WorldWideScience

Sample records for domain interface interacts

  1. A protein domain interaction interface database: InterPare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jungsul

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most proteins function by interacting with other molecules. Their interaction interfaces are highly conserved throughout evolution to avoid undesirable interactions that lead to fatal disorders in cells. Rational drug discovery includes computational methods to identify the interaction sites of lead compounds to the target molecules. Identifying and classifying protein interaction interfaces on a large scale can help researchers discover drug targets more efficiently. Description We introduce a large-scale protein domain interaction interface database called InterPare http://interpare.net. It contains both inter-chain (between chains interfaces and intra-chain (within chain interfaces. InterPare uses three methods to detect interfaces: 1 the geometric distance method for checking the distance between atoms that belong to different domains, 2 Accessible Surface Area (ASA, a method for detecting the buried region of a protein that is detached from a solvent when forming multimers or complexes, and 3 the Voronoi diagram, a computational geometry method that uses a mathematical definition of interface regions. InterPare includes visualization tools to display protein interior, surface, and interaction interfaces. It also provides statistics such as the amino acid propensities of queried protein according to its interior, surface, and interface region. The atom coordinates that belong to interface, surface, and interior regions can be downloaded from the website. Conclusion InterPare is an open and public database server for protein interaction interface information. It contains the large-scale interface data for proteins whose 3D-structures are known. As of November 2004, there were 10,583 (Geometric distance, 10,431 (ASA, and 11,010 (Voronoi diagram entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB containing interfaces, according to the above three methods. In the case of the geometric distance method, there are 31,620 inter-chain domain-domain

  2. Structures of the Sgt2/SGTA Dimerization Domain with the Get5/UBL4A UBL Domain Reveal an Interaction that Forms a Conserved Dynamic Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Chartron

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the cytoplasm, the correct delivery of membrane proteins is an essential and highly regulated process. The posttranslational targeting of the important tail-anchor membrane (TA proteins has recently been under intense investigation. A specialized pathway, called the guided entry of TA proteins (GET pathway in yeast and the transmembrane domain recognition complex (TRC pathway in vertebrates, recognizes endoplasmic-reticulum-targeted TA proteins and delivers them through a complex series of handoffs. An early step is the formation of a complex between Sgt2/SGTA, a cochaperone with a presumed ubiquitin-like-binding domain (UBD, and Get5/UBL4A, a ubiquitin-like domain (UBL-containing protein. We structurally characterize this UBD/UBL interaction for both yeast and human proteins. This characterization is supported by biophysical studies that demonstrate that complex formation is mediated by electrostatics, generating an interface that has high-affinity with rapid kinetics. In total, this work provides a refined model of the interplay of Sgt2 homologs in TA targeting.

  3. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  4. Crystal structures of a CTXphi pIII domain unbound and in complex with a Vibrio cholerae TolA domain reveal novel interaction interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Christopher G; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Phan, Hanh T H; Waldor, Matthew K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Craig, Lisa

    2012-10-19

    Vibrio cholerae colonize the small intestine where they secrete cholera toxin, an ADP-ribosylating enzyme that is responsible for the voluminous diarrhea characteristic of cholera disease. The genes encoding cholera toxin are located on the genome of the filamentous bacteriophage, CTXϕ, that integrates as a prophage into the V. cholerae chromosome. CTXϕ infection of V. cholerae requires the toxin-coregulated pilus and the periplasmic protein TolA. This infection process parallels that of Escherichia coli infection by the Ff family of filamentous coliphage. Here we demonstrate a direct interaction between the N-terminal domain of the CTXϕ minor coat protein pIII (pIII-N1) and the C-terminal domain of TolA (TolA-C) and present x-ray crystal structures of pIII-N1 alone and in complex with TolA-C. The structures of CTXϕ pIII-N1 and V. cholerae TolA-C are similar to coliphage pIII-N1 and E. coli TolA-C, respectively, yet these proteins bind via a distinct interface that in E. coli TolA corresponds to a colicin binding site. Our data suggest that the TolA binding site on pIII-N1 of CTXϕ is accessible in the native pIII protein. This contrasts with the Ff family phage, where the TolA binding site on pIII is blocked and requires a pilus-induced unfolding event to become exposed. We propose that CTXϕ pIII accesses the periplasmic TolA through retraction of toxin-coregulated pilus, which brings the phage through the outer membrane pilus secretin channel. These data help to explain the process by which CTXϕ converts a harmless marine microbe into a deadly human pathogen.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of multi-interface domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    Full Text Available A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8% of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain.

  6. An English language interface for constrained domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    The Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) Jargon Interpreter (MJI) demonstrates an English language interface for a constrained domain. A constrained domain is defined as one with a small and well delineated set of actions and objects. The set of actions chosen for the MJI is from the domain of MSOCC Applications Executive (MAE) Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) directives and contains directives for signing a cathode ray tube (CRT) on or off, calling up or clearing a display page, starting or stopping a procedure, and controlling history recording. The set of objects chosen consists of CRTs, display pages, STOL procedures, and history files. Translation from English sentences to STOL directives is done in two phases. In the first phase, an augmented transition net (ATN) parser and dictionary are used for determining grammatically correct parsings of input sentences. In the second phase, grammatically typed sentences are submitted to a forward-chaining rule-based system for interpretation and translation into equivalent MAE STOL directives. Tests of the MJI show that it is able to translate individual clearly stated sentences into the subset of directives selected for the prototype. This approach to an English language interface may be used for similarly constrained situations by modifying the MJI's dictionary and rules to reflect the change of domain.

  7. Interface Metaphors for Interactive Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasper, Robert J.; Blaha, Leslie M.

    2017-07-14

    To promote more interactive and dynamic machine learn- ing, we revisit the notion of user-interface metaphors. User-interface metaphors provide intuitive constructs for supporting user needs through interface design elements. A user-interface metaphor provides a visual or action pattern that leverages a user’s knowledge of another domain. Metaphors suggest both the visual representations that should be used in a display as well as the interactions that should be afforded to the user. We argue that user-interface metaphors can also offer a method of extracting interaction-based user feedback for use in machine learning. Metaphors offer indirect, context-based information that can be used in addition to explicit user inputs, such as user-provided labels. Implicit information from user interactions with metaphors can augment explicit user input for active learning paradigms. Or it might be leveraged in systems where explicit user inputs are more challenging to obtain. Each interaction with the metaphor provides an opportunity to gather data and learn. We argue this approach is especially important in streaming applications, where we desire machine learning systems that can adapt to dynamic, changing data.

  8. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  9. DIMA 3.0: Domain Interaction Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qibin; Pagel, Philipp; Vilne, Baiba; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2011-01-01

    Domain Interaction MAp (DIMA, available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/dima) is a database of predicted and known interactions between protein domains. It integrates 5807 structurally known interactions imported from the iPfam and 3did databases and 46,900 domain interactions predicted by four computational methods: domain phylogenetic profiling, domain pair exclusion algorithm correlated mutations and domain interaction prediction in a discriminative way. Additionally predictions are filtered to exclude those domain pairs that are reported as non-interacting by the Negatome database. The DIMA Web site allows to calculate domain interaction networks either for a domain of interest or for entire organisms, and to explore them interactively using the Flash-based Cytoscape Web software.

  10. Interactive multimedia ethnography: Archiving workflow, interface aesthetics and metadata

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, P.; Aston, J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital heritage archives often lack engaging user interfaces that strike a balance between providing narrative context and affording user interaction and exploration. It seems nevertheless feasible for metadata tagging and a “joined up” workflow to provide a basis for this rich interaction. After outlining relevant research from within and outside the heritage domain, we present our project FINE (Fluid Interfaces for Narrative Exploration), an effort to develop such a system. Based on conten...

  11. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  12. Playful User Interfaces. Interfaces that Invite Social and Physical Interaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  13. Open Core Protocol (OCP) Clock Domain Crossing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlev, Mathias; Poulsen, Christian Keis; Sparsø, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The open core protocol (OCP) is an openly licensed configurable and scalable interface protocol for on-chip subsystem communications. The protocol defines read and write transactions from a master towards a slave across a point-to-point connection and the protocol assumes a single common clock....... This paper presents the design of two OCP clock domain crossing interface modules that can be used to construct systems with multiple clock domains. An OCP interface typically has control signals related to both the master issuing a read or write request and the slave producing a response. If all...

  14. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  15. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  16. Defining Interactions and Interfaces in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parslov, Jakob Filippson

    ’ across any engineering discipline for describing and communicating about interactions and interfaces in engineering design. The framework contains classifications of three key terms; interaction, interaction mechanism, and interface. Due to the first principles, physics-­based approach to deriving......This PhD thesis focuses on the understanding and definition of interactions and interfaces during the architectural decomposition of complex, multi-technological products. The Interaction and Interface Framework developed in this PhD project contribute to the field of engineering design research....... Developing complex, multi-technological products involves the joint effort of multiple engineering disciplines in order to arrive at an end product, which satisfies its requirements. A major challenge is however the fact that bringing together engineers from different technical backgrounds means...

  17. Domain nucleation in the contact layer at an interface of water and a polarizable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    The growth of a molecular water film on the basic plane of a silver iodide monocrystal is studied through computer simulation. Decomposition into domains with spontaneous polarization is observed in the contact layer of the film at the interface with the substrate. The formation of domains is found to be sharply enhanced on a model substrate with the double polarizability of iodine ions; heteropolarization interactions caused by the formation of domain structures increase the film's coupling with the substrate. It is demonstrated that the vapor pressure needed for molecular film growth is reduced appreciably via heteropolarization interactions.

  18. High-affinity single-domain binding proteins with a binary-code interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akiko; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Esaki, Kaori; Tereshko, Valentina; Koide, Shohei

    2007-04-17

    High degrees of sequence and conformation complexity found in natural protein interaction interfaces are generally considered essential for achieving tight and specific interactions. However, it has been demonstrated that specific antibodies can be built by using an interface with a binary code consisting of only Tyr and Ser. This surprising result might be attributed to yet undefined properties of the antibody scaffold that uniquely enhance its capacity for target binding. In this work we tested the generality of the binary-code interface by engineering binding proteins based on a single-domain scaffold. We show that Tyr/Ser binary-code interfaces consisting of only 15-20 positions within a fibronectin type III domain (FN3; 95 residues) are capable of producing specific binding proteins (termed "monobodies") with a low-nanomolar K(d). A 2.35-A x-ray crystal structure of a monobody in complex with its target, maltose-binding protein, and mutation analysis revealed dominant contributions of Tyr residues to binding as well as striking molecular mimicry of a maltose-binding protein substrate, beta-cyclodextrin, by the Tyr/Ser binary interface. This work suggests that an interaction interface with low chemical diversity but with significant conformational diversity is generally sufficient for tight and specific molecular recognition, providing fundamental insights into factors governing protein-protein interactions.

  19. Domain Specific Languages for Interactive Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus

    This dissertation shows how domain specific languages may be applied to the domain of interactive Web services to obtain flexible, safe, and efficient solutions. We show how each of four key aspects of interactive Web services involving sessions, dynamic creation of HTML/XML documents, form field......, , that supports virtually all aspects of the development of interactive Web services and provides flexible, safe, and efficient solutions....

  20. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    that approximately 80% of eukaryotic proteins and 67% of prokaryotic proteins have multiple domains [13,14]. Most annotation databases characterize...domain annotations, Domain-domain interactions, Protein-protein interaction networks Background The living cell is a dynamic, interconnected system...detailed in Methods. Here, we illustrate its application on a well- annotated single- cell organism. We created a merged set of protein-domain annotations

  1. Interaction Sheaves on Continuous Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdou, J.; Keiding, Hans

    We introduce a description of the power structure which is inherent in a strategic game form using the concept of an interaction sheaf. The latter assigns to each open set of outcomes a set of interaction arrays, specifying the changes that coalitions can make if outcome belongs to this open set....

  2. Plasma-wall interactions in tokamaks, a scope between physics and chemistry; Interactions plasma-paroi dans les tokamaks. Un domaine a l'interface de la physique et de la chimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosset, Ch. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Allouche, A. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2005-09-01

    Remarkable results have been obtained in thermonuclear fusion researches since the first experiments performed in tokamaks, about 40 years ago. The next step is now to succeed in controlling deuterium-tritium long discharges in order to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. This is the aim of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the next magnetic fusion device. While great progresses have been made, new questions emerged and the plasma-wall interactions are one of them. In this paper, we show that this domain is interdisciplinary, particularly because of the presence of carbon and hydrogen. Indeed, we highlight the fundamental role played by chemical processes in the interactions between hydrogen and carbon-based materials and the beneficial contribution of quantum-modelling works in the understanding of them. Ab initio calculations, using the density functional theory, allow studying chemical reactivity of the concerned species. Elementary processes and associated energies can be investigated without any empirical assumptions. The understanding of the elementary reactions, the calculation of the energy transfer and barriers of reaction, together with the modelling of reactions through quantum molecular dynamics provide helpful and more realistic input data to plasma-wall interaction simulation codes. (authors)

  3. Designing Gestural Interfaces Touchscreens and Interactive Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Saffer, Dan

    2008-01-01

    If you want to get started in new era of interaction design, this is the reference you need. Packed with informative illustrations and photos, Designing Gestural Interfaces provides you with essential information about kinesiology, sensors, ergonomics, physical computing, touchscreen technology, and new interface patterns -- information you need to augment your existing skills in traditional" websites, software, or product development. This book will help you enter this new world of possibilities."

  4. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alvaro J; Liao, Li

    2010-10-29

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI) is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs), based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM) where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD). Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure), an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on the web at http

  5. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. Results In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs, based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD. Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure, an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. Conclusions We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on

  6. Java interface for asserting interactive telerobotic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Peter; Lewis, John; Stein, Matthew R.

    1997-12-01

    Many current web-based telerobotic interfaces use HyperText Markup Language (HTML) forms to assert user control on a robot. While acceptable for some tasks, a Java interface can provide better client-server interaction. The Puma Paint project is a joint effort between the Department of Computing Sciences at Villanova University and the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Wilkes University. THe project utilizes a Java applet to control a Unimation Puma 1760 robot during the task of painting on a canvas. The interface allows the user to control the paint strokes as well as the pressure of a brush on the canvas and how deep the brush is dipped into a paint jar. To provide immediate feedback, a virtual canvas models the effects of the controls as the artist paints. Live color video feedback is provided, allowing the user to view the actual results of the robot's motions. Unlike the step-at-a-time model of many web forms, the application permits the user to assert interactive control. The greater the complexity of the interaction between the robot and its environment, the greater the need for high quality information presentation to the user. The use of Java allows the sophistication of the user interface to be raised to the level required for satisfactory control. This paper describes the Puma Paint project, including the interface and communications model. It also examines the challenges of using the Internet as the medium of communications and the challenges of encoding free ranging motions for transmission from the client to the robot.

  7. 3did: a catalog of domain-based interactions of known three-dimensional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Roberto; Céol, Arnaud; Stein, Amelie; Olivella, Roger; Aloy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The database of 3D interacting domains (3did, available online for browsing and bulk download at http://3did.irbbarcelona.org) is a catalog of protein-protein interactions for which a high-resolution 3D structure is known. 3did collects and classifies all structural templates of domain-domain interactions in the Protein Data Bank, providing molecular details for such interactions. The current version also includes a pipeline for the discovery and annotation of novel domain-motif interactions. For every interaction, 3did identifies and groups different binding modes by clustering similar interfaces into 'interaction topologies'. By maintaining a constantly updated collection of domain-based structural interaction templates, 3did is a reference source of information for the structural characterization of protein interaction networks. 3did is updated every 6 months.

  8. Interface dynamics and domain growth in thermally bistable fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaviv, N.J.; Regev, O.

    1994-01-01

    Domain growth kinetics in a thermally bistable fluid with heat diffusion is studied. The time evolution of interfaces between the stable phases is calculated numerically in two dimensions and compared to some general results derived analytically. The qualitative behavior is found to be similar to the previously studied cases where fluid dynamics was neglected. There are, however, several important differences such as the value of the dynamical exponent, which determines the power law of the system's correlation length growth. The introduction of fluid motion into the model introduces additional properties, unfamiliar to previously studied systems, like the change of the pressure or the size of the system. This behavior is due to the advection of mass. The present model may have general relevance to any system modeled by a real Ginzburg-Landau-type equation coupled to fluid dynamical conservation equations. In particular, it is a step forward on the way to a faithful modeling of thermally bistable cloudy astrophysical media

  9. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Feng, Gao; Jian-Jun, Shi; Shan, Guan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases. (general)

  10. Navigation domain representation for interactive multiview imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugey, Thomas; Daribo, Ismael; Cheung, Gene; Frossard, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    Enabling users to interactively navigate through different viewpoints of a static scene is a new interesting functionality in 3D streaming systems. While it opens exciting perspectives toward rich multimedia applications, it requires the design of novel representations and coding techniques to solve the new challenges imposed by the interactive navigation. In particular, the encoder must prepare a priori a compressed media stream that is flexible enough to enable the free selection of multiview navigation paths by different streaming media clients. Interactivity clearly brings new design constraints: the encoder is unaware of the exact decoding process, while the decoder has to reconstruct information from incomplete subsets of data since the server generally cannot transmit images for all possible viewpoints due to resource constrains. In this paper, we propose a novel multiview data representation that permits us to satisfy bandwidth and storage constraints in an interactive multiview streaming system. In particular, we partition the multiview navigation domain into segments, each of which is described by a reference image (color and depth data) and some auxiliary information. The auxiliary information enables the client to recreate any viewpoint in the navigation segment via view synthesis. The decoder is then able to navigate freely in the segment without further data request to the server; it requests additional data only when it moves to a different segment. We discuss the benefits of this novel representation in interactive navigation systems and further propose a method to optimize the partitioning of the navigation domain into independent segments, under bandwidth and storage constraints. Experimental results confirm the potential of the proposed representation; namely, our system leads to similar compression performance as classical inter-view coding, while it provides the high level of flexibility that is required for interactive streaming. Because of

  11. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Halmai

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well.

  12. A Gaze Interactive Textual Smartwatch Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Biermann, Florian; Askø Madsen, Janus

    2015-01-01

    Mobile gaze interaction is challenged by inherent motor noise. We examined the gaze tracking accuracy and precision of twelve subjects wearing a gaze tracker on their wrist while standing and walking. Results suggest that it will be possible to detect whether people are glancing the watch......, but not where on the screen they are looking. To counter the motor noise we present a word-by-word textual UI that shows temporary command options to be executed by gaze-strokes. Twenty-seven participants conducted a simulated smartwatch task and were able to reliably perform commands that would adjust...... the speed of word presentation or make regressions. We discuss future design and usage options for a textual smartwatch gaze interface....

  13. Physical modelling of interactions between interfaces and turbulence; Modelisation physique des interactions entre interfaces et turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutant, A

    2006-12-15

    The complex interactions between interfaces and turbulence strongly impact the flow properties. Unfortunately, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have to entail a number of degrees of freedom proportional to the third power of the Reynolds number to correctly describe the flow behaviour. This extremely hard constraint makes it impossible to use DNS for industrial applications. Our strategy consists in using and improving DNS method in order to develop the Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales concept. ISS is a two-phase equivalent to the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation (LES) concept. The challenge of ISS is to integrate the two-way coupling phenomenon into sub-grid models. Applying a space filter, we have exhibited correlations or sub-grid terms that require closures. We have shown that, in two-phase flows, the presence of a discontinuity leads to specific sub-grid terms. Comparing the maximum of the norm of the sub-grid terms with the maximum of the norm of the advection tensor, we have found that sub-grid terms related to interfacial forces and viscous effect are negligible. Consequently, in the momentum balance, only the sub-grid terms related to inertia have to be closed. Thanks to a priori tests performed on several DNS data, we demonstrate that the scale similarity hypothesis, reinterpreted near discontinuity, provides sub-grid models that take into account the two-way coupling phenomenon. These models correspond to the first step of our work. Indeed, in this step, interfaces are smooth and, interactions between interfaces and turbulence occur in a transition zone where each physical variable varies sharply but continuously. The next challenge has been to determine the jump conditions across the sharp equivalent interface corresponding to the sub-grid models of the transition zone. We have used the matched asymptotic expansion method to obtain the jump conditions. The first tests on the velocity of the sharp equivalent interface are very promising (author)

  14. Prediction of inter domain interactions in modular polyketide synthases by docking and correlated mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Gitanjali; Anand, Swadha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are huge multi-enzymatic protein complexes involved in the biosynthesis of one of the largest families of bioactive natural products, namely polyketides. The specificity of interactions between various catalytic domains of these megasynthases is one of the pivotal factors which control the precise order in which the extender units are joined during the biosynthetic process. Hence, understanding the molecular details of protein-protein interactions in the PKS megasynthases would be crucial for rational design of novel polyketides by domain swapping experiments involving engineered combinations of PKS catalytic domains. We have developed a computational method for exploring the binding interface between two proteins, and used it to identify the interacting residue pairs, which govern the specificity of recognition between acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain and two core catalytic domains, namely the ketosynthase (KS) and acyl transferase (AT). Both of these domain interactions i.e. the KS-ACP and the AT-ACP, are likely to play a major role in channelling of substrates and control of specificity during polyketide biosynthesis. The method, called interface scan, uses a combination of geometric docking and evolutionary information for the identification of the most appropriate mode of association between two proteins. The parameters of interface scan have been standardized based on analysis of contacts in the crystal structure of ACP in complex with ACP synthase (AcpS). Many of the contacts predicted for PKS domains are in agreement with available experiments.

  15. Perception-action icons: an interface design strategy for intermediate domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, Christopher R; Martinez, Silas G; Stansifer, Craig

    2007-02-01

    A prototype interface was developed to support decision making during tactical operations; a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the capability of this interface to support a critical activity (i.e., obtaining the status of friendly combat resources). Effective interface design strategies have been developed for domains that have primarily law-driven (e.g., process control) or intent-driven (e.g., information retrieval) constraints. However, design strategies for intermediate domains in which both types of constraints are equally critical, such as military command and control, have not been explored as extensively. The principles of direct perception, direct manipulation, and perception-action loops were used to develop a hybrid interface design strategy ("perception-action icons") that was incorporated into the prototype interface. A qualitative tactical simulation and an alternative interface (an experimental version of an existing U.S. Army interface) were developed. Participants used both interfaces to provide estimates of friendly combat resources for three different categories of information at three different echelon levels. The results were unequivocal, indicating that the interface with perception-action icons produced significantly better performance. The perception-action icon design strategy was very effective in this experimental context. The potential for this design strategy to be useful for other intermediate domains is explored. Actual or potential applications of this research include both specific interface design strategies for military command and control and general interface design principles for intermediate work domains.

  16. Interface-induced chiral domain walls, spin spirals and skyrmions revealed by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Kubetzka, André; Pietzsch, Oswald; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The spin textures of ultra-thin magnetic layers exhibit surprising variety. The loss of inversion symmetry at the interface of the magnetic layer and substrate gives rise to the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction which favors non-collinear spin arrangements with unique rotational sense. Here we review the application of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to such systems, which has led to the discovery of interface-induced chiral domain walls and spin spirals. Recently, different interface-driven skyrmion lattices have been found, and the writing as well as the deleting of individual skyrmions based on local spin-polarized current injection has been demonstrated. These interface-induced non-collinear magnetic states offer new exciting possibilities to study fundamental magnetic interactions and to tailor material properties for spintronic applications.

  17. The intrinsically disordered structural platform of the plant defence hub protein RPM1-interacting protein 4 provides insights into its mode of action in the host-pathogen interface and evolution of the nitrate-induced domain protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolin; Greenwood, David R; Templeton, Matthew D; Libich, David S; McGhie, Tony K; Xue, Bin; Yoon, Minsoo; Cui, Wei; Kirk, Christopher A; Jones, William T; Uversky, Vladimir N; Rikkerink, Erik H A

    2014-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (At) RPM1-interacting protein 4 (RIN4), targeted by many defence-suppressing bacterial type III effectors and monitored by several resistance proteins, regulates plant immune responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and type III effectors. Little is known about the overall protein structure of AtRIN4, especially in its unbound form, and the relevance of structure to its diverse biological functions. AtRIN4 contains two nitrate-induced (NOI) domains and is a member of the NOI family. Using experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we demonstrate that the unbound AtRIN4 is intrinsically disordered under physiological conditions. The intrinsically disordered polypeptide chain of AtRIN4 is interspersed with molecular recognition features (MoRFs) and anchor-identified long-binding regions, potentially allowing it to undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to partner(s). A poly-l-proline II structure, often responsible for protein recognition, is also identified in AtRIN4. By performing bioinformatics analyses on RIN4 homologues from different plant species and the NOI proteins from Arabidopsis, we infer the conservation of intrinsic disorder, MoRFs and long-binding regions of AtRIN4 in other plant species and the NOI family. Intrinsic disorder and MoRFs could provide RIN4 proteins with the binding promiscuity and plasticity required to act as hubs in a pivotal position within plant defence signalling cascades. © 2014 FEBS.

  18. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yinghua [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Simmonds, Robin S. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Timkovich, Russell, E-mail: rtimkovi@bama.ua.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Peptidoglycan added to zoocin rTRD perturbs NMR resonances around W115. •Simulations predict docking to a shallow surface groove near W115. •The docking interface is similar to mammalian antibody–antigen sites. •EDTA binds to a distinct surface site. -- Abstract: A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  19. Domain-specific knowledge as playful interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Starting from reflections on designing games for learning, aimed at providing a tangible grounding to abstract knowledge, we designed Prime Slaughter, a game to support learning of factorisation and prime numbers, targeted to primary and early secondary school children. This new study draws upon ...... on activity theory, aimed at facilitating the transposition of abstract knowledge into playful interactions, so to develop new learning games of this kind, also keeping into account children’s individual needs regarding play.......Starting from reflections on designing games for learning, aimed at providing a tangible grounding to abstract knowledge, we designed Prime Slaughter, a game to support learning of factorisation and prime numbers, targeted to primary and early secondary school children. This new study draws upon...... the design process of Prime Slaughter, to move further in developing a general approach in developing games, aimed at effectively conveying knowledge from a specific domain. Hence this paper will discuss the past design process, as a concrete case, and then formulate a theoretical framework, based...

  20. Exploring Interaction Space as Abstraction Mechanism for Task-Based User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    , but there is considerable variation in the other models that are employed. This paper explores the extent to which the notion of interaction space is useful as an abstraction mechanism to reduce the complexity of creating and specifying a user interface design. We present how we designed a specific user interface through...... use of design techniques and models that employ the notion of interaction space. This design effort departed from the task models in an object-oriented model of the users’ problem and application domains. The lessons learned emphasize that the notion of interactions spaces is a useful abstraction...

  1. An Architecture for Non-Intrusive User Interfaces for Interactive Digital Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); Z. Obrenovic; J. Ducret; S. Cruz-Lara

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper presents an architecture for non-intrusive user interfaces in the interactive digital TV domain. The architecture is based on two concepts. First, the deployment of non-monolithic rendering for content consumption, which allows micro-level personalization of content delivery

  2. The different roles of aggrecan interaction domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspberg, Anders

    2012-01-01

    glycosaminoglycan chains, that provide the basis for the viscoelastic properties necessary for load distribution over the articular surface. This review is focused on the globular domains of aggrecan and their role in anchoring the proteoglycans to other extracellular matrix components. The N-terminal G1 domain...

  3. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do

    2016-05-23

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  4. The many faces of protein-protein interactions: A compendium of interface geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Kyu Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A systematic classification of protein-protein interfaces is a valuable resource for understanding the principles of molecular recognition and for modelling protein complexes. Here, we present a classification of domain interfaces according to their geometry. Our new algorithm uses a hybrid approach of both sequential and structural features. The accuracy is evaluated on a hand-curated dataset of 416 interfaces. Our hybrid procedure achieves 83% precision and 95% recall, which improves the earlier sequence-based method by 5% on both terms. We classify virtually all domain interfaces of known structure, which results in nearly 6,000 distinct types of interfaces. In 40% of the cases, the interacting domain families associate in multiple orientations, suggesting that all the possible binding orientations need to be explored for modelling multidomain proteins and protein complexes. In general, hub proteins are shown to use distinct surface regions (multiple faces for interactions with different partners. Our classification provides a convenient framework to query genuine gene fusion, which conserves binding orientation in both fused and separate forms. The result suggests that the binding orientations are not conserved in at least one-third of the gene fusion cases detected by a conventional sequence similarity search. We show that any evolutionary analysis on interfaces can be skewed by multiple binding orientations and multiple interaction partners. The taxonomic distribution of interface types suggests that ancient interfaces common to the three major kingdoms of life are enriched by symmetric homodimers. The classification results are online at http://www.scoppi.org.

  5. Modeling nonspecific interactions at biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew D.

    Difficulties in applied biomaterials often arise from the complexities of interactions in biological environments. These interactions can be broadly broken into two categories: those which are important to function (strong binding to a single target) and those which are detrimental to function (weak binding to many targets). These will be referred to as specific and nonspecific interactions, respectively. Nonspecific interactions have been central to failures of biomaterials, sensors, and surface coatings in harsh biological environments. There is little modeling work on studying nonspecific interactions. Modeling all possible nonspecific interactions within a biological system is difficult, yet there are ways to both indirectly model nonspecific interactions and directly model many interactions using machine-learning. This research utilizes bioinformatics, phenomenological modeling, molecular simulations, experiments, and stochastic modeling to study nonspecific interactions. These techniques are used to study the hydration molecules which resist nonspecific interactions, the formation of salt bridges, the chemistry of protein surfaces, nonspecific stabilization of proteins in molecular chaperones, and analysis of high-throughput screening experiments. The common aspect for these systems is that nonspecific interactions are more important than specific interactions. Studying these disparate systems has created a set of principles for resisting nonspecific interactions which have been experimentally demonstrated with the creation and testing of novel materials which resist nonspecific interactions.

