from the High Middle Ages of the European society and one from a contemporary nonWestern culture. The second part of the chapter analyzes the reason why material selfinterest maximizing became a dominant motivation in the modern Western society. The works on historical sociology attribute this development to Calvinism but this hypothesis suffers from some serious defects. In the article we prove that the modern sensibility resulted from much longeracting trends specifically secularization urbanization and commercialization. The final section of the chapter explores the relationship between the Westrsquos prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization and the particular norms that have been discussed in microeconomic theory. It argues that some of these norms are internal to the prevailing one and are thus explicable in terms of material selfinterest but that others reflect additional norms in the general society that exist alongside and sometimes in competition with the prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization. The historicallybased view that selfinterest maximizing is a prevailing norm rather than a human universal allows these other norms to be acknowledged in a plausible and realistic manner rather than being explained away by a

  18. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, C

    2010-11-05

    Nephroaenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a potentiallv fatal dermatiological condition found exclusively in patients with advanced renal I failure. There is minimal literature regarding the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with NSF in Ireland. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with NSF in Ireland. Ireland\\'s experience with the disease was examined in light of international reports. There have been three cases of NSF in Ireland; an area which serves 1915 dialysis patients--giving a point prevalence among Irish end-stage kidney disease patients of 0.002. There was a large variation in disease severity between the three patients. All three patients had significant exposure to gadolinium chelate. Caution with gadolinium administration must be exercised in patients with advanced renal failure.

  19. Perfect secure domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Divya Rashmi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Let $G=(V,E$ be a graph. A subset $S$ of $V$ is a dominating set of $G$ if every vertex in $Vsetminus  S$ is adjacent to a vertex in $S.$ A dominating set $S$ is called a secure dominating set if for each $vin Vsetminus S$ there exists $uin S$ such that $v$ is adjacent to $u$ and $S_1=(Ssetminus{u}cup {v}$ is a dominating set. If further the vertex $uin S$ is unique, then $S$ is called a perfect secure dominating set. The minimum cardinality of a perfect secure dominating set of $G$ is called the perfect  secure domination number of $G$ and is denoted by $gamma_{ps}(G.$ In this paper we initiate a study of this parameter and present several basic results.

  20. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  1. Total Domination Versus Paired-Domination in Regular Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyman Joanna

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A subset S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex not in S has a neighbor in S, while S is a total dominating set of G if every vertex has a neighbor in S. If S is a dominating set with the additional property that the subgraph induced by S contains a perfect matching, then S is a paired-dominating set. The domination number, denoted γ(G, is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G, while the minimum cardinalities of a total dominating set and paired-dominating set are the total domination number, γt(G, and the paired-domination number, γpr(G, respectively. For k ≥ 2, let G be a connected k-regular graph. It is known [Schaudt, Total domination versus paired domination, Discuss. Math. Graph Theory 32 (2012 435–447] that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k+1. In the special case when k = 2, we observe that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 4/3, with equality if and only if G ≅ C5. When k = 3, we show that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 3/2, with equality if and only if G is the Petersen graph. More generally for k ≥ 2, if G has girth at least 5 and satisfies γpr(G/γt(G = (2k/(k + 1, then we show that G is a diameter-2 Moore graph. As a consequence of this result, we prove that for k ≥ 2 and k ≠ 57, if G has girth at least 5, then γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k +1, with equality if and only if k = 2 and G ≅ C5 or k = 3 and G is the Petersen graph.

  2. Management of diabetes insipidus in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Garima; Chandrashekhar, Sudha Rao

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome of disturbance in water balance, characterized by polyuria (urine output > 4 ml/kg/hr), polydypsia (water intake > 2 L/m2/d) and failure to thrive. In children, Nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than Central DI (CDI), and is often acquired. The signs and symptoms vary with etiology, age at presentation and mode of onset. Neonates and infants with NDI are severely affected and difficult to treat. Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. Water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI and CDI and diagnose their partial forms. Measurement of urinary aquaporin 2 and serum copeptin levels are being studied and show promising diagnostic potential. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) pituitary helps in the etiological diagnosis of CDI, absence of posterior pituitary bright signal being the pathognomic sign. If pituitary stalk thickening of < 2 mm is present, these children need to be monitored for evolving lesion. Neonates and young infants are better managed with fluids alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin. The oral form is safe, highly effective, with more flexibility of dosing and has largely replaced the intranasal form. In NDI besides treatment of the underlying cause, use of high calorie low solute diet and drugs to ameliorate water excretion (thiazide, amelioride, indomethacin) are useful. Children with NDI however well treated, remain short and have mental retardation on follow up. PMID:22029022

  3. Diabetes insipidus: Differential diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Gary L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a syndrome characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of dilute urine. It can be caused by any of 4 fundamentally different defects that must be distinguished for safe and effective management. They are: (1) pituitary DI, due to inadequate production and secretion of antidiuretic hormone, arginine-vasopressin (AVP); (2) gestational DI due to degradation of AVP by an enzyme made in placenta; (3) primary polydipsia, due to suppression of AVP secretion by excessive fluid intake; and (4) nephrogenic DI due to renal insensitivity to the antidiuretic effect of AVP. This review describes several methods of differential diagnosis, indicates the advantages and disadvantages of each and presents a new approach that is simpler and less costly but just as reliable as the best of the older methods. The various treatments for the different types of DI and recent findings on the genetic basis of the familial forms of DI are also discussed with emphasis on their contributions to improved diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of diabetes insipidus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Insipidus (DI is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome of disturbance in water balance, characterized by polyuria (urine output > 4 ml/kg/hr, polydypsia (water intake > 2 L/m 2 /d and failure to thrive. In children, Nephrogenic DI (NDI is more common than Central DI (CDI, and is often acquired. The signs and symptoms vary with etiology, age at presentation and mode of onset. Neonates and infants with NDI are severely affected and difficult to treat. Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. Water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI and CDI and diagnose their partial forms. Measurement of urinary aquaporin 2 and serum copeptin levels are being studied and show promising diagnostic potential. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI pituitary helps in the etiological diagnosis of CDI, absence of posterior pituitary bright signal being the pathognomic sign. If pituitary stalk thickening of < 2 mm is present, these children need to be monitored for evolving lesion. Neonates and young infants are better managed with fluids alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin. The oral form is safe, highly effective, with more flexibility of dosing and has largely replaced the intranasal form. In NDI besides treatment of the underlying cause, use of high calorie low solute diet and drugs to ameliorate water excretion (thiazide, amelioride, indomethacin are useful. Children with NDI however well treated, remain short and have mental retardation on follow up.

  5. Waiting for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troughton, Jacqui; Jarvis, Janet; Skinner, Chas

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to inform the development of an educational intervention for people with pre-diabetes in the UK by ascertaining individuals' experience of screening and diagnosis, their appraisal of the condition, and experience of health service delivery from diagnosis to 1 year post......-diagnosis. Methods: Qualitative interviews directed by framework methodology. Fifteen people diagnosed with pre-diabetes from the community (Midlands, UK) as part of a screening programme. Results: Respondents consistently expressed the need for education and support at diagnosis. Dominating all respondents......' narratives was the theme of 'uncertainty', which linked to two further themes of seriousness and taking action. These themes were influenced by respondents' prior experience and appraisal of both diabetes and pre-diabetes and their interpretation of health professionals' attitudes and actions towards them...

  6. Diabetic Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic hypoglycemia Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin ... your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of ...

  7. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaigns Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Diabetic Emergencies Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  8. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  9. Dominance Hierarchies in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Murray S.; Omark, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    This study uses the ethological approach of seeking species characteristics and phylogenetic continuities in an investigation of human behavior. Among primates a striking consistency is the presence of some form of dominance hierarchy in many species. The present study examines peer group dominance hierarchies as they are perceived by children in…

  10. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    colors required for a dominator coloring of G is called the dominator .... Theorem 1.3 shows that the complete graph Kn is the only connected graph of order n ... Conversely, if a graph G satisfies condition (i) or (ii), it is easy to see that χd(G) =.

  11. Preclinical investigation to compare different gadolinium-based contrast agents regarding their propensity to release gadolinium in vivo and to trigger nephrogenic systemic fibrosis-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieber, Martin A.; Frenzel, Thomas; Golfier, Sven; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Pietsch, Hubertus; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Schmitt-Willich, Heribert; Siegmund, Fred; Walter, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is associated with the administration of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and in particular with the stability of the Gd-complex. The aim of this investigation was to compare GBCAs and their potential to trigger NSF. Forty-two healthy male rats received repeated intravenous injections of six different GBCAs at high doses to simulate the exposure seen in patients with severe renal dysfunction. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of the skin was performed, and the concentrations of Gd, zinc and copper were measured in several tissues by inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Macroscopic and histological skin changes similar to those seen in NSF patients were only observed in rats receiving Omniscan. In addition, very high concentrations of Gd were observed in the animals treated with Omniscan, and, to a lesser extent, in animals treated with OptiMARK. Significantly lower levels of Gd were found after the treatment with ionic linear agents and even less after the treatment with macrocyclic agents. The data in this investigation strongly suggest that the stability of the Gd-complex is a key factor for the development of NSF-like symptoms in this experimental setting. (orig.)

  12. In an animal model nephrogenic systemic fibrosis cannot be induced by intraperitoneal injection of high-dose gadolinium based contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, R.D.; Lorke, D.E.; Neidl van Gorkom, K.F.; Petroianu, G.; Azimullah, S.; Nurulain, S.M.; Singh, S.; Fuchsjäger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim and objective: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been reported in humans to be most likely induced by gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA), namely by gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadoversetamide, rarely by other GBCA. The pathogenesis of NSF remains unclear; different hypotheses are under discussion. The objective of the study is to assess if in the animal model human-like NSF changes can be induced by high-dose, intraperitoneal GBCA injections over four weeks. Materials and methods: After approval by the institutional animal ethics committee, six rats each were randomly assigned to groups, and treated with seven different GBCA. Intraperitoneal (IP) injections – proven in the animal model to be effective – were chosen to prolong the animals’ exposure to the respective GBCA. GBCA doses of previous intravenous (IV) animal studies were applied. After five weeks all rats were sacrificed. Sham controls were treated with IP saline injections, employing the same regimen. Results: No findings comparable with human NSF were observed in all animals after IP treatment with all seven GBCA at daily doses of 2.5 and 5.0 mmol/kg body weight (BW). No histopathological abnormalities of all examined organs were noted. Weight loss was stated in weeks three and four with GBCA injections at doses of 5.0 mmol/kg BW, but rats regained weight after cessation of GBCA treatment. Conclusions: NSF-comparable pathological findings could not be induced by high dose intraperitoneal injection of seven GBCA

  13. Preclinical investigation to compare different gadolinium-based contrast agents regarding their propensity to release gadolinium in vivo and to trigger nephrogenic systemic fibrosis-like lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieber, Martin A.; Frenzel, Thomas; Golfier, Sven; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, GMA DG Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Schmitt-Willich, Heribert [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, GDD Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Siegmund, Fred; Walter, Jakob [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Nonclinical Drug Safety, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Recent reports suggest that nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is associated with the administration of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and in particular with the stability of the Gd-complex. The aim of this investigation was to compare GBCAs and their potential to trigger NSF. Forty-two healthy male rats received repeated intravenous injections of six different GBCAs at high doses to simulate the exposure seen in patients with severe renal dysfunction. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of the skin was performed, and the concentrations of Gd, zinc and copper were measured in several tissues by inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Macroscopic and histological skin changes similar to those seen in NSF patients were only observed in rats receiving Omniscan. In addition, very high concentrations of Gd were observed in the animals treated with Omniscan, and, to a lesser extent, in animals treated with OptiMARK. Significantly lower levels of Gd were found after the treatment with ionic linear agents and even less after the treatment with macrocyclic agents. The data in this investigation strongly suggest that the stability of the Gd-complex is a key factor for the development of NSF-like symptoms in this experimental setting. (orig.)

  14. In an animal model nephrogenic systemic fibrosis cannot be induced by intraperitoneal injection of high-dose gadolinium based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, R.D., E-mail: rlanger@uaeu.ac.ae [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Lorke, D.E. [Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Neidl van Gorkom, K.F. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Petroianu, G. [Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Azimullah, S.; Nurulain, S.M.; Singh, S. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Fuchsjäger, M. [Al Ain Hospital, MUV-VAMED, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-10-15

    Aim and objective: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been reported in humans to be most likely induced by gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA), namely by gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadoversetamide, rarely by other GBCA. The pathogenesis of NSF remains unclear; different hypotheses are under discussion. The objective of the study is to assess if in the animal model human-like NSF changes can be induced by high-dose, intraperitoneal GBCA injections over four weeks. Materials and methods: After approval by the institutional animal ethics committee, six rats each were randomly assigned to groups, and treated with seven different GBCA. Intraperitoneal (IP) injections – proven in the animal model to be effective – were chosen to prolong the animals’ exposure to the respective GBCA. GBCA doses of previous intravenous (IV) animal studies were applied. After five weeks all rats were sacrificed. Sham controls were treated with IP saline injections, employing the same regimen. Results: No findings comparable with human NSF were observed in all animals after IP treatment with all seven GBCA at daily doses of 2.5 and 5.0 mmol/kg body weight (BW). No histopathological abnormalities of all examined organs were noted. Weight loss was stated in weeks three and four with GBCA injections at doses of 5.0 mmol/kg BW, but rats regained weight after cessation of GBCA treatment. Conclusions: NSF-comparable pathological findings could not be induced by high dose intraperitoneal injection of seven GBCA.

  15. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Jerrold L. [Department of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Chandra, Subhash [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: sc40@cornell.edu; Thakral, Charu [Department of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Abraham, Joshua M. [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  16. Domination criticality in product graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Chithra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A connected dominating set is an important notion and has many applications in routing and management of networks. Graph products have turned out to be a good model of interconnection networks. This motivated us to study the Cartesian product of graphs G with connected domination number, γc(G=2,3 and characterize such graphs. Also, we characterize the k−γ-vertex (edge critical graphs and k−γc-vertex (edge critical graphs for k=2,3 where γ denotes the domination number of G. We also discuss the vertex criticality in grids.

  17. diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban Falahati

    2016-09-01

    candiduria and female gender, high FBS and urine glucose, uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c ≥8, and acidic urine pH (P<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the high incidence rate of candiduria in diabetic patients, control of diabetes, predisposing factors, and causal relationships between diabetes and candiduria should be highlighted.

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy may have rapid onset or worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms and Detection What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and ... with diabetes protect their vision? Vision lost to diabetic retinopathy is ... However, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness ...

  19. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  20. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  1. A note on isolate domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sahul Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ such that $\\left\\langle S\\right\\rangle$ has an isolated vertex is called an \\emph{isolate set} of $G$. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate set are called the \\emph{isolate number} $i_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate number} $I_0(G$ respectively. An isolate set that is also a dominating set (an irredundant set is an $\\emph{isolate dominating set} \\ (\\emph{an isolate irredundant set}$. The \\emph{isolate domination number} $\\gamma_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate domination number} $\\Gamma_0(G$ are respectively the minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set while the \\emph{isolate irredundance number} $ir_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate irredundance number} $IR_0(G$ are the minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate irredundant set of $G$. The notion of isolate domination was introduced in \\cite{sb} and the remaining were introduced in \\cite{isrn}. This paper further extends a study of these parameters.   

  2. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriya; Yamamoto, Miyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a group setting, individuals' perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems' level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation. PMID:26136644

  3. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya eWatanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group setting, individuals’ perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems’ level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation.

  4. Severe hydramnios and preterm delivery in association with transient maternal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Lori E; Dinsmoor, Mara J; Silver, Richard K

    2010-08-01

    Diabetes insipidus is rare in pregnancy. It is characterized by hypoosmolar polyuria and may be central, nephrogenic, or transient in etiology; the latter is presumably related to excess placental vasopresinase production. In theory, fetal effects of this endocrine condition may include hydramnios secondary to fetal polyuria. A pregnant patient developed rapid-onset second-trimester hydramnios that prompted a thorough fetal and maternal evaluation. She ultimately was diagnosed with transient diabetes insipidus of pregnancy because of an abrupt change in her voiding pattern at 20 weeks of gestation, significant polydipsia, and laboratory studies that revealed a hypoosmolar polyuria with normal serum and urine electrolytes. Transient neonatal polyuria also was confirmed in association with this unique maternal endocrine syndrome. The most likely cause of hydramnios in this case is transient maternal diabetes insipidus of pregnancy from excessive secretion of placental vasopressinase resulting in fetal polyuria. In cases of hydramnios of unknown etiology, if a history of maternal polyuria is elicited and confirmed, diabetes insipidus of pregnancy may play a role in some cases.

  5. Real or symbolic domination: New revision of La Domination masculine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassadit Yacine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper does a rereading of Pierre Bourdieu’s Masculine Domination (1998, from the context in which it was developed. Thus, we rely on the work carried out during the 50s in Algeria (Sociologie de l'Algérie, 1958, Esquisse d'une théorie de la pratique, 1972 and Le Sens pratique, 1980 and later in France, to show that Masculine Domination was not born spontaneously, but as a result of a long decantation enriched by field experiences and the theoretical advances of the author’s concepts. If it is true that the situation of the women described in Sociologie de l'Algérie is the result of empirical research, it is less so for Masculine Domination, whose analysis retakes the concepts forged by the social anthropologist, such as habitus and symbolic domination. In this way, this article proposes a rereading of this work through the analysis of the work that preceded it in the field.

  6. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements.

  7. Adrenal and nephrogenic hypertension: an image quality study of low tube voltage, low-concentration contrast media combined with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Li, Qiong; Shen, Yaqi; Li, Anqin; Li, Haojie; Liang, Lili; Hu, Yao; Hu, Xuemei; Hu, Daoyu

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using low tube voltage, low-concentration contrast media and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing the radiation and iodine contrast doses in adrenal and nephrogenic hypertension patients. A total of 148 hypertension patients who were suspected for adrenal lesions or renal artery stenoses were assigned to two groups and. Group A (n=74) underwent a low tube voltage, low molecular weight dextran enhanced multi-detector row spiral CT (MDCT) (80 kVp, 270 mg I/mL contrast agent), and the raw data were reconstructed with standard filtered back projection (FBP) and ASIR at four different levels of blending (20%, 40%, 60% and 80%, respectively). The control group (Group B, n=74) underwent conventional MDCT (120 kVp, 370 mg I/mL contrast agent), and the data were reconstructed with FBP. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) were measured in the renal vessels, normal adrenal tissue, adrenal neoplasms and subcutaneous fat. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol ) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded, and an effective dose (ED) was obtained. Two-tailed independent t-tests, paired Chi-square tests and Kappa consistency tests were used for statistical analysis of the data. The CTDIvol , DLP and total iodine dose in group A were decreased by 47.8%, 49.0% and 26.07%, respectively, compared to group B (Pcontrast media and 60% ASIR provides similar enhancement and image quality with a reduced radiation dose and contrast iodine dose. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  9. Visual dominance in olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, N; Gabassi, P G

    1987-08-01

    The object of the present study was to verify the emergence of a 'visual dominance' effect in memory tests involving different sensory modes (sight and smell), brought about the preattentive mechanisms which select the visual sensory mode regardless of the recall task.

  10. Vector-meson dominance revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terschlüsen Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesons with electromagnetism is often well described by the concept of vector-meson dominance (VMD. However, there are also examples where VMD fails. A simple chiral Lagrangian for pions, rho and omega mesons is presented which can account for the respective agreement and disagreement between VMD and phenomenology in the sector of light mesons.

  11. Testing for Stochastic Dominance Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); O. Linton; Y-J. Whang

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new test of the stochastic dominance efficiency of a given portfolio over a class of portfolios. We establish its null and alternative asymptotic properties, and define a method for consistently estimating critical values. We present some numerical evidence that our

  12. Lifestyle dominates cardiovascular risks in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalib A. Latiff

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular problem is one of the leading cause of death in Malaysia and now invaded to the sub-urban and rural areas. To prevent and control of this problem, several main risk factors needed to be known and shall be reexamined and ranked according to the priority. The objectives of this research paper was to identify several dominant risk factor related to cardiovascular problem. A cross sectional study was carried out from March 2000 – June 2001 on a total of 8159 rural population aged 18 and above to measure the prevalence of the common cardiovascular risk factors. Those risk factors are systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol level, obesity index, blood glucose level, smoking, physical activity and mental stress. Overall prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors were higher, dominated by physical inactivity (65.7%, hypercholesterolemia – TC:HC (62.3%, mental stress (55.5% and obesity (53.7%. Smoking was also high at 49.9% especially among men. However systolic hypertension, diastolic hypertension and diabetes mellitus; although increased by age, its prevalence is relatively low at 23.7%, 19.2%, and 6.3% respectively. Cardiovascular risk factors related to lifestyle are much evidenced as compared to risk factors related to the biological influence. Therefore, all initiatives in community health intervention should be mobilized specifically on prevention and control of lifestyle-related risk factors. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 50-6Keywords: cardiovascular problem, community intervention, lifestyle-linked risk factors

  13. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000320.htm Diabetic ketoacidosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening problem that ...

  14. Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  15. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  16. Diabetes Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Diabetes Myths On behalf of the millions of Americans ... or obese, you will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Fact: Being overweight is a risk factor for ...

  17. Gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000896.htm Gestational diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that starts or ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  19. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes: Tips for American Indians & Alaska ... pressure instead of using a needle to deliver the insulin. What oral ... eating and physical activity habits to manage your type 2 diabetes. You can ...

  20. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated

  1. Untangling Partnership and Domination Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Loye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Riane Eisler’s (1987 cultural transformation theory is an effective framework for understanding many of the constructs that shape society. This article uses Eisler’s theory to explain the formation of morality and the construction of conscience. It contrasts partnership morality and domination morality, and describes the factors that shape our tendency to embrace one or the other. The article helps us understand that we have a choice, and invites us to choose partnership morality.

  2. The clinical pattern of diabetes Insipidus in a large university hospital in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir M I; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A M; Al Jurayyan, Rushaid N A; Al Gadi, Iman; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but serious endocrine disorder. Paediatric patients were evaluated for polyuria at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over a decade (2000-13). Relevant clinical examination and/or a triad of high serum osmolality, hypernatremia and low urine osmolality due to increased urine output confirmed the diagnosis. Water deprivation test was required in some cases with non-classic presentations. Appropriate brain imaging was performed whenever central diabetes insipidus (CDI) was suspected. Twenty-eight patients, 15 males (53.6%) and 13 females (46.4%), aged 0-17 years (mean: 6 years) were included. The calculated period prevalence was 7 in 10,000. In our cohort, 60.7% (17 of 28 patients) had CDI, 21.4% (6 of 28) were diagnosed with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and 17.9% (5 of 30) had psychogenic polydipsia. CDI was due to variable aetiology. Though CDI was the commonest, NDI was not a rare encounter in our community, possibly because of high consanguineous marriages. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  4. Dominant inheritance of cerebral gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonana, J; Sotos, J F; Romshe, C A; Fisher, D A; Elders, M J; Rimoin, D L

    1977-08-01

    Cerebral gigantism is a syndrome consisting of characteristic dysmorphic features, accelerated growth in early childhood, and variable degrees of mental retardation. Its etiology and pathogenesis have not been defined. Three families are presented with multiple affected members. The vertical transmission of the trait and equal expression in both sexes in these families indicates a genetic etiology with a dominant pattern of inheritance, probably autosomal. As in previously reported cases, extensive endocrine evaluation failed to define the pathogenesis of the accelerated growth present in this disorder.

  5. Ergodic averages via dominating processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2006-01-01

    We show how the mean of a monotone function (defined on a state space equipped with a partial ordering) can be estimated, using ergodic averages calculated from upper and lower dominating processes of a stationary irreducible Markov chain. In particular, we do not need to simulate the stationary...... Markov chain and we eliminate the problem of whether an appropriate burn-in is determined or not. Moreover, when a central limit theorem applies, we show how confidence intervals for the mean can be estimated by bounding the asymptotic variance of the ergodic average based on the equilibrium chain....

  6. Radiation dominated relativistic current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroschek, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic Current Sheets (RCS) feature plasma instabilities considered as potential key to magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation in Poynting flux dominated plasma flows. We show in a series of kinetic plasma simulations that the physical nature of non-linear RCS evolution changes in the presence of incoherent radiation losses: In the ultra-relativistic regime (i.e. magnetization parameter sigma = 104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density) the combination of non-linear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the Relativistic Tearing Mode (RTM). As direct consequence the RTM prevails over the Relativistic Drift Kink (RDK) Mode as competitive RCS instability. This is in contrast to the previously studied situation of weakly relativistic RCS (sigma ∼ 1) where the RDK is dominant and most of the plasma is thermalized. The simulations witness the typical life cycle of ultra-relativistic RCS evolving from a violent radiation induced collapse towards a radiation quiescent state in rather classical Sweet-Parker topology. Such a transition towards Sweet-Parker configuration in the late non-linear evolution has immediate consequences for the efficiency of magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation. Ceasing dissipation rates directly affect our present understanding of non-linear RCS evolution in conventional striped wind scenarios. (author)

  7. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has lots of free information to help you manage your diabetes. General Tips Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and ... Check these resources for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other ... Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need ...

  11. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  12. Genetics of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  13. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  14. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  15. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Managing Diabetes You can manage your diabetes and live a ... you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, ...

  16. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  17. On domination multisubdivision number of unicyclic graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Raczek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper continues the interesting study of the domination subdivision number and the domination multisubdivision number. On the basis of the constructive characterization of the trees with the domination subdivision number equal to 3 given in [H. Aram, S.M. Sheikholeslami, O. Favaron, Domination subdivision number of trees, Discrete Math. 309 (2009, 622-628], we constructively characterize all connected unicyclic graphs with the domination multisubdivision number equal to 3. We end with further questions and open problems.

  18. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Gestational Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-14

    Gestational diabetes happens in a woman who develops diabetes during pregnancy. This podcast discusses its potential effects and action steps to avoid complications.  Created: 11/14/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) and National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Prevention Research Branch.   Date Released: 11/27/2007.

  19. Diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Gerdes, V. E.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Meesters, E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol

  20. Gestational diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recognition of diabetes during pregnancy.1D.n However, GOM has sufficient .... If the plasma glucose value at 1 hour is over 7.8 mmolll, the ..... OeFronzo RA Pathogenesis of type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes: a balanced overview.

  1. Diabetes Detection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Diabetes is among the most common chronic diseases in the U.S. and the seventh leading cause of death. Over 90 percent of cases are type 2. In this podcast, Dr. Ann Albright discusses ways to prevent or control diabetes.

  2. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  3. Evaluation of dominant thyroid masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Buckwalter, J.A.; Staab, E.V.; Kerr, C.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the management of solitary thyroid nodules because of conflicting information concerning the high clinical incidence of thyroid nodules, the varying incidence of cancer reported in those surgically excised and the infrequency of death from thyroid cancer. During the past several years, a plan for evaluating patients with dominant thyroid masses has evolved. The objective is to avoid unnecessary operations by identifying patients with a high risk of cancer. The criteria which are used are the age and sex of the patient, the duration of the mass, 125 I or /sup 99m/Tc scans, 75 Selenomethionine scans, B-mode ultrasonography and the response of the mass to suppressive therapy. This is a report of the findings in 222 patients who have been studied employing this approach. Thirty percent of the patients were operated upon. Forty percent had neoplasms (well differentiated cancer--28.8 percent, adenoma--12.1 percent), 47.0 percent--nodular goiter, 6.1 percent cysts, and 6.1 percent chronic thyroiditis. The incidence of cancer in the 222 patients was 8.6 percent and adenoma 3.6 percent. Patients at greatest risk of having cancer are those with solid nonfunctioning nodules which fail to regress with suppressive therapy. This study indicates that the approach described above is effective in selecting for surgical excision those individuals at greatest risk of having thyroid cancer

  4. The dominance behavioral system and manic temperament: Motivation for dominance, self-perceptions of power, and socially dominant behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Carver, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    The dominance behavioral system has been conceptualized as a biologically based system comprising motivation to achieve social power and self-perceptions of power. Biological, behavioral, and social correlates of dominance motivation and self-perceived power have been related to a range of psychopathological tendencies. Preliminary evidence suggests that mania and risk for mania (manic temperament) relate to the dominance system.

  5. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens Diabetes Center Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ... Mass Index (BMI) Charts Eating Out When Your Child Has Diabetes Meal Plans and Diabetes Treating Type 2 Diabetes ...

  6. On The Roman Domination Stable Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajian Majid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A Roman dominating function (or just RDF on a graph G = (V,E is a function f : V → {0, 1, 2} satisfying the condition that every vertex u for which f(u = 0 is adjacent to at least one vertex v for which f(v = 2. The weight of an RDF f is the value f(V (G = Pu2V (G f(u. The Roman domination number of a graph G, denoted by R(G, is the minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on G. A graph G is Roman domination stable if the Roman domination number of G remains unchanged under removal of any vertex. In this paper we present upper bounds for the Roman domination number in the class of Roman domination stable graphs, improving bounds posed in [V. Samodivkin, Roman domination in graphs: the class RUV R, Discrete Math. Algorithms Appl. 8 (2016 1650049].

  7. Dominant drivers of business students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Cătălina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Taibi Kahler wrote in 1974 a theory about five main drivers that could explain people’s motivation and a series of positive and negative behavior patterns: Be Strong, Be Perfect, Hurry Up, Try Hard and Please People. Of course, we consider there is no absolute positive or negative behavior, since (1 everything needs to be analyzed by taking into account the context and (2 any behavior pattern can mean a series of advantages as long as people understand their own values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors. It would be interesting to link Kahler’s drivers to the educational process, in order to be able to adapt our courses and our teaching styles to students’ requirements and also to the requirements in the labor market. Our paper is built on literature review and a questionnaire applied to a sample of 607 students in Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania. Information was processed with Microsoft Excel 2013, in order to look at the main working styles our students have, at the main explanations for the differences between them and in order to test a series of hypotheses. We were interested to look at the main traits of the current generation of students in our university: dominant drivers, roles of managers and specialists, the attractiveness of the entrepreneurial career path, etc. and at a series of patterns (i.e. gender-related differences. We consider results of this study are useful both for teaching and research purposes. In terms of teaching, we plan to adapt our educational methods in order to improve the educational process.

  8. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy ...

  9. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Skiadopoulos, Dionysios

    2013-01-01

    This theses on Diabetes Mellitus aims at giving an insight at various aspects of this chronic disease and the risk factors that lead to it; the varius ways it develops in the human body; the old and new approaches to treatment, both from a pharmacological and a non- pharmacologiacal point of view; ways to prevent and to manage the diabetes complications; how to improve the live of the diabetic patients who are faced with not only physical but also psychological problems; statistical data from...

  10. A Boundary Property for Upper Domination

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.; Hussain, Shahid; Lozin, Vadim; Monnot, Jé rô me; Ries, Bernard; Zamaraev, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality.The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard, but can be solved in polynomial time in some restricted graph

  11. Epigenetic dominance of prion conformers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Saijo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although they share certain biological properties with nucleic acid based infectious agents, prions, the causative agents of invariably fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative disorders such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, sheep scrapie, and human Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, propagate by conformational templating of host encoded proteins. Once thought to be unique to these diseases, this mechanism is now recognized as a ubiquitous means of information transfer in biological systems, including other protein misfolding disorders such as those causing Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. To address the poorly understood mechanism by which host prion protein (PrP primary structures interact with distinct prion conformations to influence pathogenesis, we produced transgenic (Tg mice expressing different sheep scrapie susceptibility alleles, varying only at a single amino acid at PrP residue 136. Tg mice expressing ovine PrP with alanine (A at (OvPrP-A136 infected with SSBP/1 scrapie prions propagated a relatively stable (S prion conformation, which accumulated as punctate aggregates in the brain, and produced prolonged incubation times. In contrast, Tg mice expressing OvPrP with valine (V at 136 (OvPrP-V136 infected with the same prions developed disease rapidly, and the converted prion was comprised of an unstable (U, diffusely distributed conformer. Infected Tg mice co-expressing both alleles manifested properties consistent with the U conformer, suggesting a dominant effect resulting from exclusive conversion of OvPrP-V136 but not OvPrP-A136. Surprisingly, however, studies with monoclonal antibody (mAb PRC5, which discriminates OvPrP-A136 from OvPrP-V136, revealed substantial conversion of OvPrP-A136. Moreover, the resulting OvPrP-A136 prion acquired the characteristics of the U conformer. These results, substantiated by in vitro analyses, indicated that co-expression of OvPrP-V136 altered the conversion potential of OvPrP-A136 from the S to

  12. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  13. [Diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  14. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ketones build up in the blood and eventually "spill over" into the urine. Diabetic ketoacidosis is usually ... your heart, muscles and nerves. Swelling in the brain (cerebral edema). Adjusting your blood sugar level too ...

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    diabetic foot were significantly associated with DR. Within patients' practice, regular .... Major limb complications included foot ulcer, claudication .... Flat. 217 44.5 66 30.6. Family income / month (KD). 1500. 45 9.2 24 ...

  16. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  17. Aglycosuric Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, W. B.; Spitzer, W. O.; Truscott, P. W.