  6. Designing interfaces patterns for effective interaction design

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2005-01-01

    This convenient resource offers advice on creating user-friendly interface designs--whether they're delivered on the Web, a CD, or a smart" devices like a cell phone. Solutions to common UI design problems are expressed as a collection of patterns--each one containing concrete examples, recommendations, and warnings. Intended for designers with basic UI design knowledge

  7. Transfer of control system interface solutions from other domains to the thermal power industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligård, L-O; Andersson, J; Osvalder, A-L

    2012-01-01

    In a thermal power plant the operators' roles are to control and monitor the process to achieve efficient and safe production. To achieve this, the human-machine interfaces have a central part. The interfaces need to be updated and upgraded together with the technical functionality to maintain optimal operation. One way of achieving relevant updates is to study other domains and see how they have solved similar issues in their design solutions. The purpose of this paper is to present how interface design solution ideas can be transferred from domains with operator control to thermal power plants. In the study 15 domains were compared using a model for categorisation of human-machine systems. The result from the domain comparison showed that nuclear power, refinery and ship engine control were most similar to thermal power control. From the findings a basic interface structure and three specific display solutions were proposed for thermal power control: process parameter overview, plant overview, and feed water view. The systematic comparison of the properties of a human-machine system allowed interface designers to find suitable objects, structures and navigation logics in a range of domains that could be transferred to the thermal power domain.

  8. More playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfacesinterfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  9. Clock domain crossing modules for OCP-style read/write interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlev, Mathias; Sparsø, Jens

    The open core protocol (OCP) is an openly licensed, configurable, and scalable interface protocol for on-chip subsystem communications. The protocol defines read and write transactions from a master towards a slave across a point-to-point connection and the protocol assumes a single common clock....... This paper presents the design of two OCP clock domain crossing interface modules, that can be used to construct systems with multiple clock domains. One module (called OCPio) supports a single word read-write interface and the other module (called OCPburst) supports a four word burst read-write interface...... to connect the Processor and its cache controllers to a shared o_-chip memory. While the problem of synchronizing a simple streaming interface is well described in the literature and often solved using bi-synchronous FIFOs we found surprisingly little published material addressing synchronization of bus...

  10. The domain interface method: a general-purpose non-intrusive technique for non-conforming domain decomposition problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafiero, M; Lloberas-Valls, O; Cante, J; Oliver, J

    A domain decomposition technique is proposed which is capable of properly connecting arbitrary non-conforming interfaces. The strategy essentially consists in considering a fictitious zero-width interface between the non-matching meshes which is discretized using a Delaunay triangulation. Continuity is satisfied across domains through normal and tangential stresses provided by the discretized interface and inserted in the formulation in the form of Lagrange multipliers. The final structure of the global system of equations resembles the dual assembly of substructures where the Lagrange multipliers are employed to nullify the gap between domains. A new approach to handle floating subdomains is outlined which can be implemented without significantly altering the structure of standard industrial finite element codes. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm is demonstrated through a patch test example and a number of tests that highlight the accuracy of the methodology and independence of the results with respect to the framework parameters. Considering its high degree of flexibility and non-intrusive character, the proposed domain decomposition framework is regarded as an attractive alternative to other established techniques such as the mortar approach.

  11. Creativity in Interactive TV: Personalize, Share, and Invent Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatavu, Radu-Daniel

    This chapter tries to induce changes in the way we think about interfaces and currently interact with television today. Either in the comfort of our home, in public shared spaces, or on the go via personal mobile devices, interaction should be intuitive, simple, and undemanding. This chapter is a quest for creativity and invention, it is about bringing new ideas into current interaction paradigms as well as shifting the way we see TV interfaces today. Technology has been available for quite a while now providing mechanisms that allow us to play, record, store, archive, and stream TV-related information, but the way we interface such complex systems and mechanisms is still bound to dozens of buttons on one or more remote controls. When groups of people need to interact simultaneously with today's TV set, the interface barrier immediately appears with all its inherent frustrations: lack of control at the desired time and no immediate availability of the interface; single-viewer and single-task interfacing; and limited or burdensome options for viewing, archiving, and sharing. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to encourage creativity in TV interface design with focus on today's available and affordable technologies such as video cameras and computer vision, computer graphics, and projection equipment all under the same principle: keep the interaction as simple and intuitive as possible and add just a bit of fun to it to make it really captivating.

  12. Structure and transport properties of the interface between CVD-grown graphene domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yui; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Kawahara, Kenji; Tsuji, Masaharu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Ago, Hiroki

    2014-06-01

    During the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene, graphene domains grown on a Cu surface merge together and form a uniform graphene sheet. For high-performance electronics and other applications, it is important to understand the interfacial structure of the merged domains, as well as their influence on the physical properties of graphene. We synthesized large hexagonal graphene domains with controlled orientations on a heteroepitaxial Cu film and studied the structure and properties of the interfaces between the domains mainly merged with the same angle. Although the merged domains have various interfaces with/without wrinkles and/or increased defect-related Raman D-band intensity, the intra-domain transport showed higher carrier mobility reaching 20 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 on SiO2 at 280 K (the mean value was 7200 cm2 V-1 s-1) than that measured for inter-domain areas, 6400 cm2 V-1 s-1 (mean value 2000 cm2 V-1 s-1). The temperature dependence of the mobility suggests that impurity scattering dominates at the interface even for the merged domains with the same orientation. This study highlights the importance of domain interfaces, especially on the carrier transport properties, in CVD-grown graphene.During the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene, graphene domains grown on a Cu surface merge together and form a uniform graphene sheet. For high-performance electronics and other applications, it is important to understand the interfacial structure of the merged domains, as well as their influence on the physical properties of graphene. We synthesized large hexagonal graphene domains with controlled orientations on a heteroepitaxial Cu film and studied the structure and properties of the interfaces between the domains mainly merged with the same angle. Although the merged domains have various interfaces with/without wrinkles and/or increased defect-related Raman D-band intensity, the intra-domain transport showed higher carrier mobility reaching 20

  13. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact......-domain proteins catalyse the formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, whereas others appear to target ubiquitinated proteins for degradation and interact with chaperones. Hence, by binding to the 26S proteasome the UBL-domain proteins seem to tailor and direct the basic proteolytic functions of the particle...

  14. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  15. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: Binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotelo, N.S.; Schepens, J.T.G.; Valiente, M.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Pulido, R.

    2015-01-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from

  16. Affective Interface Adaptations in the Musickiosk Interactive Entertainment Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, L.; Raouzaiou, A.; Pearce, L.; Karpouzis, K.

    The current work presents the affective interface adaptations in the Musickiosk application. Adaptive interaction poses several open questions since there is no unique way of mapping affective factors of user behaviour to the output of the system. Musickiosk uses a non-contact interface and implicit interaction through emotional affect rather than explicit interaction where a gesture, sound or other input directly maps to an output behaviour - as in traditional entertainment applications. PAD model is used for characterizing the different affective states and emotions.

  17. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  18. More playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfacesinterfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing cost of sensor and actuator technology makes it possible to integrate physical behavior information in human-computer interactions. This leads to many new entertainment and game applications that allow or require social and physical interaction in sensor- and actuator-equipped smart environments. The topics discussed include: human-nature interaction, human-animal interaction and the interaction with tangibles that are naturally integrated in our smart environments. Digitally supported remote audience participation in artistic or sport events is also discussed. One important theme that emerges throughout the book is the involvement of users in the digital-entertainment design process or even design and implement...

  19. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The dimer interface of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase hemopexin domain: crystal structure and biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-04

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.

  1. Metallic Interface Emerging at Magnetic Domain Wall of Antiferromagnetic Insulator: Fate of Extinct Weyl Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Yamaji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators, in contrast to ordinary semiconductors, accompany protected metallic surfaces described by Dirac-type fermions. Here, we theoretically show that another emergent two-dimensional metal embedded in the bulk insulator is realized at a magnetic domain wall. The domain wall has long been studied as an ingredient of both old-fashioned and leading-edge spintronics. The domain wall here, as an interface of seemingly trivial antiferromagnetic insulators, emergently realizes a functional interface preserved by zero modes with robust two-dimensional Fermi surfaces, where pyrochlore iridium oxides proposed to host the condensed-matter realization of Weyl fermions offer such examples at low temperatures. The existence of in-gap states that are pinned at domain walls, theoretically resembling spin or charge solitons in polyacetylene, and protected as the edges of hidden one-dimensional weak Chern insulators characterized by a zero-dimensional class-A topological invariant, solves experimental puzzles observed in R_{2}Ir_{2}O_{7} with rare-earth elements R. The domain wall realizes a novel quantum confinement of electrons and embosses a net uniform magnetization that enables magnetic control of electronic interface transports beyond the semiconductor paradigm.

  2. The international river interface cooperative: Public domain flow and morphodynamics software for education and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Abe, Takaaki; Asahi, Kazutake; Gamou, Mineyuki; Inoue, Takuya; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kakinuma, Takaharu; Kawamura, Satomi; Kimura, Ichiro; Kyuka, Tomoko; McDonald, Richard R.; Nabi, Mohamed; Nakatsugawa, Makoto; Simoes, Francisco J.; Takebayashi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new, public-domain interface for modeling flow, sediment transport and morphodynamics in rivers and other geophysical flows. The interface is named after the International River Interface Cooperative (iRIC), the group that constructed the interface and many of the current solvers included in iRIC. The interface is entirely free to any user and currently houses thirteen models ranging from simple one-dimensional models through three-dimensional large-eddy simulation models. Solvers are only loosely coupled to the interface so it is straightforward to modify existing solvers or to introduce other solvers into the system. Six of the most widely-used solvers are described in detail including example calculations to serve as an aid for users choosing what approach might be most appropriate for their own applications. The example calculations range from practical computations of bed evolution in natural rivers to highly detailed predictions of the development of small-scale bedforms on an initially flat bed. The remaining solvers are also briefly described. Although the focus of most solvers is coupled flow and morphodynamics, several of the solvers are also specifically aimed at providing flood inundation predictions over large spatial domains. Potential users can download the application, solvers, manuals, and educational materials including detailed tutorials at www.-i-ric.org. The iRIC development group encourages scientists and engineers to use the tool and to consider adding their own methods to the iRIC suite of tools.

  3. Learner-Interface Interaction for Technology-Enhanced Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neelu; Khreisat, Laila; Sharma, Kiron

    2009-01-01

    Neelu Sinha, Laila Khreisat, and Kiron Sharma describe how learner-interface interaction promotes active learning in computer science education. In a pilot study using technology that combines DyKnow software with a hardware platform of pen-enabled HP Tablet notebook computers, Sinha, Khreisat, and Sharma created dynamic learning environments by…

  4. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Greenleaf, Arno L., E-mail: arno.greenleaf@duke.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  5. Drug-domain interaction networks in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2013-09-01

    It has been well recognized that the pace of the development of new drugs and therapeutic interventions lags far behind biological knowledge discovery. Network-based approaches have emerged as a promising alternative to accelerate the discovery of new safe and effective drugs. Based on the integration of several biological resources including two recently published datasets i.e., Drug-target interactions in myocardial infarction (My-DTome) and drug-domain interaction network, this paper reports the association between drugs and protein domains in the context of myocardial infarction (MI). A MI drug-domain interaction network, My-DDome, was firstly constructed, followed by topological analysis and functional characterization of the network. The results show that My-DDome has a very clear modular structure, where drugs interacting with the same domain(s) within each module tend to have similar therapeutic effects. Moreover it has been found that drugs acting on blood and blood forming organs (ATC code B) and sensory organs (ATC code S) are significantly enriched in My-DDome (p drugs, their known targets, and seemingly unrelated proteins can be revealed.

  6. Finding optimal interaction interface alignments between biological complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-06-13

    Motivation: Biological molecules perform their functions through interactions with other molecules. Structure alignment of interaction interfaces between biological complexes is an indispensable step in detecting their structural similarities, which are keys to understanding their evolutionary histories and functions. Although various structure alignment methods have been developed to successfully access the similarities of protein structures or certain types of interaction interfaces, existing alignment tools cannot directly align arbitrary types of interfaces formed by protein, DNA or RNA molecules. Specifically, they require a \\'blackbox preprocessing\\' to standardize interface types and chain identifiers. Yet their performance is limited and sometimes unsatisfactory. Results: Here we introduce a novel method, PROSTA-inter, that automatically determines and aligns interaction interfaces between two arbitrary types of complex structures. Our method uses sequentially remote fragments to search for the optimal superimposition. The optimal residue matching problem is then formulated as a maximum weighted bipartite matching problem to detect the optimal sequence order-independent alignment. Benchmark evaluation on all non-redundant protein-DNA complexes in PDB shows significant performance improvement of our method over TM-align and iAlign (with the \\'blackbox preprocessing\\'). Two case studies where our method discovers, for the first time, structural similarities between two pairs of functionally related protein-DNA complexes are presented. We further demonstrate the power of our method on detecting structural similarities between a protein-protein complex and a protein-RNA complex, which is biologically known as a protein-RNA mimicry case. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in the Diagnosis and Management of Vitreoretinal Interface Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Barak, Yoreh; Ihnen, Mark A.; Schaal, Shlomit

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has enhanced Vitreoretinal Interface (VRI) imaging considerably and facilitated the diagnosis, followup, prognosis determination, and management of VRI-associated pathologies. HR-OCT became a common practical tool seen in almost every ophthalmology practice. Knowledge of SD-OCT image interpretation and recognition of pathologies are required for all ophthalmologists. This paper methodically reviews the normal aging proc...

  8. Soil-Framed Structure Interaction Analysis - A New Interface Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dalili Shoaei

    Full Text Available AbstractInterfacial behavior between soil and shallow foundation has been found so influential to combined soil-footing performance and redistribution of forces in the superstructure. This study introduces a new thin-layer interface element formulated within the context of finite element method to idealize interfacial behavior of soil-framed structure interaction with new combination of degrees of freedom at top and bottom sides of the interface element, compatible with both isoparametric beam and quadrilateral element. This research also tends to conduct a parametric study on respective parameters of the new joint element. Presence of interface element showed considerable changes in the performance of the framed structure under quasi-static loading.

  9. Explore the interactive design of touch interface Webpage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the arrival of the era of mobile touch,website HTML,CSS and JavaScript building have been changed.Especially the functional development of hypertext markup language HTML5 and touch interface not only enhances the speed of the Website,but also creates amazing user experiences.Therefore,now Webpage design focus on the transmission of information at the same time,more concerns itself about the personalized and interactive design of users,including visual experience,browsing expect and psychological interaction,etc.

  10. Molecular determinants of transport stimulation of EAAT2 are located at interface between the trimerization and substrate transport domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Ole V; Liberato, José L; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Dos Santos, Wagner F; Fontana, Andréia C K

    2015-04-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate glutamatergic signal transmission by clearing extracellular glutamate. Dysfunction of these transporters has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders. Previous studies have shown that venom from the spider Parawixia bistriata and a purified compound (Parawixin1) stimulate EAAT2 activity and protect retinal tissue from ischemic damage. In the present study, the EAAT2 subtype specificity of this compound was explored, employing chimeric proteins between EAAT2 and EAAT3 transporter subtypes and mutants to characterize the structural region targeted by the compound. This identified a critical residue (Histidine-71 in EAAT2 and Serine-45 in EAAT3) in transmembrane domain 2 (TM2) to be important for the selectivity between EAAT2 and EAAT3 and for the activity of the venom. Using the identified residue in TM2 as a structural anchor, several neighboring amino acids within TM5 and TM8 were identified to also be important for the activity of the venom. This structural domain of the transporter lies at the interface of the rigid trimerization domain and the central substrate-binding transport domain. Our studies suggest that the mechanism of glutamate transport enhancement involves an interaction with the transporter that facilitates the movement of the transport domain. We identified a domain (purple star) in the glutamate transporter EAAT2 that is important for transport stimulation through a spider venom, and suggest a mechanism for enhanced transporter function through facilitated substrate translocation (arrow). Because the dysfunction of glutamate transporters is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders, understanding the mechanisms of enhanced transport could have therapeutic implications. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Video game interfaces for interactive lower and upper member therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Quevedo, Alvaro; Perez-Gutierrez, Byron; Alves, Silas

    2013-01-01

    With recent advances in electronics and mechanics, a new trend in interaction is taking place changing how we interact with our environment, daily tasks and other people. Even though sensor based technologies and tracking systems have been around for several years, recently they have become affordable and used in several areas such as physical and mental rehabilitation, educational applications, physical exercises, and natural interactions, among others. This work presents the integration of two mainstream videogame interfaces as tools for developing an interactive lower and upper member therapy tool. The goal is to study the potential of these devices as complementing didactic elements for improving and following user performance during a series of exercises with virtual and real devices.

  12. Interfaces and interactions in the Swiss waste disposal programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.

    1994-01-01

    Switzerland is a small country (41,293 km 2 ) with a small population (∼7 million) and a small nuclear power park (∼3000 MWe) which gives rise to correspondingly limited volumes of radioactive wastes. The following sections present a summary of the technical and organizational structures involved in the procedures for implementing a back-end strategy in Switzerland and the rationale for their choice. The hierarchical organizational units involved in repository projects, their responsibilities and their interactions are described. This linked chain of responsibilities must be thought through as a whole if interface and communication problems in the line structure are to be minimized -- this we call vertical integration. The programme implementers do not work, however, in a technical or social vacuum. Interfaces to other bodies (regulators, politicians, public) are equally vital to programme success. These communications and exchanges must all be coordinated with one another and with the line organization -- this we call horizontal interaction. The multidimensional organizational system to be considered is described in Sections 2 and 3, in which the roles of each of the entities involved and the relevant interfaces are described. Beforehand, however, we present a short overview of the Swiss waste management strategy and the current programme status in order that individual points made in the following discussion can be related to concrete projects, plans, locations and waste management facilities

  13. The social-sensory interface: category interactions in person perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Johnson, Kerri L; Adams, Reginald B; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Research is increasingly challenging the claim that distinct sources of social information-such as sex, race, and emotion-are processed in discrete fashion. Instead, there appear to be functionally relevant interactions that occur. In the present article, we describe research examining how cues conveyed by the human face, voice, and body interact to form the unified representations that guide our perceptions of and responses to other people. We explain how these information sources are often thrown into interaction through bottom-up forces (e.g., phenotypic cues) as well as top-down forces (e.g., stereotypes and prior knowledge). Such interactions point to a person perception process that is driven by an intimate interface between bottom-up perceptual and top-down social processes. Incorporating data from neuroimaging, event-related potentials (ERP), computational modeling, computer mouse-tracking, and other behavioral measures, we discuss the structure of this interface, and we consider its implications and adaptive purposes. We argue that an increased understanding of person perception will likely require a synthesis of insights and techniques, from social psychology to the cognitive, neural, and vision sciences.

  14. A segmental labeling strategy for unambiguous determination of domain–domain interactions of large multi-domain proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianglei; Wang Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    NMR structural determination of large multi-domain proteins is a challenging task due to significant spectral overlap with a particular difficulty in unambiguous identification of domain–domain interactions. Segmental labeling is a NMR strategy that allows for isotopically labeling one domain and leaves the other domain unlabeled. This significantly simplifies spectral overlaps and allows for quick identification of domain–domain interaction. Here, a novel segmental labeling strategy is presented for detection of inter-domain NOEs. To identify domain–domain interactions in human apolipoprotein E (apoE), a multi-domain, 299-residues α-helical protein, on-column expressed protein ligation was utilized to generate a segmental-labeled apoE samples in which the N-terminal (NT-) domain was 2 H(99%)/ 15 N-labeled whereas the C-terminal (CT-) domain was either 15 N- or 15 N/ 13 C-labeled. 3-D 15 N-edited NOESY spectra of these segmental-labeled apoE samples allow for direct observation of the inter-domain NOEs between the backbone amide protons of the NT-domain and the aliphatic protons of the CT-domain. This straightforward approach permits unambiguous identification of 78 inter-domain NOEs, enabling accurate definition of the relative positions of both the NT- and the CT-domains and determination of the NMR structure of apoE.

  15. Protein-nanoparticle interactions the bio-nano interface

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Masoud; Tawil, Nancy; Yahia, L'Hocine; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the fabrication of nanomaterials and exploration of their properties have attracted the attention of various scientific disciplines such as biology, physics, chemistry, and engineering. Although nanoparticulate systems are of significant interest in various scientific and technological areas, there is little known about the safety of these nanoscale objects. It has now been established that the surfaces of nanoparticles are immediately covered by biomolecules (e.g. proteins, ions, and enzymes) upon their entrance into a biological medium. This interaction with the biological medium modulates the surface of the nanoparticles, conferring a “biological identity” to their surfaces (referred to as a “corona”), which determines the subsequent cellular/tissue responses. The new interface between the nanoparticles and the biological medium/proteins, called “bio-nano interface,” has been very rarely studied in detail to date, though the interest in this topic is rapidly growing. In this bo...

  16. Playte, a tangible interface for engaging human-robot interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David Johan; Fogh, Rune; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a tangible interface, Playte, designed for children animating interactive robots. The system supports physical manipulation of behaviors represented by LEGO bricks and allows the user to record and train their own new behaviors. Our objective is to explore several modes of in...... that Playte facilitates playful activities and is appropriate for the intended target group (age 6+). Further, we discuss lessons learned regarding pros and cons of the different supported interactions modes....... of interaction, i.e. direct remote control, tangible programming, programming by demonstration, and programming by training, to learn the design principles for more accessible, engaging, and playful robots. We evaluate the system experimentally and report on key observations from play sessions. We conclude...

  17. Effect of domain size and interface characteristics on the impact resistance of selected polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viratyaporn, Wantinee

    Nanocomposite technology has advanced considerably in recent years and excellent engineering properties have been achieved in numerous systems. In multiphase materials the enhancement of properties relies heavily on the nature at the interphase region between polymer domains and nanoparticle reinforcements. Strong adhesion between the phases provides excellent load-transfer and good mechanical elastic modulus and strength, whereas weak interaction contributes to crack deflection mechanisms and toughness. Polymer molecules are large and the presence of comparably sized filler particles affects chain gyration, which in turn influences the conformation of the polymer and the properties of the composite. Nanoparticles were incorporated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix by means of in situ free radical (bulk) polymerization. Aluminum oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles were added to study the effects of particle chemistry and shape on selected mechanical properties such as impact resistance, which showed significant improvement at a certain loading of zinc oxide. The elongated shape of zinc oxide particles appears to promote crack deflection processes and to introduce a pull-out mechanism similar to that observed in fiber composite systems. Moreover, the thermal stability of PMMA was improved with the addition of nanoparticles, apparently by steric hindrance of polymer chain motion and a second mechanism related to the dipole inducing effect of the oxide particles. The sensitivity of infrared spectroscopy to changes in molecular dipoles was used to study the nature of the polymer/particle interface. The results revealed some interesting aspects of the secondary bonds between polymers and oxides. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the extent of polymerization and changes in polymer conformation. A degree of polymerization of 93% was achieved in neat PMMA, and even when 5.0 v/o of PGMEA was introduced into the system no monomer was detected. However, when

  18. Brine crude oil interactions at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    -, HPO42-, and HCO3- (anions), were studied through gas chromatographic analysis. Crude oil from the North Sea was doped with various fractions of organic acids to mimic different polar behavior. Increased brine concentration showed up to 15% upsurge of polar fractions on the oil-water emulsion formation...... in enhancing oil emulsion formation by increasing interactions between polar acids and brine solutions. The results propose the potential use of HPO42- ions in reservoirs having inactive mineral surfaces. The relative oil affinity of different ions including K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ (cations), and Cl-, SO42....... During emulsion formation the relative interactions at the oil-water interface are proved to follow the Hofmeister series: K+emulsion formation was observed. Among anions, SO42- and HPO42- showed optimum...

  19. Elucidating the Interacting Domains of Chandipura Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N protein of Chandipura virus (CHPV plays a crucial role in viral life cycle, besides being an important structural component of the virion through proper organization of its interactions with other viral proteins. In a recent study, the authors had mapped the associations among CHPV proteins and shown that N protein interacts with four of the viral proteins: N, phosphoprotein (P, matrix protein (M, and glycoprotein (G. The present study aimed to distinguish the regions of CHPV N protein responsible for its interactions with other viral proteins. In this direction, we have generated the structure of CHPV N protein by homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL workspace and Accelrys Discovery Studio client 2.55 and mapped the domains of N protein using PiSQRD. The interactions of N protein fragments with other proteins were determined by ZDOCK rigid-body docking method and validated by yeast two-hybrid and ELISA. The study revealed a unique binding site, comprising of amino acids 1–30 at the N terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (N1 that is instrumental in its interactions with N, P, M, and G proteins. It was also observed that N2 associates with N and G proteins while N3 interacts with N, P, and M proteins.

  20. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues’s method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI data, domain-domain interaction (DDI data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS, and cancer linker degree (CLD data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I using individual algorithm, (II combining algorithms, and (III combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues’s method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis.

  1. Interacting domain-specific languages with biological problem solving environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cickovski, Trevor M.

    Iteratively developing a biological model and verifying results with lab observations has become standard practice in computational biology. This process is currently facilitated by biological Problem Solving Environments (PSEs), multi-tiered and modular software frameworks which traditionally consist of two layers: a computational layer written in a high level language using design patterns, and a user interface layer which hides its details. Although PSEs have proven effective, they still enforce some communication overhead between biologists refining their models through repeated comparison with experimental observations in vitro or in vivo, and programmers actually implementing model extensions and modifications within the computational layer. I illustrate the use of biological Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) as a middle-level PSE tier to ameliorate this problem by providing experimentalists with the ability to iteratively test and develop their models using a higher degree of expressive power compared to a graphical interface, while saving the requirement of general purpose programming knowledge. I develop two radically different biological DSLs: XML-based BIOLOGO will model biological morphogenesis using a cell-centered stochastic cellular automaton and translate into C++ modules for an object-oriented PSE C OMPUCELL3D, and MDLab will provide a set of high-level Python libraries for running molecular dynamics simulations, using wrapped functionality from the C++ PSE PROTOMOL. I describe each language in detail, including its its roles within the larger PSE and its expressibility in terms of representable phenomena, and a discussion of observations from users of the languages. Moreover I will use these studies to draw general conclusions about biological DSL development, including dependencies upon the goals of the corresponding PSE, strategies, and tradeoffs.

  2. Conversational interfaces for task-oriented spoken dialogues: design aspects influencing interaction quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the design and evaluation of speech-based conversational interfaces for task-oriented dialogues. Conversational interfaces are software programs enabling interaction with computer devices through natural language dialogue. Even though processing conversational speech is

  3. The use of affective interaction design in car user interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkouskos, Dimitrios; Chen, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in the car industry have put Human Machine Interfaces under the spotlight. Developing gratifying human-car interactions has become one of the more prominent areas that car manufacturers want to invest in. However, concepts like emotional design remain foreign to the industry. In this study 12 experts on the field of automobile HMI design were interviewed in order to investigate their needs and opinions of emotional design. Results show that emotional design has yet to be introduced for this context of use. Designers need a tool customized for the intricacies of the car HMI field that can provide them with support and guidance so that they can create emotionally attractive experiences for drivers and passengers alike.

  4. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in the Diagnosis and Management of Vitreoretinal Interface Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoreh Barak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT has enhanced Vitreoretinal Interface (VRI imaging considerably and facilitated the diagnosis, followup, prognosis determination, and management of VRI-associated pathologies. HR-OCT became a common practical tool seen in almost every ophthalmology practice. Knowledge of SD-OCT image interpretation and recognition of pathologies are required for all ophthalmologists. This paper methodically reviews the normal aging process of the VRI and discusses several commonly encountered VRI pathologies. The role of SD-OCT imaging in VRI-associated disorders such as posterior vitreous detachment, vitreomacular traction syndrome, idiopathic epiretinal membranes, lamellar holes, pseudoholes, and full thickness macular holes is portrayed. Future perspectives of new OCT technologies based on SD-OCT are discussed.

  5. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony (Mount Sinai Hospital); (Toronto)

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  6. User interfaces for computational science: A domain specific language for OOMMF embedded in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Marijan; Pepper, Ryan A.; Fangohr, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations are used widely across the engineering and science disciplines, including in the research and development of magnetic devices using computational micromagnetics. In this work, we identify and review different approaches to configuring simulation runs: (i) the re-compilation of source code, (ii) the use of configuration files, (iii) the graphical user interface, and (iv) embedding the simulation specification in an existing programming language to express the computational problem. We identify the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches and discuss their implications on effectiveness and reproducibility of computational studies and results. Following on from this, we design and describe a domain specific language for micromagnetics that is embedded in the Python language, and allows users to define the micromagnetic simulations they want to carry out in a flexible way. We have implemented this micromagnetic simulation description language together with a computational backend that executes the simulation task using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We illustrate the use of this Python interface for OOMMF by solving the micromagnetic standard problem 4. All the code is publicly available and is open source.