    1963-01-01

    The usefulness of urine tests for glucose was compared with that of blood sugar determinations in detecting diabetes mellitus in 2000 medical outpatients. Eighty-five patients proved to be diabetic, but 33 of these had no glycosuria on their first visit and would not have been detected by laboratory tests had the blood glucose levels not been measured. Exactly one-half of the new diabetics discovered would have been missed (15 of 30) had only urine tests been performed. The new diabetics who were aglycosuric at their initial examination had a mild form of the disease, were predominantly elderly, and were controlled, in nearly every case, by diet alone. Most of these patients had evidence of an elevated renal threshold for glucose. These results indicate that there is a large group of patients with mild, asymptomatic, diabetes mellitus who remain undetected unless blood tests are employed routinely. Because they have little or no glycosuria these patients do not have polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, or loss of weight. Automation in the medical laboratory has made routine blood tests for glucose feasible and rewarding in detecting diabetes mellitus. PMID:20327667

  18. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care team is there for you. Your child's diabetes management plan should be easy to understand, detailed, ... Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Monitoring Blood Sugar Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Medicines for Diabetes Type 2 ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicines and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the ... Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering ...

  20. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  2. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  3. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  4. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women with diabetes can make a difference. Other Resources from the FDA FDA Information on Diabetes Treatment ... for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth ...

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other FDA ... on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... diabetes. More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's ...

  13. The dominance behavioral system and manic temperament: motivation for dominance, self-perceptions of power, and socially dominant behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2012-12-15

    The dominance behavioral system has been conceptualized as a biologically based system comprising motivation to achieve social power and self-perceptions of power. Biological, behavioral, and social correlates of dominance motivation and self-perceived power have been related to a range of psychopathological tendencies. Preliminary evidence suggests that mania and risk for mania (manic temperament) relate to the dominance system. Four studies examine whether manic temperament, measured with the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HPS), is related to elevations in dominance motivation, self-perceptions of power, and engagement in socially dominant behavior across multiple measures. In Study 1, the HPS correlated with measures of dominance motivation and the pursuit of extrinsically-oriented ambitions for fame and wealth among 454 undergraduates. In Study 2, the HPS correlated with perceptions of power and extrinsically-oriented lifetime ambitions among 780 undergraduates. In Study 3, the HPS was related to trait-like tendencies to experience hubristic (dominance-related) pride, as well as dominance motivation and pursuit of extrinsically-oriented ambitions. In Study 4, we developed the Socially Dominant Behavior Scale to capture behaviors reflecting high power. The scale correlated highly with the HPS among 514 undergraduates. The studies rely on self-ratings of manic temperament and dominance constructs, and findings have not yet been generalized to a clinical sample. Taken together, results support the hypothesis that manic temperament is related to a focus on achieving social dominance, ambitions related to achieving social recognition, perceptions of having achieved power, tendencies to experience dominance-related pride, and engagement in social behaviors consistent with this elevated sense of power. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yingfeng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM and diabetic retinopathy (DR in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR. Presenting visual impairment (VI was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1% English-speaking and 885 (27.9% Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p  Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations.

  15. Consumers, health insurance and dominated choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Hirth, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    We analyze employee health plan choices when the choice set offered by their employer includes a dominated plan. During our study period, one-third of workers were enrolled in the dominated plan. Some may have selected the plan before it was dominated and then failed to switch out of it. However, a substantial number actively chose the dominated plan when they had an unambiguously better choice. These results suggest limitations in the ability of health reform based solely on consumer choice to achieve efficient outcomes and that implementation of health reform should anticipate, monitor and account for this consumer behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Autosomal dominant adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, Peter C.G.

    2011-01-01

    this thesis investigates a family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, with chapters on clinical neurology, neuropathology, neurogenetics, neurophysiology, auditory and visual aspects.

  17. Semi-strong split domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Alwardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a graph $G = (V,E$, a dominating set $D subseteq V$ is called a semi-strong split dominating set of $G$ if $|V setminus D| geq 1$ and the maximum degree of the subgraph induced by $V setminus D$ is 1. The minimum cardinality of a semi-strong split dominating set (SSSDS of G is the semi-strong split domination number of G, denoted $gamma_{sss}(G$. In this work, we introduce the concept and prove several results regarding it.

  18. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Monogenic Diabetes (Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus & MODY) The most common forms of diabetes, ... from each parent. What are monogenic forms of diabetes? Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  19. Domination, self-determination and circular organizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romme, A.G.L.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of self-organizing forms of control, based on the idea of self-determination, have challenged traditional forms of control based on the concept of domination. As such, self-determination has been put forward as an alternative rather than as a complement to domination. This paper

  20. Multivariate Discrete First Order Stochastic Dominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    This paper characterizes the principle of first order stochastic dominance in a multivariate discrete setting. We show that a distribution  f first order stochastic dominates distribution g if and only if  f can be obtained from g by iteratively shifting density from one outcome to another...

  1. Epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and produce qualitatively different allozymes and the two alleles are expressed equally within and across all three genotypes and and play an equal role in the epigenetics of dominance. Subunit interaction in the heterodimer over a wide range of H+ concentrations accounts for the epigenetics of dominance for ...

  2. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    independent dominating set of a graph is a set of vertices of such that every vertex of ()\\ has a neighbor in and the maximum vertex degree of the subgraph induced by ()\\ is at most one. The outer-2-independent domination ...

  3. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  4. Central diabetes insipidus associated with impaired renal aquaporin-1 expression in mice lacking liver X receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Kong, Xiaomu; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Gao, Min; Jia, Xiao; Ohnishi, Hideo; Ueta, Yoichi; Warner, Margaret; Guan, Youfei; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-02-21

    The present study demonstrates a key role for the oxysterol receptor liver X receptor β (LXRβ) in the etiology of diabetes insipidus (DI). Given free access to water, LXRβ(-/-) but not LXRα(-/-) mice exhibited polyuria (abnormal daily excretion of highly diluted urine) and polydipsia (increased water intake), both features of diabetes insipidus. LXRβ(-/-) mice responded to 24-h dehydration with a decreased urine volume and increased urine osmolality. To determine whether the DI was of central or nephrogenic origin, we examined the responsiveness of the kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP). An i.p. injection of AVP to LXRβ(-/-) mice revealed a partial kidney response: There was no effect on urine volume, but there was a significant increase of urine osmolality, suggesting that DI may be caused by a defect in central production of AVP. In the brain of WT mice LXRβ was expressed in the nuclei of magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. In LXRβ(-/-) mice the expression of AVP was markedly decreased in the magnocellular neurons as well as in urine collected over a 24-h period. The persistent high urine volume after AVP administration was traced to a reduction in aquaporin-1 expression in the kidney of LXRβ(-/-) mice. The LXR agonist (GW3965) in WT mice elicited an increase in urine osmolality, suggesting that LXRβ is a key receptor in controlling water balance with targets in both the brain and kidney, and it could be a therapeutic target in disorders of water balance.

  5. Diabetes research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linfoot, J.A.; Stubbs, H.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term effects of alpha-particle pituitary irradiation in patients being treated for diabetic retinopathy. Of particular interest is whether the altered hormonal environment influences vision, renal function, and survival

  6. Hand dominance in upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Varonen, Helena; Heliövaara, Markku; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the role of hand dominance in common upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSD) in a population study. The target population consisted of a representative sample of people aged 30 years or older residing in Finland during 2000-2001. Of the 7977 eligible subjects, 6254 (78.4%) were included in the study. The prevalence of UEMSD was as follows: rotator cuff tendinitis 3.8%, bicipital tendinitis 0.5%, lateral epicondylitis 1.1%, medial epicondylitis 0.3%, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) 3.8%, and surgery due to CTS 1.3%. CTS was 2.5 times as prevalent in women as men, whereas the other UEMSD were as common in both sexes. Rotator cuff and bicipital tendinitis and medial epicondylitis were more prevalent in the dominant arm only in women, whereas lateral epicondylitis was more prevalent in the dominant elbow in both sexes. The higher prevalence of rotator cuff and bicipital tendinitis in the dominant side persisted beyond working age. The prevalence of CTS did not differ by hand dominance. Dominant hand had been operated more frequently for CTS in women. Our findings show that UEMSD are more prevalent in the dominant than nondominant arm mainly in women. For shoulder tendinitis, the difference persists throughout adult age. Physical load factors may have long-lasting effects on the shoulder and they may play a greater role in women than men.

  7. Rapid differential diagnosis of diabetes insipidus in a 7-month-old infant: The copeptin approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergier, J; Fromonot, J; Alvares De Azevedo Macedo, A; Godefroy, A; Marquant, E; Guieu, R; Tsimaratos, M; Reynaud, R

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is characterized by hypoosmotic polyuria related to deficiency of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion (central diabetes insipidus, CDI) or renal insensitivity to AVP (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, NDI). The water deprivation test with assessment of AVP activity is currently the gold standard for differential diagnosis in patients presenting polyuria-polydipsia syndrome. Nevertheless, it can be dangerous without proper surveillance and its interpretation may be challenging. Other markers have been suggested. Direct quantification of circulating AVP is not sufficient for diagnosis: vasopressin is unstable, analysis is complex. AVP comes from prohormone preprovasopressin with concomitant release of copeptin (C-terminal moiety) in the equimolar ratio. Copeptin is stable in vitro, with easy and rapid measurement (polyuria in adults, but its value has not been demonstrated in infants yet. A 7-month-old infant presented polyuria-polydipsia syndrome with poor weight gain. Laboratory tests pointed out hypernatremia (170mmol/L) and blood hyperosmolarity (330mOsm/L) with inappropriate urinary hypoosmolarity (168mOsm/L). Plasmatic copeptin measurement was found at a very high level, 303pmol/L (1-14pmol/L). DdAVP administration did not improve the polyuria, confirming the final diagnosis of NDI. Hyperhydration with a hypoosmolar diet normalized the hydration status and circulating levels of copeptin within 1 week. Copeptin, a stable peptide reflecting AVP secretion, could be a safer and faster biomarker for etiological diagnosis of polyuria-polydipsia syndrome in children. Before regularization of hydration status, a single baseline measurement may be enough to discriminate NDI from other etiologies without the water deprivation test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance and sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kumar, A; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2004-06-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites: endogenous digoxin (membrane sodium-potassium ATPase inhibitor, immunomodulator and regulator of neurotransmitter/amino acid transport), dolichol (regulates N-glycosylation of proteins) and ubiquinone (free radical scavenger). The role of the isoprenoid pathway in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis in relation to hemispheric dominance was studied. The isoprenoid pathway-related cascade was assessed in patients with systemic sarcoidosis with pulmonary involvement. The pathway was also assessed in patients with right hemispheric, left hemispheric and bihemispheric dominance for comparison to find out the role of hemispheric dominance in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. In patients with sarcoidosis there was elevated digoxin synthesis, increased dolichol and glycoconjugate levels and low ubiquinone and elevated free radical levels. There was also an increase in tryptophan catabolites and a reduction in tyrosine catabolites. There was an increase in the cholesterol:phospholipid ratio and a reduction in the glycoconjugate level of red blood cell (RBC) membrane in this group of patients. The same biochemical patterns were obtained in individuals with right hemispheric dominance. In individuals with left hemispheric dominance the patterns were reversed. Endogenous digoxin, by activating the calcineurin signal transduction pathway of T cells, can contribute to immune activation in sarcoidosis. An altered glycoconjugate metabolism can lead to the generation of endogenous self-glycoprotein antigens in the lung as well as other tissues. Increased free radical generation can also lead to immune activation. The role of a dysfunctional isoprenoid pathway and endogenous digoxin in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis in relation to right hemispheric chemical dominance is discussed. All the patients with sarcoidosis were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant according to the dichotic listening test, but their biochemical patterns

  9. Why social dominance theory has been falsified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John C; Reynolds, Katherine J

    2003-06-01

    Schmitt, Branscombe and Kappen (2003) and Wilson and Lui (2003) present a persuasive series of studies which raise major problems for the conceptualization of social dominance orientation in social dominance theory. Building on these and other data in the literature, this commentary summarizes six fundamental criticisms which can be made of the theory. We conclude that social dominance theory is flawed by conceptual inconsistencies and has been disconfirmed empirically in relation to its key hypothesis of behavioural asymmetry. The reaction of subordinate groups to the social hierarchy is better explained by social identity theory.

  10. Total dominator chromatic number of a graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel P. Kazemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a graph $G$, the total dominator coloring problem seeks a proper coloring of $G$ with the additional property that every vertex in the graph is adjacent to all vertices of a color class. We seek to minimize the number of color classes. We initiate to study this problem on several classes of graphs, as well as finding general bounds and characterizations. We also compare the total dominator chromatic number of a graph with the chromatic number and the total domination number of it.

  11. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis; Anwendung von extrazellulaeren gadoliniumhaltigen MR-Kontrastmitteln und Risiko der Nephrogenen Systemischen Fibrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heverhagen, J.T. [Univ. Hospital Bern (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital; Krombach, G.A. [Justus Liebig Univ. Hopsital Giessen (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Gizewski, E. [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-07-15

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  12. Fats for diabetics. (Letter).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katan, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Opinion. Comments on the treatment of type 2 diabetes from the interaction between nature and nurture. Effective form of treatment for type 2 diabetes; Composition of the diet for diabetics; Identification of unsaturated fats in the diabetic diet; Risks faced by diabetic patients.

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical ...

  14. Outside finance, dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies optimal financial contracts and product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. When firms seeking outside finance resort to actively monitored debt in order to commit against opportunistic behaviour, the dominant lender can influence corporate transparency.

  15. Connectivity editing for quad-dominant meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan; Wonka, Peter

    2013-01-01

    and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies for quad-dominant mesh design. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Collective Dominance In Canada: A New Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Banicevic; Mark Katz

    2009-01-01

    It appears that the Canadian Competition Bureau ("Bureau") will be taking a more aggressive approach than in the past to instances of what it regards as the collective (or "joint") abuse of dominance.

  17. Autosomal dominant inheritance of Weaver syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Fryer, A; Smith, C; Rosenbloom, L; Cole, T

    1997-01-01

    Most report of Weaver syndrome have been sporadic cases and the genetic basis of the syndrome is uncertain. This report of an affected father and daughter provides evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

  18. A Boundary Property for Upper Domination

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2016-08-08

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality.The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard, but can be solved in polynomial time in some restricted graph classes, such as P4-free graphs or 2K2-free graphs.For classes defined by finitely many forbidden induced subgraphs, the boundary separating difficult instances of the problem from polynomially solvable ones consists of the so called boundary classes.However, none of such classes has been identified so far for the upper dominating set problem.In the present paper, we discover the first boundary class for this problem.

  19. Epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dimer over a wide range of H+ concentrations accounts for the epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity. [Trehan K S ... The present study has been carried on acid phosphatase .... enzyme activity over mid parent value (table 3, col. 13),.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals have features of a kidney disorder called Bartter syndrome in addition to hypocalcemia. These features can include ... sometimes referred to as autosomal dominant hypocalcemia with Bartter syndrome or Bartter syndrome type V. There are two ...

  1. Foam topology. Bending versus stretching dominated architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, V.; Ashby, M.; Fleck, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular solids can deform by either the bending or stretching of the cell walls. While most cellular solids are bending-dominated, those that are stretching-dominated are much more weight-efficient for structural applications. In this study we have investigated the topological criteria that dictate the deformation mechanism of a cellular solid by analysing the rigidity (or otherwise) of pin-jointed frameworks comprising inextensional struts. We show that the minimum node connectivity for a special class of lattice structured materials to be stretching-dominated is 6 for 2D foams and 12 for 3D foams. Similarly, sandwich plates comprising of truss cores faced with planar trusses require a minimum node connectivity of 9 to undergo stretching-dominated deformation for all loading states. (author)

  2. Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Eating out when you have diabetes Diabetes nutrition — Make restaurant meals a healthy part of your diabetes ... have diabetes, eating out while sticking to your nutrition plan has gotten easier. Many restaurants offer healthy ...

  3. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-04-01

    The human hypothalamus produces an endogenous membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase inhibitor, digoxin, which regulates neuronal transmission. The digoxin status and neurotransmitter patterns were studied in creative and non-creative individuals, as well as in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance, in order to find out the role of cerebral dominance in this respect. The activity of HMG CoA reductase and serum levels of digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, and tyrosine catabolites were measured in creative/non-creative individuals, and in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance. In creative individuals there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in creative individuals correlated with right hemispheric dominance. In non-creative individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in non-creative individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to creative tendency.