  7. Novel Scientific Visualization Interfaces for Interactive Information Visualization and Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    As geoscientists are confronted with increasingly massive datasets from environmental observations to simulations, one of the biggest challenges is having the right tools to gain scientific insight from the data and communicate the understanding to stakeholders. Recent developments in web technologies make it easy to manage, visualize and share large data sets with general public. Novel visualization techniques and dynamic user interfaces allow users to interact with data, and modify the parameters to create custom views of the data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. This requires developing new data models and intelligent knowledge discovery techniques to explore and extract information from complex computational simulations or large data repositories. Scientific visualization will be an increasingly important component to build comprehensive environmental information platforms. This presentation provides an overview of the trends and challenges in the field of scientific visualization, and demonstrates information visualization and communication tools in the Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS), developed within the light of these challenges. The IFIS is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to and visualization of flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, and other flood-related data for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and

  8. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The triclinic structure of the HIV-1 capsid protein contains four molecules in the asymmetric unit that form a novel packing interface that could conceivably resemble an intermediate structure that is involved in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD–CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs

  9. Solution structure of the first SH3 domain of human vinexin and its interaction with vinculin peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jiahai; Li, Xiang; Yao, Bo; Shen, Weiqun; Sun, Hongbin; Xu, Chao; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2007-01-01

    Solution structure of the first Src homology (SH) 3 domain of human vinexin (V S H3 1 ) was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method and revealed that it was a canonical SH3 domain, which has a typical β-β-β-β-α-β fold. Using chemical shift perturbation and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied the binding properties of the SH3 domain with two different peptides from vinculin hinge regions: P856 and P868. The observations illustrated slightly different affinities of the two peptides binding to V S H3 1 . The interaction between P868 and V S H3 1 belonged to intermediate exchange with a modest binding affinity, while the interaction between P856 and V S H3 1 had a low binding affinity. The structure and ligand-binding interface of V S H3 1 provide a structural basis for the further functional study of this important molecule

  10. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  11. Differential occurrence of interactions and interaction domains in proteins containing homopolymeric amino acid repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria ePelassa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs, which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as ‘junk’ sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction

  12. Antibody V and C domain sequence, structure, and interaction analysis with special reference to IMGT®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamyar, Eltaf; Giudicelli, Véronique; Duroux, Patrice; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    IMGT(®), the international ImMunoGeneTics information system(®) (http://www.imgt.org), created in 1989 (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Montpellier University), is acknowledged as the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. The accuracy and the consistency of the IMGT(®) data are based on IMGT-ONTOLOGY which bridges the gap between genes, sequences, and three-dimensional (3D) structures. Thus, receptors, chains, and domains are characterized with the same IMGT(®) rules and standards (IMGT standardized labels, IMGT gene and allele nomenclature, IMGT unique numbering, IMGT Collier de Perles), independently from the molecule type (genomic DNA, complementary DNA, transcript, or protein) or from the species. More particularly, IMGT(®) tools and databases provide a highly standardized analysis of the immunoglobulin (IG) or antibody and T cell receptor (TR) V and C domains. IMGT/V-QUEST analyzes the V domains of IG or TR rearranged nucleotide sequences, integrates the IMGT/JunctionAnalysis and IMGT/Automat tools, and provides IMGT Collier de Perles. IMGT/HighV-QUEST analyzes sequences from high-throughput sequencing (HTS) (up to 150,000 sequences per batch) and performs statistical analysis on up to 450,000 results, with the same resolution and high quality as IMGT/V-QUEST online. IMGT/DomainGapAlign analyzes amino acid sequences of V and C domains and IMGT/3Dstructure-DB and associated tools provide information on 3D structures, contact analysis, and paratope/epitope interactions. These IMGT(®) tools and databases, and the IMGT/mAb-DB interface with access to therapeutical antibody data, provide an invaluable help for antibody engineering and antibody humanization.

  13. Topology and weights in a protein domain interaction network – a novel way to predict protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchty Stefan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the analysis of unweighted biological webs as diverse as genetic, protein and metabolic networks allowed spectacular insights in the inner workings of a cell, biological networks are not only determined by their static grid of links. In fact, we expect that the heterogeneity in the utilization of connections has a major impact on the organization of cellular activities as well. Results We consider a web of interactions between protein domains of the Protein Family database (PFAM, which are weighted by a probability score. We apply metrics that combine the static layout and the weights of the underlying interactions. We observe that unweighted measures as well as their weighted counterparts largely share the same trends in the underlying domain interaction network. However, we only find weak signals that weights and the static grid of interactions are connected entities. Therefore assuming that a protein interaction is governed by a single domain interaction, we observe strong and significant correlations of the highest scoring domain interaction and the confidence of protein interactions in the underlying interactions of yeast and fly. Modeling an interaction between proteins if we find a high scoring protein domain interaction we obtain 1, 428 protein interactions among 361 proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Assessing their quality by a logistic regression method we observe that increasing confidence of predicted interactions is accompanied by high scoring domain interactions and elevated levels of functional similarity and evolutionary conservation. Conclusion Our results indicate that probability scores are randomly distributed, allowing to treat static grid and weights of domain interactions as separate entities. In particular, these finding confirms earlier observations that a protein interaction is a matter of a single interaction event on domain level. As an immediate application, we

  14. Spin orbit torques and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in dual-interfaced Co-Ni multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jiawei

    2016-09-07

    We study the spin orbit torque (SOT) and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in the dual-interfaced Co-Ni perpendicular multilayers. Through the combination of top and bottom layer materials (Pt, Ta, MgO and Cu), SOT and DMI are efficiently manipulated due to an enhancement or cancellation of the top and bottom contributions. However, SOT is found to originate mostly from the bulk of a heavy metal (HM), while DMI is more of interfacial origin. In addition, we find that the direction of the domain wall (DW) motion can be either along or against the electron flow depending on the DW tilting angle when there is a large DMI. Such an abnormal DW motion induces a large assist field required for hysteretic magnetization reversal. Our results provide insight into the role of DMI in SOT driven magnetization switching, and demonstrate the feasibility of achieving desirable SOT and DMI for spintronic devices.

  15. A Natural Interaction Interface for UAVs Using Intuitive Gesture Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Meghan; Trujillo, Anna; Shimada, Kenji; Allen, Danette

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is increasing as technological advancements boost their favorability for a broad range of applications. One application is science data collection. In fields like Earth and atmospheric science, researchers are seeking to use UAVs to augment their current portfolio of platforms and increase their accessibility to geographic areas of interest. By increasing the number of data collection platforms UAVs will significantly improve system robustness and allow for more sophisticated studies. Scientists would like be able to deploy an available fleet of UAVs to fly a desired flight path and collect sensor data without needing to understand the complex low-level controls required to describe and coordinate such a mission. A natural interaction interface for a Ground Control System (GCS) using gesture recognition is developed to allow non-expert users (e.g., scientists) to define a complex flight path for a UAV using intuitive hand gesture inputs from the constructed gesture library. The GCS calculates the combined trajectory on-line, verifies the trajectory with the user, and sends it to the UAV controller to be flown.

  16. Three-dimensional local ALE-FEM method for fluid flow in domains containing moving boundaries/objects interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, David Bradley [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Monayem, A. K. M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mazumder, H. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heinrich, Juan C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-05

    A three-dimensional finite element method for the numerical simulations of fluid flow in domains containing moving rigid objects or boundaries is developed. The method falls into the general category of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian methods; it is based on a fixed mesh that is locally adapted in the immediate vicinity of the moving interfaces and reverts to its original shape once the moving interfaces go past the elements. The moving interfaces are defined by separate sets of marker points so that the global mesh is independent of interface movement and the possibility of mesh entanglement is eliminated. The results is a fully robust formulation capable of calculating on domains of complex geometry with moving boundaries or devises that can also have a complex geometry without danger of the mesh becoming unsuitable due to its continuous deformation thus eliminating the need for repeated re-meshing and interpolation. Moreover, the boundary conditions on the interfaces are imposed exactly. This work is intended to support the internal combustion engines simulator KIVA developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories. The model's capabilities are illustrated through application to incompressible flows in different geometrical settings that show the robustness and flexibility of the technique to perform simulations involving moving boundaries in a three-dimensional domain.

  17. Coupling compositional liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at porous and free-flow domains interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masson, R., E-mail: roland.masson@unice.fr [LJAD, University Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 7351 (France); Team COFFEE INRIA Sophia Antipolis Méditerranée (France); Trenty, L., E-mail: laurent.trenty@andra.fr [Andra, Chatenay Malabry (France); Zhang, Y., E-mail: yumeng.zhang@unice.fr [LJAD, University Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 7351 (France); Team COFFEE INRIA Sophia Antipolis Méditerranée (France)

    2016-09-15

    This paper proposes an efficient splitting algorithm to solve coupled liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at the interface between a porous medium and a free-flow domain. This model is compared to the reduced model introduced in [6] using a 1D approximation of the gas free flow. For that purpose, the gas molar fraction diffusive flux at the interface in the free-flow domain is approximated by a two point flux approximation based on a low-frequency diagonal approximation of a Steklov–Poincaré type operator. The splitting algorithm and the reduced model are applied in particular to the modelling of the mass exchanges at the interface between the storage and the ventilation galleries in radioactive waste deposits.

  18. A key centriole assembly interaction interface between human PLK4 and STIL appears to not be conserved in flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Cottee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A small number of proteins form a conserved pathway of centriole duplication. In humans and flies, the binding of PLK4/Sak to STIL/Ana2 initiates daughter centriole assembly. In humans, this interaction is mediated by an interaction between the Polo-Box-3 (PB3 domain of PLK4 and the coiled-coil domain of STIL (HsCCD. We showed previously that the Drosophila Ana2 coiled-coil domain (DmCCD is essential for centriole assembly, but it forms a tight parallel tetramer in vitro that likely precludes an interaction with PB3. Here, we show that the isolated HsCCD and HsPB3 domains form a mixture of homo-multimers in vitro, but these readily dissociate when mixed to form the previously described 1:1 HsCCD:HsPB3 complex. In contrast, although Drosophila PB3 (DmPB3 adopts a canonical polo-box fold, it does not detectably interact with DmCCD in vitro. Thus, surprisingly, a key centriole assembly interaction interface appears to differ between humans and flies.

  19. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  20. Interaction energy of interface dislocation loops in piezoelectric bi-crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface dislocations may dramatically change the electric properties, such as polarization, of the piezoelectric crystals. In this paper, we study the linear interactions of two interface dislocation loops with arbitrary shape in generally anisotropic piezoelectric bi-crystals. A simple formula for calculating the interaction energy of the interface dislocation loops is derived and given by a double line integral along two closed dislocation curves. Particularly, interactions between two straight segments of the interface dislocations are solved analytically, which can be applied to approximate any curved loop so that an analytical solution can be also achieved. Numerical results show the influence of the bi-crystal interface as well as the material orientation on the interaction of interface dislocation loops.

  1. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  2. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  3. The structure and function of an RNA polymerase interaction domain in the PcrA/UvrD helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kelly; Lin, Chia-Liang; Smith, Abigail J; Cronin, Nora; Fisher, Gemma; Eftychidis, Vasileios; McGlynn, Peter; Savery, Nigel J; Wigley, Dale B; Dillingham, Mark S

    2017-04-20

    The PcrA/UvrD helicase functions in multiple pathways that promote bacterial genome stability including the suppression of conflicts between replication and transcription and facilitating the repair of transcribed DNA. The reported ability of PcrA/UvrD to bind and backtrack RNA polymerase (1,2) might be relevant to these functions, but the structural basis for this activity is poorly understood. In this work, we define a minimal RNA polymerase interaction domain in PcrA, and report its crystal structure at 1.5 Å resolution. The domain adopts a Tudor-like fold that is similar to other RNA polymerase interaction domains, including that of the prototype transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd. Removal or mutation of the interaction domain reduces the ability of PcrA/UvrD to interact with and to remodel RNA polymerase complexes in vitro. The implications of this work for our understanding of the role of PcrA/UvrD at the interface of DNA replication, transcription and repair are discussed. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Disruption of Rhodopsin Dimerization with Synthetic Peptides Targeting an Interaction Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Chen, Yuanyuan; Orban, Tivadar; Jin, Hui; Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Although homo- and heterodimerizations of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well documented, GPCR monomers are able to assemble in different ways, thus causing variations in the interactive interface between receptor monomers among different GPCRs. Moreover, the functional consequences of this phenomenon, which remain to be clarified, could be specific for different GPCRs. Synthetic peptides derived from transmembrane (TM) domains can interact with a full-length GPCR, blocking dimer formation and affecting its function. Here we used peptides corresponding to TM helices of bovine rhodopsin (Rho) to investigate the Rho dimer interface and functional consequences of its disruption. Incubation of Rho with TM1, TM2, TM4, and TM5 peptides in rod outer segment (ROS) membranes shifted the resulting detergent-solubilized protein migration through a gel filtration column toward smaller molecular masses with a reduced propensity for dimer formation in a cross-linking reaction. Binding of these TM peptides to Rho was characterized by both mass spectrometry and a label-free assay from which dissociation constants were calculated. A BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer) assay revealed that the physical interaction between Rho molecules expressed in membranes of living cells was blocked by the same four TM peptides identified in our in vitro experiments. Although disruption of the Rho dimer/oligomer had no effect on the rates of G protein activation, binding of Gt to the activated receptor stabilized the dimer. However, TM peptide-induced disruption of dimer/oligomer decreased receptor stability, suggesting that Rho supramolecular organization could be essential for ROS stabilization and receptor trafficking. PMID:26330551

  5. Disruption of Rhodopsin Dimerization with Synthetic Peptides Targeting an Interaction Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Chen, Yuanyuan; Orban, Tivadar; Jin, Hui; Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-10-16

    Although homo- and heterodimerizations of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well documented, GPCR monomers are able to assemble in different ways, thus causing variations in the interactive interface between receptor monomers among different GPCRs. Moreover, the functional consequences of this phenomenon, which remain to be clarified, could be specific for different GPCRs. Synthetic peptides derived from transmembrane (TM) domains can interact with a full-length GPCR, blocking dimer formation and affecting its function. Here we used peptides corresponding to TM helices of bovine rhodopsin (Rho) to investigate the Rho dimer interface and functional consequences of its disruption. Incubation of Rho with TM1, TM2, TM4, and TM5 peptides in rod outer segment (ROS) membranes shifted the resulting detergent-solubilized protein migration through a gel filtration column toward smaller molecular masses with a reduced propensity for dimer formation in a cross-linking reaction. Binding of these TM peptides to Rho was characterized by both mass spectrometry and a label-free assay from which dissociation constants were calculated. A BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer) assay revealed that the physical interaction between Rho molecules expressed in membranes of living cells was blocked by the same four TM peptides identified in our in vitro experiments. Although disruption of the Rho dimer/oligomer had no effect on the rates of G protein activation, binding of Gt to the activated receptor stabilized the dimer. However, TM peptide-induced disruption of dimer/oligomer decreased receptor stability, suggesting that Rho supramolecular organization could be essential for ROS stabilization and receptor trafficking. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  7. Domain-Based Predictive Models for Protein-Protein Interaction Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xue-Wen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are of biological interest because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Recently, methods for predicting protein interactions using domain information are proposed and preliminary results have demonstrated their feasibility. In this paper, we develop two domain-based statistical models (neural networks and decision trees for protein interaction predictions. Unlike most of the existing methods which consider only domain pairs (one domain from one protein and assume that domain-domain interactions are independent of each other, the proposed methods are capable of exploring all possible interactions between domains and make predictions based on all the domains. Compared to maximum-likelihood estimation methods, our experimental results show that the proposed schemes can predict protein-protein interactions with higher specificity and sensitivity, while requiring less computation time. Furthermore, the decision tree-based model can be used to infer the interactions not only between two domains, but among multiple domains as well.

  8. Design and verification of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of human fertilization-related MUP PDZ5 domain with CAMK's C-terminal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Guo, Yunjie; Zhang, Xue

    2018-02-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK) is physiologically activated in fertilized human oocytes and is involved in the Ca 2+ response pathways that link the fertilization calmodulin signal to meiosis resumption and cortical granule exocytosis. The kinase has an unstructured C-terminal tail that can be recognized and bound by the PDZ5 domain of its cognate partner, the multi-PDZ domain protein (MUP). In the current study, we reported a rational biomolecular design of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of CAMK's C-terminal peptide with MUP PDZ5 domain by using high-level computational approaches. Four organic halogens were employed as atom probes to explore the structural geometry and energetic property of designed halogen bonds in the PDZ5-peptide complex. It was found that the heavier halogen elements such as bromine Br and iodine I can confer stronger halogen bond but would cause bad atomic contacts and overlaps at the complex interface, while fluorine F cannot form effective halogen bond in the complex. In addition, the halogen substitution at different positions of peptide's aromatic ring would result in distinct effects on the halogen-bonding system. The computational findings were then verified by using fluorescence analysis; it is indicated that the halogen type and substitution position play critical role in the interaction strength of halogen bonds, and thus the PDZ5-peptide binding affinity can be improved considerably by optimizing their combination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Time-domain soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Justin L.; Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50 Appendix S requires consideration of soil-structure interaction (SSI) in nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis and design. Soil-structure interaction analysis for NPPs is routinely carried out using guidance provided in the ASCE Standard 4-98 titled “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary”. This Standard, which is currently under revision, provides guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities using deterministic and probabilistic methods. A new appendix has been added to the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 to provide guidance for time-domain, nonlinear SSI (NLSSI) analysis. Nonlinear SSI analysis will be needed to simulate material nonlinearity in soil and/or structure, static and dynamic soil pressure effects on deeply embedded structures, local soil failure at the foundation-soil interface, nonlinear coupling of soil and pore fluid, uplift or sliding of the foundation, nonlinear effects of gaps between the surrounding soil and the embedded structure and seismic isolation systems, none of which can be addressed explicitly at present. Appendix B of ASCE Standard 4 provides general guidance for NLSSI analysis but will not provide a methodology for performing the analysis. This paper provides a description of an NLSSI methodology developed for application to nuclear facilities, including NPPs. This methodology is described as series of sequential steps to produce reasonable results using any time-domain numerical code. These steps require some numerical capabilities, such as nonlinear soil constitutive models, which are also described in the paper.

  10. Graphene-metal interaction and its effect on the interface stability under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Aiyi; Fu, Qiang, E-mail: qfu@dicp.ac.cn; Wei, Mingming; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Graphene (Gr)/transition metal (TM: Fe, Co, Pt, and Au) interfaces form through TM intercalation at Gr/Ru(0001) surface. • Graphene-metal interaction strength follows the order of Ru ≈ Fe ≈ Co > Pt > Au. • Oxygen intercalation occurs at Gr/Fe, Gr/Co, Gr/Pt, and Gr/Ru interfaces but not at Gr/Au interface in air around 100 °C. - Abstract: Interaction between graphene (Gr) and metal plays an important role in physics and chemistry of graphene/metal interfaces. In this work, well-defined interfaces between graphene and transition metals (TMs) including Fe, Co, Pt, and Au were prepared through TM intercalation on Gr/Ru(0001) surface. The Gr-metal interaction was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. We found that graphene interacts most strongly with Ru, Fe and Co and most weakly with Au, following the order of Ru ≈ Fe ≈ Co > Pt > Au. The Gr/Fe, Gr/Co, Gr/Pt, and Gr/Ru interfaces can be readily intercalated by oxygen when exposed to air and illuminated by an infrared lamp. In contrast, oxygen intercalation does not happen at the Gr/Au interface under the same condition. It is suggested that both Gr-metal interaction and oxygen adsorption on the underlying metal surface are critical in the oxygen intercalation and the Gr/metal interface stability.

  11. Domain distribution and intrinsic disorder in hubs in the human protein–protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashwini; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder and distributed surface charge have been previously identified as some of the characteristics that differentiate hubs (proteins with a large number of interactions) from non-hubs in protein–protein interaction networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in the quantity, diversity, and functional nature of Pfam domains, and their relationship with intrinsic disorder, in hubs and non-hubs. We found that proteins with a more diverse domain composition were over-represented in hubs when compared with non-hubs, with the number of interactions in hubs increasing with domain diversity. Conversely, the fraction of intrinsic disorder in hubs decreased with increasing number of ordered domains. The difference in the levels of disorder was more prominent in hubs and non-hubs with fewer domains. Functional analysis showed that hubs were enriched in kinase and adaptor domains acting primarily in signal transduction and transcription regulation, whereas non-hubs had more DNA-binding domains and were involved in catalytic activity. Consistent with the differences in the functional nature of their domains, hubs with two or more domains were more likely to connect distinct functional modules in the interaction network when compared with single domain hubs. We conclude that the availability of greater number and diversity of ordered domains, in addition to the tendency to have promiscuous domains, differentiates hubs from non-hubs and provides an additional means of achieving interaction promiscuity. Further, hubs with fewer domains use greater levels of intrinsic disorder to facilitate interaction promiscuity with the prevalence of disorder decreasing with increasing number of ordered domains. PMID:20509167

  12. Domain distribution and intrinsic disorder in hubs in the human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashwini; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2010-08-01

    Intrinsic disorder and distributed surface charge have been previously identified as some of the characteristics that differentiate hubs (proteins with a large number of interactions) from non-hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in the quantity, diversity, and functional nature of Pfam domains, and their relationship with intrinsic disorder, in hubs and non-hubs. We found that proteins with a more diverse domain composition were over-represented in hubs when compared with non-hubs, with the number of interactions in hubs increasing with domain diversity. Conversely, the fraction of intrinsic disorder in hubs decreased with increasing number of ordered domains. The difference in the levels of disorder was more prominent in hubs and non-hubs with fewer domains. Functional analysis showed that hubs were enriched in kinase and adaptor domains acting primarily in signal transduction and transcription regulation, whereas non-hubs had more DNA-binding domains and were involved in catalytic activity. Consistent with the differences in the functional nature of their domains, hubs with two or more domains were more likely to connect distinct functional modules in the interaction network when compared with single domain hubs. We conclude that the availability of greater number and diversity of ordered domains, in addition to the tendency to have promiscuous domains, differentiates hubs from non-hubs and provides an additional means of achieving interaction promiscuity. Further, hubs with fewer domains use greater levels of intrinsic disorder to facilitate interaction promiscuity with the prevalence of disorder decreasing with increasing number of ordered domains.

  13. Biophysical characterization of the dimer and tetramer interface interactions of the human cytosolic malic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Sujithkumar; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The cytosolic NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME) has a dimer-dimer quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In this study, the urea-induced unfolding process of the c-NADP-ME interface mutants was monitored using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activities. Here, we demonstrate the differential protein stability between dimer and tetramer interface interactions of human c-NADP-ME. Our data clearly demonstrate that the protein stability of c-NADP-ME is affected predominantly by disruptions at the dimer interface rather than at the tetramer interface. First, during thermal stability experiments, the melting temperatures of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are 8-10°C higher than those of the dimer interface mutants. Second, during urea denaturation experiments, the thermodynamic parameters of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are almost identical. However, for the dimer interface mutants, the first transition of the urea unfolding curves shift towards a lower urea concentration, and the unfolding intermediate exist at a lower urea concentration. Third, for tetrameric WT c-NADP-ME, the enzyme is first dissociated from a tetramer to dimers before the 2 M urea treatment, and the dimers then dissociated into monomers before the 2.5 M urea treatment. With a dimeric tetramer interface mutant (H142A/D568A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 2.5 M urea treatment, while for a dimeric dimer interface mutant (H51A/D90A), the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 1.5 M urea treatment, indicating that the interactions of c-NADP-ME at the dimer interface are truly stronger than at the tetramer interface. Thus, this study provides a reasonable explanation for why malic enzymes need to assemble as a dimer of dimers.

  14. Biophysical characterization of the dimer and tetramer interface interactions of the human cytosolic malic enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujithkumar Murugan

    Full Text Available The cytosolic NADP(+-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME has a dimer-dimer quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In this study, the urea-induced unfolding process of the c-NADP-ME interface mutants was monitored using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activities. Here, we demonstrate the differential protein stability between dimer and tetramer interface interactions of human c-NADP-ME. Our data clearly demonstrate that the protein stability of c-NADP-ME is affected predominantly by disruptions at the dimer interface rather than at the tetramer interface. First, during thermal stability experiments, the melting temperatures of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are 8-10°C higher than those of the dimer interface mutants. Second, during urea denaturation experiments, the thermodynamic parameters of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are almost identical. However, for the dimer interface mutants, the first transition of the urea unfolding curves shift towards a lower urea concentration, and the unfolding intermediate exist at a lower urea concentration. Third, for tetrameric WT c-NADP-ME, the enzyme is first dissociated from a tetramer to dimers before the 2 M urea treatment, and the dimers then dissociated into monomers before the 2.5 M urea treatment. With a dimeric tetramer interface mutant (H142A/D568A, the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 2.5 M urea treatment, while for a dimeric dimer interface mutant (H51A/D90A, the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 1.5 M urea treatment, indicating that the interactions of c-NADP-ME at the dimer interface are truly stronger than at the tetramer interface. Thus, this study provides a reasonable explanation for why malic enzymes need to assemble as a dimer of dimers.

  15. Grb7 SH2 domain structure and interactions with a cyclic peptide inhibitor of cancer cell migration and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pero Stephanie C

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human growth factor receptor bound protein 7 (Grb7 is an adapter protein that mediates the coupling of tyrosine kinases with their downstream signaling pathways. Grb7 is frequently overexpressed in invasive and metastatic human cancers and is implicated in cancer progression via its interaction with the ErbB2 receptor and focal adhesion kinase (FAK that play critical roles in cell proliferation and migration. It is thus a prime target for the development of novel anti-cancer therapies. Recently, an inhibitory peptide (G7-18NATE has been developed which binds specifically to the Grb7 SH2 domain and is able to attenuate cancer cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell lines. Results As a first step towards understanding how Grb7 may be inhibited by G7-18NATE, we solved the crystal structure of the Grb7 SH2 domain to 2.1 Å resolution. We describe the details of the peptide binding site underlying target specificity, as well as the dimer interface of Grb 7 SH2. Dimer formation of Grb7 was determined to be in the μM range using analytical ultracentrifugation for both full-length Grb7 and the SH2 domain alone, suggesting the SH2 domain forms the basis of a physiological dimer. ITC measurements of the interaction of the G7-18NATE peptide with the Grb7 SH2 domain revealed that it binds with a binding affinity of Kd = ~35.7 μM and NMR spectroscopy titration experiments revealed that peptide binding causes perturbations to both the ligand binding surface of the Grb7 SH2 domain as well as to the dimer interface, suggesting that dimerisation of Grb7 is impacted on by peptide binding. Conclusion Together the data allow us to propose a model of the Grb7 SH2 domain/G7-18NATE interaction and to rationalize the basis for the observed binding specificity and affinity. We propose that the current study will assist with the development of second generation Grb7 SH2 domain inhibitors, potentially leading to novel inhibitors of

  16. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  17. Brain Computer Interfaces for Enhanced Interaction with Mobile Robot Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    omnidirectional base, and a Baxter dual- arm robotic manipulator . Brain-Computer Interfaces are promising technologies that can improve Human- Robot Interac... robotic arm through an automated grasping task using EEG BCI. On the left side is the robotic manipulator and three containers in the grasping scene... robot platforms used are the Willow Garage PR2 personal robot [21], a humanoid like robot with a mobile omnidirectional base, and a Baxter dual- arm

  18. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ancău Dorina; Roman Nicolae-Marius; Ancău Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for er...

  19. Improving aircraft conceptual design - A PHIGS interactive graphics interface for ACSYNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, S. G.; Myklebust, A.; Jayaram, S.; Gelhausen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A CAD interface has been created for the 'ACSYNT' aircraft conceptual design code that permits the execution and control of the design process via interactive graphics menus. This CAD interface was coded entirely with the new three-dimensional graphics standard, the Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics System. The CAD/ACSYNT system is designed for use by state-of-the-art high-speed imaging work stations. Attention is given to the approaches employed in modeling, data storage, and rendering.

  20. iPfam: a database of protein family and domain interactions found in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Robert D; Miller, Benjamin L; Clements, Jody; Bateman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The database iPfam, available at http://ipfam.org, catalogues Pfam domain interactions based on known 3D structures that are found in the Protein Data Bank, providing interaction data at the molecular level. Previously, the iPfam domain-domain interaction data was integrated within the Pfam database and website, but it has now been migrated to a separate database. This allows for independent development, improving data access and giving clearer separation between the protein family and interactions datasets. In addition to domain-domain interactions, iPfam has been expanded to include interaction data for domain bound small molecule ligands. Functional annotations are provided from source databases, supplemented by the incorporation of Wikipedia articles where available. iPfam (version 1.0) contains >9500 domain-domain and 15 500 domain-ligand interactions. The new website provides access to this data in a variety of ways, including interactive visualizations of the interaction data.

  1. The STI and UBA Domains of UBQLN1 Are Critical Determinants of Substrate Interaction and Proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlawala, Zimple; Shah, Parag P; Shah, Charmi; Beverly, Levi J

    2017-08-01

    There are five Ubiquilin proteins (UBQLN1-4, UBQLN-L), which are evolutionarily conserved and structurally similar. UBQLN proteins have three functional domains: N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain (UBL), C-terminal ubiquitin-associated domain (UBA), and STI chaperone-like regions in the middle. Alterations in UBQLN1 gene have been detected in a variety of disorders ranging from Alzheimer's disease to cancer. UBQLN1 has been largely studied in neurodegenerative disorders in the context of protein quality control. Several studies have hypothesized that the UBA domain of UBQLN1 binds to poly-ubiquitin chains of substrate and shuttles it to the proteasome via its UBL domain for degradation. UBQLN1 either facilitates degradation (Ataxin3, EPS15) or stabilizes (PSEN1/2, BCLb) substrates it binds to. The signal that determines this fate is unknown and there is conflicting data to support the existing working model of UBQLN1. Using BCLb as a model substrate, we characterized UBQLN1-substrate interaction. We identified the first two STI domains of UBQLN1 as critical for binding to BCLb. Interaction of UBQLN1 with BCLb is independent of ubiquitination of BCLb, but interaction with ubiquitin via UBA domain is required for stabilization of BCLb. Similarly, we showed that UBQLN1 interacts with IGF1R and ESYT2 through the STI domains and stabilizes these proteins through its UBA domain. Interactions that are not dependent on STI domains, for example, UBL mediated interaction with PSMD4 and BAG6, do not appear to be stabilized by UBQLN1. We conclude that fate of substrates that UBQLN1 associates with, is interaction domain specific. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2261-2270, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Control of interactive robotic interfaces: A port-Hamiltonian approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siciliano, B.; Secchi, C; Stramigioli, Stefano; Khatib, O.; Groen, F.; Fantuzzi, C.

    2007-01-01

    When two physical systems (e.g. a robot and its environment) interact they exchange energy through localized ports and, in order to control their interaction, it is necessary to control the exchanged energy. The port-Hamiltonian formalism provides a general framework for modeling physical systems

  3. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancău Dorina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for error decoding.

  4. Solving partial differential equations on irregular domains with moving interfaces, with applications to superconformal electrodeposition in semiconductor manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethian, J.A.; Shan, Y.

    2007-12-10

    We present a numerical algorithm for solving partial differential equations on irregular domains with moving interfaces. Instead of the typical approach of solving in a larger rectangular domain, our approach performs most calculations only in the desired domain. To do so efficiently, we have developed a one-sided multigrid method to solve the corresponding large sparse linear systems. Our focus is on the simulation of the electrodeposition process in semiconductor manufacturing in both two and three dimensions. Our goal is to track the position of the interface between the metal and the electrolyte as the features are filled and to determine which initial configurations and physical parameters lead to superfilling. We begin by motivating the set of equations which model the electrodeposition process. Building on existing models for superconformal electrodeposition, we develop a model which naturally arises from a conservation law form of surface additive evolution. We then introduce several numerical algorithms, including a conservative material transport level set method and our multigrid method for one-sided diffusion equations. We then analyze the accuracy of our numerical methods. Finally, we compare our result with experiment over a wide range of physical parameters.

  5. Mechanism of mRNA-STAR domain interaction: Molecular dynamics simulations of Mammalian Quaking STAR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Anirudh, C R

    2017-10-03

    STAR proteins are evolutionary conserved mRNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression at all stages of RNA metabolism. These proteins possess conserved STAR domain that recognizes identical RNA regulatory elements as YUAAY. Recently reported crystal structures show that STAR domain is composed of N-terminal QUA1, K-homology domain (KH) and C-terminal QUA2, and mRNA binding is mediated by KH-QUA2 domain. Here, we present simulation studies done to investigate binding of mRNA to STAR protein, mammalian Quaking protein (QKI). We carried out conventional MD simulations of STAR domain in presence and absence of mRNA, and studied the impact of mRNA on the stability, dynamics and underlying allosteric mechanism of STAR domain. Our unbiased simulations results show that presence of mRNA stabilizes the overall STAR domain by reducing the structural deviations, correlating the 'within-domain' motions, and maintaining the native contacts information. Absence of mRNA not only influenced the essential modes of motion of STAR domain, but also affected the connectivity of networks within STAR domain. We further explored the dissociation of mRNA from STAR domain using umbrella sampling simulations, and the results suggest that mRNA binding to STAR domain occurs in multi-step: first conformational selection of mRNA backbone conformations, followed by induced fit mechanism as nucleobases interact with STAR domain.

  6. Structural insights into a wildtype domain of the oncoprotein E6 and its interaction with a PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mischo

    Full Text Available The high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 interact with key cellular regulators and are etiological agents for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance in cervical cancer and other malignant conditions. E6 induces degradation of the tumor suppressor p53, activates telomerase and deregulates cell polarity. Analysis of E6 derived from a number of high risk HPV finally yielded the first structure of a wild-type HPV E6 domain (PDB 2M3L representing the second zinc-binding domain of HPV 51 E6 (termed 51Z2 determined by NMR spectroscopy. The 51Z2 structure provides clues about HPV-type specific structural differences between E6 proteins. The observed temperature sensitivity of the well-folded wild-type E6 domain implies a significant malleability of the oncoprotein in vivo. Hence, the structural differences between individual E6 and their malleability appear, together with HPV type-specific surface exposed side-chains, to provide the structural basis for the different interaction networks reported for individual E6 proteins. Furthermore, the interaction of 51Z2 with a PDZ domain of hDlg was analyzed. Human Dlg constitutes a prototypic representative of the large family of PDZ proteins regulating cell polarity, which are common targets of high-risk HPV E6. Nine C-terminal residues of 51Z2 interact with the second PDZ domain of hDlg2. Surface plasmon resonance in conjunction with the NMR spectroscopy derived complex structure (PDB 2M3M indicate that E6 residues N-terminal to the canonical PDZ-BM of E6 significantly contribute to this interaction and increase affinity. The structure of the complex reveals how residues outside of the classical PDZ-BM enhance the affinity of E6 towards PDZ domains. Such mechanism facilitates successful competition of E6 with cellular PDZ-binding proteins and may apply to PDZ-binding proteins of other viruses as well.

  7. GAIA: a gram-based interaction analysis tool--an approach for identifying interacting domains in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kelvin X; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2009-01-30

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play important roles in many biological functions. Protein domains, which are defined as independently folding structural blocks of proteins, physically interact with each other to perform these biological functions. Therefore, the identification of Domain-Domain Interactions (DDIs) is of great biological interests because it is generally accepted that PPIs are mediated by DDIs. As a result, much effort has been put on the prediction of domain pair interactions based on computational methods. Many DDI prediction tools using PPIs network and domain evolution information have been reported. However, tools that combine the primary sequences, domain annotations, and structural annotations of proteins have not been evaluated before. In this study, we report a novel approach called Gram-bAsed Interaction Analysis (GAIA). GAIA extracts peptide segments that are composed of fixed length of continuous amino acids, called n-grams (where n is the number of amino acids), from the annotated domain and DDI data set in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and identifies a list of n-grams that may contribute to DDIs and PPIs based on the frequencies of their appearance. GAIA also reports the coordinate position of gram pairs on each interacting domain pair. We demonstrate that our approach improves on other DDI prediction approaches when tested against a gold-standard data set and achieves a true positive rate of 82% and a false positive rate of 21%. We also identify a list of 4-gram pairs that are significantly over-represented in the DDI data set and may mediate PPIs. GAIA represents a novel and reliable way to predict DDIs that mediate PPIs. Our results, which show the localizations of interacting grams/hotspots, provide testable hypotheses for experimental validation. Complemented with other prediction methods, this study will allow us to elucidate the interactome of cells.

  8. Brain-Computer Interfaces Revolutionizing Human-Computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Graimann, Bernhard; Allison, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) establishes a direct output channel between the human brain and external devices. BCIs infer user intent via direct measures of brain activity and thus enable communication and control without movement. This book, authored by experts in the field, provides an accessible introduction to the neurophysiological and signal-processing background required for BCI, presents state-of-the-art non-invasive and invasive approaches, gives an overview of current hardware and software solutions, and reviews the most interesting as well as new, emerging BCI applications. The book is intended not only for students and young researchers, but also for newcomers and other readers from diverse backgrounds keen to learn about this vital scientific endeavour.

  9. A domain-based approach to predict protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resat Haluk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing which proteins exist in a certain organism or cell type and how these proteins interact with each other are necessary for the understanding of biological processes at the whole cell level. The determination of the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks has been the subject of extensive research. Despite the development of reasonably successful methods, serious technical difficulties still exist. In this paper we present DomainGA, a quantitative computational approach that uses the information about the domain-domain interactions to predict the interactions between proteins. Results DomainGA is a multi-parameter optimization method in which the available PPI information is used to derive a quantitative scoring scheme for the domain-domain pairs. Obtained domain interaction scores are then used to predict whether a pair of proteins interacts. Using the yeast PPI data and a series of tests, we show the robustness and insensitivity of the DomainGA method to the selection of the parameter sets, score ranges, and detection rules. Our DomainGA method achieves very high explanation ratios for the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. Based on our cross-verification tests on human PPIs, comparison of the optimized scores with the structurally observed domain interactions obtained from the iPFAM database, and sensitivity and specificity analysis; we conclude that our DomainGA method shows great promise to be applicable across multiple organisms. Conclusion We envision the DomainGA as a first step of a multiple tier approach to constructing organism specific PPIs. As it is based on fundamental structural information, the DomainGA approach can be used to create potential PPIs and the accuracy of the constructed interaction template can be further improved using complementary methods. Explanation ratios obtained in the reported test case studies clearly show that the false prediction rates of the template networks constructed

  10. Interaction domains in high-performance NdFeB thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodcock, T.G. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: t.woodcock@ifw-dresden.de; Khlopkov, K. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Walther, A. [Insitut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25 avenue de Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); CEA Leti - MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Dempsey, N.M.; Givord, D. [Insitut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25 avenue de Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Schultz, L.; Gutfleisch, O. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The magnetic domain structure in sputtered NdFeB thick films has been imaged by magnetic force microscopy. The local texture of the films was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The average misorientation of the grains was shown to decrease with increasing substrate temperature during deposition. Interaction domains were observed and are discussed with reference (i) to the sample grain size compared to the single domain particle size and (ii) to sample texture.

  11. Decay Rates of Interactive Hyperbolic-Parabolic PDE Models with Thermal Effects on the Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasiecka, I.; Lebiedzik, C.

    2000-01-01

    We consider coupled PDE systems comprising of a hyperbolic and a parabolic-like equation with an interface on a portion of the boundary. These models are motivated by structural acoustic problems. A specific prototype consists of a wave equation defined on a three-dimensional bounded domain Ω coupled with a thermoelastic plate equation defined on Γ 0 -a flat surface of the boundary Ω. Thus, the coupling between the wave and the plate takes place on the interface Γ 0 . The main issue studied here is that of uniform stability of the overall interactive model. Since the original (uncontrolled) model is only strongly stable, but not uniformly stable, the question becomes: what is the 'minimal amount' of dissipation necessary to obtain uniform decay rates for the energy of the overall system? Our main result states that boundary nonlinear dissipation placed only on a suitable portion of the part of the boundary which is complementary to Γ 0 , suffices for the stabilization of the entire structure. This result is new with respect to the literature on several accounts: (i) thermoelasticity is accounted for in the plate model; (ii) the plate model does not account for any type of mechanical damping, including the structural damping most often considered in the literature; (iii) there is no mechanical damping placed on the interface Γ 0 ; (iv) the boundary damping is nonlinear without a prescribed growth rate at the origin; (v) the undamped portions of the boundary partial Ω are subject to Neumann (rather than Dirichlet) boundary conditions, which is a recognized difficulty in the context of stabilization of wave equations, due to the fact that the strong Lopatinski condition does not hold. The main mathematical challenge is to show how the thermal energy is propagated onto the hyperbolic component of the structure. This is achieved by using a recently developed sharp theory of boundary traces corresponding to wave and plate equations, along with the analytic

  12. Designing personal attentive user interfaces in the mobile public safety domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J.W.; Esch van-Bussemakers, M.P.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the mobile computing environment, there is a need to adapt the information and service provision to the momentary attentive state of the user, operational requirements and usage context. This paper proposes to design personal attentive user interfaces (PAUI) for which the content and style of

  13. New method of detecting hydrophobic interaction between C-terminal binding domain and biomacromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, JiaFeng; Wu, RiBang; Wu, CuiLing; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Jiang; Liao, BinQiang; Lei, Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Ma, ChangBei; He, HaiLun

    2018-01-10

    The C-terminal domains of proteases play crucial roles in hydrolysis, substrate adsorption and targeted binding. Identifying and characterizing interactions between C-terminal domains and biomacromolecules can help to examine the diversity as well as the substrate-binding ability of C-terminal domains and to explore novel functions. The bacterial pre-peptidase C-terminal (PPC) domain is a typical C-terminal domain normally found at the C-terminus of bacterial secreted proteases. In this work, we successfully demonstrated that 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) could be used to rapidly determine the interactions between this C-terminal domain and biomacromolecules. The time-resolved ANS fluorescence of PPC and collagen interaction could be used for quantitative analysis of the collagen-binding capability based on the slope of the time-scanning curve. Using this method, we found that PPC domains had an obvious affinity to fibrillar proteins but had little or no capacity to bind polysaccharides or linear DNAs. Docking studies proved that collagen bound to the same hydrophobic site of PPC as the ANS probe, causing a decrease in the emission intensity. This method is simple and cost effective and provides an effective detection technique to analyze the interaction between this C-terminal domain and biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. i-Car: An Intelligent and Interactive Interface for Driver Assistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It emerged as an Interactive Technology with an interactive audio, visual, touch and touch-less interfaces. These can assist to avoid accidents in the world by intelligently ignoring certain hardware sensors like IR, UV, Acoustic, Proximity and mechanical devices like costlier LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) fitted in ...

  15. Tasty tech: human-food interaction and multimodal interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn; Huisman, Gijs; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of food involves, not just taste, but all senses. We describe several interactive and novel mixed reality systems designed to enhance or change a dining experience by using computer generated visual, audio, and tactile stimuli. We describe how ideas from these playful designs can

  16. Domain distribution and intrinsic disorder in hubs in the human protein–protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Ashwini; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder and distributed surface charge have been previously identified as some of the characteristics that differentiate hubs (proteins with a large number of interactions) from non-hubs in protein–protein interaction networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in the quantity, diversity, and functional nature of Pfam domains, and their relationship with intrinsic disorder, in hubs and non-hubs. We found that proteins with a more diverse domain composition were over-re...

  17. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  18. Computer Aided Grid Interface: An Interactive CFD Pre-Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Bharat K.

    1997-01-01

    NASA maintains an applications oriented computational fluid dynamics (CFD) efforts complementary to and in support of the aerodynamic-propulsion design and test activities. This is especially true at NASA/MSFC where the goal is to advance and optimize present and future liquid-fueled rocket engines. Numerical grid generation plays a significant role in the fluid flow simulations utilizing CFD. An overall goal of the current project was to develop a geometry-grid generation tool that will help engineers, scientists and CFD practitioners to analyze design problems involving complex geometries in a timely fashion. This goal is accomplished by developing the CAGI: Computer Aided Grid Interface system. The CAGI system is developed by integrating CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) geometric system output and/or Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) files (including all the NASA-IGES entities), geometry manipulations and generations associated with grid constructions, and robust grid generation methodologies. This report describes the development process of the CAGI system.

  19. Blocking the Interactions between Calcium-Bound S100A12 Protein and the V Domain of RAGE Using Tranilast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jian Wei; Fu, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor in the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in several inflammatory processes. RAGE induces cellular signaling pathways upon binding with various ligands, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), β-amyloids, and S100 proteins. The solution structure of S100A12 and the V ligand-binding region of RAGE have been reported previously. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to conduct 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) titration experiments, we identified and mapped the binding interface between S100A12 and the V domain of RAGE. The NMR chemical shift data were used as the constraints for the High Ambiguity Driven biomolecular DOCKing (HADDOCK) calculation to generate a structural model of the S100A12–V domain complex. In addition, tranilast (an anti-allergic drug) showed strong interaction with S100A12 in the 1H–15N HSQC titration, fluorescence experiments, and WST-1 assay. The results also indicated that tranilast was located at the binding site between S100A12 and the V domain, blocking interaction between these two proteins. Our results provide the mechanistic details for a structural model and reveal a potential precursor for an inhibitor for pro-inflammatory diseases, which could be useful for the development of new drugs. PMID:27598566

  20. Conversational Interfaces: A Domain-Independent Architecture for Task-Oriented Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-12

    738.4 Avoiding Mode Confusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738.4.1 Announ ing State Changes ...involved insupporting a new task-oriented domain for dialogue. In parti ular, Iwill assume that the goal is to modify the CSLI dialogue mananger towork with

  1. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2015-03-15

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  2. Bacteria interface interactions in Ecology-on-a-Chip by holographic microscopy and interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian; White, Andrew; Jalali, Maryam

    2017-11-01

    To improve our remediation of oil spills into marine system, one must understand the fate of oil under complex physical, chemical and biological environments. It is found that various processes such as wind, wave, turbulence and currents break oil into suspensions of droplets, in which states consumption by microbial further degrade the oil. Our prior studies show that marine bacteria do not adopt biofilm life style at oil-water interface in comparison to those near a solid substrate. On the contrary, Extracellular Polymer Substance of oily microbial aggregates is easily formed around an oil droplet. This highlights complexities of cell oil interactions at a liquid-liquid interface. To investigate these mechanisms at oil water interface quantitative, we have developed a micro-bioassay consisting of continuous microfluidics with a substrate printed with oil droplet array, namely Ecology-on-a-Chip, and an integrated digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and interferometer (DHI). The oil-water interface can be maintained over days (>10 days), suitable for conducting long-term observations. 3D movements of bacteria are tracked by DHM, while the interface morphology are measured by DHI at 10nm. The system is applied to Pseudomonas sp. (PS62) near crude-water interface and Escherichia coli (AW405) at hexadecane-water interface subject to low surface tension. The 3D motility, attachment, detachment and dispersion of cells as well as motility induced interface change are discussed. Funded by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  3. Energetics of Src homology domain interactions in receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, John E; Arold, Stefan T

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) on extracellular stimulation is fundamental to all cellular processes. The protein-protein interactions which form the basis of this signaling are mediated through a limited number of polypeptide domains. For signal transduction without corruption, based on a model where signaling pathways are considered as linear bimolecular relays, these interactions have to be highly specific. This is particularly the case when one considers that any cell may have copies of similar binding domains found in numerous proteins. In this work, an overview of the thermodynamics of binding of two of the most common of these domains (SH2 and SH3 domains) is given. This, coupled with insight from high-resolution structural detail, provides a comprehensive survey of how recognition of cognate binding sites for these domains occurs. Based on the data presented, we conclude that specificity offered by these interactions of SH2 and SH3 domains is limited and not sufficient to enforce mutual exclusivity in RTK-mediated signaling. This may explain the current lack of success in pharmaceutical intervention to inhibit the interactions of these domains when they are responsible for aberrant signaling and the resulting disease states such as cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Membrane Interaction of the Factor VIIIa Discoidin Domains in Atomistic Detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipi...... binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent nonspecificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2.......A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid....... The results indicate that FVIII C1 may be important in modulating the orientation of the FVIIIa molecule to optimize the interaction with FIXa, which is anchored to the membrane via its γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich (Gla) domain. Additionally, a structural change was observed in FVIII C1 in the coiled main...

  5. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  6. Manipulating perfume delivery to the interface using polymer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-03-15

    Enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces is an important element of their effectiveness in a range of home and personal care products. The role of polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures to promote perfume adsorption at interfaces is explored here. Neutron reflectivity, NR, was used to quantify the adsorption of the model perfumes phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, at the air-water interface in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS, and the cationic polyelectrolytes, poly(dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride), polydmdaac, and poly(ethyleneimine), PEI. The strong SDS-polydmdaac interaction dominates the surface adsorption in SDS-polymer-perfume (PE, LL) mixtures, such that the PE and LL adsorption is greatly suppressed. For PEI-SDS-perfume mixtures the PEI-LL interaction competes with the SDS-PEI interaction at all pH at the surface and significant LL adsorption occurs, whereas for PE the PEI-SDS interaction dominates and the PE adsorption is greatly reduced. The use of the strong surface polyelectrolyte-ionic surfactant interaction to manipulate perfume adsorption at the air-water interface has been demonstrated. In particular the results show how the competition between polyelectrolyte, surfactant and perfume interactions at the surface and in solution affect the partitioning of perfumes to the surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational analysis of RNA-protein interaction interfaces via the Voronoi diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Sedigheh; Mohades, Ali; Salehzadeh Yazdi, Ali; Jahandideh, Samad; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2012-01-21

    Cellular functions are mediated by various biological processes including biomolecular interactions, such as protein-protein, DNA-protein and RNA-protein interactions in which RNA-Protein interactions are indispensable for many biological processes like cell development and viral replication. Unlike the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, accurate mechanisms and structures of the RNA-Protein complexes are not fully understood. A large amount of theoretical evidence have shown during the past several years that computational geometry is the first pace in understanding the binding profiles and plays a key role in the study of intricate biological structures, interactions and complexes. In this paper, RNA-Protein interaction interface surface is computed via the weighted Voronoi diagram of atoms. Using two filter operations provides a natural definition for interface atoms as classic methods. Unbounded parts of Voronoi facets that are far from the complex are trimmed using modified convex hull of atom centers. This algorithm is implemented to a database with different RNA-Protein complexes extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). Afterward, the features of interfaces have been computed and compared with classic method. The results show high correlation coefficients between interface size in the Voronoi model and the classical model based on solvent accessibility, as well as high accuracy and precision in comparison to classical model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Domain Structures and Inter-Domain Interactions Defining the Holoenzyme Architecture of Archaeal D-Family DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  9. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  10. Improving access to clinical practice guidelines with an interactive graphical interface using an iconic language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are useful for physicians, and guidelines are available on the Internet from various websites such as Vidal Recos. However, these guidelines are long and difficult to read, especially during consultation. Similar difficulties have been encountered with drug summaries of product characteristics. In a previous work, we have proposed an iconic language (called VCM, for Visualization of Concepts in Medicine) for representing patient conditions, treatments and laboratory tests, and we have used these icons to design a user interface that graphically indexes summaries of product characteristics. In the current study, our objective was to design and evaluate an iconic user interface for the consultation of clinical practice guidelines by physicians. Methods Focus groups of physicians were set up to identify the difficulties encountered when reading guidelines. Icons were integrated into Vidal Recos, taking human factors into account. The resulting interface includes a graphical summary and an iconic indexation of the guideline. The new interface was evaluated. We compared the response times and the number of errors recorded when physicians answered questions about two clinical scenarios using the interactive iconic interface or a textual interface. Users’ perceived usability was evaluated with the System Usability Scale. Results The main difficulties encountered by physicians when reading guidelines were obtaining an overview and finding recommendations for patients corresponding to “particular cases”. We designed a graphical interface for guideline consultation, using icons to identify particular cases and providing a graphical summary of the icons organized by anatomy and etiology. The evaluation showed that physicians gave clinical responses more rapidly with the iconic interface than the textual interface (25.2 seconds versus 45.6, p iconic interface can provide physicians with an overview of clinical practice guidelines

  11. Soil-structure interaction analysis of NPP containments: substructure and frequency domain methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio-Filho, F.; Almeida, M.C.F.; Ferreira, W.G.; De Barros, F.C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Substructure and frequency domain methods for soil-structure interaction are addressed in this paper. After a brief description of mathematical models for the soil and of excitation, the equations for dynamic soil-structure interaction are developed for a rigid surface foundation and for an embedded foundation. The equations for the frequency domain analysis of MDOF systems are provided. An example of soil-structure interaction analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties is given and examples of identification of foundation impedance functions and soil properties are presented. (orig.)

  12. Interaction of calmodulin with the calmodulin binding domain of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorherr, T.; James, P.; Krebs, J.; Carafoli, E.; McCormick, D.J.; Penniston, J.T.; Enyedi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Peptides corresponding to the calmodulin binding domain of the plasma membrane Ca 2+ pump were synthesized, and their interaction with calmodulin was studied with circular dichroism, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and fluorescence techniques. They corresponded to the complete calmodulin binding domain (28 residues), to its first 15 or 20 amino acids, and to its C-terminal 14 amino acids. The first three peptides interacted with calmodulin. The K value was similar to that of the intact enzyme in the 28 and 20 amino acid peptides, but increased substantially in the shorter 15 amino acid peptide. The 14 amino acid peptide corresponding to the C-terminal portion of the domain failed to bind calmodulin. 2D NMR experiments on the 20 amino acid peptides have indicated that the interaction occurred with the C-terminal half of calmodulin. A tryptophan that is conserved in most calmodulin binding domains of proteins was replaced by other amino acids, giving rise to modified peptides which had lower affinity for calmodulin. An 18 amino acid peptide corresponding to an acidic sequence immediately N-terminal to the calmodulin binding domain which is likely to be a Ca 2+ binding site in the pump was also synthesized. Circular dichroism experiments have shown that it interacted with calmodulin binding domain, supporting the suggestion that the latter, or a portion of it, may act as a natural inhibitor of the pump

  13. An Efficient Semi-supervised Learning Approach to Predict SH2 Domain Mediated Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Kousik; Backofen, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is an important subclass of modular protein domains that plays an indispensable role in several biological processes in eukaryotes. SH2 domains specifically bind to the phosphotyrosine residue of their binding peptides to facilitate various molecular functions. For determining the subtle binding specificities of SH2 domains, it is very important to understand the intriguing mechanisms by which these domains recognize their target peptides in a complex cellular environment. There are several attempts have been made to predict SH2-peptide interactions using high-throughput data. However, these high-throughput data are often affected by a low signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, the prediction methods have several additional shortcomings, such as linearity problem, high computational complexity, etc. Thus, computational identification of SH2-peptide interactions using high-throughput data remains challenging. Here, we propose a machine learning approach based on an efficient semi-supervised learning technique for the prediction of 51 SH2 domain mediated interactions in the human proteome. In our study, we have successfully employed several strategies to tackle the major problems in computational identification of SH2-peptide interactions.

  14. Microsphere Wetting, Meniscus Structure, and Capillary Interactions on a Curved Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Dinsmore, Anthony; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    A small spherical microparticle on a cylindrically curved liquid interface locally induces a quadrupolar interface deformation to maintain a constant contact angle about its wetted periphery. Measured by optical profilometry, this deformation was compared to a recent theoretical expression, and good agreement was noted for contact line shape, particle vertical position, and deformation vs. (distance, angle, particle size, interfacial curvature). Interface quadrupoles lead to particle capillary interactions in analogy to 2D electrostatic quadrupoles, and as one consequence, spheres on a cylindrical interface assemble tetragonally, i.e., into a square lattice. This assembly was monitored in the optical microscope, with particles interacting as predicted, into a square lattice aligned with the underlying cylindrical axis. These particles and assemblies were driven to the middle of the curved interface by capillary interaction with pinned liquid contact lines on each side of the liquid cylindrical section used in the experiments. These phenomena can inform the directed interfacial assembly of micro-sized spherical objects, with potential application in fabrication of functional devices and materials, encapsulation, and emulsification.

  15. Interaction of von Willebrand factor domains with collagen investigated by single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Sandra; Obser, Tobias; König, Gesa; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2018-03-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a huge multimeric protein that plays a key role in primary hemostasis. Sites for collagen binding, an initial event of hemostasis, are located in the VWF-domains A1 and A3. In this study, we investigated single molecule interactions between collagen surfaces and wild type VWF A1A2A3 domain constructs, as well as clinically relevant VWF A3 domain point mutations, such as p.Ser1731Thr, p.Gln1734His, and p.His1786Arg. For this, we utilized atomic force microscopy based single molecular force spectroscopy. The p.Ser1731Thr mutant had no impact on the VWF-collagen type III and VI interactions, while the p.Gln1734His and p.His1786Arg mutants showed a slight increase in bond stability to collagen type III. This effect probably arises from additional hydrogen bonds that come along with the introduction of these mutations. Using the same mutants, but collagen type VI as a binding partner, resulted in a significant increase in bond stability. VWF domain A1 was reported to be essential for the interaction with collagen type VI and thus our findings strengthen the hypothesis that the VWF A1 domain can compensate for mutations in the VWF A3 domain. Additionally, our data suggest that the mutations could even stabilize the interaction between VWF and collagen without shear. VWF-collagen interactions seem to be an important system in which defective interactions between one VWF domain and one type of collagen can be compensated by alternative binding events.

  16. Closing remarks on Faraday Discussion 107: Interactions of acoustic waves with thin films and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    The papers in this Faraday Discussion represent the state-of-the-art in using acoustic devices to measure the properties of thin films and interfaces. Sauerbrey first showed that the mass sensitivity of a quartz crystal could be used to measure the thickness of vacuum-deposited metals. Since then, significant progress has been made in understanding other interaction mechanisms between acoustic devices and contacting media. Bruckenstein and Shay and Kanazawa and Gordon showed that quartz resonators could be operated in a fluid to measure surface mass accumulation and fluid properties. The increased understanding of interactions between acoustic devices and contacting media has allowed new information to be obtained about thin films and interfaces. These closing remarks will summarize the current state of using acoustic techniques to probe thin films and interfaces, describe the progress reported in this Faraday Discussion, and outline some remaining problems. Progress includes new measurement techniques, novel devices, new applications, and improved modeling and data analysis.

  17. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-04-08

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior - a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC - was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface.

  18. Integrating natural language processing and web GIS for interactive knowledge domain visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangming

    Recent years have seen a powerful shift towards data-rich environments throughout society. This has extended to a change in how the artifacts and products of scientific knowledge production can be analyzed and understood. Bottom-up approaches are on the rise that combine access to huge amounts of academic publications with advanced computer graphics and data processing tools, including natural language processing. Knowledge domain visualization is one of those multi-technology approaches, with its aim of turning domain-specific human knowledge into highly visual representations in order to better understand the structure and evolution of domain knowledge. For example, network visualizations built from co-author relations contained in academic publications can provide insight on how scholars collaborate with each other in one or multiple domains, and visualizations built from the text content of articles can help us understand the topical structure of knowledge domains. These knowledge domain visualizations need to support interactive viewing and exploration by users. Such spatialization efforts are increasingly looking to geography and GIS as a source of metaphors and practical technology solutions, even when non-georeferenced information is managed, analyzed, and visualized. When it comes to deploying spatialized representations online, web mapping and web GIS can provide practical technology solutions for interactive viewing of knowledge domain visualizations, from panning and zooming to the overlay of additional information. This thesis presents a novel combination of advanced natural language processing - in the form of topic modeling - with dimensionality reduction through self-organizing maps and the deployment of web mapping/GIS technology towards intuitive, GIS-like, exploration of a knowledge domain visualization. A complete workflow is proposed and implemented that processes any corpus of input text documents into a map form and leverages a web

  19. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, M.; Nijboer, F.; Broek, E.L. van den; Fairclough, S.; Nijholt, A.