  4. SOME CONSIDERATIONS ON ABUSE OF DOMINANT POSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Maican

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Article 82 (formerly 86 EC contains four essential elements (an undertaking, a dominant position, an abuse of that position and the abuse must affect trade between member states. The term undertakings is subject to the same broad interpretation as that applied to article 81 (formerly 85 EC and covers the same activities, both public and private.The Community interest must be also taken into account. Although it is not clear precisely what this element of article 86 requires, it will clearly curtail the scope of the exception provided under this article. Although abusive behavior of undertakings in a dominant position is prohibited, it must be recalled that merely being in a strong position is not a problem in itself. It is necessary for major players in a market to be aware of their position because practices which would not fall foul of article 82 (formerly 86 EC, where an undertaking is not dominant, will do so where dominance is established. A refusal to deal by a non-dominant undertaking would not be an abuse within article 82 (formerly 86 EC, but it will be so where the undertaking is dominant.

  5. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-03-01

    The isoprenoid pathway was assessed in atheistic and spiritually inclined individuals. The pathway was also assessed in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance to assess whether hemispheric dominance has a correlation with spiritual and atheistic tendency. HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, RBC membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum magnesium, and tyrosine/tryptophan catabolic patterns were assessed in spiritual/atheistic individuals and in those differing hemispheric dominance. In spiritually-inclined individuals, there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in spiritually-inclined individuals correlated with right hemispheric chemical dominance. In atheistic individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolities (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in atheistic individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to spirituality or atheism.

  6. A New Algorithm Using the Non-Dominated Tree to Improve Non-Dominated Sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Patrik; Syberfeldt, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Non-dominated sorting is a technique often used in evolutionary algorithms to determine the quality of solutions in a population. The most common algorithm is the Fast Non-dominated Sort (FNS). This algorithm, however, has the drawback that its performance deteriorates when the population size grows. The same drawback applies also to other non-dominating sorting algorithms such as the Efficient Non-dominated Sort with Binary Strategy (ENS-BS). An algorithm suggested to overcome this drawback is the Divide-and-Conquer Non-dominated Sort (DCNS) which works well on a limited number of objectives but deteriorates when the number of objectives grows. This article presents a new, more efficient algorithm called the Efficient Non-dominated Sort with Non-Dominated Tree (ENS-NDT). ENS-NDT is an extension of the ENS-BS algorithm and uses a novel Non-Dominated Tree (NDTree) to speed up the non-dominated sorting. ENS-NDT is able to handle large population sizes and a large number of objectives more efficiently than existing algorithms for non-dominated sorting. In the article, it is shown that with ENS-NDT the runtime of multi-objective optimization algorithms such as the Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) can be substantially reduced.

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Email Print Diabetes is a serious illness that affects over 29 million people in the United States. ... help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse ...

  8. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy- ... to Store your Insulin during Storms and Blackouts Safety Information for Diabetes Medicines and Devices Beware of ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... day. FDA has lots of free information to help you manage your diabetes. General Tips Diabetes Treatments ... General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People ...

  11. Causes of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Neonatal diabetes occurs in the first 6 months of life. Doctors usually diagnose MODY during adolescence or early adulthood, but sometimes the ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  13. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  14. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  15. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & ... & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  16. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  17. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  18. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... to help control symptoms and restore intimacy. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  19. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Zika and Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  20. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's Story ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your ... and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your health ...

  2. Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type 2 diabetes; Oral hypoglycemic - type 2 diabetes; High blood sugar - type 2 diabetes ... your kidneys are working well ( microalbuminuria and serum creatinine ). Visit your eye doctor at least once a ...

  3. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of diabetes, or are overweight. Physical inactivity, race, certain health problems such as high blood pressure, ... diabetes: meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies . Diabetes Car e. 2011;34(9):2116-2122. Haritoglou C, ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ... Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ... & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy- ... resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes for the first time when they become pregnant. This is called gestational (jes-Tay-shun-ul) diabetes. Other women have diabetes before they get pregnant. Use these resources to help you talk to ...

  11. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and ...

  14. Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichiro; Ito, Chikako

    1992-01-01

    It is believed that the pancreas is low sensitive to radiation. In this chapter, the effect of radiation on the pancreas is discussed in the light of the radiosensitivity of the pancreas in animal experiments and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in A-bomb survivors. In an experiment on the whole-body irradiation with 800 rad using rats, a decrease in insulin secretion itself has not been noted, although a decrease in blood insulin and an increase in glucagon were associated with transiently increased blood glucose. In other studies, there was neither histologically nor endocrinologically abnormal findings due to several hundreds rad of radiation in the acute stage. For A-bomb survivors, blood levels of insulin tended to be slightly increased in the 40-59 age group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤1.5 km than those exposed at ≥3.0 km; and in the other age groups, there was no tendency for decreased blood levels of insulin. The ABCC-RERF Adult Health Study data (1958-1960) has revealed that there is no statistically significant correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and A-bomb radiation; nor has this been noted in any other study. Neither the prevalence of diabetes mellitus nor its complications is found to be independent upon distance from the hypocenter. (N.K.)

  15. Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  16. Clinical Diabetes Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this series for medical professionals, specialists from pharmacy, podiatry, optometry, and dental professions discuss preventing diabetes complications and working as part of the diabetes care team.

  17. Type 2 diabetes and quality of life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikaterini; Trikkalinou; Athanasia; K; Papazafiropoulou; Andreas; Melidonis

    2017-01-01

    It is true that a primary goal of diabetes early diagnosis and treatment is quality of life(QoL). The term QoL is still confusing but it is agreed that it composes of four components:The physical component, mental, cogitative component, psychological and social component. Many articles have been written addressing those four components. During the last five years 15500 articles and reviews have been written addressing diabetes and coronary arterial disease, 16100 addressing diabetes and renal function, 28900 addressing diabetes and retinopathy, 16800 addressing diabetic foot ulcers and other 26300 addressing diabetic neuropathy. Moreover 17200 articles are dealing with diabetic sexual dysfunction, 24500 with the correlation of diabetes and depression 17500 about diabetes and dementia, only 1 about diabetes and family functioning and 1950000 about diabetes and QoL, indicating the worldwide interest. In order to confront this metabolic anomaly and its consequences, researchers developed numerous generic and disease specific psychometric tools. With the aid of those psychometric tools the scientific community has started to realize the gruesome effect of diabetes on patients’ lives. Diabetic’s QoL becomes worse when complications start to develop or comorbidities coexist. Dominant amongst complications, in health-related quality of life(HRQoL) lowering, but not related to risk factors(genetic, the weight of birth, or others) is coronary arterial disease followed by renal failure, blindness, and the combination of micro-and macrovascular complications and in some studies by sexual dysfunction. Moreover many are the comorbidities which deteriorate further the effect of diabetes in a patient life. Among them obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, depression, arthritis are the most common. Most intriguing field for research is the interaction of diabetes and depression and in some cases the progression to dementia. Many aspects and combinations of actions are under

  18. [Dominating motivation in systemic memory mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, K V

    2005-01-01

    The materials provided in the article support the key role of dominating motivation in the systemic processes of fixation and opening of memory mechanisms. The activating mechanisms of dominating motivations in the systemic architectonics of behavioural acts provide the basis for development of a multicomponent acceptor apparatus of an action outcomes broadly represented in various analysing brain sections. As result of enhancement of action outcomes on acceptors structures, molecular behaviour engrammes form within the functional systems. It is these molecular engrammes that are opened by dominating motivations in the same spatial-temporal sequence in which training takes place, and determine deliberate actions of animals. It was demonstrated that dominating motivation opens genetic information with an approximating-exploratory reaction under strong activation of early genes expression, in particular, of c-fos gene protein. Inherent motivation reactions are not blocked by inhibitors of proteins synthesis, by cycloheximide, in particular. In the process of training animals, i.e., satisfaction of the demands which are the basis of dominating motivations, expression of early genes in reduced, while expression of late genes is initiated. In this case, blockators of protein synthesis begin to produce strong inhibiting impact on behaviour of animals.

  19. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-04-01

    The isoprenoid path way produces endogenous digoxin, a substance that can regulate neurotransmitter and amino acid transport. Digoxin synthesis and neurotransmitter patterns were assessed in individuals with chronic insomnia. The patterns were compared in those with right hemispheric and left hemispheric dominance. The activity of HMG GoA reductase and serum levels of digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, and tyrosine catabolites were measured in individuals with chronic insomnia and in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance. Digoxin synthesis was increased with upregulated tryptophan catabolism (increased levels of serotonin, strychnine, and nicotine), and downregulated tyrosine catabolism (decreased levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine) in those with chronic insomnia and right hemispheric chemical dominance. Digoxin synthesis was reduced with downregulated tryptophan catabolism (decreased levels of serotonin, strychnine, and nicotine) and upregulated tyrosine catabolism (increased levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine) in those with normal sleep patterns and left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hypothalamic digoxin plays a central role in the regulation of sleep behavior. Hemispheric chemical dominance in relation to digoxin status is also crucial.

  20. Incretin hormones and maturity onset diabetes of the young - pathophysiological implications and anti-diabetic treatment potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østoft, Signe Harring

    2015-01-01

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) designates monogenic forms of non-autoimmune diabetes characterised by autosomal dominant inheritance, non-insulin dependent diabetes at onset and diagnosis often before 25 years of age. MODY constitutes genetically and clinically heterogeneous forms...... of diabetes. More than 8 different genes are known to cause MODY, among which hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A) (MODY3) and glucokinase (GCK) (MODY2) mutations are the most common. Both forms of MODY are characterised by specific beta cell dysfunction, with patients with HNF1A-diabetes having...... a reduced insulin secretory capacity, while patients with GCK-diabetes have a glucose-sensing defect, but preserved insulin secretory capacity. Patients with MODY are effectively treated with sulphonylurea (SU) due to very high sensitivity to these drugs, but they are also prone to develop hypoglycaemia...

  1. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  2. Autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis: An incidental finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajathi Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis is a descriptive term that refers to a group of rare, heritable disorders of the skeleton. Osteopetrotic conditions vary greatly in their presentation and severity, from just as an incidental finding on radiographs to causing life-threatening complications such as bone marrow suppression. It is caused by failure of osteoclast development and function. Osteopetrosis can be inherited as autosomal-recessive, autosomal-dominant or as X-linked traits, with the most severe forms being the autosomal-recessive ones. The severity of the disease is mild to moderate in the autosomal-dominant forms, with normal life expectancy. Diagnosis is largely based on clinical and radiographic evaluation. The present paper reports a case of autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis complicated by osteomyelitis with a short review of the condition.

  3. Stochastic Dominance under the Nonlinear Expected Utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinling Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1947, von Neumann and Morgenstern introduced the well-known expected utility and the related axiomatic system (see von Neumann and Morgenstern (1953. It is widely used in economics, for example, financial economics. But the well-known Allais paradox (see Allais (1979 shows that the linear expected utility has some limitations sometimes. Because of this, Peng proposed a concept of nonlinear expected utility (see Peng (2005. In this paper we propose a concept of stochastic dominance under the nonlinear expected utilities. We give sufficient conditions on which a random choice X stochastically dominates a random choice Y under the nonlinear expected utilities. We also provide sufficient conditions on which a random choice X strictly stochastically dominates a random choice Y under the sublinear expected utilities.

  4. Describing the organization of dominance relationships by dominance-directed tree method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izar, Patrícia; Ferreira, Renata G; Sato, Takechi

    2006-02-01

    Methods to describe dominance hierarchies are a key tool in primatology studies. Most current methods are appropriate for analyzing linear and near-linear hierarchies; however, more complex structures are common in primate groups. We propose a method termed "dominance-directed tree." This method is based on graph theory and set theory to analyze dominance relationships in social groups. The method constructs a transitive matrix by imposing transitivity to the dominance matrix and produces a graphical representation of the dominance relationships, which allows an easy visualization of the hierarchical position of the individuals, or subsets of individuals. The method is also able to detect partial and complete hierarchies, and to describe situations in which hierarchical and nonhierarchical principles operate. To illustrate the method, we apply a dominance tree analysis to artificial data and empirical data from a group of Cebus apella. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Increasing dominance of IT in ICT convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Tadayoni, Reza

    The aim of the paper is to examine the increasing dominance of IT companies in the converging ICT industry and, on the basis of this development, to contribute to extending the theoretical understanding of market and industry convergence in the ICT area.......The aim of the paper is to examine the increasing dominance of IT companies in the converging ICT industry and, on the basis of this development, to contribute to extending the theoretical understanding of market and industry convergence in the ICT area....

  6. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Key words: Diabetes mellitus, diabetes distress, HbA1c, glycaemic status ... [3] The management of diabetes mellitus and the ... morbidity and mortality risks associated with ... appropriate policy for prevention, control and ..... Mellitus and its Association Risk Indicators in a ... collaborative Research on Internal Medicine and.

  8. Comparison of Scapular Position in Dominant and Non Dominant Sides of Healthy Adult\\'s Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoun Nodehi-Moghaddam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of this research was to compare normal scapular position (protraction, rotation and lateral scapular test on arm elevation between dominant and non dominant sides. Materials & Methods: Thirty healthy females (age=21.9 years, weight=53.37 kg, height =160.60 cm were chosen by non probability sampling and participated in this cross – sectional and comparative study. Scapular rest positions (protraction and Rotation were measured by use of Diveta method and scapular asymmetry was assessed by using lateral scapular slide test (Kibler test. Validity and reliability of measurement methods were assessed by determination of ICC and SEM and data were analyzed by use of paired T test. Results: The difference between dominant and non dominant scapular protraction and rotation was not found to be statistically significant (P=0.61, P=0.57.The dominant scapula was found to be more lateral in 2nd and 3rd Kibler tests positions than non dominant scapula (P<0.001. There was no significant difference in lateral scapular slide test between dominant and non dominant sides when the arms were by the side of body (P=0.66. Conclusion: Scapular rest position is influenced by hand dominance

  9. Translating Dominant Institutional Logics in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger Nielsen, Jeppe; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    In this paper we examine the proliferation of a new mobile technology in a structured setting of home care in Denmark, focusing on how actions at multiple levels interact to enable technology diffusion and institutionalization. The case study shows how a dominating field level logic...... that combining an institutional logic perspective with a translation perspective furthers our understanding of the malleability of institutional logics....

  10. Personality, Hemispheric Dominance, and Cognitive Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Jaime; Hartman, Steve E.

    1997-01-01

    Shows that 154 medical students and 526 undergraduates (samples treated separately) who were judged left- or right-hemisphere dominant (by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator) were found to have very different personalities (as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator). Considers some of the practical ramifications of the psychometric overlap of…

  11. Can massless neutrinos dominate the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The restrictions from cosmological considerations on masses and lifetimes of neutral, weakly interacting fermions are reviewed. In particular, the possibility that the massless decay products of a heavy neutrino dominate the energy density of the present universe is discussed in detail. 4 figures

  12. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, M.L.; Sommeijer, J.-P.; Levelt, C.N.; Heimel, J.A.; Brussaard, A.B.; Borst, J.G.G.; Elgersma, Y.; Galjart, N.; van der Horst, G.T.; Pennartz, C.M.; Smit, A.B.; Spruijt, B.M.; Verhage, M.; de Zeeuw, C.I.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  13. A photon dominated region code comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roellig, M.; Abel, N. P.; Bell, T.; Bensch, F.; Black, J.; Ferland, G. J.; Jonkheid, B.; Kamp, I.; Kaufman, M. J.; Le Bourlot, J.; Le Petit, F.; Meijerink, R.; Morata, O.; Ossenkopf, Volker; Roueff, E.; Shaw, G.; Spaans, M.; Sternberg, A.; Stutzki, J.; Thi, W.-F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Viti, S.; Wolfire, M. G.

    Aims. We present a comparison between independent computer codes, modeling the physics and chemistry of interstellar photon dominated regions (PDRs). Our goal was to understand the mutual differences in the PDR codes and their effects on the physical and chemical structure of the model clouds, and

  14. Pleasure, arousal, dominance: Mehrabian and Russell revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, I.C.; van der Voordt, Theo; de Boon, J; Vink, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a discursive review of the dimensions pleasure, arousal and dominance that Mehrabian and Russell developed in 1974 to assess environmental perception, experience, and psychological responses. Since then numerous researchers applied these dimensions to assess the experience of the

  15. Dominant Taylor Spectrum and Invariant Subspaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrozie, Calin-Grigore; Müller, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2009), s. 101-111 ISSN 0379-4024 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/06/0128 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Taylor spectrum * Scott-Brown technique * dominant spectrum Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.580, year: 2009

  16. Challenging executive dominance in European democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtin, D.

    2014-01-01

    Executive dominance in the contemporary EU is part of a wider migration of executive power towards types of decision making that eschew electoral accountability and popular democratic control. This democratic gap is fed by far-going secrecy arrangements and practices exercised in a concerted fashion

  17. Challenging Executive Dominance in European Democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtin, D.

    2013-01-01

    Executive dominance in the contemporary EU is part of a wider migration of executive power towards types of decision making that eschew electoral accountability and popular democratic control. This democratic gap is fed by far‐going secrecy arrangements and practices exercised in a concerted fashion

  18. Social dominance theory: Its agenda and method

    OpenAIRE

    Sidanius, Jim; Pratto, Felicia; van Laar, Colette; Levin, Shana

    2004-01-01

    The theory has been misconstrued in four primary ways, which are often expressed as the claims of psychological reductionism, conceptual redundancy, biological reductionism, and hierarchy justification. This paper addresses these claims and suggests how social dominance theory builds on and moves beyond social identity theory and system justification theor.