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This

  20. Designing interactive voice response (IVR) interfaces: localisation for low literacy users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sharma Grover, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available -literate, and the impact of a different set of social-cultural, linguistic, and domestic challenges, amongst others, the authords advocate the enculturation of IVR interfaces different from the developed world. This requires the tailoring of functionalities and interactive...

  1. Extreme Scalability: Designing Interfaces and Algorithms for Soldier-Robotic Swarm Interaction, Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Christopher Stachowiak , Susan Hill, and Krishna Pillalamarri ARL-TR-5222 June 2010 Approved for...Interfaces and Algorithms for Soldier-Robotic Swarm Interaction, Year 2 Ellen C. Haas, Christopher Stachowiak , Susan Hill, and Krishna Pillalamarri Human...Haas, Susan Hill, Christopher Stachowiak , Krishna Pillalamarri, and MaryAnne Fields 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  2. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Lee

    Full Text Available Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS and pressure gradients (∇P across the atrioventricular (AV canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP (y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV across the atrioventricular (AV canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf, simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6, whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  3. Interaction of the superconducting domains induced by external electric field with electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a superconductor in time-independent electric field perpendicular to the surface and in the external electromagnetic wave is theoretically investigated. A new type of the resonance interaction between superconducting domains localized along the magnetic field (if the superconducting phase transition takes place in the external magnetic field perpendicular to the surface) and electromagnetic waves is predicted. The surface impedance of the superconductor with domains is calculated. It is shown that the real part of the impedance has a saturation if the skin length equals the domain size. (orig.)

  4. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaux, Patricia, E-mail: devaux.patricia@mayo.edu; Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  5. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, Patricia; Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway

  6. The Atypical Response Regulator Protein ChxR Has Structural Characteristics and Dimer Interface Interactions That Are Unique within the OmpR/PhoB Subfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Lei; Middaugh, C. Russell; Hefty, P. Scott (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2013-05-29

    Typically as a result of phosphorylation, OmpR/PhoB response regulators form homodimers through a receiver domain as an integral step in transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation stabilizes the ionic and hydrophobic interactions between monomers. Recent studies have shown that some response regulators retain functional activity in the absence of phosphorylation and are termed atypical response regulators. The two currently available receiver domain structures of atypical response regulators are very similar to their phospho-accepting homologs, and their propensity to form homodimers is generally retained. An atypical response regulator, ChxR, from Chlamydia trachomatis, was previously reported to form homodimers; however, the residues critical to this interaction have not been elucidated. We hypothesize that the intra- and intermolecular interactions involved in forming a transcriptionally competent ChxR are distinct from the canonical phosphorylation (activation) paradigm in the OmpR/PhoB response regulator subfamily. To test this hypothesis, structural and functional studies were performed on the receiver domain of ChxR. Two crystal structures of the receiver domain were solved with the recently developed method using triiodo compound I3C. These structures revealed many characteristics unique to OmpR/PhoB subfamily members: typical or atypical. Included was the absence of two {alpha}-helices present in all other OmpR/PhoB response regulators. Functional studies on various dimer interface residues demonstrated that ChxR forms relatively stable homodimers through hydrophobic interactions, and disruption of these can be accomplished with the introduction of a charged residue within the dimer interface. A gel shift study with monomeric ChxR supports that dimerization through the receiver domain is critical for interaction with DNA.

  7. Prediction of protein–protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein–protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein–protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations

  8. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self-associate form......Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P....... The specificity of adhesive interaction was localized to the amino-terminal (EC1) domain of both cadherins. Thus, EC1 domain of classic cadherins exposes two determinants responsible for nonspecific lateral and cadherin type-specific adhesive dimerization....

  9. Identification of the interaction and interaction domains of chicken anemia virus VP2 and VP3 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fenfen; Pan, Wei; Gao, Honglei; Qi, Xiaole; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2018-01-01

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is a small, single-stranded DNA virus of Anelloviridae family. Its genome segments encode three proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3. This study identified an interaction between VP2 and VP3 and mapped the interaction domains. Through the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system, VP2 was found to interact with VP3. The presence of the VP2-VP3 complex in CAV-infected chicken cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopy showed that VP2 and VP3 were expressed in the cytoplasm in cotransfected Vero cells. In the Y2H system, the interaction domains were identified as being within the N-terminal aa 1-30 and C-terminal aa 17-60 for VP2 and the N-terminal aa 46-60 and C-terminal aa 1-7 for VP3. This study showed the interaction between VP2 and VP3 of CAV and identified multiple independent interactive domains within the two proteins. This provides novel information for investigating the biological functions of these proteins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Interactions of U24 from Roseolovirus with WW domains: canonical vs noncanonical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yurou; Zhang, Rui; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Straus, Suzana K

    2017-06-01

    U24 is a C-terminal membrane-anchored protein found in both human herpes virus type 6 and 7 (HHV-6 and HHV-7), with an N-terminal segment that is rich in prolines (PPxY motif in both HHV-6A and 7; PxxP motif in HHV-6A). Previous work has shown that U24 interacts strongly with Nedd4 WW domains, in particular, hNedd4L-WW3*. It was also shown that this interaction depends strongly on the nature of the amino acids that are upstream from the PY motif in U24. In this contribution, data was obtained from pull-downs, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR to further determine what modulates U24:WW domain interactions. Specifically, 3 non-canonical WW domains from human Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor (Smurf), namely hSmurf2-WW2, hSmurf2-WW3, and a tandem construct hSmurf2-WW2 + 3, were studied. Overall, the interactions between U24 and these Smurf WW domains were found to be weaker than those in U24:Nedd4 WW domain pairs, suggesting that U24 function is tightly linked to specific E3 ubiqitin ligases.

  11. Mobile Mixed-Reality Interfaces That Enhance Human–Robot Interaction in Shared Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Frank

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although user interfaces with gesture-based input and augmented graphics have promoted intuitive human–robot interactions (HRI, they are often implemented in remote applications on research-grade platforms requiring significant training and limiting operator mobility. This paper proposes a mobile mixed-reality interface approach to enhance HRI in shared spaces. As a user points a mobile device at the robot’s workspace, a mixed-reality environment is rendered providing a common frame of reference for the user and robot to effectively communicate spatial information for performing object manipulation tasks, improving the user’s situational awareness while interacting with augmented graphics to intuitively command the robot. An evaluation with participants is conducted to examine task performance and user experience associated with the proposed interface strategy in comparison to conventional approaches that utilize egocentric or exocentric views from cameras mounted on the robot or in the environment, respectively. Results indicate that, despite the suitability of the conventional approaches in remote applications, the proposed interface approach provides comparable task performance and user experiences in shared spaces without the need to install operator stations or vision systems on or around the robot. Moreover, the proposed interface approach provides users the flexibility to direct robots from their own visual perspective (at the expense of some physical workload and leverages the sensing capabilities of the tablet to expand the robot’s perceptual range.

  12. Fostering learners' interaction with content: A learner-centered mobile device interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the ever-increasing omnipresence of mobile devices in student life, leveraging smart devices to foster students' interaction with course content is critical. Following a learner-centered design iterative approach, we designed a mobile interface that may enable learners to access and interact with online course content efficiently and intuitively. Our design process leveraged recent technologies, such as bootstrap, Google's Material Design, HTML5, and JavaScript to design an intuitive, efficient, and portable mobile interface with a variety of built-in features, including context sensitive bookmarking, searching, progress tracking, captioning, and transcript display. The mobile interface also offers students the ability to ask context-related questions and to complete self-checks as they watch audio/video presentations. Our design process involved ongoing iterative feedback from learners, allowing us to refine and tweak the interface to provide learners with a unified experience across platforms and devices. The innovative combination of technologies built around well-structured and well-designed content seems to provide an effective learning experience to mobile learners. Early feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction with the interface's efficiency, intuitiveness, and robustness from both students and faculty.

  13. Dynamic Brain-Machine Interface: a novel paradigm for bidirectional interaction between brains and dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Francois D; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Fadiga, Luciano; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) are systems which mediate communication between brains and artificial devices. Their long term goal is to restore motor functions, and this ultimately demands the development of a new generation of bidirectional brain-machine interfaces establishing a two-way brain-world communication channel, by both decoding motor commands from neural activity and providing feedback to the brain by electrical stimulation. Taking inspiration from how the spinal cord of vertebrates mediates communication between the brain and the limbs, here we present a model of a bidirectional brain-machine interface that interacts with a dynamical system by generating a control policy in the form of a force field. In our model, bidirectional communication takes place via two elements: (a) a motor interface decoding activities recorded from a motor cortical area, and (b) a sensory interface encoding the state of the controlled device into electrical stimuli delivered to a somatosensory area. We propose a specific mathematical model of the sensory and motor interfaces guiding a point mass moving in a viscous medium, and we demonstrate its performance by testing it on realistically simulated neural responses.

  14. Electrostatic Interactions at the Dimer Interface Stabilize the E. coli β Sliding Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Anirban; England, Jennifer K; Douma, Lauren G; Tondnevis, Farzaneh; Bloom, Linda B; Levitus, Marcia

    2017-08-22

    Sliding clamps are ring-shaped oligomeric proteins that encircle DNA and associate with DNA polymerases for processive DNA replication. The dimeric Escherichia coli β-clamp is closed in solution but must adopt an open conformation to be assembled onto DNA by a clamp loader. To determine what factors contribute to the stability of the dimer interfaces in the closed conformation and how clamp dynamics contribute to formation of the open conformation, we identified conditions that destabilized the dimer and measured the effects of these conditions on clamp dynamics. We characterized the role of electrostatic interactions in stabilizing the β-clamp interface. Increasing salt concentration results in decreased dimer stability and faster subunit dissociation kinetics. The equilibrium dissociation constant of the dimeric clamp varies with salt concentration as predicted by simple charge-screening models, indicating that charged amino acids contribute to the remarkable stability of the interface at physiological salt concentrations. Mutation of a charged residue at the interface (Arg-103) weakens the interface significantly, whereas effects are negligible when a hydrophilic (Ser-109) or a hydrophobic (Ile-305) amino acid is mutated instead. It has been suggested that clamp opening by the clamp loader takes advantage of spontaneous opening-closing fluctuations at the clamp's interface, but our time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation experiments rule out conformational fluctuations that lead to a significant fraction of open states. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans, E-mail: hans.brandstetter@sbg.ac.at [University of Salzburg, Billrothstrasse 11, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  16. The RNA core weakly influences the interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 at key environmental interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the RNA core on interfacial interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 was investigated. After removal of the RNA core, empty intact capsids were characterized and compared to untreated MS2. Electron density of untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based small angle spectroscopy (SAXS). Suspensions of both particles exhibited similar electrophoretic mobility across a range of pH values. Similar effects were observed at pH 5.9 across a range of NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. We compared key interfacial interactions (particle-particle and particle/air-water interface) between suspensions of each type of particle using time resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) to observe and quantify aggregation kinetics and axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure adsorption at the air-water interface. Both suspensions showed insignificant aggregation over 4 h in 600 mM NaCl solutions. In the presence of Ca2+ ions, aggregation of both types of particles was consistent with earlier aggregation studies and was characterized by both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes occurring at similar [Ca2+]. However, the removal of the RNA from MS2 had no apparent effect on the aggregation kinetics of particles. Despite some differences in the kinetics of adsorption to the air-water interface, the changes in surface tension which result from particle adsorption showed no difference between the untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2. The interactions and structure of particles at the air-water interface were further probed using interfacial dilational rheology. The surface elasticity (E s) and surface viscosity (ηs) at the interface were low for both the untreated virus and the RNA-free capsid. This observation suggests that the factors that impact the adsorption kinetics are not important for an equilibrated interface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. A study on the application of voice interaction in automotive human machine interface experience design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Xiemin

    2018-04-01

    This paper, firstly, introduces the application trend of the integration of multi-channel interactions in automotive HMI ((Human Machine Interface) from complex information models faced by existing automotive HMI and describes various interaction modes. By comparing voice interaction and touch screen, gestures and other interaction modes, the potential and feasibility of voice interaction in automotive HMI experience design are concluded. Then, the related theories of voice interaction, identification technologies, human beings' cognitive models of voices and voice design methods are further explored. And the research priority of this paper is proposed, i.e. how to design voice interaction to create more humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios to enhance interactive experiences of automotive HMI. The specific scenarios in driving behaviors suitable for the use of voice interaction are studied and classified, and the usability principles and key elements for automotive HMI voice design are proposed according to the scenario features. Then, through the user participatory usability testing experiment, the dialogue processes of voice interaction in automotive HMI are defined. The logics and grammars in voice interaction are classified according to the experimental results, and the mental models in the interaction processes are analyzed. At last, the voice interaction design method to create the humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios in the driving environment is proposed.

  18. The expanded octarepeat domain selectively binds prions and disrupts homomeric prion protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliveld, Sirik Rutger; Dame, Remus Thei; Wuite, Gijs J L; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2006-02-10

    Insertion of additional octarepeats into the prion protein gene has been genetically linked to familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and hence to de novo generation of infectious prions. The pivotal event during prion formation is the conversion of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc, which subsequently induces further conversion in an autocatalytic manner. Apparently, an expanded octarepeat domain directs folding of PrP toward the PrPSc conformation and initiates a self-replicating conversion process. Here, based on three main observations, we have provided a model on how altered molecular interactions between wild-type and mutant PrP set the stage for familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease with octarepeat insertions. First, we showed that wild-type octarepeat domains interact in a copper-dependent and reversible manner, a "copper switch." This interaction becomes irreversible upon domain expansion, possibly reflecting a loss of function. Second, expanded octarepeat domains of increasing length gradually form homogenous globular multimers of 11-21 nm in the absence of copper ions when expressed as soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Third, octarepeat domain expansion causes a gain of function with at least 10 repeats selectively binding PrPSc in a denaturant-resistant complex in the absence of copper ions. Thus, the combination of both a loss and gain of function profoundly influences homomeric interaction behavior of PrP with an expanded octarepeat domain. A multimeric cluster of prion proteins carrying expanded octarepeat domains may therefore capture and incorporate spontaneously arising short-lived PrPSc-like conformers, thereby providing a matrix for their conversion.

  19. Hierarchy and Interactions in Environmental Interfaces Regarded as Biophysical Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T.; Balaz, Igor

    The field of environmental sciences is abundant with various interfaces and is the right place for the application of new fundamental approaches leading towards a better understanding of environmental phenomena. For example, following the definition of environmental interface by Mihailovic and Balaž [23], such interface can be placed between: human or animal bodies and surrounding air, aquatic species and water and air around them, and natural or artificially built surfaces (vegetation, ice, snow, barren soil, water, urban communities) and the atmosphere. Complex environmental interface systems are open and hierarchically organised, interactions between their constituent parts are nonlinear, and the interaction with the surrounding environment is noisy. These systems are therefore very sensitive to initial conditions, deterministic external perturbations and random fluctuations always present in nature. The study of noisy non-equilibrium processes is fundamental for modelling the dynamics of environmental interface systems and for understanding the mechanisms of spatio-temporal pattern formation in contemporary environmental sciences, particularly in environmental fluid mechanics. In modelling complex biophysical systems one of the main tasks is to successfully create an operative interface with the external environment. It should provide a robust and prompt translation of the vast diversity of external physical and/or chemical changes into a set of signals, which are "understandable" for an organism. Although the establishment of organisation in any system is of crucial importance for its functioning, it should not be forgotten that in biophysical systems we deal with real-life problems where a number of other conditions should be reached in order to put the system to work. One of them is the proper supply of the system by the energy. Therefore, we will investigate an aspect of dynamics of energy flow based on the energy balance equation. The energy as well as

  20. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Jeremy D., E-mail: jwilbur@msg.ucsf.edu [Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hwang, Peter K. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Brodsky, Frances M. [The G. W. Hooper Foundation, Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Fletterick, Robert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  1. Structure and function of the interacting domains of Spire and Fmn-family formins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcarra, Christina L.; Kreutz, Barry; Rodal, Avital A.; Toms, Angela V.; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Quinlan, Margot E.; Eck, Michael J. (UCLA); (Brandeis); (DFCI)

    2012-07-11

    Evidence for cooperation between actin nucleators is growing. The WH2-containing nucleator Spire and the formin Cappuccino interact directly, and both are essential for assembly of an actin mesh during Drosophila oogenesis. Their interaction requires the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) domain of Spire and the C-terminal tail of the formin. Here we describe the crystal structure of the KIND domain of human Spir1 alone and in complex with the tail of Fmn2, a mammalian ortholog of Cappuccino. The KIND domain is structurally similar to the C-lobe of protein kinases. The Fmn2 tail is coordinated in an acidic cleft at the base of the domain that appears to have evolved via deletion of a helix from the canonical kinase fold. Our functional analysis of Cappuccino reveals an unexpected requirement for its tail in actin assembly. In addition, we find that the KIND/tail interaction blocks nucleation by Cappuccino and promotes its displacement from filament barbed ends providing insight into possible modes of cooperation between Spire and Cappuccino.

  2. Structure and function of the interacting domains of Spire and Fmn-family formins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcarra, Christina L.; Kreutz, Barry; Rodal, Avital A.; Toms, Angela V.; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Quinlan, Margot E.; Eck, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for cooperation between actin nucleators is growing. The WH2-containing nucleator Spire and the formin Cappuccino interact directly, and both are essential for assembly of an actin mesh during Drosophila oogenesis. Their interaction requires the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) domain of Spire and the C-terminal tail of the formin. Here we describe the crystal structure of the KIND domain of human Spir1 alone and in complex with the tail of Fmn2, a mammalian ortholog of Cappuccino. The KIND domain is structurally similar to the C-lobe of protein kinases. The Fmn2 tail is coordinated in an acidic cleft at the base of the domain that appears to have evolved via deletion of a helix from the canonical kinase fold. Our functional analysis of Cappuccino reveals an unexpected requirement for its tail in actin assembly. In addition, we find that the KIND/tail interaction blocks nucleation by Cappuccino and promotes its displacement from filament barbed ends providing insight into possible modes of cooperation between Spire and Cappuccino. PMID:21730168

  3. The K Domain Mediates Homologous and Heterologous Interactions Between FLC and SVP Proteins of Brassica juncea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Guanpeng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factors FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP can interact to form homologous and heterologous protein complexes that regulate flowering time in Brassica juncea Coss. (Mustard.Previous studies showed that protein interactions were mediated by the K domain, which contains the subdomains K1, K2 and K3. However, it remains unknown how the subdomains mediate the interactions between FLC and SVP. In the present study, we constructed several mutants of subdomains K1–K3 and investigated the mechanisms involved in the heterologous interaction of BjFLC/BjSVP and in the homologous interaction of BjFLC/BjFLC or BjSVP/BjSVP. Yeast two-hybrid and β-Galactosidase activity assays showed that the 19 amino acids of the K1 subdomain in BjSVP and the 17 amino acids of the K1 subdomain in BjFLC were functional subdomains that interact with each other to mediate hetero-dimerization. The heterologous interaction was enhanced by the K2 subdomain of BjSVP protein, but weakened by its interhelical domain L2. The heterologous interaction was also enhanced by the K2 subdomain of BjFLC protein, but weakened by its K3 subdomain. The homologous interaction of BjSVP was mediated by the full K-domain. However, the homologous interaction of BjFLC was regulated only by its K1 and weakened by its K2 and K3 subdomains. The results provided new insights into the interactions between FLC and SVP, which will be valuable for further studies on the molecular regulation mechanisms of the regulation of flowering time in B. juncea and other Brassicaceae.

  4. Interaction domains in high performance NdFeB thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodcock, Tom; Khlopkov, Kirill; Schultz, Ludwig; Gutfleisch, Oliver [IFW Dresden, IMW, Dresden (Germany); Walther, Arno [Insitut Neel, CNRS-UJF, Grenoble (France); CEA Leti - MINATEC, Grenoble (France); Dempsey, Nora; Givord, Dominique [Insitut Neel, CNRS-UJF, Grenoble (France)

    2009-07-01

    Thick sputtered films (5-300 micron) of NdFeB have excellent hard magnetic properties which make them attractive for applications in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). A two step process consisting of triode sputtering and high temperature annealing produced films with energy densities approaching those of sintered NdFeB magnets. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) using hard magnetic tips showed that the films deposited without substrate heating and at 300 C exhibited magnetic domains typical of low anisotropy materials. These films were amorphous in the as-deposited state. The film deposited at 500 C was crystalline and displaid hard magnetic properties. This was reflected in the magnetic microstructure which showed interaction domains typical of highly textured and high magnetic anisotropy materials with a grain size below or equal to the critical single-domain particle limit. With increasing substrate temperature, the domain patterns of the annealed films became coarser, indicating higher degrees of texture.

  5. Unidirectional Magnon-Driven Domain Wall Motion due to Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seo-Won

    2018-03-28

    We theoretically study magnon-driven motion of a tranverse domain wall in the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Contrary to previous studies, the domain wall moves along the same direction regardless of the magnon-flow direction. Our symmetry analysis reveals that the odd order DMI contributions to the domain wall velocity are independent of the magnon-flow direction. Corresponding DMI-induced asymmetric transitions from a spin-wave state to another give rise to a large momentum transfer to the domain wall without nonreciprocity and much reflection. This counterintuitive unidirectional motion occurs not only for a spin wave with a single wavevector but also for thermal magnons with distributed wavevectors.

  6. A Model of Inter and Multi Disciplinary Domains, and their Mutual Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Dan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Melvil Dewey Decimal Classification system maps the human knowledge domains into a library classification decimal system, which means that the knowledge is discretized. The domains are countable similarly to how Cantor proved the countability of the fractions' domain. The debate about the "inter-" and "multi-" disciplinary domains may also be extended into "sub-domains" or from another point of view – into "super-domains". However, Science and Technology has rapidly developed after it was classified. If at the beginning, two decimal digits were enough to classify the world's knowledge into a knowledge domain, today we need more digits – about five. This means we are able to display about a million domains of knowledge. The decimal point indicates the sub-division in the zooming-in; the number of such decimal points is unlimited. Thus, the number of hierarchical levels in the knowledge-tree is unlimited. The maximal level is unreachable since it propagates in time. This intriguing issue raises doubts whether the tree is the most appropriate structure in the current state of the knowledge classification. However, I believe that the knowledge tree is a convenient way of expressing various connections between the knowledge domains. There are other models such as multi-level graph-networks that approximate closer to reality. These models can be further visualized by graph diagrams. The knowledge diagram is more complicated, considering the interaction between science and industry relative to each domain. The model of reality might be compared to the object-oriented programming languages approximating reality in order to construct more naturally computer programs that can model the world. The mutual correspondence of the knowledge domains is dynamic. Some examples of relatively new domains are as follows: biotechnology, bioinformatics, nanotechnology, integro-differential equations, data warehouse, data mining, requirements engineering, micro

  7. Importance of a Conserved Lys/Arg Residue for Ligand/PDZ Domain Interactions as Examined by Protein Semisynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Moran, Griffin E; Sereikaité, Vita

    2016-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous small protein domains that are mediators of numerous protein-protein interactions, and play a pivotal role in protein trafficking, synaptic transmission, and the assembly of signaling-transduction complexes. In recent years, PDZ domains have emerged as novel and exciting...... drug targets for diseases (in the brain in particular), so understanding the molecular details of PDZ domain interactions is of fundamental importance. PDZ domains bind to a protein partner at either a C-terminal peptide or internal peptide motifs. Here, we examined the importance of a conserved Lys...... into the mechanism of PDZ/ligand interaction....

  8. Frequency- and Time-Domain Methods in Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Coleman, Justin L.

    2015-06-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis in the nuclear industry is currently performed using linear codes that function in the frequency domain. There is a consensus that these frequency-domain codes give reasonably accurate results for low-intensity ground motions that result in almost linear response. For higher intensity ground motions, which may result in nonlinear response in the soil, structure or at the vicinity of the foundation, the adequacy of frequency-domain codes is unproven. Nonlinear analysis, which is only possible in the time domain, is theoretically more appropriate in such cases. These methods are available but are rarely used due to the large computational requirements and a lack of experience with analysts and regulators. This paper presents an assessment of the linear frequency-domain code, SASSI, which is widely used in the nuclear industry, and the time-domain commercial finite-element code, LS-DYNA, for SSI analysis. The assessment involves benchmarking the SSI analysis procedure in LS-DYNA against SASSI for linearly elastic models. After affirming that SASSI and LS-DYNA result in almost identical responses for these models, they are used to perform nonlinear SSI analyses of two structures founded on soft soil. An examination of the results shows that, in spite of using identical material properties, the predictions of frequency- and time-domain codes are significantly different in the presence of nonlinear behavior such as gapping and sliding of the foundation.

  9. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  10. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present ...

  11. INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF PDZ-DOMAIN INTERACTIONS FOR DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER FUNCTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Gether, Ulrik

    PICK1 has been shown to interact with the distal dopamine transporter (DAT) C-terminus via its PDZ domain. Although we recently have shown that ER export and targeting of the DAT to the cell surface is critically dependent on discrete epitopes in the distal C-terminus, these events do not require...

  12. Interactions among Domain-Specific Expectancies, Values, and Gender: Predictors of Test Anxiety during Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Laura C.; Bouchey, Heather A.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the interaction between students' domain-specific expectancies and values as a predictor of test anxiety. A subsample of adolescents from the MSALT dataset are used in the current study; students complete measures during the spring of sixth grade and again during the spring of seventh grade. Overall, findings provide…

  13. Mapping the interactions between the Alzheimer's Aβ-peptide and human serum albumin beyond domain resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algamal, Moustafa; Milojevic, Julijana; Jafari, Naeimeh; Zhang, William; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ self-association and this novel, to our knowledge, function of HSA is of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. It is known that HSA interacts with Aβ oligomers through binding sites evenly partitioned across the three albumin domains and with comparable affinities. However, as of this writing, no information is available on the HSA-Aβ interactions beyond domain resolution. Here, we map the HSA-Aβ interactions at subdomain and peptide resolution. We show that each separate subdomain of HSA domain 3 inhibits Aβ self-association. We also show that fatty acids (FAs) compete with Aβ oligomers for binding to domain 3, but the determinant of the HSA/Aβ oligomer interactions are markedly distinct from those of FAs. Although salt bridges with the FA carboxylate determine the FA binding affinities, hydrophobic contacts are pivotal for Aβ oligomer recognition. Specifically, we identified a site of Aβ oligomer recognition that spans the HSA (494-515) region and aligns with the central hydrophobic core of Aβ. The HSA (495-515) segment includes residues affected by FA binding and this segment is prone to self-associate into β-amyloids, suggesting that sites involved in fibrilization may provide a lead to develop inhibitors of Aβ self-association. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A brain-computer interface method combined with eye tracking for 3D interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eui Chul; Woo, Jin Cheol; Kim, Jong Hwa; Whang, Mincheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-07-15

    With the recent increase in the number of three-dimensional (3D) applications, the need for interfaces to these applications has increased. Although the eye tracking method has been widely used as an interaction interface for hand-disabled persons, this approach cannot be used for depth directional navigation. To solve this problem, we propose a new brain computer interface (BCI) method in which the BCI and eye tracking are combined to analyze depth navigation, including selection and two-dimensional (2D) gaze direction, respectively. The proposed method is novel in the following five ways compared to previous works. First, a device to measure both the gaze direction and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern is proposed with the sensors needed to measure the EEG attached to a head-mounted eye tracking device. Second, the reliability of the BCI interface is verified by demonstrating that there is no difference between the real and the imaginary movements for the same work in terms of the EEG power spectrum. Third, depth control for the 3D interaction interface is implemented by an imaginary arm reaching movement. Fourth, a selection method is implemented by an imaginary hand grabbing movement. Finally, for the independent operation of gazing and the BCI, a mode selection method is proposed that measures a user's concentration by analyzing the pupil accommodation speed, which is not affected by the operation of gazing and the BCI. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed 3D interaction method using eye tracking and a BCI. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Defining a Two-pronged Structural Model for PB1 (Phox/Bem1p) Domain Interaction in Plant Auxin Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A.; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Tonelli, Marco; Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Soon Goo; Westfall, Corey S.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Strader, Lucia C.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-04-03

    Phox/Bem1p (PB1) domains are universal structural modules that use surfaces of different charge for protein-protein association. In plants, PB1-mediated interactions of auxin response factors (ARF) and auxin/indole 3-acetic acid inducible proteins regulate transcriptional events modulated by the phytohormone auxin. Here we investigate the thermodynamic and structural basis for Arabidopsis thaliana ARF7 PB1 domain self-interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR experiments indicate that key residues on both the basic and acidic faces of the PB1 domain contribute to and organize coordinately to stabilize protein-protein interactions. Calorimetric analysis of ARF7PB1 site-directed mutants defines a two-pronged electrostatic interaction. The canonical PB1 interaction between a lysine and a cluster of acidic residues provides one prong with an arginine and a second cluster of acidic residues defining the other prong. Evolutionary conservation of this core recognition feature and other co-varying interface sequences allows for versatile PB1-mediated interactions in auxin signaling.

  16. Nano-inspired smart interfaces: fluidic interactivity and its impact on heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Byoung In; Lee, Namkyu; Choi, Geehong; Gemming, Thomas; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2017-03-01

    Interface-inspired convection is a key heat transfer scheme for hot spot cooling and thermal energy transfer. An unavoidable trade-off of the convective heat transfer is pressure loss caused by fluidic resistance on an interface. To overcome this limitation, we uncover that nano-inspired interfaces can trigger a peculiar fluidic interactivity, which can pursue all the two sides of the coin: heat transfer and fluidic friction. We demonstrate the validity of a quasi-fin effect of Si-based nanostructures based on conductive capability of heat dissipation valid under the interactivity with fluidic viscous sublayer. The exclusive fluid-interface friction is achieved when the height of the nanostructures is much less than the thickness of the viscous sublayers in the turbulent regime. The strategic nanostructures show an enhancement of heat transfer coefficients in the wall jet region by more than 21% without any significant macroscale pressure loss under single-phase impinging jet. Nanostructures guaranteeing fluid access via an equivalent vacancy larger than the diffusive path length of viscid flow lead to local heat transfer enhancement of more than 13% at a stagnation point. Functional nanostructures will give shape to possible breakthroughs in heat transfer and its optimization can be pursued for engineered systems.