  19. Heavy-ion dominance near Cluster perigees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Time periods in which heavy ions dominate over H+ in the energy range of 1-40 keV were observed by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS)/COmposition DIstribution Function (CODIF) instrument onboard Cluster Spacecraft 4 at L values less than 4. The characteristic feature is a narrow flux peak at around 10 keV that extends into low L values, with He+ and/or O+ dominating. In the present work we perform a statistical study of these events and examine their temporal occurrence and spatial distribution. The observed features, both the narrow energy range and the heavy-ion dominance, can be interpreted using a model of ion drift from the plasma sheet, subject to charge exchange losses. The narrow energy range corresponds to the only energy range that has direct drift access from the plasma sheet during quiet times. The drift time to these locations from the plasma sheet is > 30 h, so that charge exchange has a significant impact on the population. We show that a simple drift/loss model can explain the dependence on L shell and MLT of these heavy-ion-dominant time periods.

  20. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Outer-2-independent domination in graphs. MARCIN KRZYWKOWSKI1,2,∗, DOOST ALI MOJDEH3 and MARYEM RAOOFI4. 1Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of Johannesburg,. Johannesburg, South Africa. 2Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdansk University.

  1. Breaking Male Dominance in Old Democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlerup, D.; Leyenaar, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Has male dominance in political life been broken? Will gender balance in elected assemblies soon be reached? This book analyses the longitudinal development of women’s political representation in eight old democracies, in which women were enfranchised before and around World War I: Denmark, Iceland,

  2. Floating plant dominance as a stable state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Szabo, S.; Gragnani, A.; Nes, van E.H.; Rinaldi, S.; Kautsky, N.; Norberg, J.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Franken, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that floating-plant dominance can be a self-stabilizing ecosystem state, which may explain its notorious persistence in many situations. Their results, based on experiments, field data, and models (in Dutch ditches and Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe), represent evidence for

  3. Excessive prices as abuse of dominance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Lisbeth; Møllgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    firm abused its position by charging excessive prices. We also test whether tightening of the Danish competition act has altered the pricing behaviour on the market. We discuss our results in the light of a Danish competition case against the dominant cement producer that was abandoned by the authority...

  4. Converting skeletal structures to quad dominant meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Welnicka, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    We propose the Skeleton to Quad-dominant polygonal Mesh algorithm (SQM), which converts skeletal structures to meshes composed entirely of polar and annular regions. Both types of regions have a regular structure where all faces are quads except for a single ring of triangles at the center of each...

  5. Sedimentation in a river dominated estuary

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, JAG

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mgeni Estuary on the wave dominated cast coast of South Africa occupies a narrow, bedrock confined, alluvial valley and is partially blocked at the coast by an elongate sandy barrier. Fluvial sediment extends to the barrier and marine depositon...

  6. Steep microbial boundstone-dominated plaform margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenter, J.A.M.; Harris, P.M.; Della Porta, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Seaward progradation of several kilometers has been documented mostly for leeward margin low-angle carbonate slope systems with a dominant platform top sediment source. However, steep and high-relief margins fronting deep basins can also prograde and as such are somewhat perplexing. Characteristics

  7. Efficient Diversification According to Stochastic Dominance Criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuosmanen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper develops the first operational tests of portfolio efficiency based on the general stochastic dominance (SD) criteria that account for an infinite set of diversification strategies. The main insight is to preserve the cross-sectional dependence of asset returns when forming portfolios by

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other ... YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information ...

  10. What Is Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Home Current issue contents Features: Diabetes Follow us What is Diabetes? Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, ... of First Automated Insulin Device for Type 1 Diabetes Spring 2017 Issue: Volume 12 ... Magazine Information Contact Us Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Monitoring Devices FDA Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  12. duration diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... group, type of diabetes, age of onset and duration of diabetes), presence of retinopathy, markers of nephropathy and biochemical variables. ... type 2 diabetes and for each ethnic group. Results. ... time of diabetes diagnosis in blacks than Indians. In the type ... countries, minority groups and disadvantaged communities in.

  13. Myths about diabetes mellitus among non-diabetic individuals attending primary health care centers of karachi suburbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisar, N.; Khan, I.A.; Qadri, M.H.; Sher, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the myths and misconception about diabetes mellitus among non-diabetics attending primary health care centers of Gadap town, Karachi. Data was collected from four primary health care centers, located at Gadap Town, Karachi, and about 198 non-diabetic patients, above 18 years of age, and resident of Gadap Town, coming consecutively during the month of July 2005, were interviewed after taking the informed consent by using a semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire regarding prevailing myths about diabetes mellitus. The data collected was entered and analyzed by using a statistical package SPSS 11.0. Myths are defined as stories shared by a group, as part of the cultural identity. There were 198 participants in the study. Mean age of study participants was 40 years with standard deviation of 13, while approximately two thirds, 62.6%, were females. About 39% had history of type II diabetes mellitus in family. Overall myths related to diabetes mellitus were common among the individuals, males reported myths pre-dominantly contagiousness of diabetes (p= <0.03), diabetics becoming more ill (p=<0.009) and belief in spiritual treatment for permanent cure of diabetes (p=<0.006). People having 5- 16 years of education were less misconceived as compared to illiterates. The variables that showed significant difference were overeating, causing diabetes (p= <0.006), diabetics falling ill more than others (p=<0.04), eating less starch (p=< 0.0006) and alternative treatment like spiritual treatment (p=<0.00001). Family history of diabetes was also found significantly associated with reporting myths. Frequency of reporting myths was significantly high in this study with preponderance of males, family history of diabetes mellitus and educational status. Education serves as protective factor, hence efforts should be made to promote education and health awareness regarding the disease, with more emphasis on addressing myths regarding diabetes mellitus. (author)

  14. Topics in the generalized vector dominance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavin, S.

    1976-01-01

    Two topics are covered in the generalized vector dominance model. In the first topic a model is constructed for dilepton production in hadron-hadron interactions based on the idea of generalized vector-dominance. It is argued that in the high mass region the generalized vector-dominance model and the Drell-Yan parton model are alternative descriptions of the same underlying physics. In the low mass regions the models differ; the vector-dominance approach predicts a greater production of dileptons. It is found that the high mass vector mesons which are the hallmark of the generalized vector-dominance model make little contribution to the large yield of leptons observed in the transverse-momentum range 1 less than p/sub perpendicular/ less than 6 GeV. The recently measured hadronic parameters lead one to believe that detailed fits to the data are possible under the model. The possibility was expected, and illustrated with a simple model the extreme sensitivity of the large-p/sub perpendicular/ lepton yield to the large-transverse-momentum tail of vector-meson production. The second topic is an attempt to explain the mysterious phenomenon of photon shadowing in nuclei utilizing the contribution of the longitudinally polarized photon. It is argued that if the scalar photon anti-shadows, it could compensate for the transverse photon, which is presumed to shadow. It is found in a very simple model that the scalar photon could indeed anti-shadow. The principal feature of the model is a cancellation of amplitudes. The scheme is consistent with scalar photon-nucleon data as well. The idea is tested with two simple GVDM models and finds that the anti-shadowing contribution of the scalar photon is not sufficient to compensate for the contribution of the transverse photon. It is found doubtful that the scalar photon makes a significant contribution to the total photon-nuclear cross section

  15. Why large cells dominate estuarine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Surveys across the world oceans have shown that phytoplankton biomass and production are dominated by small cells (picoplankton) where nutrient concentrations are low, but large cells (microplankton) dominate when nutrient-rich deep water is mixed to the surface. I analyzed phytoplankton size structure in samples collected over 25 yr in San Francisco Bay, a nutrient-rich estuary. Biomass was dominated by large cells because their biomass selectively grew during blooms. Large-cell dominance appears to be a characteristic of ecosystems at the land–sea interface, and these places may therefore function as analogs to oceanic upwelling systems. Simulations with a size-structured NPZ model showed that runs of positive net growth rate persisted long enough for biomass of large, but not small, cells to accumulate. Model experiments showed that small cells would dominate in the absence of grazing, at lower nutrient concentrations, and at elevated (+5°C) temperatures. Underlying these results are two fundamental scaling laws: (1) large cells are grazed more slowly than small cells, and (2) grazing rate increases with temperature faster than growth rate. The model experiments suggest testable hypotheses about phytoplankton size structure at the land–sea interface: (1) anthropogenic nutrient enrichment increases cell size; (2) this response varies with temperature and only occurs at mid-high latitudes; (3) large-cell blooms can only develop when temperature is below a critical value, around 15°C; (4) cell size diminishes along temperature gradients from high to low latitudes; and (5) large-cell blooms will diminish or disappear where planetary warming increases temperature beyond their critical threshold.

  16. Genomet og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

    2014-01-01

    In terms of their genetic architecture monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes represent two extremes. Whereas each subtype of monogenic diabetes is caused by one penetrant, rare mutation in a single gene, the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be attributed to many low-penetrant variants...... across the genome. At present, only 10% of the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be explained by the hitherto identified 90 genomic loci. Here we briefly review the genetics of monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes and outline future directions of research within this field....

  17. The paired-domination and the upper paired-domination numbers of graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Ulatowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we continue the study of paired-domination in graphs. A paired-dominating set, abbreviated PDS, of a graph \\(G\\ with no isolated vertex is a dominating set of vertices whose induced subgraph has a perfect matching. The paired-domination number of \\(G\\, denoted by \\(\\gamma_{p}(G\\, is the minimum cardinality of a PDS of \\(G\\. The upper paired-domination number of \\(G\\, denoted by \\(\\Gamma_{p}(G\\, is the maximum cardinality of a minimal PDS of \\(G\\. Let \\(G\\ be a connected graph of order \\(n\\geq 3\\. Haynes and Slater in [Paired-domination in graphs, Networks 32 (1998, 199-206], showed that \\(\\gamma_{p}(G\\leq n-1\\ and they determine the extremal graphs \\(G\\ achieving this bound. In this paper we obtain analogous results for \\(\\Gamma_{p}(G\\. Dorbec, Henning and McCoy in [Upper total domination versus upper paired-domination, Questiones Mathematicae 30 (2007, 1-12] determine \\(\\Gamma_{p}(P_n\\, instead in this paper we determine \\(\\Gamma_{p}(C_n\\. Moreover, we describe some families of graphs \\(G\\ for which the equality \\(\\gamma_{p}(G=\\Gamma_{p}(G\\ holds.

  18. Men's sex-dominance inhibition: do men automatically refrain from sexually dominant behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Amy K; Sanchez, Diana T

    2007-12-01

    Men receive conflicting messages about their sexual roles in heterosexual relationships. Men are socialized to initiate and direct sexual activities with women; yet societal norms also proscribe the sexual domination and coercion of women. The authors test these competing hypotheses by assessing whether men inhibit the link between sex and dominance. In Studies 1a and b, using a subliminal priming procedure embedded in a lexical decision task, the authors demonstrate that men automatically suppress the concept of dominance following exposure to subliminal sex primes relative to neutral primes. In Studies 2 and 3, the authors show that men who are less likely to perceive sexual assertiveness as necessary, to refrain from dominant sexual behavior, and who do not invest in masculine gender ideals are more likely to inhibit dominant thoughts following sex primes. Implications for theories of automatic cognitive networks and gender-based sexual roles are discussed.

  19. The socialization of dominance: peer group contextual effects on homophobic and dominance attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V Paul; Espelage, Dorothy L; Green, Harold D

    2007-06-01

    Using the framework of social dominance theory, the current investigation tested for the contextual effects of adolescent peer groups on individuals' homophobic and social dominance attitudes. Results from multilevel models indicated that significant differences existed across peer groups on homophobic attitudes. In addition, these differences were accounted for on the basis of the hierarchy-enhancing or -attenuating climate of the group. A group socialization effect on individuals' social dominance attitudes over time was also observed. Furthermore, the social climate of the peer group moderated the stability of individuals' social dominance attitudes. Findings support the need to examine more proximal and informal group affiliations and earlier developmental periods in efforts to build more comprehensive theoretical models explaining when and how prejudiced and dominance attitudes are formed and the way in which they are perpetuated. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğrul, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health problem. Its prevalence is 1.5-2 times higher in diabetic population than that in non-diabetic individuals. Its pathogenesis depends on diabetic nephropathy in type 1, whereas may be multifactorial in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In diabetics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are most widely preferred in the treatment of hypertension because of their numerous desirable effects. In this article, the most recent data are presented on the relationshi...

  1. Power, Domination and Kafka’s Castle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel Karadaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The propositions of the Enlightenment philosophy, which valued the individual and his/her freedom, began to lose effect in the middle of the 19th century, with the increasing dominance of the ‘social’ and ‘class’ brought about by the growing industrialization. This dominance, which was the result of the modern capitalist society and the beurocratic state power it gave rise to, drove the intellectuals and thinkers of the time to question the individual freedom ideals of the Enlightenment and the early stages of modernity. In the intellectual sphere this questioning gained speed with Marx but became most apparent in the propositions of the Frankfurt School, which showed a lean on Weber’s idea of beurocratic structures of the modern state. Franz Kafka’s The Castle contributes to this questioning from a literary perspective. The Castle is also important because it was written in Germany where the mechanisms of the beurocratic dominance structures were most overt. The novel strikingly represents how these mechanisms of dominance affect the individuals and the relationships between them. This study handles the individual ideal of the Enlightenment and the criticisms directed to this ideal in the modern times, and it analyzes Kafka’s The Castle in terms of how it takes its place among the criticisms to this ideal with a literary dimension. In his famous work Castle, Kafka, evaluate the modern bureaucracy and its impact on the society in a different perspective from Weber who deal with modern society with the context of rationalization. For a better understanding of the novel, it may be necessary to make a double-layer reading of it. Because, until the last pages of the novel, it is thought that modern bureaucracy as a structure is constructed in the context of “nonsense” not “rationality”. The bureucratic mechanism that woven by hundreds of details in the novel, neither its officality nor its domination built on invididuals, and

  2. Distance 2-Domination in Prisms of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurtado Ferran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A set of vertices D of a graph G is a distance 2-dominating set of G if the distance between each vertex u ∊ (V (G − D and D is at most two. Let γ2(G denote the size of a smallest distance 2-dominating set of G. For any permutation π of the vertex set of G, the prism of G with respect to π is the graph πG obtained from G and a copy G′ of G by joining u ∊ V(G with v′ ∊ V(G′ if and only if v′ = π(u. If γ2(πG = γ2(G for any permutation π of V(G, then G is called a universal γ2-fixer. In this work we characterize the cycles and paths that are universal γ2-fixers.

  3. Mean Field Games with a Dominating Player

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensoussan, A., E-mail: axb046100@utdallas.edu [The University of Texas at Dallas, International Center for Decision and Risk Analysis, Jindal School of Management (United States); Chau, M. H. M., E-mail: michaelchaumanho@gmail.com; Yam, S. C. P., E-mail: scpyam@sta.cuhk.edu.hk [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Statistics (Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China) (China)

    2016-08-15

    In this article, we consider mean field games between a dominating player and a group of representative agents, each of which acts similarly and also interacts with each other through a mean field term being substantially influenced by the dominating player. We first provide the general theory and discuss the necessary condition for the optimal controls and equilibrium condition by adopting adjoint equation approach. We then present a special case in the context of linear-quadratic framework, in which a necessary and sufficient condition can be asserted by stochastic maximum principle; we finally establish the sufficient condition that guarantees the unique existence of the equilibrium control. The proof of the convergence result of finite player game to mean field counterpart is provided in Appendix.

  4. Synthesis of Greedy Algorithms Using Dominance Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedunuri, Srinivas; Smith, Douglas R.; Cook, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Greedy algorithms exploit problem structure and constraints to achieve linear-time performance. Yet there is still no completely satisfactory way of constructing greedy algorithms. For example, the Greedy Algorithm of Edmonds depends upon translating a problem into an algebraic structure called a matroid, but the existence of such a translation can be as hard to determine as the existence of a greedy algorithm itself. An alternative characterization of greedy algorithms is in terms of dominance relations, a well-known algorithmic technique used to prune search spaces. We demonstrate a process by which dominance relations can be methodically derived for a number of greedy algorithms, including activity selection, and prefix-free codes. By incorporating our approach into an existing framework for algorithm synthesis, we demonstrate that it could be the basis for an effective engineering method for greedy algorithms. We also compare our approach with other characterizations of greedy algorithms.