  17. SoundScapes - Beyond Interaction... in search of the ultimate human-centred interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2006-01-01

    that can also benefit communication. To achieve this a new generation of intuitive natural interfaces will be required and SoundScapes (see below) is a step toward this goal to discover the ultimate interface for matching the human experience to technology. Emergent hypothesis that have developed...... on stage and to create interactive art installations which have been exhibited at leading Museums for Modern Art. The research evolved from performance art experiences which inspired my creation of idiosyncratic and personalised environments for others who had different abilities and challenges in life. My...... art thus became a way to stimulate creative expression in others and to offer new opportunities for improved life quality. Games are also involved in the participant's development. In this case the ludic engagement involved in playing the game and the exercise involved in the interaction that utilises...

  18. Learning from 3D Puzzles to Inform Future Interactions with Deformable Mobile Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakers, Raf; Luyten, Kris; Schoening, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, an increasing number of people use ensembles of differently sized mobile devices to accomplish different tasks. With advantages in display and input technologies, such as flexible and deformable OLED and E-ink displays, we can close the gap between different form factors and offer devices that can be deformed and transformed for different purposes. In this paper, we explore 3D puzzles in terms of interaction and engineering principles to inform future deformable mobile interfaces. 3...

  19. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  20. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho [Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  1. The role of cytochrome b5 structural domains in interaction with cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, G V; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A

    2014-05-01

    To understand the role of the structural elements of cytochrome b5 in its interaction with cytochrome P450 and the catalysis performed by this heme protein, we carried out comparative structural and functional analysis of the two major mammalian forms of membrane-bound cytochrome b5 - microsomal and mitochondrial, designed chimeric forms of the heme proteins in which the hydrophilic domain of one heme protein is replaced by the hydrophilic domain of another one, and investigated the effect of the highly purified native and chimeric heme proteins on the enzymatic activity of recombinant cytochromes P4503A4 and P45017A1 (CYP3A4 and CYP17A1). We show that the presence of a hydrophobic domain in the structure of cytochrome b5 is necessary for its effective interaction with its redox partners, while the nature of the hydrophobic domain has no significant effect on the ability of cytochrome b5 to stimulate the activity of cytochrome P450-catalyzed reactions. Thus, the functional properties of cytochrome b5 are mainly determined by the structure of the heme-binding domain.

  2. Pairwise structure alignment specifically tuned for surface pockets and interaction interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-09-09

    To detect and evaluate the similarities between the three-dimensional (3D) structures of two molecules, various kinds of methods have been proposed for the pairwise structure alignment problem [6, 9, 7, 11]. The problem plays important roles when studying the function and the evolution of biological molecules. Recently, pairwise structure alignment methods have been extended and applied on surface pocket structures [10, 3, 5] and interaction interface structures [8, 4]. The results show that, even when there are no global similarities discovered between the global sequences and the global structures, biological molecules or complexes could share similar functions because of well conserved pockets and interfaces. Thus, pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments are promising to unveil such shared functions that cannot be discovered by the well-studied global sequence and global structure alignments. State-of-the-art methods for pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments [4, 5] are direct extensions of the classic pairwise protein structure alignment methods, and thus such methods share a few limitations. First, the goal of the classic protein structure alignment methods is to align single-chain protein structures (i.e., a single fragment of residues connected by peptide bonds). However, we observed that pockets and interfaces tend to consist of tens of extremely short backbone fragments (i.e., three or fewer residues connected by peptide bonds). Thus, existing pocket and interface alignment methods based on the protein structure alignment methods still rely on the existence of long-enough backbone fragments, and the fragmentation issue of pockets and interfaces rises the risk of missing the optimal alignments. Moreover, existing interface structure alignment methods focus on protein-protein interfaces, and require a "blackbox preprocessing" before aligning protein-DNA and protein-RNA interfaces. Therefore, we introduce the PROtein STucture Alignment

  3. iHand: an interactive bare-hand-based augmented reality interface on commercial mobile phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junyeong; Park, Jungsik; Park, Hanhoon; Park, Jong-Il

    2013-02-01

    The performance of mobile phones has rapidly improved, and they are emerging as a powerful platform. In many vision-based applications, human hands play a key role in natural interaction. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the interaction between human hands and the mobile phone. Thus, we propose a vision- and hand gesture-based interface in which the user holds a mobile phone in one hand but sees the other hand's palm through a built-in camera. The virtual contents are faithfully rendered on the user's palm through palm pose estimation, and reaction with hand and finger movements is achieved that is recognized by hand shape recognition. Since the proposed interface is based on hand gestures familiar to humans and does not require any additional sensors or markers, the user can freely interact with virtual contents anytime and anywhere without any training. We demonstrate that the proposed interface works at over 15 fps on a commercial mobile phone with a 1.2-GHz dual core processor and 1 GB RAM.

  4. HiTAD: detecting the structural and functional hierarchies of topologically associating domains from chromatin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Cui, Wang; Peng, Cheng

    2017-11-02

    A current question in the high-order organization of chromatin is whether topologically associating domains (TADs) are distinct from other hierarchical chromatin domains. However, due to the unclear TAD definition in tradition, the structural and functional uniqueness of TAD is not well studied. In this work, we refined TAD definition by further constraining TADs to the optimal separation on global intra-chromosomal interactions. Inspired by this constraint, we developed a novel method, called HiTAD, to detect hierarchical TADs from Hi-C chromatin interactions. HiTAD performs well in domain sensitivity, replicate reproducibility and inter cell-type conservation. With a novel domain-based alignment proposed by us, we defined several types of hierarchical TAD changes which were not systematically studied previously, and subsequently used them to reveal that TADs and sub-TADs differed statistically in correlating chromosomal compartment, replication timing and gene transcription. Finally, our work also has the implication that the refinement of TAD definition could be achieved by only utilizing chromatin interactions, at least in part. HiTAD is freely available online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  6. Mechano-Chemical Interactions at Cement-Geomaterial Interfaces in Repository and Borehole Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghi, J. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Matteo, E. N.; Heath, J. E.; Jove Colon, C. F.; Fuller, T.

    2017-12-01

    A number of factors negatively affect wellbore integrity including interactions at boundaries between cement and surrounding geomaterial. These include mechanical and chemical mechanisms that can lead to wellbore failure. To examine these interactions, potential coupling, and pathways to failure, we discuss progress on an experimental and modeling study involving cement-clay and cement-salt interfaces. A sample shotcrete-bentonite interface from the FEBEX heater test at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland is examined using multi-beam scanning electron microscopy (mSEM) at 4 nm resolution over an area 10's of square millimeters. We examine changes in alteration as manifested by pore structural changes as a function of distance from the interface. A parallel effort examines time-dependent changes in interface structure in cement cores in a triaxial coreholder. Cores are exposed to conditions of 70oC, 14 MPa pressure, and small differential loads, with degradation being monitored by effluent pH, pulse-echo ultrasonics, and piston displacement (measuring sample shortening). We will measure the mechanical consequences of interface alteration using nano-indentation. Experimental results are being incorporated as a validation effort in a coupled reactive-transport mechanics model linking the Sandia ALBANY finite element code, the KAYENTA elasto-plastic constitutive model, with the reactive transport code PFLOTRAN. Plans call to apply the model to understanding the evolution of the FEBEX sample, as well as a cement-salt sample from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. SAND 2017-8277 A

  7. The interaction between BSA and DOTAP at the air-buffer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqing; Hao, Changchun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Runguang

    2018-01-10

    In this article, the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) at the air-buffer interface was investigated at different subphase's pH values (pH = 3, 5 and 10). Surface pressure measurements (π - A) and penetration kinetics process (π - t) were carried out to reveal the interaction mechanism and the dynamical behavior. The data showed that π - A isotherms moved towards larger mean molecular area when the concentration of BSA ([BSA]) increased, the amount of BSA adsorbed onto DOTAP monolayer reached a threshold value at a [BSA] of 5 × 10 -8 M, and BSA desorbed from the lipid monolayer as time goes by. The results revealed that the association of BSA with DOTAP at the air-buffer interface was affected by the subphase's pH value. When pH = 10, the interaction mechanism between them was a combination of hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic attraction, so BSA molecules could be well separated and purified from complex mixtures. AFM images demonstrated that pH value and [BSA] could affect the morphology feature of DOTAP monolayer and the adsorption and desorption processes of BSA. So the study provides an important experimental basis and theoretical support for learning the interaction mechanism among biomolecules in separation and purification of biomolecules and biosensor.

  8. The interactions between CdTe quantum dots and proteins: understanding nano-bio interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreeram S. Joglekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite remarkable developments in the nanoscience, relatively little is known about the physical (electrostatic interactions of nanoparticles with bio macromolecules. These interactions can influence the properties of both nanoparticles and the bio-macromolecules. Understanding this bio-interface is a prerequisite to utilize both nanoparticles and biomolecules for bioengineering. In this study, luminescent, water soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA were synthesized by organometallic method and then interaction between nanoparticles (QDs and three different types of proteins (BSA, Lysozyme and Hemoglobin were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy at pH= 7.4. Based on fluorescence quenching results, Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv, binding constant (Kq and binding sites (n for proteins were calculated. The results show that protein structure (e.g.,globular, metalloprotein, etc. has a significant role in Protein-Quantum dots interactions and each type of protein influence physicochemical properties of Quantum dots differently.

  9. A Video Game-Based Framework for Analyzing Human-Robot Interaction: Characterizing Interface Design in Real-Time Interactive Multimedia Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richer, Justin; Drury, Jill L

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper segments video game interaction into domain-independent components which together form a framework that can be used to characterize real-time interactive multimedia applications in general...

  10. The BAR domain protein PICK1 regulates cell recognition and morphogenesis by interacting with Neph proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Martin; Lorscheider, Johannes; von Bardeleben, Anna; Dufner, Matthias; Scharf, M Antonia; Gödel, Markus; Helmstädter, Martin; Schurek, Eva-Maria; Zank, Sibylle; Gerke, Peter; Kurschat, Christine; Sivritas, Sema Hayriye; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke; Huber, Tobias B; Reinhardt, H Christian; Schauss, Astrid C; Schermer, Bernhard; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Benzing, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Neph proteins are evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins of the immunoglobulin superfamily that control the formation of specific intercellular contacts. Cell recognition through these proteins is essential in diverse cellular contexts such as patterning of the compound eye in Drosophila melanogaster, neuronal connectivity in Caenorhabditis elegans, and the formation of the kidney filtration barrier in mammals. Here we identify the PDZ and BAR domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1) as a Neph-interacting protein. Binding required dimerization of PICK1, was dependent on PDZ domain protein interactions, and mediated stabilization of Neph1 at the plasma membrane. Moreover, protein kinase C (PKCα) activity facilitated the interaction through releasing Neph proteins from their binding to the multidomain scaffolding protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), another PDZ domain protein. In Drosophila, the Neph homologue Roughest is essential for sorting of interommatidial precursor cells and patterning of the compound eye. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PICK1 in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc caused a Roughest destabilization at the plasma membrane and a phenotype that resembled rst mutation. These data indicate that Neph proteins and PICK1 synergistically regulate cell recognition and contact formation.

  11. Nac1 interacts with the POZ-domain transcription factor, Miz1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Mark A.; Wright, Stephanie C.

    2014-01-01

    Nac1 (nucleus accumbens 1) is a POZ (poxvirus and zinc finger)-domain transcriptional repressor that is expressed at high levels in ovarian serous carcinoma. Here we identify Nac1 as a novel interacting partner of the POZ-domain transcriptional activator, Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc-finger protein 1), and using chemical crosslinking we show that this association is mediated by a heterodimeric interaction of the Nac1 and Miz1 POZ domains. Nac1 is found in discrete bodies within the nucleus of mammalian cells, and we demonstrate the relocalization of Miz1 to these structures in transfected HeLa cells. We show that siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated knockdown of Nac1 in ovarian cancer cells results in increased levels of the Miz1 target gene product, p21Cip1. The interaction of Nac1 with Miz1 may thus be relevant to its mechanism of tumourigenesis in ovarian cancer. PMID:24702277

  12. Tetratricopeptide repeat domain 9A is an interacting protein for tropomyosin Tm5NM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Gay

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetratricopeptide repeat domain 9A (TTC9A protein is a recently identified protein which contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs on its C-terminus. In our previous studies, we have shown that TTC9A was a hormonally-regulated gene in breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that TTC9A was over-expressed in breast cancer tissues compared with the adjacent controls (P Methods Breast samples from 25 patients including the malignant breast tissues and the adjacent normal tissues were processed for Southern blot analysis. Yeast-two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation were used to identify and verify the interaction between TTC9A and other proteins. Results Tropomyosin Tm5NM-1 was identified as one of the TTC9A partner proteins. The interaction between TTC9A and Tm5NM-1 was further confirmed by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells. TTC9A domains required for the interaction were also characterized in this study. The results suggested that the first TPR domain and the linker fragment between the first two TPR domains of TTC9A were important for the interaction with Tm5NM-1 and the second and the third TPR might play an inhibitory role. Conclusion Since the primary function of tropomyosin is to stabilize actin filament, its interaction with TTC9A may play a role in cell shape and motility. In our previous results, we have found that progesterone-induced TTC9A expression was associated with increased cell motility and cell spreading. We speculate that TTC9A acts as a chaperone protein to facilitate the function of tropomyosins in stabilizing microfilament and it may play a role in cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  13. Multi-level learning: improving the prediction of protein, domain and residue interactions by allowing information flow between levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Kevin Y; Kim, Philip M; McDermott, Drew; Gerstein, Mark

    2009-08-05

    Proteins interact through specific binding interfaces that contain many residues in domains. Protein interactions thus occur on three different levels of a concept hierarchy: whole-proteins, domains, and residues. Each level offers a distinct and complementary set of features for computationally predicting interactions, including functional genomic features of whole proteins, evolutionary features of domain families and physical-chemical features of individual residues. The predictions at each level could benefit from using the features at all three levels. However, it is not trivial as the features are provided at different granularity. To link up the predictions at the three levels, we propose a multi-level machine-learning framework that allows for explicit information flow between the levels. We demonstrate, using representative yeast interaction networks, that our algorithm is able to utilize complementary feature sets to make more accurate predictions at the three levels than when the three problems are approached independently. To facilitate application of our multi-level learning framework, we discuss three key aspects of multi-level learning and the corresponding design choices that we have made in the implementation of a concrete learning algorithm. 1) Architecture of information flow: we show the greater flexibility of bidirectional flow over independent levels and unidirectional flow; 2) Coupling mechanism of the different levels: We show how this can be accomplished via augmenting the training sets at each level, and discuss the prevention of error propagation between different levels by means of soft coupling; 3) Sparseness of data: We show that the multi-level framework compounds data sparsity issues, and discuss how this can be dealt with by building local models in information-rich parts of the data. Our proof-of-concept learning algorithm demonstrates the advantage of combining levels, and opens up opportunities for further research. The software

  14. Multi-level learning: improving the prediction of protein, domain and residue interactions by allowing information flow between levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Drew

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins interact through specific binding interfaces that contain many residues in domains. Protein interactions thus occur on three different levels of a concept hierarchy: whole-proteins, domains, and residues. Each level offers a distinct and complementary set of features for computationally predicting interactions, including functional genomic features of whole proteins, evolutionary features of domain families and physical-chemical features of individual residues. The predictions at each level could benefit from using the features at all three levels. However, it is not trivial as the features are provided at different granularity. Results To link up the predictions at the three levels, we propose a multi-level machine-learning framework that allows for explicit information flow between the levels. We demonstrate, using representative yeast interaction networks, that our algorithm is able to utilize complementary feature sets to make more accurate predictions at the three levels than when the three problems are approached independently. To facilitate application of our multi-level learning framework, we discuss three key aspects of multi-level learning and the corresponding design choices that we have made in the implementation of a concrete learning algorithm. 1 Architecture of information flow: we show the greater flexibility of bidirectional flow over independent levels and unidirectional flow; 2 Coupling mechanism of the different levels: We show how this can be accomplished via augmenting the training sets at each level, and discuss the prevention of error propagation between different levels by means of soft coupling; 3 Sparseness of data: We show that the multi-level framework compounds data sparsity issues, and discuss how this can be dealt with by building local models in information-rich parts of the data. Our proof-of-concept learning algorithm demonstrates the advantage of combining levels, and opens up

  15. Characterization of the TRBP domain required for Dicer interaction and function in RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Far Mohamed

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dicer, Ago2 and TRBP are the minimum components of the human RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. While Dicer and Ago2 are RNases, TRBP is the double-stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP that loads small interfering RNA into the RISC. TRBP binds directly to Dicer through its C-terminal domain. Results We show that the TRBP binding site in Dicer is a 165 amino acid (aa region located between the ATPase and the helicase domains. The binding site in TRBP is a 69 aa domain, called C4, located at the C-terminal end of TRBP. The TRBP1 and TRBP2 isoforms, but not TRBPs lacking the C4 site (TRBPsΔC4, co-immunoprecipitated with Dicer. The C4 domain is therefore necessary to bind Dicer, irrespective of the presence of RNA. Immunofluorescence shows that while full-length TRBPs colocalize with Dicer, TRBPsΔC4 do not. tarbp2-/- cells, which do not express TRBP, do not support RNA interference (RNAi mediated by short hairpin or micro RNAs against EGFP. Both TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, were able to rescue RNAi function. In human cells with low RNAi activity, addition of TRBP1 or 2, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescued RNAi function. Conclusion The mapping of the interaction sites between TRBP and Dicer show unique domains that are required for their binding. Since TRBPsΔC4 do not interact or colocalize with Dicer, we suggest that TRBP and Dicer, both dsRBPs, do not interact through bound dsRNA. TRBPs, but not TRBPsΔC4, rescue RNAi activity in RNAi-compromised cells, indicating that the binding of Dicer to TRBP is critical for RNAi function.

  16. FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interaction sites required for defense signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Koller

    Full Text Available Signaling initiation by receptor-like kinases (RLKs at the plasma membrane of plant cells often requires regulatory leucine-rich repeat (LRR RLK proteins such as SERK or BIR proteins. The present work examined how the microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP receptor FLS2 builds signaling complexes with BAK1 (SERK3. We first, using in vivo methods that validate separate findings by others, demonstrated that flg22 (flagellin epitope ligand-initiated FLS2-BAK1 extracellular domain interactions can proceed independent of intracellular domain interactions. We then explored a candidate SERK protein interaction site in the extracellular domains (ectodomains; ECDs of the significantly different receptors FLS2, EFR (MAMP receptors, PEPR1 (damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP receptor, and BRI1 (hormone receptor. Repeat conservation mapping revealed a cluster of conserved solvent-exposed residues near the C-terminus of models of the folded LRR domains. However, site-directed mutagenesis of this conserved site in FLS2 did not impair FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions, and mutations in the analogous site of EFR caused receptor maturation defects. Hence this conserved LRR C-terminal region apparently has functions other than mediating interactions with BAK1. In vivo tests of the subsequently published FLS2-flg22-BAK1 ECD co-crystal structure were then performed to functionally evaluate some of the unexpected configurations predicted by that crystal structure. In support of the crystal structure data, FLS2-BAK1 ECD interactions were no longer detected in in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments after site-directed mutagenesis of the FLS2 BAK1-interaction residues S554, Q530, Q627 or N674. In contrast, in vivo FLS2-mediated signaling persisted and was only minimally reduced, suggesting residual FLS2-BAK1 interaction and the limited sensitivity of co-immunoprecipitation data relative to in vivo assays for signaling outputs. However, Arabidopsis plants

  17. Interaction of thermal responsive NIPAM nanogels with model lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Resmini, Marina; Zarbakhsh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Understanding the interaction of nanoparticles (NP) with ceramide lipids is important in developing strategies to overcome the formidable obstacle that is skin. This paper presents studies of interactions between N-isopropylacrylamide nanogels, crosslinked with 30% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, and model ceramide lipid monolayers at the air-water interface as a function of temperature. In the case of the mixed ceramide/cholesterol/behenic acid monolayer, the interaction of nanogels with the ceramide was strongly mediated by the fatty acids. This interaction between nanogels and monolayer components is dominated by hydrophobic-hydrophobic binding. The data show the important intermediary role of the fatty acid in facilitating transmembrane transport. For a pure ceramide lipid monolayer, the neutron reflectivity (NR), Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and surface pressure results showed a lipid-nanogel complex formation and the subsequent depletion/solubilisation of the lipids from the interface when the area per molecule for the lipid was increased from 42 to 44 Å 2 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increasing stability of water-soluble PQQ glucose dehydrogenase by increasing hydrophobic interaction at dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri Stefano

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water-soluble quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (PQQGDH-B from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus has a great potential for application as a glucose sensor constituent. Because this enzyme shows no activity in its monomeric form, correct quaternary structure is essential for the formation of active enzyme. We have previously reported on the increasing of the stability of PQQGDH-B by preventing the subunit dissociation. Previous studies were based on decreasing the entropy of quaternary structure dissociation but not on increasing the interaction between the two subunits. We therefore attempted to introduce a hydrophobic interaction in the dimeric interface to increase the stability of PQQGDH-B. Results Amino acid residues Asn340 and Tyr418 face each other at the dimer interface of PQQGDH-B, however no interaction exists between their side chains. We simultaneously substituted Asn340 to Phe and Tyr418 to Phe or Ile, to create the two mutants Asn340Phe/Tyr418Phe and Asn340Phe/Tyr418Ile. Furthermore, residues Leu280, Val282 and Val342 form a hydrophobic region that faces, on the other subunit, residues Thr416 and Thr417, again without any specific interaction. We simultaneously substituted Thr416 and Thr417 to Val, to create the mutant Thr416Val/Thr417Val. The temperatures resulting in lose of half of the initial activity of the constructed mutants were increased by 3–4°C higher over wild type. All mutants showed 2-fold higher thermal stability at 55°C than the wild-type enzyme, without decreasing their catalytic activities. From the 3D models of all the mutant enzymes, the predicted binding energies were found to be significantly greater that in the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the increases in thermal stabilities. Conclusions We have achieved via site-directed mutagenesis the improvement of the thermal stability of PQQGDH-B by increasing the dimer interface interaction. Through rational design based on the quaternary

  19. Role of a novel PH-kinase domain interface in PKB/Akt regulation: structural mechanism for allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Calleja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs.

  20. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-06-26

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH–START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH–START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine–rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization.

  2. A computational domain decomposition approach for solving coupled flow-structure-thermal interaction problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Aulisa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving complex coupled processes involving fluid-structure-thermal interactions is a challenging problem in computational sciences and engineering. Currently there exist numerous public-domain and commercial codes available in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD, Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD and Computational Thermodynamics (CTD. Different groups specializing in modelling individual process such as CSD, CFD, CTD often come together to solve a complex coupled application. Direct numerical simulation of the non-linear equations for even the most simplified fluid-structure-thermal interaction (FSTI model depends on the convergence of iterative solvers which in turn rely heavily on the properties of the coupled system. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a flexible multilevel algorithm with finite elements that can be used to study a coupled FSTI. The method relies on decomposing the complex global domain, into several local sub-domains, solving smaller problems over these sub-domains and then gluing back the local solution in an efficient and accurate fashion to yield the global solution. Our numerical results suggest that the proposed solution methodology is robust and reliable.

  3. Technical development of PubMed interact: an improved interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul

    2006-11-03

    The project aims to create an alternative search interface for MEDLINE/PubMed that may provide assistance to the novice user and added convenience to the advanced user. An earlier version of the project was the 'Slider Interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches' (SLIM) which provided JavaScript slider bars to control search parameters. In this new version, recent developments in Web-based technologies were implemented. These changes may prove to be even more valuable in enhancing user interactivity through client-side manipulation and management of results. PubMed Interact is a Web-based MEDLINE/PubMed search application built with HTML, JavaScript and PHP. It is implemented on a Windows Server 2003 with Apache 2.0.52, PHP 4.4.1 and MySQL 4.1.18. PHP scripts provide the backend engine that connects with E-Utilities and parses XML files. JavaScript manages client-side functionalities and converts Web pages into interactive platforms using dynamic HTML (DHTML), Document Object Model (DOM) tree manipulation and Ajax methods. With PubMed Interact, users can limit searches with JavaScript slider bars, preview result counts, delete citations from the list, display and add related articles and create relevance lists. Many interactive features occur at client-side, which allow instant feedback without reloading or refreshing the page resulting in a more efficient user experience. PubMed Interact is a highly interactive Web-based search application for MEDLINE/PubMed that explores recent trends in Web technologies like DOM tree manipulation and Ajax. It may become a valuable technical development for online medical search applications.

  4. Current-driven domain wall ratchet in a nanomagnet with functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri; Saxena, Avadh

    We develop a concept of functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which provides novel ways of efficient control of the magnetization dynamics. Using this approach we realize the ratchet motion of the domain wall in a magnetic nanowire driven by spin polarized current with potential applications in magnetic devices such as race-track memory and magnetic logical devices. By engineering the spatial profile of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya parameters we provide a unidirectional motion of the domain wall along the wire. We base our study on phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations using a collective variable approach. In effective equations of motion the functionally graded Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction appears as a driving force, which can either suppress the action of the pumping by the current or can reinforce it. All analytical predictions are well confirmed by numerical simulations.

  5. Interactions between Intracellular Domains as Key Determinants of the Quaternary Structure and Function of Receptor Heteromers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Ferré, Sergi; Cordomi, Arnau; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Hoffmann, Hanne; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; Franco, Rafael; Woods, Amina S.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers are macromolecular complexes with unique functional properties different from those of its individual protomers. Little is known about what determines the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers resulting in their unique functional properties. In this study, using resonance energy transfer techniques in experiments with mutated receptors, we provide for the first time clear evidence for a key role of intracellular domains in the determination of the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers between adenosine A2A, cannabinoid CB1, and dopamine D2 receptors. In these interactions, arginine-rich epitopes form salt bridges with phosphorylated serine or threonine residues from CK1/2 consensus sites. Each receptor (A2A, CB1, and D2) was found to include two evolutionarily conserved intracellular domains to establish selective electrostatic interactions with intracellular domains of the other two receptors, indicating that these particular electrostatic interactions constitute a general mechanism for receptor heteromerization. Mutation experiments indicated that the interactions of the intracellular domains of the CB1 receptor with A2A and D2 receptors are fundamental for the correct formation of the quaternary structure needed for the function (MAPK signaling) of the A2A-CB1-D2 receptor heteromers. Analysis of MAPK signaling in striatal slices of CB1 receptor KO mice and wild-type littermates supported the existence of A1-CB1-D2 receptor heteromer in the brain. These findings allowed us to propose the first molecular model of the quaternary structure of a receptor heteromultimer. PMID:20562103

  6. A computational domain decomposition approach for solving coupled flow-structure-thermal interaction problems

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio Aulisa; Sandro Manservisi; Padmanabhan Seshaiyer

    2009-01-01

    Solving complex coupled processes involving fluid-structure-thermal interactions is a challenging problem in computational sciences and engineering. Currently there exist numerous public-domain and commercial codes available in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) and Computational Thermodynamics (CTD). Different groups specializing in modelling individual process such as CSD, CFD, CTD often come together to solve a complex coupled ap...

  7. Experimental Study of the Interactions and Dynamics at Interfaces Using Newly Developed AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi

    Compared to the bulk properties of material, our fundamental understanding of the interactions and dynamics at the liquid-air, liquid-solid, and even solid-solid interfaces are still very limited. The lack of progress is partially because the interfacial interactions are extremely sensitive to the nanoscale distance at which the measurements are made, and the interfacial dynamics are easily disturbed by defects and impurities at the interface. Well-controlled experimental systems with tunable interfacial properties together with surface-sensitive experimental tools and analysis methods are needed for the study of the interactions and dynamics at interfaces. Over the past 30 years, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become one of the most important tools for the study of interfaces. In this thesis, I present the development of new AFM probes and techniques and their applications in the investigation of novel interfacial phenomena and understanding of the underlying physics. Three interesting problems are studied at different interfaces. In the first experiment, we carry out direct AFM measurements of capillary force hysteresis (CFH) and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (MCL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The measured CFH and contact line (CL) relaxation show an asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier crossing is developed to find the effective energy barrier Eb and size lambda associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic framework, and the advancing and receding CLs are in influenced by two different sets of relatively non-wetting and wetting defects on the fiber surface. The second experiment studies the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity

  8. INS study of intermolecular interaction at the silicone-fumed silica interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheka, E.F.; Natkaniec, I.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The paper presents results related to the interface formed between finned silica particles and polydimethylsiloxane polymers, presented in the study by a five-member cyclic oligomer SiS. The substrate surface is terminated by either hydroxyl units or by trimethylsiloxy ones. When the interface is formed, methyl units are the main constituents providing neutron scattering. Protium/deuterium exchange has been used to distinguish the latter belonging to either adsorbate or substrate. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interaction impact on both adsorbed molecule and substrate has been performed. The observed features are supported by the vibrational spectra calculations performed on the basis of a modem quantum-chemical approach and supplemented by the solution of the inverse spectral problem. (author)

  9. Flicker Noise as a Probe of Electronic Interaction at Metal-Single Molecule Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Olgun; Rosenthal, Ethan; Meisner, Jeffery; Andrade, Erick F; Pasupathy, Abhay N; Nuckolls, Colin; Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-06-10

    Charge transport properties of metal-molecule interfaces depend strongly on the character of molecule-electrode interactions. Although through-bond coupled systems have attracted the most attention, through-space coupling is important in molecular systems when, for example, through-bond coupling is suppressed due to quantum interference effects. To date, a probe that clearly distinguishes these two types of coupling has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the origin of flicker noise in single molecule junctions and demonstrate how the character of the molecule-electrode coupling influences the flicker noise behavior of single molecule junctions. Importantly, we find that flicker noise shows a power law dependence on conductance in all junctions studied with an exponent that can distinguish through-space and through-bond coupling. Our results provide a new and powerful tool for probing and understanding coupling at the metal-molecule interface.