  5. Connectivity editing for quad-dominant meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan

    2013-08-01

    We propose a connectivity editing framework for quad-dominant meshes. In our framework, the user can edit the mesh connectivity to control the location, type, and number of irregular vertices (with more or fewer than four neighbors) and irregular faces (non-quads). We provide a theoretical analysis of the problem, discuss what edits are possible and impossible, and describe how to implement an editing framework that realizes all possible editing operations. In the results, we show example edits and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies for quad-dominant mesh design. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  7. On the Dominance of Attitude Emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocklage, Matthew D; Fazio, Russell H

    2016-02-01

    Many situations in our lives require us to make relatively quick decisions as whether to approach or avoid a person or object, buy or pass on a product, or accept or reject an offer. These decisions are particularly difficult when there are both positive and negative aspects to the object. How do people go about navigating this conflict to come to a summary judgment? Using the Evaluative Lexicon (EL), we demonstrate across three studies, 7,700 attitude expressions, and nearly 50 different attitude objects that when positivity and negativity conflict, the valence that is based more on emotion is more likely to dominate. Furthermore, individuals are also more consistent in the expression of their univalent summary judgments when they involve greater emotionality. In sum, valence that is based on emotion tends to dominate when resolving ambivalence and also helps individuals to remain consistent when offering quick judgments. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  8. The 2017 Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-Management Education National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Joanne; Dickinson, Jane K; Litchman, Michelle L; Williams, Ann S; Kolb, Leslie E; Cox, Carla; Lipman, Ruth D

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The American Association of Diabetes Educators conducts the National Practice Survey (NPS) biennially to document current practice in diabetes education in the United States. The purpose of the study is to obtain insight about factors influencing the work of the diabetes educator. Method The 2017 NPS was comprised of 100 questions covering diabetes educator demographics, profile populations of people with diabetes, practice information, program accreditation, program curriculum, staffing, education delivery methods, data collection, and reporting. The basic survey consisted of 22 questions using branch logic, from which respondents were then directed to questions tailored to their particular practice setting, enabling them to answer only a relevant subset of the remaining questions. The web-based survey was sent to approximately 32 000 individuals who were either members of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) or Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE) with the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) but not AADE members. Weekly reminder e-mails were sent to recipients who had not yet responded. The outreach efforts resulted in the survey being completed by 4696 individuals, a 17% response rate yielding 95% confidence that these responses are within ±5% accuracy. Results Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) continues to be a field dominated by women (95%). Diabetes educators represent a diverse health care profession, with educators indicating most commonly that their primary discipline is nursing (48%), nutrition (38%), and pharmacy (7%). When asked about credentials, 82.6% indicated that they held a CDE, 3.8% held the Board Certified-Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM) credential, and 16.5% held neither the CDE nor the BC-ADM. Nearly 75% characterized their role as a diabetes educator as providing direct patient care. DSMES continued to be provided in a varied array of settings to educationally

  9. Huntington's disease does not appear to increase the risk of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, T W; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Josefsen, Knud Elnegaard

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder characterised by neurological, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. HD has been associated with diabetes mellitus, which is, to some extent, supported by studies in transgenic HD mice. In transgenic mice...

  10. Pleasure, arousal, dominance: Mehrabian and Russell revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, I.C.; van der Voordt, Theo; de Boon, J; Vink, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a discursive review of the dimensions pleasure, arousal and dominance that Mehrabian and Russell developed in 1974 to assess environmental perception, experience, and psychological responses. Since then numerous researchers applied these dimensions to assess the experience of the physical environment and its perceived qualities. Although the dimensions appeared to be useful, there is a long-lasting debate going on among environmental psychologists about the interpretation ...

  11. Blockchain Transaction Analysis Using Dominant Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Awan , Malik ,; Cortesi , Agostino

    2017-01-01

    Part 4: Engineering of Enterprise Software Products; International audience; Blockchain is an emerging backbone technology behind different crypto-currencies. It can also be used for other purposes and areas. There are different scalability issues associated with blockchain. It is important to know the in depth structure of blockchain by identifying common behaviors of the transactions and the effect of these behaviors on the nodes of the network. Dominant set approach can categorize the bloc...

  12. Different patterns of modality dominance across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Wesley R; Rivera, Samuel; Robinson, Christopher W

    2018-01-01

    The present study sought to better understand how children, young adults, and older adults attend and respond to multisensory information. In Experiment 1, young adults were presented with two spoken words, two pictures, or two word-picture pairings and they had to determine if the two stimuli/pairings were exactly the same or different. Pairing the words and pictures together slowed down visual but not auditory response times and delayed the latency of first fixations, both of which are consistent with a proposed mechanism underlying auditory dominance. Experiment 2 examined the development of modality dominance in children, young adults, and older adults. Cross-modal presentation attenuated visual accuracy and slowed down visual response times in children, whereas older adults showed the opposite pattern, with cross-modal presentation attenuating auditory accuracy and slowing down auditory response times. Cross-modal presentation also delayed first fixations in children and young adults. Mechanisms underlying modality dominance and multisensory processing are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Social dominance modulates eavesdropping in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril-de-Abreu, Rodrigo; Cruz, Ana S.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2015-01-01

    Group living animals may eavesdrop on signalling interactions between conspecifics and integrate it with their own past social experience in order to optimize the use of relevant information from others. However, little is known about this interplay between public (eavesdropped) and private social information. To investigate it, we first manipulated the dominance status of bystander zebrafish. Next, we either allowed or prevented bystanders from observing a fight. Finally, we assessed their behaviour towards the winners and losers of the interaction, using a custom-made video-tracking system and directional analysis. We found that only dominant bystanders who had seen the fight revealed a significant increase in directional focus (a measure of attention) towards the losers of the fights. Furthermore, our results indicate that information about the fighters' acquired status was collected from the signalling interaction itself and not from post-interaction status cues, which implies the existence of individual recognition in zebrafish. Thus, we show for the first time that zebrafish, a highly social model organism, eavesdrop on conspecific agonistic interactions and that this process is modulated by the eavesdroppers' dominance status. We suggest that this type of integration of public and private information may be ubiquitous in social learning processes. PMID:26361550

  14. Photosynthesis in Hydrogen-Dominated Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, William; Seager, Sara; Zsom, Andras

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of extrasolar planets discovered in the last decade shows that we should not be constrained to look for life in environments similar to early or present-day Earth. Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency, and some will be able to retain a stable, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. We explore the possibilities for photosynthesis on a rocky planet with a thin H2-dominated atmosphere. If a rocky, H2-dominated planet harbors life, then that life is likely to convert atmospheric carbon into methane. Outgassing may also build an atmosphere in which methane is the principal carbon species. We describe the possible chemical routes for photosynthesis starting from methane and show that less energy and lower energy photons could drive CH4-based photosynthesis as compared with CO2-based photosynthesis. We find that a by-product biosignature gas is likely to be H2, which is not distinct from the hydrogen already present in the environment. Ammonia is a potential biosignature gas of hydrogenic photosynthesis that is unlikely to be generated abiologically. We suggest that the evolution of methane-based photosynthesis is at least as likely as the evolution of anoxygenic photosynthesis on Earth and may support the evolution of complex life. PMID:25411926

  15. The kinetically dominated quasar 3C 418

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Kharb, Preeti

    2017-06-01

    The existence of quasars that are kinetically dominated, where the jet kinetic luminosity, Q, is larger than the total (infrared to X-ray) thermal luminosity of the accretion flow, Lbol, provides a strong constraint on the fundamental physics of relativistic jet formation. Since quasars have high values of Lbol by definition, only ˜10 kinetically dominated quasars (with \\overline{Q}/L_{bol}>1) have been found, where \\overline{Q} is the long-term time-averaged jet power. We use low-frequency (151 MHz-1.66 GHz) observations of the quasar 3C 418 to determine \\overline{Q}≈ 5.5 ± 1.3 × 10^{46} {erg s^{-1}}. Analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum indicates that this equates to 0.57 ± 0.28 times the Eddington luminosity of the central supermassive black hole and \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} ≈ 4.8 ± 3.1, making 3C 418 one of the most kinetically dominated quasars found to date. It is shown that this maximal \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} is consistent with models of magnetically arrested accretion of jet production in which the jet production reproduces the observed trend of a decrement in the extreme ultraviolet continuum as the jet power increases. This maximal condition corresponds to an almost complete saturation of the inner accretion flow with vertical large-scale magnetic flux (maximum saturation).

  16. Photosynthesis in Hydrogen-Dominated Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Bains

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of extrasolar planets discovered in the last decade shows that we should not be constrained to look for life in environments similar to early or present-day Earth. Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency, and some will be able to retain a stable, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. We explore the possibilities for photosynthesis on a rocky planet with a thin H2-dominated atmosphere. If a rocky, H2-dominated planet harbors life, then that life is likely to convert atmospheric carbon into methane. Outgassing may also build an atmosphere in which methane is the principal carbon species. We describe the possible chemical routes for photosynthesis starting from methane and show that less energy and lower energy photons could drive CH4-based photosynthesis as compared with CO2-based photosynthesis. We find that a by-product biosignature gas is likely to be H2, which is not distinct from the hydrogen already present in the environment. Ammonia is a potential biosignature gas of hydrogenic photosynthesis that is unlikely to be generated abiologically. We suggest that the evolution of methane-based photosynthesis is at least as likely as the evolution of anoxygenic photosynthesis on Earth and may support the evolution of complex life.

  17. A global map of dominant malaria vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinka Marianne E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global maps, in particular those based on vector distributions, have long been used to help visualise the global extent of malaria. Few, however, have been created with the support of a comprehensive and extensive evidence-based approach. Methods Here we describe the generation of a global map of the dominant vector species (DVS of malaria that makes use of predicted distribution maps for individual species or species complexes. Results Our global map highlights the spatial variability in the complexity of the vector situation. In Africa, An. gambiae, An. arabiensis and An. funestus are co-dominant across much of the continent, whereas in the Asian-Pacific region there is a highly complex situation with multi-species coexistence and variable species dominance. Conclusions The competence of the mapping methodology to accurately portray DVS distributions is discussed. The comprehensive and contemporary database of species-specific spatial occurrence (currently available on request will be made directly available via the Malaria Atlas Project (MAP website from early 2012.

  18. Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid complications Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes is a serious disease. Following ...

  19. Hemispheric dominance and cell phone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael D; Siegel, Bianca; Shah, Priyanka; Bowyer, Susan M

    2013-05-01

    A thorough understanding of why we hold a cell phone to a particular ear may be of importance when studying the impact of cell phone safety. To determine if there is an obvious association between sidedness of cell phone use and auditory hemispheric dominance (AHD) or language hemispheric dominance (LHD). It is known that 70% to 95% of the population are right-handed, and of these, 96% have left-brain LHD. We have observed that most people use their cell phones in their right ear. An Internet survey was e-mailed to individuals through surveymonkey.com. The survey used a modified Edinburgh Handedness Inventory protocol. Sample questions surveyed which hand was used to write with, whether the right or left ear was used for phone conversations, as well as whether a brain tumor was present. General community. An Internet survey was randomly e-mailed to 5000 individuals selected from an otology online group, patients undergoing Wada testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging, as well as persons on the university listserv, of which 717 surveys were completed. Determination of hemispheric dominance based on preferred ear for cell phone use. A total of 717 surveys were returned. Ninety percent of the respondents were right handed, and 9% were left handed. Sixty-eight percent of the right-handed people used the cell phone in their right ear, 25% in the left ear, and 7% had no preference. Seventy-two of the left-handed respondents used their left ear, 23% used their right ear, and 5% had no preference. Cell phone use averaged 540 minutes per month over the past 9 years. An association exists between hand dominance laterality of cell phone use (73%) and our ability to predict hemispheric dominance. Most right-handed people have left-brain LHD and use their cell phone in their right ear. Similarly, most left-handed people use their cell phone in their left ear. Our study suggests that AHD may differ from LHD owing to the difference in handedness and cell phone ear use

  20. Calpastatin overexpression prevents progression of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC)-initiated acute renal injury and renal failure (ARF) in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Lock, Edward A.; Latendresse, John R.; Warbritton, Alan A.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2006-01-01

    Previously we have shown that 90% of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1 diabetic (DB) mice survive from acute renal failure (ARF) and death induced by a normally LD 9 dose (75 mg/kg, i.p.) of the nephrotoxicant S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC). This remarkable protection is due to a combination of slower progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury and increased compensatory nephrogenic tissue repair in the DB kidneys. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed that the DB condition led to 4-fold higher number of proximal tubular cells (PTC) entering S-phase of cell cycle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that DB-induced augmentation of PTC into S-phase is accompanied by overexpression of the calpain-inhibitor calpastatin, which endogenously prevents the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury mediated by the calpain escaping out of damaged PTCs. Immunohistochemical detection of renal calpain and its activity in the urine, over a time course after treatment with the LD 9 dose of DCVC, indicated progressive increase in leakage of calpain into the extracellular spaces of the injured PTCs of the non-diabetic (NDB) kidneys as compared to the DB kidneys. Calpastatin expression was minimally detected in the NDB kidneys, using immunohistochemistry, over the time course. On the other hand, consistently higher number of tubules in the DB kidney showed calpastatin expression over the time course. The lower leakage of calpain in the DB kidneys was commensurate with constitutively higher expression of calpastatin in the S-phase-laden PTCs of these mice. To test the protective role of newly divided/dividing PTCs, DB mice were given the anti-mitotic agent colchicine (CLC) (2 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg, i.p., on days 8 and 10 after STZ injection) prior to challenge with a LD 9 dose of DCVC, which led to 100% mortality by 48 h. Mortality was due to rapid progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury, suggesting that newly divided/dividing cells are instrumental in mitigating

  1. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  2. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  3. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

  4. Rearing room affects the non-dominant chicken caecum microbiota, while diet affects the dominant microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eLudvigsen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of environment and diet in shaping the gut microbiota remain largely unknown. This knowledge, however, is important for animal welfare and safe food production. For these reasons we determined the effect of experimental units on the chicken caecum microbiota for a full factorial experiment where we tested the combined effect of room, diet and antimicrobial treatment. By Illumina Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that diet mainly affected the dominant microbiota, while the room as a proxy for environment had major effects on the non-dominant microbiota (p=0.006, Kruskal Wallis test. We therefore propose that the dominant and non-dominant microbiotas are shaped by different experimental units. These findings have implications both for our general understanding of the host-associated microbiota, and for setting up experiments related to specific targeting of pathogens.

  5. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Desta, Semere Tekeste

    2017-01-01

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet Avdeling for helsefag for sykepleiere Tittel: Diabetes type 1 Bakgrunn for val av tema: I 2000 var det ca. 130 000 personer i Norge med diabetes, av disse hadde ca. 20 000 diabetes type 1. I dag er det ca. 230 000 personer som har diabetes i Norge. Av disse ca. 28 000 type 1 diabetes. Tallet viser hvor alvorlig sykdommen er, fordi det har vært og fortsatt er, en økning av antall diabetikere i Norge. Type 1 diabetes kan komme i alle aldersgrupper, men vanligvis...

  6. Maturity onset diabetes of the young : Seek and you will find

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel-Borsboom, H; de Valk, H W; Losekoot, M; Westerink, J

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic, autosomal dominant form of diabetes characterised by mutations in genes resulting in dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells and subsequent insulin production. We present a family with HNF1A-MODY due to a likely pathogenic mutation in HNF1A

  7. Genetic forms of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Jonas; Spiess, Martin; Kopp, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is characterized by polyuria and polydipsia owing to partial or complete deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although in most patients non-hereditary causes underlie the disorder, genetic forms have long been recognized and studied both in vivo and in vitro. In most affected families, the disease is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, whereas autosomal recessive forms are much less frequent. Both phenotypes can be caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP) gene. In transfected cells expressing dominant mutations, the mutated hormone precursor is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it forms fibrillar aggregates. Autopsy studies in humans and a murine knock-in model suggest that the dominant phenotype results from toxicity to vasopressinergic neurons, but the mechanisms leading to cell death remain unclear. Recessive transmission results from AVP with reduced biologic activity or the deletion of the locus. Genetic neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus occurring in the context of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness is termed DIDMOAD or Wolfram syndrome, a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the wolframin (WFS 1) gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brazilian Credit Union Member Groups: Borrower-dominated, Saver-dominated or Neutral Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Gama Fully Bressan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical models concerning Credit Unions (CUs suggest that the type of CU domination determines the way it allocates the monetary value it generates. A borrower- (saver- dominated CU benefits borrower (saver members at the expenses of saver (borrower members, and a neutral CU equally benefits its member groups.This paper applies direct measure of monetary benefits to each member group (Patin & McNiel, 1991a to testfor the existence of dominated behavior in Brazilian CUs, and is the first to apply panel data regressions to identify the determinants of CUs behavior. We use a unique panel data with 40,664 observations taken from 533 CUs affiliated with the largest Brazilian cooperative network. Results indicate Brazilian CUs are dominated by borrowers, but behave close to neutrality. Panel regression estimates show that common or multiple bond type,size and overdue loans of a CU have no effect on its behavior, the greater the total amount of loans over social capital and adjusted equity over total assets are the more likely a CU is borrower dominated, and the greater the age and current operational expenses over total asset of a CU are the more likely a CU is saver dominated.