  10. Structural interface parameters are discriminatory in recognising near-native poses of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Malhotra

    Full Text Available Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets.

  11. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arza, Vamsi Spandan; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid–liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid–liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle

  12. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  13. Interaction between the glutamate transporter GLT1b and the synaptic PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassan, Merav; Liu, Hongguang; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is implemented by the interaction of glutamate receptors with PDZ domain proteins. Glutamate transporters provide the only known mechanism of clearance of glutamate from excitatory synapses, and GLT1 is the major glutamate transporter. We show here that GLT1 interacts...... expressing PICK1 and GLT1b. In addition, expression of GLT1b in COS7 cells changed the distribution of PICK1, bringing it to the surface. GLT1b and PICK1 co-localized with each other and with synaptic markers in hippocampal neurons in culture. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a known...

  14. Distinct TERB1 Domains Regulate Different Protein Interactions in Meiotic Telomere Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic telomeres attach to the nuclear envelope (NE and drive the chromosome movement required for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. The meiosis-specific telomere proteins TERB1, TERB2, and MAJIN are required to regulate these events, but their assembly processes are largely unknown. Here, we developed a germ-cell-specific knockout mouse of the canonical telomere-binding protein TRF1 and revealed an essential role for TRF1 in directing the assembly of TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN. Further, we identified a TERB2 binding (T2B domain in TERB1 that is dispensable for the TRF1-TERB1 interaction but is essential for the subsequent TERB1-TERB2 interaction and therefore for telomere attachment to the NE. Meanwhile, cohesin recruitment at telomeres, which is required for efficient telomere movement, is mediated by the MYB-like domain of TERB1, but not by TERB2-MAJIN. Our results reveal distinct protein interactions through various domains of TERB1, which enable the sequential assembly of the meiotic telomere complex for their movements.

  15. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed disulfide cross-linking suggest an important dynamic interface between the two lysostaphin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Rong; Gu, Mei-Gang; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Jin-jiang; Lu, Wan-Ying; Lu, Hong; Huang, Qing-Shan

    2013-04-01

    Lysostaphin is a peptidoglycan hydrolase secreted by Staphylococcus simulans. It can specifically lyse Staphylococcus aureus and is being tested as a novel antibacterial agent. The protein contains an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal cell wall targeting domain. Although the two domains from homologous enzymes were structurally determined, the structural organization of lysostaphin domains remains unknown. We used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) and site-directed disulfide cross-linking to probe the interface between the lysostaphin catalytic and targeting domains. H/DX-MS-mediated comparison of peptides from full-length lysostaphin and the separated domains identified four peptides of lower solvent accessibility in the full-length protein. Cross-linking analysis using cysteine pair substitutions within those peptides showed that two pairs of cysteines can form disulfide bonds, supporting the domain association role of the targeted peptides. The cross-linked mutant exhibited a binding capacity to S. aureus that was similar to that of the wild-type protein but reduced bacteriolytic activity probably because of restraint in conformation. The diminished activity was further reduced with increasing NaCl concentrations that can cause contractions of bacterial peptidoglycan. The lytic activity, however, could be fully recovered by reducing the disulfide bonds. These results suggest that lysostaphin may require dynamic association of the two domains for coordinating substrate binding and target cleavage on the elastic peptidoglycan. Our study will help develop site-specific PEGylated lysostaphin to treat systemic S. aureus infections.

  16. Gaze-and-brain-controlled interfaces for human-computer and human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkin S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human-machine interaction technology has greatly evolved during the last decades, but manual and speech modalities remain single output channels with their typical constraints imposed by the motor system’s information transfer limits. Will brain-computer interfaces (BCIs and gaze-based control be able to convey human commands or even intentions to machines in the near future? We provide an overview of basic approaches in this new area of applied cognitive research. Objective. We test the hypothesis that the use of communication paradigms and a combination of eye tracking with unobtrusive forms of registering brain activity can improve human-machine interaction. Methods and Results. Three groups of ongoing experiments at the Kurchatov Institute are reported. First, we discuss the communicative nature of human-robot interaction, and approaches to building a more e cient technology. Specifically, “communicative” patterns of interaction can be based on joint attention paradigms from developmental psychology, including a mutual “eye-to-eye” exchange of looks between human and robot. Further, we provide an example of “eye mouse” superiority over the computer mouse, here in emulating the task of selecting a moving robot from a swarm. Finally, we demonstrate a passive, noninvasive BCI that uses EEG correlates of expectation. This may become an important lter to separate intentional gaze dwells from non-intentional ones. Conclusion. The current noninvasive BCIs are not well suited for human-robot interaction, and their performance, when they are employed by healthy users, is critically dependent on the impact of the gaze on selection of spatial locations. The new approaches discussed show a high potential for creating alternative output pathways for the human brain. When support from passive BCIs becomes mature, the hybrid technology of the eye-brain-computer (EBCI interface will have a chance to enable natural, fluent, and the

  17. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment on preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Grabich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141 were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD and 95% confidence intervals (CI comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a each individual domain main effect b the interaction contrast and c the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e., the net effect to show departure from additivity for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interactions, between the sociodemographic/air domains (net effect (i.e. the association including main effects and interaction effects PD: -0.004 (95% CI:-0.007, 0.000, interaction contrast: -0.013 (95% CI:-0.020, -0.007 and built/air domains (net effect PD: 0.008 (95% CI 0.004, 0.011, interaction contrast: -0.008 (95% CI:-0.015, -0.002. Most interactions were between the air domain and other respective domains. Interactions differed by urbanicity, with more interactions observed in non-metropolitan regions

  18. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion.

  19. HD domain of SAMHD1 influences Vpx-induced degradation at a post-interaction step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jian; Hou, Jingwei; Zhao, Ke; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Du, Juan, E-mail: jdu@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-02-12

    Primate SAMHD1 proteins are potent inhibitors of viruses, including retroviruses such as HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Vpx, a distinctive viral protein expressed by HIV-2 and some SIVs, induces SAMHD1 degradation by forming a Vpx-DCAF1-based ubiquitin ligase complex. Either the N- or the C-terminus of SAMHD1 is critical for Vpx-induced degradation, depending on the types of SAMHD1 and Vpx proteins. However, it was not fully understood whether other regions of SAMHD1 also contribute to its depletion by Vpx. In the present study, we report that SAMHD1 from chicken (SAMHD1{sub GG}) was not degraded by SIVmac Vpx, in contrast with results for human SAMHD1 (SAMHD1{sub HS}). Results regarding to SAMHD1{sub HS} and SAMHD1{sub GG} fusion proteins supported previous findings that the C-terminus of SAMHD1{sub HS} is essential for Vpx-induced degradation. Internal domain substitution, however, revealed that the HD domain also contributes to Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Interestingly, the HD domain influenced Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation without affecting Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction. Therefore, our findings revealed that factors in addition to Vpx-SAMHD1 binding influence the efficiency of Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. - Highlights: • SAMHD1{sub GG} from chicken could not be depleted by SIVmac Vpx. • The C-terminus of human SAMHD1{sub HS} is critical for its degradation by Vpx. • The HD domain is essential for Vpx-induced degradation of SAMHD1{sub HS}. • Altering the HD domain does not affect Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction.

  20. Interface bonding in silicon oxide nanocontacts: interaction potentials and force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierez-Kien, M.; Craciun, A. D.; Pinon, A. V.; Le Roux, S.; Gallani, J. L.; Rastei, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The interface bonding between two silicon-oxide nanoscale surfaces has been studied as a function of atomic nature and size of contacting asperities. The binding forces obtained using various interaction potentials are compared with experimental force curves measured in vacuum with an atomic force microscope. In the limit of small nanocontacts (typically measured with sensitive probes the bonding is found to be influenced by thermal-induced fluctuations. Using interface interactions described by Morse, embedded atom model, or Lennard-Jones potential within reaction rate theory, we investigate three bonding types of covalent and van der Waals nature. The comparison of numerical and experimental results reveals that a Lennard-Jones-like potential originating from van der Waals interactions captures the binding characteristics of dry silicon oxide nanocontacts, and likely of other nanoscale materials adsorbed on silicon oxide surfaces. The analyses reveal the importance of the dispersive surface energy and of the effective contact area which is altered by stretching speeds. The mean unbinding force is found to decrease as the contact spends time in the attractive regime. This contact weakening is featured by a negative aging coefficient which broadens and shifts the thermal-induced force distribution at low stretching speeds.

  1. Interaction between colloidal particles on an oil-water interface in dilute and dense phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Lucia; Law, Adam D; Maestro, Armando; Buzza, D Martin A; Cicuta, Pietro

    2015-05-20

    The interaction between micron-sized charged colloidal particles at polar/non-polar liquid interfaces remains surprisingly poorly understood for a relatively simple physical chemistry system. By measuring the pair correlation function g(r) for different densities of polystyrene particles at the decane-water interface, and using a powerful predictor-corrector inversion scheme, effective pair-interaction potentials can be obtained up to fairly high densities, and these reproduce the experimental g(r) in forward simulations, so are self consistent. While at low densities these potentials agree with published dipole-dipole repulsion, measured by various methods, an apparent density dependence and long range attraction are obtained when the density is higher. This condition is thus explored in an alternative fashion, measuring the local mobility of colloids when confined by their neighbors. This method of extracting interaction potentials gives results that are consistent with dipolar repulsion throughout the concentration range, with the same magnitude as in the dilute limit. We are unable to rule out the density dependence based on the experimental accuracy of our data, but we show that incomplete equilibration of the experimental system, which would be possible despite long waiting times due to the very strong repulsions, is a possible cause of artefacts in the inverted potentials. We conclude that to within the precision of these measurements, the dilute pair potential remains valid at high density in this system.

  2. Integrated multimodal human-computer interface and augmented reality for interactive display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Marius S.; Sundareswaran, Venkataraman; Chen, S.; Behringer, Reinhold; Tam, Clement K.; Chan, M.; Bangayan, Phil T.; McGee, Joshua H.

    2000-08-01

    We describe new systems for improved integrated multimodal human-computer interaction and augmented reality for a diverse array of applications, including future advanced cockpits, tactical operations centers, and others. We have developed an integrated display system featuring: speech recognition of multiple concurrent users equipped with both standard air- coupled microphones and novel throat-coupled sensors (developed at Army Research Labs for increased noise immunity); lip reading for improving speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments, three-dimensional spatialized audio for improved display of warnings, alerts, and other information; wireless, coordinated handheld-PC control of a large display; real-time display of data and inferences from wireless integrated networked sensors with on-board signal processing and discrimination; gesture control with disambiguated point-and-speak capability; head- and eye- tracking coupled with speech recognition for 'look-and-speak' interaction; and integrated tetherless augmented reality on a wearable computer. The various interaction modalities (speech recognition, 3D audio, eyetracking, etc.) are implemented a 'modality servers' in an Internet-based client-server architecture. Each modality server encapsulates and exposes commercial and research software packages, presenting a socket network interface that is abstracted to a high-level interface, minimizing both vendor dependencies and required changes on the client side as the server's technology improves.

  3. Brain-Computer Interfaces Applying Our Minds to Human-computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Desney S

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person's mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science fiction stories. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging technologies have started to turn these myths into a reality, and are providing us with the ability to interface directly with the human brain. This ability is made possible through the use of sensors that monitor physical p

  4. Interactive fuel shuffle assistant graphics interface and automation for nuclear fuel shuffle with PDQ7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetschat, G.R.; Faught, W.S.; Rothleder, B.M.; Eich, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    A mini-computer based interactive shuffle assistant program has been designed and implemented to provide a demonstration capability with graphics display and rudimentary artificial intelligence logic which assists the engineer in determining a trial reload pattern. The program has been automated to interface with the BETCY/PDQ7E nuclear design programs. Physics data are extracted from the PDQ7E calculations and displayed to allow rapid evaluation of the trial reload patterns. The system reduces the engineering labor needed to determine an acceptable reload pattern

  5. Atomic interaction networks in the core of protein domains and their native folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S; Sasisekharan, V; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-02-23

    Vastly divergent sequences populate a majority of protein folds. In the quest to identify features that are conserved within protein domains belonging to the same fold, we set out to examine the entire protein universe on a fold-by-fold basis. We report that the atomic interaction network in the solvent-unexposed core of protein domains are fold-conserved, extraordinary sequence divergence notwithstanding. Further, we find that this feature, termed protein core atomic interaction network (or PCAIN) is significantly distinguishable across different folds, thus appearing to be "signature" of a domain's native fold. As part of this study, we computed the PCAINs for 8698 representative protein domains from families across the 1018 known protein folds to construct our seed database and an automated framework was developed for PCAIN-based characterization of the protein fold universe. A test set of randomly selected domains that are not in the seed database was classified with over 97% accuracy, independent of sequence divergence. As an application of this novel fold signature, a PCAIN-based scoring scheme was developed for comparative (homology-based) structure prediction, with 1-2 angstroms (mean 1.61A) C(alpha) RMSD generally observed between computed structures and reference crystal structures. Our results are consistent across the full spectrum of test domains including those from recent CASP experiments and most notably in the 'twilight' and 'midnight' zones wherein <30% and <10% target-template sequence identity prevails (mean twilight RMSD of 1.69A). We further demonstrate the utility of the PCAIN protocol to derive biological insight into protein structure-function relationships, by modeling the structure of the YopM effector novel E3 ligase (NEL) domain from plague-causative bacterium Yersinia Pestis and discussing its implications for host adaptive and innate immune modulation by the pathogen. Considering the several high-throughput, sequence

  6. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  7. Endophilin-A1 BAR domain interaction with arachidonyl CoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoukhov, Maxim V; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2014-01-01

    Endophilin-A1 belongs to the family of BAR domain containing proteins that catalyze membrane remodeling processes via sensing, inducing and stabilizing membrane curvature. We show that the BAR domain of endophilin-A1 binds arachidonic acid and molds its coenzyme A (CoA) activated form, arachidonyl-CoA into a defined structure. We studied low resolution structures of endophilin-A1-BAR and its complex with arachidonyl-CoA in solution using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The free endophilin-A1-BAR domain is shown to be dimeric at lower concentrations but builds tetramers and higher order complexes with increasing concentrations. Extensive titration SAXS studies revealed that the BAR domain produces a homogenous complex with the lipid micelles. The structural model of the complexes revealed two arachidonyl-CoA micelles bound to the distal arms of an endophilin-A1-BAR dimer. Intriguingly, the radius of the bound micelles significantly decreases compared to that of the free micelles, and this structural result may provide hints on the potential biological relevance of the endophilin-A1-BAR interaction with arachidonyl CoA.

  8. The Hippo pathway target, YAP, promotes metastasis through its TEAD-interaction domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, John M; Stern, Patrick; Liu, Hui; Schindler, Jeffrey W; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Hynes, Richard O

    2012-09-11

    The transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major regulator of organ size and proliferation in vertebrates. As such, YAP can act as an oncogene in several tissue types if its activity is increased aberrantly. Although no activating mutations in the yap1 gene have been identified in human cancer, yap1 is located on the 11q22 amplicon, which is amplified in several human tumors. In addition, mutations or epigenetic silencing of members of the Hippo pathway, which represses YAP function, have been identified in human cancers. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to increasing tumor growth, increased YAP activity is potently prometastatic in breast cancer and melanoma cells. Using a Luminex-based approach to multiplex in vivo assays, we determined that the domain of YAP that interacts with the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors but not the WW domains or PDZ-binding motif, is essential for YAP-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. We further demonstrate that, through its TEAD-interaction domain, YAP enhances multiple processes known to be important for tumor progression and metastasis, including cellular proliferation, transformation, migration, and invasion. Finally, we found that the metastatic potential of breast cancer and melanoma cells is strongly correlated with increased TEAD transcriptional activity. Together, our results suggest that increased YAP/TEAD activity plays a causal role in cancer progression and metastasis.

  9. iDoRNA: An Interacting Domain-based Tool for Designing RNA-RNA Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittrawan Thaiprasit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA-RNA interactions play a crucial role in gene regulation in living organisms. They have gained increasing interest in the field of synthetic biology because of their potential applications in medicine and biotechnology. However, few novel regulators based on RNA-RNA interactions with desired structures and functions have been developed due to the challenges of developing design tools. Recently, we proposed a novel tool, called iDoDe, for designing RNA-RNA interacting sequences by first decomposing RNA structures into interacting domains and then designing each domain using a stochastic algorithm. However, iDoDe did not provide an optimal solution because it still lacks a mechanism to optimize the design. In this work, we have further developed the tool by incorporating a genetic algorithm (GA to find an RNA solution with maximized structural similarity and minimized hybridized RNA energy, and renamed the tool iDoRNA. A set of suitable parameters for the genetic algorithm were determined and found to be a weighting factor of 0.7, a crossover rate of 0.9, a mutation rate of 0.1, and the number of individuals per population set to 8. We demonstrated the performance of iDoRNA in comparison with iDoDe by using six RNA-RNA interaction models. It was found that iDoRNA could efficiently generate all models of interacting RNAs with far more accuracy and required far less computational time than iDoDe. Moreover, we compared the design performance of our tool against existing design tools using forty-four RNA-RNA interaction models. The results showed that the performance of iDoRNA is better than RiboMaker when considering the ensemble defect, the fitness score and computation time usage. However, it appears that iDoRNA is outperformed by NUPACK and RNAiFold 2.0 when considering the ensemble defect. Nevertheless, iDoRNA can still be an useful alternative tool for designing novel RNA-RNA interactions in synthetic biology research. The source code of i

  10. Does action planning moderate the intention-habit interaction in the exercise domain? A three-way interaction analysis investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Rhodes, Ryan E; van Osch, Liesbeth

    2012-10-01

    Both habit strength and action planning have been found to moderate the intention-exercise behaviour relationship, but no research exists that has investigated how habit strength and action planning simultaneously influence this relationship. The present study was designed to explore this issue in a prospective sample of undergraduate students (N = 415): action planning, habit strength, intention, attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control were assessed at baseline and exercise behaviour was assessed 2 weeks later. Both habit strength and action planning moderated the intention-exercise relationship, with stronger relationship at higher levels of planning or habit strength. Decomposing a significant action planning × habit strength × intention interaction showed that the strength of the intention-exercise relationship progressed linearly through levels of action planning and habit strength. These novel results show that action planning strengthens the intention-habit strength interaction in the exercise domain: exercise interventions should therefore focus on simultaneously bolstering action planning and habit strength.

  11. Regulation of the interaction between the neuronal BIN1 isoform 1 and Tau proteins - role of the SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Idir; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sottejeau, Yoann; Lippens, Guy; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    Bridging integrator 1 (bin1) gene is a genetic determinant of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been reported to modulate Alzheimer's pathogenesis through pathway(s) involving Tau. The functional impact of Tau/BIN1 interaction as well as the molecular details of this interaction are still not fully resolved. As a consequence, how BIN1 through its interaction with Tau affects AD risk is also still not determined. To progress in this understanding, interaction of Tau with two BIN1 isoforms was investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. 1 H, 15 N spectra showed that the C-terminal SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 1 (BIN1Iso1) is not mobile in solution but locked with the core of the protein. In contrast, the SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 9 (BIN1Iso9) behaves as an independent mobile domain. This reveals an equilibrium between close and open conformations for the SH3 domain. Interestingly, a 334-376 peptide from the clathrin and AP-2-binding domain (CLAP) domain of BIN1Iso1, which contains a SH3-binding site, is able to compete with BIN1-SH3 intramolecular interaction. For both BIN1 isoforms, the SH3 domain can interact with Tau(210-240) sequence. Tau(210-240) peptide can indeed displace the intramolecular interaction of the BIN1-SH3 of BIN1Iso1 and form a complex with the released domain. The measured K d were in agreement with a stronger affinity of Tau peptide. Both CLAP and Tau peptides occupied the same surface on the BIN1-SH3 domain, showing that their interaction is mutually exclusive. These results emphasize an additional level of complexity in the regulation of the interaction between BIN1 and Tau dependent of the BIN1 isoforms. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Modeling Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction at Transition Metal Interfaces: Constrained Moment versus Generalized Bloch Theorem

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Yao-Jun

    2017-10-29

    Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) at Pt/Co interfaces is investigated theoretically using two different first principles methods. The first one uses the constrained moment method to build a spin spiral in real space, while the second method uses the generalized Bloch theorem approach to construct a spin spiral in reciprocal space. We show that although the two methods produce an overall similar total DMI energy, the dependence of DMI as a function of the spin spiral wavelength is dramatically different. We suggest that long-range magnetic interactions, that determine itinerant magnetism in transition metals, are responsible for this discrepancy. We conclude that the generalized Bloch theorem approach is more adapted to model DMI in transition metal systems, where magnetism is delocalized, while the constrained moment approach is mostly applicable to weak or insulating magnets, where magnetism is localized.

  13. A Case Study of MasterMind Chess: Comparing Mouse/Keyboard Interaction with Kinect-Based Gestural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Alves Mendes Vasiljevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As gestural interfaces emerged as a new type of user interface, their use has been vastly explored by the entertainment industry to better immerse the player in games. Despite being mainly used in dance and sports games, little use was made of gestural interaction in more slow-paced genres, such as board games. In this work, we present a Kinect-based gestural interface for an online and multiplayer chess game and describe a case study with users with different playing skill levels. Comparing the mouse/keyboard interaction with the gesture-based interaction, the results of the activity were synthesized into lessons learned regarding general usability and design of game control mechanisms. These results could be applied to slow-paced board games like chess. Our findings indicate that gestural interfaces may not be suitable for competitive chess matches, yet it can be fun to play while using them in casual matches.

  14. Interface interaction within nanopores in thin films of an amphiphilic block copolymer and CTAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Deyan; Hu, Xiaoya; Wang, Guoxiu

    2011-02-01

    With water droplets as sacrificed templates at a particular humidity, micro-porous solid thin films were successfully fabricated by self-assembly using an amphiphilic block polymer, polystyrene-b-polyacrylic acid (PS-b-PAA). Interface interactions between the micro-porous thin film and a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), are investigated by in-situ AFM in aqueous solutions. An interesting phenomenon was observed in water and CTAB solution, which the dimensions of the micropores are remarkably larger than the dimensions of those in air. The solid thin films exhibit different surface morphologies in response to stimulus by different concentrations of CTAB. These observations were explained by positing that the PAA chains in the micropores stretch and contract with interface interactions between PAA and CTAB. A promising electrochemical application of this film is suggested. This study is aimed at strategies for the functionalization of stimulus-responsive micro-porous solid thin films with tunable surface morphologies, and exploring new smart materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Alexander R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  16. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  17. Interaction domains in permanent-magnetic rare-earth transition-metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielsch, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of this dissertation the phenomenon of the interaction domains was studied both experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulation. Object of the study were one-phase NdFeB magnets, which were fabricated from commercial MQU-F powders of the Magnequench Inc. company by hot pressing and subsequent warm deformation in the IWF Dresden. Additionally via the same fabrication way also composite samples of NdFeB and Fe with different original particle sizes ere obtained and studied. Supported wer the experimental works by simulations with the FEMME software package, which is based on a hybrid finite-element method/boundary-element method.

  18. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding interaction in xylitol-water mixtures using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rander, D. N.; Joshi, Y. S.; Kanse, K. S.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of complex dielectric permittivity of xylitol-water mixtures have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 MHz-30 GHz using a time domain reflectometry technique. Measurements have been done at six temperatures from 0 to 25 °C and at different weight fractions of xylitol (0 xylitol-water can be well described by Cole-Davidson model having an asymmetric distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric parameters such as static dielectric constant and relaxation time for the mixtures have been evaluated. The molecular interaction between xylitol and water molecules is discussed using the Kirkwood correlation factor ( g eff ) and thermodynamic parameter.

  19. The interface interaction behavior between E. coli and two kinds of fibrous minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qunwei; Han, Linbao; Deng, Jianjun; Zhao, Yulian; Dang, Zheng; Tan, Daoyong; Dong, Faqin

    2017-11-09

    In the present, studies of interaction between human normal flora and fibrous mineral are still lacking. Batch experiments were performed to deal with the interaction of Escherichia coli and two fibrous minerals (brucite and palygorskite), and the interface and liquid phase characteristics in the short-term interaction processes were discussed. The bacterial concentrations, the remnant glucose (GLU), pyruvic acid, and the activity of β-galactosidase and six elements were measured, and the results show that the promoting effect of brucite on the growth of E. coli was more significant than that of palygorskite. FTIR and XRD analysis results also confirmed E. coli has obviously dissolved on brucite and damage effect on palygorskite silicon structure. SEM results show that the interfacial contact degree between E. coli cells and brucite fibers was higher than that of palygorskite. These may be due to the zeta potential difference between E. coli and palygorskite was 14.57-22.37 mV, while it of brucite was 44.04-64.24 mV. The elements dissolving of two fibrous minerals not only increased regularly to liquid EC but also had a good buffer effect to the decrease of liquid pH. Studies of short-term interaction between E. coli and brucite and palygorskite can help to understand the effect of fibrous minerals on microeubiosis of human normal flora and the contribution of microbial behaviors on the fibrous minerals weathering in the natural environment.

  20. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  1. Homophilic interactions mediated by receptor tyrosine phosphatases mu and kappa. A critical role for the novel extracellular MAM domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondag, G C; Koningstein, G M; Jiang, Y P

    1995-01-01

    and is found in diverse transmembrane proteins, is not known. We previously reported that both RPTP mu and RPTP kappa can mediate homophilic cell interactions when expressed in insect cells. Here we show that despite their striking structural similarity, RPTP mu and RPTP kappa fail to interact...... in a heterophilic manner. To examine the role of the MAM domain in homophilic binding, we expressed a mutant RPTP mu lacking the MAM domain in insect Sf9 cells. Truncated RPTP mu is properly expressed at the cell surface but fails to promote cell-cell adhesion. Homophilic cell adhesion is fully restored...... in a chimeric RPTP mu molecule containing the MAM domain of RPTP kappa. However, this chimeric RPTP mu does not interact with either RPTP mu or RPTP kappa. These results indicate that the MAM domain of RPTP mu and RPTP kappa is essential for homophilic cell-cell interaction and helps determine the specificity...

  2. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment) on preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this ...