  9. Forecasting cyanobacteria dominance in Canadian temperate lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Anurani D; Paterson, Andrew M; Dillon, Peter J; Winter, Jennifer G; Palmer, Michelle; Somers, Keith M

    2015-03-15

    Predictive models based on broad scale, spatial surveys typically identify nutrients and climate as the most important predictors of cyanobacteria abundance; however these models generally have low predictive power because at smaller geographic scales numerous other factors may be equally or more important. At the lake level, for example, the ability to forecast cyanobacteria dominance is of tremendous value to lake managers as they can use such models to communicate exposure risks associated with recreational and drinking water use, and possible exposure to algal toxins, in advance of bloom occurrence. We used detailed algal, limnological and meteorological data from two temperate lakes in south-central Ontario, Canada to determine the factors that are closely linked to cyanobacteria dominance, and to develop easy to use models to forecast cyanobacteria biovolume. For Brandy Lake (BL), the strongest and most parsimonious model for forecasting % cyanobacteria biovolume (% CB) included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP, and % cyanobacteria biovolume two weeks prior. For Three Mile Lake (TML), the best model for forecasting % CB included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP concentration, and 7-d mean wind speed. The models for forecasting % CB in BL and TML are fundamentally different in their lag periods (BL = lag 1 model and TML = lag 2 model) and in some predictor variables despite the close proximity of the study lakes. We speculate that three main factors (nutrient concentrations, water transparency and lake morphometry) may have contributed to differences in the models developed, and may account for variation observed in models derived from large spatial surveys. Our results illustrate that while forecast models can be developed to determine when cyanobacteria will dominate within two temperate lakes, the models require detailed, lake-specific calibration to be effective as risk-management tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-domination and democratic legitimacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2015-01-01

    While many regard equality as the moral foundation of democracy, republican theory grounds democracy in freedom as non-domination. The grounding of democracy in freedom has been criticized for relying on either an Aristotelian perfectionism or a Rousseauian equation of the people...... in their collective capacity and the people understood severally. The republican theory of freedom and democracy has the resources to meet these criticisms. But the most systematic elaboration of republicanism, that of Philip Pettit, achieves this by turning the relationship between freedom and democracy...

  11. Is the Coma cluster binary dominated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The, L.S.; White, S.D.M.

    1990-01-01

    It is investigated whether the model of an expanding cluster dominated by a massive binary galaxy, first suggested by Valtonen and Byrd (1979), is consistent with optical data on the surface density and velocity dispersion of the Coma cluster. The evolution of this model is simulated for a wide variety of initial conditions. It is found that galaxy counts in the model can be made to agree with observation, but that the observed velocity dispersion profile cannot be reproduced. A number of other arguments suggest that the central galaxies in Coma cannot be as massive as required by the model. This model is not a viable representation of the Coma cluster. 25 refs

  12. Autosomal dominant craniometaphyseal dysplasia with atypical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D R; Fialkov, J A

    2002-03-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare genetic disorder of bone modelling characterised by hyperostosis and sclerosis of the craniofacial bones, and abnormal modelling of the metaphyses. Clinically, autosomal dominant (AD) CMD is characterised by facial distortion and cranial-nerve compression. The goals of surgical treatment for AD CMD are cosmetic recontouring of the sclerotic craniofacial bones, correction of nasal obstruction and correction or prevention of neurological manifestations. We describe the successful correction of AD CMD craniofacial manifestations in an individual with atypical findings, and outline an approach for correcting the craniofacial deformities associated with this rare disorder. Copyright 2002 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  13. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0.70 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{ext.} = 1.70). Some discussions are also presented.

  14. Dominant Capital and the New Wars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimshon Bichler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent shift from ‘global villageism’ to the ‘new wars’ revealed a deep crisis in heterodox political economy. The popular belief in neoliberal globalization, peace dividends, fiscal conservatism and sound finance that dominated the 1980s and 1990s suddenly collapsed. The early 2000s brought rising xenophobia, growing military budgets and policy profligacy. Radicals were the first to identify this transition, but their attempts to explain it have been bogged down by two major hurdles: (1 most writers continue to apply nineteenth century theories and concepts to twenty-first century realities; and (2 few seem to bother with empirical analysis. This paper offers a radical alternative that is both theoretically new and empirically grounded. We use the ‘new wars’ as a stepping stone to understand a triple transformation that altered the nature of capital, the accumulation of capital and the unit of capital. Specifically, our argument builds on a power understanding of capital that emphasizes differential accumulation by dominant capital groups. Accumulation, we argue, has little to do with the amassment of material things measured in ‘utils’ or ‘abstract labor.’ Instead, accumu-lation, or ‘capitalization,’ represents a commodification of power by leading groups in society. Over the past century, this power has been restructured and concentrated through two distinct regimes of differential accumulation—‘breadth’ and ‘depth.’ A breadth regime relies on proletarianization, on green-field investment and, particularly, on mergers and acquisitions. A depth regime builds on redistribution through stagflation—that is, on differential inflation in the midst of stagnation. In contrast to breadth which presupposes some measure of growth and stability, depth thrives on ‘accumulation through crisis.’ The past twenty years were dominated by breadth, buttressed by neoliberal rhetoric, globalization and capital mobility. This regime started

  15. When does "economic man" dominate social behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerer, Colin F; Fehr, Ernst

    2006-01-06

    The canonical model in economics considers people to be rational and self-regarding. However, much evidence challenges this view, raising the question of when "Economic Man" dominates the outcome of social interactions, and when bounded rationality or other-regarding preferences dominate. Here we show that strategic incentives are the key to answering this question. A minority of self-regarding individuals can trigger a "noncooperative" aggregate outcome if their behavior generates incentives for the majority of other-regarding individuals to mimic the minority's behavior. Likewise, a minority of other-regarding individuals can generate a "cooperative" aggregate outcome if their behavior generates incentives for a majority of self-regarding people to behave cooperatively. Similarly, in strategic games, aggregate outcomes can be either far from or close to Nash equilibrium if players with high degrees of strategic thinking mimic or erase the effects of others who do very little strategic thinking. Recently developed theories of other-regarding preferences and bounded rationality explain these findings and provide better predictions of actual aggregate behavior than does traditional economic theory.

  16. Abelian dominance in Einstein’s theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y M; Oh, S H; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    We conjecture the Abelian dominance in Einstein’s theory, that is, the Abelian part of the theory plays the central role in the dynamics. Treating Einstein’s theory as a gauge theory of the Lorentz group, we show that Einstein’s theory can be decomposed into the restricted part made up of the restricted connection which has the full Lorentz gauge invariance and the valence part made up of the valence connection which plays the role of gravitational source of the restricted gravity. In this decomposition, the role of the metric g μν is replaced by a four-index metric tensor g μν which transforms covariantly under the Lorentz group, and the metric-compatibility condition ∇ α g μν = 0 of the connection is replaced by the gauge and generally covariant condition D μ g μν = 0. We show that there are two different Abelian decompositions, the light-like (or null) decomposition and the non-light-like (or non-null) decomposition, because the Lorentz group has two maximal Abelian subgroups. The decomposition shows the existence of the restricted gravity which has the full general invariance but is much simpler than Einstein’s theory. Moreover, it tells us that the restricted gravity can be written as an Abelian gauge theory, which implies that the graviton can be described by a massless spin-1 field. This establishes the Abelian dominance in Einstein’s theory. (paper)

  17. Cyclic dominance in evolutionary games: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Mobilia, Mauro; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Rucklidge, Alastair M.; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Rock is wrapped by paper, paper is cut by scissors and scissors are crushed by rock. This simple game is popular among children and adults to decide on trivial disputes that have no obvious winner, but cyclic dominance is also at the heart of predator–prey interactions, the mating strategy of side-blotched lizards, the overgrowth of marine sessile organisms and competition in microbial populations. Cyclical interactions also emerge spontaneously in evolutionary games entailing volunteering, reward, punishment, and in fact are common when the competing strategies are three or more, regardless of the particularities of the game. Here, we review recent advances on the rock–paper–scissors (RPS) and related evolutionary games, focusing, in particular, on pattern formation, the impact of mobility and the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance. We also review mean-field and zero-dimensional RPS models and the application of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation, and we highlight the importance and usefulness of statistical physics for the successful study of large-scale ecological systems. Directions for future research, related, for example, to dynamical effects of coevolutionary rules and invasion reversals owing to multi-point interactions, are also outlined. PMID:25232048

  18. Autosomal Dominant Growth Hormone Deficiency (Type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Kular, Dalvir; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-06-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is the commonest pituitary hormone deficiency resulting from congenital or acquired causes, although for most patients its etiology remains unknown. Among the known factors, heterozygous mutations in the growth hormone gene (GH1) lead to the autosomal dominant form of GHD, also known as type II GHD. In many cohorts this is the commonest form of congenital isolated GHD and is mainly caused by mutations that affect the correct splicing of GH-1. These mutations cause skipping of the third exon and lead to the production of a 17.5-kDa GH isoform that exerts a dominant negative effect on the secretion of the wild type GH. The identification of these mutations has clinical implications for the management of patients, as there is a well-documented correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the increased expression of the 17.5-kDa isoform. Patients with type II GHD have a variable height deficit and severity of GHD and may develop additional pituitary hormone defiencies over time, including ACTH, TSH and gonadotropin deficiencies. Therefore, their lifelong follow-up is recommended. Detailed studies on the effect of heterozygous GH1 mutations on the trafficking, secretion and action of growth hormone can elucidate their mechanism on a cellular level and may influence future treatment options for GHD type II.

  19. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  1. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to ...

  3. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology .... the importance of seeking medical attention immediately.

  4. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If the urine test is positive, contact your child's diabetes health care team. Tests done by a lab ... and to learn how to help bring your child's diabetes back under control. Reviewed by: Mauri Carakushansky, MD ...

  5. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch and learn helpful tips about managing your diabetes medicines. Veal el video en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. Follow Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can ...

  7. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  8. Diabetes and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 21. Read More Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE ...

  9. Renal protection in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of diabetes and hypertension increases the chances of progressive renal disorder and, ultimately, renal failure. Roughly 40% of all diabetics, whether insulin-dependent or not, develop diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end...... function in diabetic patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy. There are still no long-term trials using the new long-acting dihydropyridine calcium antagonists to treat patients with incipient nephropathy. A recent, 1-year, randomized, double-blind study in hypertensive insulin-dependent diabetic...... identical in both treatment groups, at 103 (SD 9) and 101 (SD 11) mmHg, respectively. Furthermore, a recent 5-year randomized open study in hypertensive non-insulin-dependent patients with diabetic nephropathy has revealed the same beneficial effect of a calcium antagonist and of ACE inhibition...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a serious illness that affects over 29 million people in the United States. Watch and learn helpful ... help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, ... Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women Other FDA Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people ... back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases ...

  13. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  14. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  15. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ...

  16. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammati...

  17. The diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the princ...

  18. [MODY type diabetes: overview and recent findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khelifa, Souhaïra; Barboura, Ilhem; Dandana, Azza; Ferchichi, Selima; Miled, Abdelhedi

    2011-01-01

    We present an update of knowledge on diabetes MODY (maturity onset diabetes of the young), including the recent molecular discoveries, and new diagnostic strategies. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the different molecular abnormalities that cause MODY and the phenotypic consequences resulting therefrom. MODY diabetes is very heterogeneous and is the most common form of monogenic diabetes. Its distribution is worldwide. MODY is an autosomal dominant diabetes mellitus, nonketotic and occurs at an early age (usually before 25 years). To date, at least seven genes are associated with MODY, with frequencies that differ from one population to another. Both 2 and 3 subtypes predominate, while other subtypes (1, 4, 5, 6 and 7) concern only a few families. Since its discovery in the sixties, studies have succeeded to fully clarify the epidemiological, molecular and clinical diagnosis of each subtype, to provide better care for patients. However, the subject of MODY has not yet revealed all its secrets. Indeed, it remains to identify other genes that are associated with MODY X.

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to ...

  20. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  1. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a ...

  2. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affiliates JDRF Celebrity Ambassadors JDRF Logo Usage Contact Us Donate Events More Type 1 Diabetes Facts Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune ... about Insulin and T1D Learn More What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing ... US CAREERS NEWSROOM FOR RESEARCHERS © JDRF 2018 • Privacy Policy • ...

  3. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  4. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign-up for a ... to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical ...

  6. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Diabetes Movie KidsHealth / For Parents / Diabetes Movie Print Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from ...

  7. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  8. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  9. On a conjecture about inverse domination in graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frendrup, Allan; Henning, Michael A.; Randerath, Bert

    Let G = (V,E) be a graph with no isolated vertex. A classical observation in domination theory is that if D is a minimum dominating set of G, then V \\D is also a dominating set of G. A set D′ is an inverse dominating set of G if D′ is a dominating set of G and D′ ⊆ V \\D for some minimum dominatin...

  10. Dominantly inherited isolated hyperparathyroidism: a syndromic association?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, K.; Czerminska-Kowalska, A.; Kulczycka, H.; Rowinska, E.; Pronicka, E.

    1999-01-01

    Dominantly inherited isolated hyperparathyroidism (DIIH) is rare in childhood. It may be the first biochemical abnormality in the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I) and type II (MEN II) syndromes. Its clinical course is usually asymptomatic or of low morbidity. Radiographic examination is most often normal. We describe six members of a family with distinctive phenotype and DIIH. Limited systemic symptoms and severe radiographic osteitis fibrosa cystica were further unusual features in this family. The diagnosis of DIIH was made only after a 9-year-old girl developed hypercalcaemic crisis after a pathological femoral fracture. Distinctive phenotype, unusual clinical course and unparalleled radiographic changes suggest a not yet described syndromic association. (orig.)

  11. Changing the Dominant Paradigm in Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Mollo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the discussion proposed by the World Academy of Art & Science (WAAS about the need to build a new paradigm to confront the challenges of the global society and to move across to a New Society discussing specific problems related to economic globalization and proposing changes. The ways in which economic orthodoxy and heterodoxy analyze the role of the State and the question of sustainability of development and the problems of environmental sustainability depend on their different views or theoretical arguments about the role of the market. The article contrasts the mainstream economics arguments to support the free market context of globalization with Post-Keynesian and Marxist’s skeptical or critical views. Finally, it proposes some strategies to face the critical aspects analyzed making suggestions to move to another dominant economic paradigm.

  12. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

  13. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of eye movements during classic visual cognitive tasks. The results reveal interaction-dominant dynamics in eye movements in each of the three tasks, and that fine-grained eye movements are modulated by task constraints. These findings reveal the interactive nature of cognitive processing and are consistent with theories that view cognition as an emergent property of processes that are broadly distributed over many scales of space and time rather than a componential assembly line. PMID:20070957

  14. ARCO Chairman forecasts end of oil dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The head of one of the world's biggest oil companies said in February that the era of oil dominating the global energy market is creaking to a close. Future energy needs will be met by a mix of fuels that are less harmful to the environment, he said, and he called for the energy and automobile industries to collaborate on solutions to reduce emissions.“We've embarked on the beginning of the last days of the age of oil,” ARCO Chairman Mike Bowlin said at a Cambridge Energy Research Associates conference in Houston, Texas, where he also described how ARCO is moving toward a new energy model. “Our challenge is not merely to survive today's low prices, but to plan for a future in which hydrocarbons are just one of a wide variety of clean fuels that will build the global economy of the 21st century”.

  15. Price volatility in wind dominant electricity markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farashbashi-Astaneh, Seyed-Mostafa; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    High penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources causes price volatility in future electricity markets. This is specially the case in European countries that plan high penetration levels. This highlights the necessity for revising market regulations and mechanisms in accordance...... to generation combination portfolio. Proposed solutions should be able to tackle with emerging challenges which are mainly due to high variability and unpredictability of intermittent renewable resources. In this paper high price volatility will be introduced as an emerging challenge in wind dominant...... electricity markets. High price volatility is unappreciated because it imposes high financial risk levels to both electricity consumers and producers. Additionally high price variations impede tracking price signals by consumers in future smart grid and jeopardize implementation of demand response concepts...

  16. Radiation damping in focusing-dominated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    A quasi-classical method is developed to calculate the radiation damping of a relativistic particle in a straight, continuous focusing system. In one limiting case where the pitch angle of the particle θ p is much larger than the radiation opening angle 1/γ, the radiation power spectrum is similar to synchrotron radiation and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is proportional to the relative energy loss rate. In the other limiting case where θ p much-lt 1/γ, the radiation is dipole in nature and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is energy-independent and is much faster than the relative energy rate. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing channel. These results can be extended to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field

  17. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  18. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K.; Nielsen, J.E.; Fallentin, E.

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus...... callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a "corpus-callosum index" expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord...... at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and "corpus-callosum index" than controls. This finding, not reported previously...

  19. ["Animal hypnosis" and defensive dominant, behavioral aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlygina, R A; Galashina, A G; Bogdanov, A V

    2002-01-01

    A stationary excitation focus produced in the sensorimotor cortex of a rabbit by rhythmic electrodermal paw stimulation was manifested in the reaction to a testing sound stimulus earlier indifferent for the animal. Regardless of the stimulated paw (left or right), reactions to the testing stimuli appeared approximately in the equal percent of cases (70.7% and 71.5%, respectively). After a single-trial induction of the "animal hypnosis" state, it was difficult to produce the dominant focus by simulation of the left paw, whereas the results of the right-paw stimulation did not differ from those obtained during control stimulation. Consequently, the influence of hypnosis on defensive stationary excitation foci in different hemispheres was not the same.

  20. Reading in Colette: Domination, Resistance, Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel Cummins

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The act of reading on the part of Colette's characters reveals itself as a dynamic involving domination and resistance. A study of passages from two of her semi-autobiographical works, La Maison de Claudine and Sido , brings to light both a positively connoted model of reading, exemplified by the character 'Colette,' and a negatively connoted model, exemplified by the older sister Juliette. While Juliette approaches texts with no sense of self, and seeks instead to be defined by the texts she reads, 'Colette' remains in relation to texts and to the discourses they contain, and resists them. Gender complicates the process. Both father and mother intervene in 'Colette's' apprenticeship as reader. While the censorship that constitutes the father's intervention proves both debilitating and disempowering, the mother's modeling of reading as dialogue and resistance empowers 'Colette,' both as a reader and a female being.

  1. The right brain is dominant in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schore, Allan N

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses how recent studies of the right brain, which is dominant for the implicit, nonverbal, intuitive, holistic processing of emotional information and social interactions, can elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the relational foundations of psychotherapy. Utilizing the interpersonal neurobiological perspective of regulation theory, I describe the fundamental role of the early developing right brain in relational processes, throughout the life span. I present interdisciplinary evidence documenting right brain functions in early attachment processes, in emotional communications within the therapeutic alliance, in mutual therapeutic enactments, and in therapeutic change processes. This work highlights the fact that the current emphasis on relational processes is shared by, cross-fertilizing, and indeed transforming both psychology and neuroscience, with important consequences for clinical psychological models of psychotherapeutic change. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Year in diabetes 2012: The diabetes tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, R; Jastreboff, A M

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of β-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new β-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path.

  3. On the domination and signed domination numbers of zero-divisor graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Vatandoost

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Let $R$ be a commutative ring (with 1 and let $Z(R$ be its set of zero-divisors. The zero-divisor graph $\\Gamma(R$ has vertex set $Z^*(R=Z(R \\setminus \\lbrace0 \\rbrace$ and for distinct $x,y \\in Z^*(R$, the vertices $x$ and $y$ are adjacent if and only if $xy=0$. In this paper, we consider the domination number and signed domination number on zero-divisor graph $\\Gamma(R$ of commutative ring $R$ such that for every $0 \

  4. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly refined diet that contains too few micronutrients has been recognized as the dominant factor in the rising incidence of diabetes and other insulin related conditions. Among the missing micronutrients, chromium has the greatest impact on insulin response. The objective of this study was to determine serum chromium ...

  5. Diabetes and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Schneider, S H

    1981-01-01

    This review describes (1) the metabolic and hormonal response to exercise in normal and diabetic man, and (2) the potential benefits of physical training in diabetes. Whereas in normal man plasma glucose varies little during exercise, the insulin-dependent diabetic subject may experience...... its site of injection. The response to exercise of noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and of diabetic subjects with autonomic neuropathy is also described. Physical training improves glucose tolerance in some noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and in insulin-dependent patients, it may diminish...... insulin requirements. It may also have a role in retarding the development of cardiovascular complications. Physical training is not totally innocuous, however, and in many patients with diabetes special precautions are required....

  6. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9 am to 4 pm at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 2 pm until 4 pm. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  7. 2D:4D in Men Is Related to Aggressive Dominance but Not to Sociable Dominance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, L.; Almela, M.; Buunk, A.P.; Dubbs, S.; Salvador, A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that a smaller ratio between the length of the second and fourth digit (2D:4D) is an indicator of the exposure to prenatal testosterone (T). This study measured the 2D:4D of men and assessed dominance as a personality trait to investigate indirectly if the exposure to prenatal T is

  8. 2D : 4D in Men Is Related to Aggressive Dominance but Not to Sociable Dominance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; Buunk, Abraham P.; Dubbs, Shelli; Salvador, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that a smaller ratio between the length of the second and fourth digit (2D:4D) is an indicator of the exposure to prenatal testosterone (T). This study measured the 2D:4D of men and assessed dominance as a personality trait to investigate indirectly if the exposure to prenatal T is

  9. On the Informativeness of Dominant and Co-Dominant Genetic Markers for Bayesian Supervised Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles; Carpentier-Skandalis, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    We study the accuracy of a Bayesian supervised method used to cluster individuals into genetically homogeneous groups on the basis of dominant or codominant molecular markers. We provide a formula relating an error criterion to the number of loci used and the number of clusters. This formula...

  10. Growth dominates choice in network percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Vikram S.; Noël, Pierre-André; Waagen, Alex; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2013-09-01

    The onset of large-scale connectivity in a network (i.e., percolation) often has a major impact on the function of the system. Traditionally, graph percolation is analyzed by adding edges to a fixed set of initially isolated nodes. Several years ago, it was shown that adding nodes as well as edges to the graph can yield an infinite order transition, which is much smoother than the traditional second-order transition. More recently, it was shown that adding edges via a competitive process to a fixed set of initially isolated nodes can lead to a delayed, extremely abrupt percolation transition with a significant jump in large but finite systems. Here we analyze a process that combines both node arrival and edge competition. If started from a small collection of seed nodes, we show that the impact of node arrival dominates: although we can significantly delay percolation, the transition is of infinite order. Thus, node arrival can mitigate the trade-off between delay and abruptness that is characteristic of explosive percolation transitions. This realization may inspire new design rules where network growth can temper the effects of delay, creating opportunities for network intervention and control.

  11. Wildfires in northern Siberian larch dominated communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I; Dvinskaya, Maria L; Im, Sergey T; Ranson, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    The fire history of the northern larch forests within the permafrost zone in a portion of northern Siberia (∼66°N, 100°E) was studied. Since there is little to no human activity in this area, fires within the study area were mostly caused by lightning. Fire return intervals (FRI) were estimated on the basis of burn marks on tree stems and dates of tree natality. FRI values varied from 130 to 350 yr with a 200 ± 50 yr mean. For southerly larch dominated communities, FRI was found to be shorter (77 ± 20 yr at ∼ 61°N, and 82 ± 7 at 64°N), and it was longer at the northern boundary (∼71°) of larch stands (320 ± 50 yr). During the Little Ice Age period in the 16th–18th centuries, FRI was approximately twice as long those as recorded in this study. Fire caused changes in the soil including increases in soil drainage and permafrost thawing depth, and a radial growth increase to about twice the background value (with more than six times observed in extreme cases). This effect may simulate the predicted warming impact on the larch growth in the permafrost zone.

  12. ASYMPTOTIC STRUCTURE OF POYNTING-DOMINATED JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    In relativistic, Poynting-dominated outflows, acceleration and collimation are intimately connected. An important point is that the Lorentz force is nearly compensated by the electric force; therefore the acceleration zone spans a large range of scales. We derived the asymptotic equations describing relativistic, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic flows far beyond the light cylinder. These equations do not contain either intrinsic small scales (like the light cylinder radius) or terms that nearly cancel each other (like the electric and magnetic forces); therefore they could be easily solved numerically. They also suit well for qualitative analysis of the flow and, in many cases, they could even be solved analytically or semianalytically. We show that there are generally two collimation regimes. In the first regime, the residual of the hoop stress and the electric force is counterbalanced by the pressure of the poloidal magnetic field so that, at any distance from the source, the structure of the flow is the same as the structure of an appropriate cylindrical equilibrium configuration. In the second regime, the pressure of the poloidal magnetic field is negligibly small so that the flow could be conceived as composed from coaxial magnetic loops. In the two collimation regimes, the flow is accelerated in different ways. We study in detail the structure of jets confined by the external pressure with a power-law profile. In particular, we obtained simple scalings for the extent of the acceleration zone, for the terminal Lorentz factor, and for the collimation angle.

  13. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M.; Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K.

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ''corpus-callosum index'' expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ''corpus-callosum index'' than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs

  14. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M. [Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegaard alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre (Denmark); Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K. [Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Section of Neurogenetics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ``corpus-callosum index`` expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ``corpus-callosum index`` than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Terrestrial water fluxes dominated by transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasechko, Scott; Sharp, Zachary D; Gibson, John J; Birks, S Jean; Yi, Yi; Fawcett, Peter J

    2013-04-18

    Renewable fresh water over continents has input from precipitation and losses to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. Global-scale estimates of transpiration from climate models are poorly constrained owing to large uncertainties in stomatal conductance and the lack of catchment-scale measurements required for model calibration, resulting in a range of predictions spanning 20 to 65 per cent of total terrestrial evapotranspiration (14,000 to 41,000 km(3) per year) (refs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Here we use the distinct isotope effects of transpiration and evaporation to show that transpiration is by far the largest water flux from Earth's continents, representing 80 to 90 per cent of terrestrial evapotranspiration. On the basis of our analysis of a global data set of large lakes and rivers, we conclude that transpiration recycles 62,000 ± 8,000 km(3) of water per year to the atmosphere, using half of all solar energy absorbed by land surfaces in the process. We also calculate CO2 uptake by terrestrial vegetation by connecting transpiration losses to carbon assimilation using water-use efficiency ratios of plants, and show the global gross primary productivity to be 129 ± 32 gigatonnes of carbon per year, which agrees, within the uncertainty, with previous estimates. The dominance of transpiration water fluxes in continental evapotranspiration suggests that, from the point of view of water resource forecasting, climate model development should prioritize improvements in simulations of biological fluxes rather than physical (evaporation) fluxes.

  16. Is there any relationship between right and left hand dominance and right and left nasal airflow dominance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A; Eccles, R

    2017-10-01

    Left- or right-handedness is a common human trait, and it has been previously reported that human nasal airflow dominance correlates with hand dominance. Any relationship between hand dominance and nasal airflow dominance would be unusual. This study aimed to measure nasal airflow and look for any relationship to handedness. The modified Glatzel mirror was used to record the dominant nasal passage at 15-minute intervals over a 6-hour period in 29 healthy participants consisting of 15 left-handers and 14 right-handers. In left-handers, the percentage of time that the left nasal passage was dominant ranged from 0 to 100 per cent. In right-handers, the percentage of time that the right nasal passage was dominant ranged from 4.2 to 95.8 per cent. No correlation between nasal airflow dominance and hand dominance was identified. The results do not support the hypothesis that nasal airflow and handedness are related.

  17. Diabetes and dementia links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jankowska

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is growing globally. It is expected to observe 253.4 million sufferers in geriatric population in 2045. In this time, also 131.5 million of people is going to have dementia and other cognitive problems. In people aged over 65 these two diseases are concomitant quite often. What are the connections in the area of etiology and treatment? Aim The purpose of this study is to present links between dementia and diabetes are depicted in professional literature. Results Diabetes and dementia are associated on many levels. These conditions have common risk factors. Diabetes may contribute to cognitive impairment in many ways, promoting development of atherosclerosis, brain vessel damage and vascular dementia. Alzheimer disease may be promoted by hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. On contrary also hypoglycaemia, often met in elderly diabetic patients has negative impact on cognitive function. Dementia seriously affects treatment of diabetes. The main problems are not satisfying adherence and diabetes self-management. Conclusions Prevention of diabetes and dementia risk factors can be performed simultaneously as the are common for both diseases. Enhancing physical activity, reducing saturated fats consumption, levels of cholesterol and body mass are considered to be beneficial in the context of described conditions. Furthermore, treatment of diabetes is strongly affected by cognitive dysfunction. Management of dementive diabetics requires individualization and using long-acting drugs. It is crucial to reduce risk of life-threatening hypoglycaemias and to create wide team to take care of these patients.

  18. T cells to a dominant epitope of GAD65 express a public CDR3 motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Anthony; McInerney, Marcia; Huffman, Donald; McInerney, Brigid; Mayo, Stella; Haskins, Kathryn; Sercarz, Eli

    2006-06-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, and serve as a model for type 1 diabetes (T1D) and natural autoimmunity. T cell responses to the pancreatic islet antigen glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) can be detected in the spleens of young prediabetic NOD mice, which display a unique MHC class II molecule. Here, we report that a distinct TcR beta chain and CDR3 motif are utilized by all NOD mice in response to a dominant determinant on GAD65, establishing a public repertoire in the spontaneous autoimmunity to an important islet cell antigen. GAD65 530-543 (p530)-reactive T cells preferentially utilize the Vbeta4, Dbeta2.1 and Jbeta2.7 gene segments, with a CDR3 that is characterized by a triad of amino acids, DWG, preceded by a polar residue. In addition, we used CDR3 length spectratyping, CDR3-specific reverse transcriptase-PCR and direct TcR sequencing to show that the TcR beta chain structural patterns associated with p530-specific T cells consistently appeared in the islets of young NOD mice with insulitis, but not in the inflamed islets of streptozotocin-treated C57BL/6 mice, or in inflamed NOD salivary glands. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that a public T cell repertoire is used in spontaneous autoimmunity to a dominant self-determinant. These findings suggest that defined clonotypes and repertoires may be preferentially selected in haplotypes predisposed to spontaneous autoimmunity.

  19. Diabetes Mellitus in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Peru is an upper medium-income developing country with an increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, including diabetes. To review and describe the epidemiology, drivers, and diabetes care plan in Peru. The medical literature was reviewed based on systematic searching of PubMed, Scielo, and various gray literature from the International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organization, and local Peruvian agencies. In Peru, diabetes affects 7% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 96.8% of outpatients visits with this condition. Type 1 diabetes has an incidence of 0.4/100,000 per year, and gestational diabetes affects 16% of pregnancies. The prevalence of glucose intolerance is 8.11% and that of impaired fasting glucose 22.4%. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adults is 34.7%, 17.5%, and 25%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is greater in women and the elderly and at urban and low-altitude locations. Diabetes is the eighth cause of death, the sixth cause of blindness, and the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease and nontraumatic lower limb amputation. In Peru, diabetes accounts for 31.5% of acute myocardial infarctions and 25% of strokes. Infections, diabetic emergencies, and cardiovascular disorders are the main causes for admissions, with a mortality rate Diabetes is a major health care issue in Peru that exposes difficult challenges and shortcomings. The national strategy for tackling diabetes includes promotion of healthy lifestyles; training primary care physicians and providing them with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, safe and effective medications, and tools for monitoring treatment; and, finally, construction of a comprehensive health care network for early referral in order to prevent, detect, and treat diabetic complications. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional relationship between dominant and non-dominant hand in motor task - hand grip strength endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kljajić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the functional relationship between dominant and non-dominant hand in the strength endurance motor task - hand grip, in the referent population of healthy and young persons. For the purpose of the research we have implemented the method of isometric dynamometry and standardized hand grip test. The study included 48 participants, 23 of them being of female and 25 of male gender. The analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to determine the difference between the sets of variables in the function of gender and functional dimorphism, while the Bonferroni criterion was applied to determine the differences between pairs of individual variables. The difference between the maximum hand grip of dominant and non-dominant hand in female participants amounted to 9.28%, and in male ones 7.39% in favor of the dominant hand. There is no statistically significant difference between nondominant and dominant hand regarding the force endurance time aspect at 30%, 50% and 80% out of the maximum hand grip level, as well as at the absolute and relative force impulse indicators as an endurance measure. The value of gender dimorphism in relation to the absolute indicators of force momentum at 30%, 50% and 80% out of the maximum hand grip level in female participants is 0.9714, 0.9145, 0.9301, and in male participants 0.9515, 0.8264 and 0.8606. The force momentum indicators value at 30%, 50% and 80% out of the maximum hand grip level in female participants is ImpF30%=21167.58±6923.67 Ns, ImpF50%=10846.94±3800.56 Ns and ImpF80%=5438.46±1993.12 Ns, and in male participants ImpF30%=17734.03±6881.92 Ns, ImpF50%=13903.61±3437.76 Ns and ImpF80%=5117.53±1894.78 Ns. The obtained results can be used as the criteria for further research in special education and rehabilitation, medical and professional rehabilitation.