  3. Analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions on nonlinear scatterers using time domain volume integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2014-07-06

    Effects of material nonlinearities on electromagnetic field interactions become dominant as field amplitudes increase. A typical example is observed in plasmonics, where highly localized fields “activate” Kerr nonlinearities. Naturally, time domain solvers are the method of choice when it comes simulating these nonlinear effects. Oftentimes, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used for this purpose. This is simply due to the fact that explicitness of the FDTD renders the implementation easier and the material nonlinearity can be easily accounted for using an auxiliary differential equation (J.H. Green and A. Taflove, Opt. Express, 14(18), 8305-8310, 2006). On the other hand, explicit marching on-in-time (MOT)-based time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers have never been used for the same purpose even though they offer several advantages over FDTD (E. Michielssen, et al., ECCOMAS CFD, The Netherlands, Sep. 5-8, 2006). This is because explicit MOT solvers have never been stabilized until not so long ago. Recently an explicit but stable MOT scheme has been proposed for solving the time domain surface magnetic field integral equation (H.A. Ulku, et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 61(8), 4120-4131, 2013) and later it has been extended for the time domain volume electric field integral equation (TDVEFIE) (S. B. Sayed, et al., Pr. Electromagn. Res. S., 378, Stockholm, 2013). This explicit MOT scheme uses predictor-corrector updates together with successive over relaxation during time marching to stabilize the solution even when time step is as large as in the implicit counterpart. In this work, an explicit MOT-TDVEFIE solver is proposed for analyzing electromagnetic wave interactions on scatterers exhibiting Kerr nonlinearity. Nonlinearity is accounted for using the constitutive relation between the electric field intensity and flux density. Then, this relation and the TDVEFIE are discretized together by expanding the intensity and flux - sing half

  4. Interaction of toremifene with dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol in monolayers at the air–water interface followed by fluorescence microscopy in Langmuir–Blodgett films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romão, Rute I.S.; Maçôas, Ermelinda; Martinho, José M.G.; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M.P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG) containing toremifene (TOR), an antiestrogen drug derivative of tamoxifen, were prepared in order to study the interaction of the drug with the cell membrane. TOR is not surface active but it remains at the interface in DPPG rich monolayers anchored by electrostatic interaction with the anionic DPPG up to the equimolar composition. The fluidity of mixed monolayers increases up to the TOR mole fraction X TOR = 0.3, remaining practically invariant for higher compositions. Brewster angle microscopy shows that the TOR disturbs the DPPG organization and the liquid condensed (LC) domains of DPPG become undetectable for X TOR ≥ 0.4. Laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy images of the LB films doped with rhodamine B-piperazine amide dye confirm the progressive reduction in size of LC domains, from which TOR and rhodamine are excluded. The incorporation of TOR in DPPG monolayers up to the equimolar composition supports the formation of a TOR:DPPG complex (1:1) due to electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged polar groups of DPPG and protonated TOR. - Highlights: • Toremifene (TOR) in dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG) monolayers • Electrostatic interactions between DPPG and TOR form a 1:1 complex. • TOR increases the fluidity of DPPG monolayers. • Incorporation of TOR in the fluid phase of DPPG followed by fluorescence imaging

  5. New insights into interactions between the nucleotide‐binding domain of CFTR and keratin 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Kupniewska, Anna; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Faure, Grazyna; Fraczyk, Tomasz; Roldan, Ariel; Hoffmann, Brice; Faria da Cunha, Mélanie; Herrmann, Harald; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The intermediate filament protein keratin 8 (K8) interacts with the nucleotide‐binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) with phenylalanine 508 deletion (ΔF508), and this interaction hampers the biogenesis of functional ΔF508‐CFTR and its insertion into the plasma membrane. Interruption of this interaction may constitute a new therapeutic target for CF patients bearing the ΔF508 mutation. Here, we aimed to determine the binding surface between these two proteins, to facilitate the design of the interaction inhibitors. To identify the NBD1 fragments perturbed by the ΔF508 mutation, we used hydrogen–deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX‐MS) on recombinant wild‐type (wt) NBD1 and ΔF508‐NBD1 of CFTR. We then performed the same analysis in the presence of a peptide from the K8 head domain, and extended this investigation using bioinformatics procedures and surface plasmon resonance, which revealed regions affected by the peptide binding in both wt‐NBD1 and ΔF508‐NBD1. Finally, we performed HDX‐MS analysis of the NBD1 molecules and full‐length K8, revealing hydrogen‐bonding network changes accompanying complex formation. In conclusion, we have localized a region in the head segment of K8 that participates in its binding to NBD1. Our data also confirm the stronger binding of K8 to ΔF508‐NBD1, which is supported by an additional binding site located in the vicinity of the ΔF508 mutation in NBD1. PMID:27870250

  6. Interactions between strike-slip earthquakes and the subduction interface near the Mendocino Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between the North American, Pacific, and Gorda plates at the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) create one of the most seismically active regions in North America. The earthquakes rupture all three plate boundaries but also include considerable intraplate seismicity reflecting the strong internal deformation of the Gorda plate. Understanding the stress levels that drive these ruptures and estimating the locking state of the subduction interface are especially important topics for regional earthquake hazard assessment. However owing to the lack of offshore seismic and geodetic instruments, the rupture process of only a few large earthquakes near the MTJ have been studied in detail and the locking state of the subduction interface is not well constrained. In this paper, first, we use the second moments inversion method to study the rupture process of the January 28, 2015 Mw 5.7 earthquake on the Mendocino transform fault that was unusually well recorded by both onshore and offshore strong motion instruments. We estimate the rupture dimension to be approximately 6 km by 3 km corresponding to a stress drop of ∼4 MPa for a crack model. Next we investigate the frictional state of the subduction interface by simulating the afterslip that would be expected there as a result of the stress changes from the 2015 earthquake and a 2010 Mw 6.5 intraplate earthquake within the subducted Gorda plate. We simulate afterslip scenarios for a range of depths of the downdip end of the locked zone defined as the transition to velocity strengthening friction and calculate the corresponding surface deformation expected at onshore GPS monuments. We can rule out a very shallow downdip limit owing to the lack of a detectable signal at onshore GPS stations following the 2010 earthquake. Our simulations indicate that the locking depth on the slab surface is at least 14 km, which suggests that the next M8 earthquake rupture will likely reach the coastline and strong shaking

  7. LOADS INTERACTION DOMAINS METHODOLOGY FOR THE DESIGN OF STEEL GREENHOUSE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castellano

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to develop a design methodology which correlates main structural design parameters, whose production is characterised by high levels of standardization, such as the height of gutter or the distance between frames, with actions on the greenhouse. The methodology, based on the use of charts and abacus, permits a clear and a direct interpretation of the structural response to design load combinations and allows the design of structural improvements with the aim of the optimization of the ratio benefits (structural strength/costs. The study of structural interaction domains allowed a clear and a direct interpretation of the structural response to design load combinations. The diagrams highlight not only if the structure fulfils the standard requirements but also the safety levels with respect to design load combinations and allow the structural designer how to operate in order to optimize the structural response with standard requirements achieving the best ratio benefits (structural safety/ costs. The methodology was developed basing on criteria assigned by EN13031 on two different kinds of greenhouse structures: an arched greenhouse with a film plastic covering and a duo pitched roof greenhouse cover with rigid plastic membranes. Structural interaction domains for arched greenhouse showed a better capability of the structure to resist to vertical loads then to horizontal one. Moreover, the climatic load distribution on the structure assigned by EN13031 is such that the combination of climatic actions is less dangerous for the structure then their individual application. Whilst, duo pitched roof steel greenhouse interaction domains, showed a better capability of the structure to resist to vertical loads then to horizontal one and that, in any case, the serviceability limit states analysis is more strict then the ULS one. The shape of structural domains highlighted that the combination of actions is more dangerous for the

  8. Time-Domain Modeling of RF Antennas and Plasma-Surface Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD modeling techniques allow plasma-surface interactions such as sheath formation and sputtering to be modeled concurrently with the physics of antenna near- and far-field behavior and ICRF power flow. Although typical sheath length scales (micrometers are much smaller than the wavelengths of fast (tens of cm and slow (millimeter waves excited by the antenna, sheath behavior near plasma-facing antenna components can be represented by a sub-grid kinetic sheath boundary condition, from which RF-rectified sheath potential variation over the surface is computed as a function of current flow and local plasma parameters near the wall. These local time-varying sheath potentials can then be used, in tandem with particle-in-cell (PIC models of the edge plasma, to study sputtering effects. Particle strike energies at the wall can be computed more accurately, consistent with their passage through the known potential of the sheath, such that correspondingly increased accuracy of sputtering yields and heat/particle fluxes to antenna surfaces is obtained. The new simulation capabilities enable time-domain modeling of plasma-surface interactions and ICRF physics in realistic experimental configurations at unprecedented spatial resolution. We will present results/animations from high-performance (10k-100k core FDTD/PIC simulations of Alcator C-Mod antenna operation.

  9. A Novel Protein Interaction between Nucleotide Binding Domain of Hsp70 and p53 Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, protein interaction of Homo sapiens nucleotide binding domain (NBD of heat shock 70 kDa protein (PDB: 1HJO with p53 motif remains to be elucidated. The NBD-p53 motif complex enhances the p53 stabilization, thereby increasing the tumor suppression activity in cancer treatment. Therefore, we identified the interaction between NBD and p53 using STRING version 9.1 program. Then, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of p53 motif through homology modeling and determined the binding affinity and stability of NBD-p53 motif complex structure via molecular docking and dynamics (MD simulation. Human DNA binding domain of p53 motif (SCMGGMNR retrieved from UniProt (UniProtKB: P04637 was docked with the NBD protein, using the Autodock version 4.2 program. The binding energy and intermolecular energy for the NBD-p53 motif complex were −0.44 Kcal/mol and −9.90 Kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, and secondary structure analyses revealed that the NBD protein had a strong bond with p53 motif and the protein-ligand complex was stable. Thus, the current data would be highly encouraging for designing Hsp70 structure based drug in cancer therapy.

  10. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  11. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Interface optical phonons and their electron-phonon interactions in ZnS/CdS multi-shell spherical quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen Deng; Bao, Li Fu; Ren, Ya Jie; Yuan, Zhao Lin

    2018-04-01

    The properties of interface optical phonons and their electron-phonon interactions in ZnS/CdS multi-shell spherical quantum dots are studied by adopting dielectric continuum model. The dispersion curves and electron-phonon coupling strengths for interface optical phonons in ZnS/CdS multi-shell dots are calculated and analyzed in detail. It is shown that the number of interface optical phonon branches increase with the increase of layers of multi-shell quantum dots. The number of interface optical phonons increase two branches for increasing one layer material. The dispersions of interface optical phonon with low quantum number l are weak. The electron-interface optical phonon interactions are mainly localized at hetero-interfaces. The interface optical phonons with low quantum number l have important contribution to electron-interface optical phonon interactions.

  13. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sablayrolles C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  14. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertron, A.; Ranaivomanana, H.; Jacquemet, N.; Erable, B.; Sablayrolles, C.; Escadeillas, G.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+). The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  15. Natural interfaces for interacting with a virtual control desk of a nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves da Cunha e

    2012-01-01

    Due to very strict standards of safe operation of a nuclear power plant operators must be well trained so they can operate it within the necessary safety procedures. This is done through training simulators, which enable the user operation, as close as possible to the real control desk, and can be inserted accident situations, so they train, how to return the plant to a normal operating condition. Normally is used two types of simulator. Preferred is the full scope simulator, what is a computational dynamics program of the plant used in conjunction with a physical replica of the control desk, but this type of simulator involves a high construction cost. The second type is what uses synoptic windows of various regions of the original control desk, its construction cost is smaller, but it have a little fidelity to the original appearance of the table. Currently, with the use of virtual reality, control desks can be modeled in 3D, making the simulator interface is very similar to the appearance of the real control desk with a low cost construction. This work shows the use of natural interfaces for operator interaction with the virtual control desk, in order that it does not use any mechanical device for displaying and acting with it. For procedures that were used, such as: computer vision to recognize the position of the operator's and observation of their hands to the work of the desk controls and voice recognition. (author)

  16. Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz María, Alonso-Valerdi; Víctor Rodrigo, Mercado-García

    2017-01-01

    Tridimensional representations stimulate cognitive processes that are the core and foundation of human-computer interaction (HCI). Those cognitive processes take place while a user navigates and explores a virtual environment (VE) and are mainly related to spatial memory storage, attention, and perception. VEs have many distinctive features (e.g., involvement, immersion, and presence) that can significantly improve HCI in highly demanding and interactive systems such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI). BCI is as a nonmuscular communication channel that attempts to reestablish the interaction between an individual and his/her environment. Although BCI research started in the sixties, this technology is not efficient or reliable yet for everyone at any time. Over the past few years, researchers have argued that main BCI flaws could be associated with HCI issues. The evidence presented thus far shows that VEs can (1) set out working environmental conditions, (2) maximize the efficiency of BCI control panels, (3) implement navigation systems based not only on user intentions but also on user emotions, and (4) regulate user mental state to increase the differentiation between control and noncontrol modalities.

  17. Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Valerdi Luz María

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tridimensional representations stimulate cognitive processes that are the core and foundation of human-computer interaction (HCI. Those cognitive processes take place while a user navigates and explores a virtual environment (VE and are mainly related to spatial memory storage, attention, and perception. VEs have many distinctive features (e.g., involvement, immersion, and presence that can significantly improve HCI in highly demanding and interactive systems such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI. BCI is as a nonmuscular communication channel that attempts to reestablish the interaction between an individual and his/her environment. Although BCI research started in the sixties, this technology is not efficient or reliable yet for everyone at any time. Over the past few years, researchers have argued that main BCI flaws could be associated with HCI issues. The evidence presented thus far shows that VEs can (1 set out working environmental conditions, (2 maximize the efficiency of BCI control panels, (3 implement navigation systems based not only on user intentions but also on user emotions, and (4 regulate user mental state to increase the differentiation between control and noncontrol modalities.

  18. Viral Interactions with PDZ Domain-Containing Proteins—An Oncogenic Trait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire D. James

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the human viruses with oncogenic capabilities, either in their natural host or in experimental systems (hepatitis B and C, human T cell leukaemia virus type 1, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk human papillomaviruses and adenovirus type 9, encode in their limited genome the ability to target cellular proteins containing PSD95/ DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ interaction modules. In many cases (but not always, the viruses have evolved to bind the PDZ domains using the same short linear peptide motifs found in host protein-PDZ interactions, and in some cases regulate the interactions in a similar fashion by phosphorylation. What is striking is that the diverse viruses target a common subset of PDZ proteins that are intimately involved in controlling cell polarity and the structure and function of intercellular junctions, including tight junctions. Cell polarity is fundamental to the control of cell proliferation and cell survival and disruption of polarity and the signal transduction pathways involved is a key event in tumourigenesis. This review focuses on the oncogenic viruses and the role of targeting PDZ proteins in the virus life cycle and the contribution of virus-PDZ protein interactions to virus-mediated oncogenesis. We highlight how many of the viral associations with PDZ proteins lead to deregulation of PI3K/AKT signalling, benefitting virus replication but as a consequence also contributing to oncogenesis.

  19. Hund’s Rule-Driven Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction at 3d−5d Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belabbes, Abderrezak

    2016-12-09

    Using relativistic first-principles calculations, we show that the chemical trend of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in 3d-5d ultrathin films follows Hund\\'s first rule with a tendency similar to their magnetic moments in either the unsupported 3d monolayers or 3d-5d interfaces. We demonstrate that, besides the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect in inversion asymmetric noncollinear magnetic systems, the driving force is the 3d orbital occupations and their spin-flip mixing processes with the spin-orbit active 5d states control directly the sign and magnitude of the DMI. The magnetic chirality changes are discussed in the light of the interplay between SOC, Hund\\'s first rule, and the crystal-field splitting of d orbitals. © 2016 American Physical Society.

  20. Hund's Rule-Driven Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction at 3 d -5 d Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belabbes, A.; Bihlmayer, G.; Bechstedt, F.; Blügel, S.; Manchon, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using relativistic first-principles calculations, we show that the chemical trend of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in 3 d -5 d ultrathin films follows Hund's first rule with a tendency similar to their magnetic moments in either the unsupported 3 d monolayers or 3 d -5 d interfaces. We demonstrate that, besides the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect in inversion asymmetric noncollinear magnetic systems, the driving force is the 3 d orbital occupations and their spin-flip mixing processes with the spin-orbit active 5 d states control directly the sign and magnitude of the DMI. The magnetic chirality changes are discussed in the light of the interplay between SOC, Hund's first rule, and the crystal-field splitting of d orbitals.

  1. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. PMID:25833946

  2. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2015-05-22

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Interaction domains in die-upset NdFeB magnets in dependence on the degree of deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopkov, K.; Gutfleisch, O.; Schaefer, R.; Hinz, D.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic domain structure of NdFeB magnets has been studied using high resolution, digitally enhanced Kerr-microscopy. Melt-spun NdFeB powder (MQU-F TM ) was hot pressed into fully dense samples and then hot deformed to axially textured magnets. Various degrees of deformation (height reduction) up to 76% have been realized. Pronounced interaction domains have been observed only in magnets, which were deformed to a degree of deformation of at least 52%. With increasing alignment of the grains the interaction domains become more and more visible and their size increases

  4. Interface, information, interaction: a narrative review of design and functional requirements for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen; Mosby, Danielle; Capan, Muge; Kowalski, Rebecca; Ratwani, Raj; Noaiseh, Yaman; Kraft, Rachel; Schwartz, Sanford; Weintraub, William S; Arnold, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Provider acceptance and associated patient outcomes are widely discussed in the evaluation of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs), but critical design criteria for tools have generally been overlooked. The objective of this work is to inform electronic health record alert optimization and clinical practice workflow by identifying, compiling, and reporting design recommendations for CDSS to support the efficient, effective, and timely delivery of high-quality care. A narrative review was conducted from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society to identify papers that discussed/recommended design features of CDSSs that are associated with the success of these systems. Fourteen papers were included as meeting the criteria and were found to have a total of 42 unique recommendations; 11 were classified as interface features, 10 as information features, and 21 as interaction features. Features are defined and described, providing actionable guidance that can be applied to CDSS development and policy. To our knowledge, no reviews have been completed that discuss/recommend design features of CDSS at this scale, and thus we found that this was important for the body of literature. The recommendations identified in this narrative review will help to optimize design, organization, management, presentation, and utilization of information through presentation, content, and function. The designation of 3 categories (interface, information, and interaction) should be further evaluated to determine the critical importance of the categories. Future work will determine how to prioritize them with limited resources for designers and developers in order to maximize the clinical utility of CDSS. This review will expand the field of knowledge and provide a novel organization structure to identify key recommendations for CDSS.

  5. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution structure of tensin2 SH2 domain and its phosphotyrosine-independent interaction with DLC-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Dai

    Full Text Available Src homology 2 (SH2 domain is a conserved module involved in various biological processes. Tensin family member was reported to be involved in tumor suppression by interacting with DLC-1 (deleted-in-liver-cancer-1 via its SH2 domain. We explore here the important questions that what the structure of tensin2 SH2 domain is, and how it binds to DLC-1, which might reveal a novel binding mode.Tensin2 SH2 domain adopts a conserved SH2 fold that mainly consists of five β-strands flanked by two α-helices. Most SH2 domains recognize phosphorylated ligands specifically. However, tensin2 SH2 domain was identified to interact with nonphosphorylated ligand (DLC-1 as well as phosphorylated ligand.We determined the solution structure of tensin2 SH2 domain using NMR spectroscopy, and revealed the interactions between tensin2 SH2 domain and its ligands in a phosphotyrosine-independent manner.

  7. On the Equivalence of the Discontinuous One- and Two-Domain Approaches for the Modeling of Transport Phenomena at a Fluid/Porous Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamet, D.; Chandesris, M. [CEA Grenoble, Dept Etud Reacteurs, DEN, F-38054 Grenoble 9, (France); Goyeau, B. [Ecole Cent Paris, Lab EM2C, F-92295 Chatenay Malabry, (France)

    2009-07-01

    In the quest (i) to determine the form of the boundary conditions that must be applied at a fluid/porous interface and (ii) to determine the value of the jump parameters that appear in the expression for these boundary conditions, two different approaches are commonly considered: the so-called one-domain and two-domain approaches. These approaches are commonly thought to be different, and they are thus sometimes compared to each other to determine the value of jump parameters. In this article, we show that the two-domain and discontinuous one-domain approaches are actually strictly equivalent, provided that the latter is mathematically interpreted in the sense of distributions. This equivalence is shown in details for a heat conduction problem and for the more classical Darcy-Brinkman problem. We show in particular that interfacial jumps are introduced in the discontinuous one-domain approach through Dirac delta functions. Numerical issues are then discussed that show that subtle discretization truncation errors give rise to large variations that can be mis-interpreted as the sign of the existence of jump parameters. (authors)

  8. Numerical time-domain modelling of hoof-ground interaction during the stance phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, R

    2017-11-09

    Hoof-ground interaction impacts on the health and performance characteristics of horses. Due to complex interactions between hoof and ground during the stance phase, previous experimentally dominated studies concentrated on subproblems of the phenomena observed. A multidisciplinary methodology with mathematical modelling, material testing and in vivo experimental measurements seems promising. With the help of a mathematical approach, this contribution aims to explain from a biomechanical point of view the phenomena observed during experimental investigations (hoof acceleration, interacting forces) and aims to contribute to an overall experimental-mathematical multidisciplinary approach. In silico modelling of hoof-ground interaction (limb, hoof and horizontally unbounded ground). Hoof-ground interaction is represented by a time-domain finite element model including the limb, the hoof and the unbounded representation of the ground via the scaled boundary finite element method to capture radiation damping during the stance phase. Motoric forces (driving forces) of the horse during locomotion are included. Numerical model results for acceleration-time relations (hoof) at different trotting velocities are compared with previously published acceleration-time relations and show qualitative agreement. From the model approach, power loss due to different ground properties and ground damping is computed in combination with the maximum limb force during the stance phase. Intentionally, a simplified model approach for the material and structural representation of the limb, the hoof and the ground in terms of material features and spatial resolution has been used for this study, which might be the basis for a model refinement in terms of contact properties as well as the integration of bone and joint structures. The comparison to experimentally obtained results demonstrates the applicability of the model, which, in turn, enables an insight into the processes taking place

  9. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  10. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  11. Silver nanoparticle-human hemoglobin interface: time evolution of the corona formation and interaction phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, A. K.; Kamilya, T.; Saha, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have used spectroscopic and electron microscopic analysis to monitor the time evolution of the silver nanoparticles (Ag NP)-human hemoglobin (Hb) corona formation and to characterize the interaction of the Ag NPs with Hb. The time constants for surface plasmon resonance binding and reorganization are found to be 9.51 and 118.48 min, respectively. The drop of surface charge and the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter indicated the corona of Hb on the Ag NP surface. The auto correlation function is found to broaden with the increasing time of the corona formation. Surface zeta potential revealed that positively charged Hb interact electrostatically with negatively charged Ag NP surfaces. The change in α helix and β sheet depends on the corona formation time. The visualization of the Hb corona from HRTEM showed large number of Hb domains aggregate containing essentially Ag NPs and without Ag NPs. Emission study showed the tertiary deformation, energy transfer, nature of interaction and quenching under three different temperatures.

  12. Mutations of the domain forming the dimeric interface of the ArdA protein affect dimerization and antimodification activity but not antirestriction activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth A; Chen, Kai; Bower, Edward K M; Madrzak, Julia; Woods, Arcadia; Barker, Amy M; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Blakely, Garry W; Manfield, Iain; Dryden, David T F

    2013-01-01

    ArdA antirestriction proteins are encoded by genes present in many conjugative plasmids and transposons within bacterial genomes. Antirestriction is the ability to prevent cleavage of foreign incoming DNA by restriction-modification (RM) systems. Antimodification, the ability to inhibit modification by the RM system, can also be observed with some antirestriction proteins. As these mobile genetic elements can transfer antibiotic resistance genes, the ArdA proteins assist their spread. The consequence of antirestriction is therefore the enhanced dissemination of mobile genetic elements. ArdA proteins cause antirestriction by mimicking the DNA structure bound by Type I RM enzymes. The crystal structure of ArdA showed it to be a dimeric protein with a highly elongated curved cylindrical shape [McMahon SA et al. (2009) Nucleic Acids Res37, 4887–4897]. Each monomer has three domains covered with negatively charged side chains and a very small interface with the other monomer. We investigated the role of the domain forming the dimer interface for ArdA activity via site-directed mutagenesis. The antirestriction activity of ArdA was maintained when up to seven mutations per monomer were made or the interface was disrupted such that the protein could only exist as a monomer. The antimodification activity of ArdA was lost upon mutation of this domain. The ability of the monomeric form of ArdA to function in antirestriction suggests, first, that it can bind independently to the restriction subunit or the modification subunits of the RM enzyme, and second, that the many ArdA homologues with long amino acid extensions, present in sequence databases, may be active in antirestriction. Structured digital abstract ArdA and ArdA bind by molecular sieving (1, 2) ArdA and ArdA bind by cosedimentation in solution (1, 2) PMID:23910724

  13. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey.

  14. A Robin-Robin Domain Decomposition Method for a Stokes-Darcy Structure Interaction with a Locally Modified Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Zhilin; Lubkin, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    A new numerical method based on locally modified Cartesian meshes is proposed for solving a coupled system of a fluid flow and a porous media flow. The fluid flow is modeled by the Stokes equations while the porous media flow is modeled by Darcy's law. The method is based on a Robin-Robin domain decomposition method with a Cartesian mesh with local modifications near the interface. Some computational examples are presented and discussed.

  15. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, James L; Laminack, William

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO(2), SnO(2), NiO, Cu(x)O, and Au(x)O (x > 1), in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO(2) and TiO(2-) (x)N(x) decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH(3) and NO(2). Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed.

  16. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Gole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO2, SnO2, NiO, CuxO, and AuxO (x >> 1, in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO2 and TiO2−xNx decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH3 and NO2. Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed.

  17. Affective Interaction with a Virtual Character through an fNIRS Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Aranyi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI harness Neuroscience knowledge to develop affective interaction from first principles. In this paper, we explore affective engagement with a virtual agent through Neurofeedback (NF. We report an experiment where subjects engage with a virtual agent by expressing positive attitudes towards her under a NF paradigm. We use for affective input the asymmetric activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC, which has been previously found to be related to the high-level affective-motivational dimension of approach/avoidance. The magnitude of left-asymmetric DL-PFC activity, measured using fNIRS and treated as a proxy for approach, is mapped onto a control mechanism for the virtual agent’s facial expressions, in which Action Units are activated through a neural network. We carried out an experiment with 18 subjects, which demonstrated that subjects are able to successfully engage with the virtual agent by controlling their mental disposition through NF, and that they perceived the agent’s responses as realistic and consistent with their projected mental disposition. This interaction paradigm is particularly relevant in the case of affective BCI as it facilitates the volitional activation of specific areas normally not under conscious control. Overall, our contribution reconciles a model of affect derived from brain metabolic data with an ecologically valid, yet computationally controllable, virtual affective communication environment.

  18. Specific noncovalent interactions at protein-ligand interface: implications for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Huang, J; Tian, F

    2012-01-01

    Specific noncovalent interactions that are indicative of attractive, directional intermolecular forces have always been of key interest to medicinal chemists in their search for the "glue" that holds drugs and their targets together. With the rapid increase in the number of solved biomolecular structures as well as the performance enhancement of computer hardware and software in recent years, it is now possible to give more comprehensive insight into the geometrical characteristics and energetic landscape of certain sophisticated noncovalent interactions present at the binding interface of protein receptors and small ligands based on accumulated knowledge gaining from the combination of two quite disparate but complementary approaches: crystallographic data analysis and quantum-mechanical ab initio calculation. In this perspective, we survey massive body of published works relating to structural characterization and theoretical investigation of three kinds of strong, specific, direct, enthalpy-driven intermolecular forces, including hydrogen bond, halogen bond and salt bridge, involved in the formation of protein-ligand complex architecture in order to characterize their biological functions in conferring affinity and specificity for ligand recognition by host protein. In particular, the biomedical implications of raised knowledge are discussed with respect to potential applications in rational drug design.

  19. Domain patterns and hysteresis in phase-transforming solids: analysis and numerical simulations of a sharp interface dissipative model via phase-field approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    DeSimone, A.; Kružík, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 481-499 ISSN 1556-1801 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : hysteresis * shape memory Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.952, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/MTR/kruzik-domain patterns and hysteresis in phase-transforming solids analysis and numerical simulations of a sharp interface dissipative model via phase-field approximation.pdf

  20. Modulation of domain-domain interaction and protein function by a charged linker: a case study of mycobacteriophage D29 endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Patidar, Neelam Devidas; Jain, Vikas

    2015-03-12

    Phage-encoded cell wall peptidoglycan hydrolyzing enzymes, called endolysins, are essential for efficient release of virions from bacteria, and show species-specific killing of the host. We have demonstrated previously that the interaction between N-terminal catalytic and C-terminal cell wall binding domains of mycobacteriophage D29 endolysin makes the enzyme inactive in Escherichiacoli. Here, we demonstrate that such interaction occurs intramolecularly and is facilitated by a charged linker that connects the two domains. We also show that linker composition is crucial for the inactivation of PG hydrolase in E. coli. Such knowledge will immensely help in bioengineering of endolysins with narrow or broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of ion acceleration mechanism through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Brandi, F. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cristoforetti, G. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Giove, D. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Koester, P. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in the femtosecond domain has been carried out at the ILIL facility at a laser intensity of up to 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson Parabola Spectrometer was used to identify different ion species and measure the energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters. We discuss the dependence of the protons spectra upon the structural characteristics of the targets (thickness and atomic mass) and the role of surface versus target bulk during acceleration process. - Highlights: • Ion acceleration mechanism in TNSA regime was investigated. • The energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters were measured. • Dependence of the spectra upon the target structural characteristics was discussed.

  2. Preface (to: Brain-Computer Interfaces. Applying our Minds to Human-Computer Interaction)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Desney; Tan, Desney S.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2010-01-01

    The advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging technologies provide us with the increasing ability to interface directly with activity in the brain. Researchers have begun to use these technologies to build brain-computer interfaces. Originally, these interfaces were meant to allow

  3. Interaction of a biguanide compound with membrane model interface systems: probing the properties of antimalaria and antidiabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samart, Nuttaporn; Beuning, Cheryle N; Haller, Kenneth J; Rithner, Chris D; Crans, Debbie C

    2014-07-29

    Since membrane penetration is important for drug efficacy, how antimalarial precursor material 1-phenylbiguanide (PBG) interacts with an interface was characterized using a reverse micelle (RM) model system. (1)H NMR studies show that PBG partitions across the membrane interface. Specifically, the (1)H NMR studies showed that the 1-phenylbiguanide compound in an aqueous environment changed when placed near an interface. PBG is known to affect hydrogen bonding in water, and as the size of the RMs changes, the water organization in the water pool is changed. The NOESY spectrum of PBG in AOT RM contains cross-peak signals between the PBG protons and AOT protons, which is consistent with the penetration of the PBG into the interface. At the same time, there is a cross peak between the biguanide moiety and the HOD signal. This shows that these NH protons are near the HOD protons, placing the biguanide functional group in the water pool. Preliminary differential FTIR spectroscopic studies confirmed this location. In summary, we found that PBG interacts with different regions of the interface, with the phenyl group penetrating the hydrophobic interface while the biguanide remains in the water pool.

  4. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  5. Soliton-like magnetic domain wall motion induced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Teruo

    Topological defects such as magnetic solitons, vortices, Bloch lines, and skyrmions start to play an important role in modern magnetism due to their extraordinary stability which can be hailed as future memory devices. Recently, novel type of antisymmetric exchange interaction, namely the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), has been uncovered and found to influence on the formation of topological defects. Exploring how the DMI affects the dynamics of topological defects is therefore an important task. Here we investigate the dynamics of the magnetic domain wall (DW) under a DMI by developing a time-of-flight measurement scheme which allows us to measure the DW velocity for magnetic fields up to 0.3T. For a weak DMI, the trend of DW velocity follows the Walker's model which predicts that the velocity of DW increases with field up to a threshold (Walker field) and decreases abruptly. On the other hand, for a strong DMI, velocity breakdown is completely suppressed and the DW keeps its maximum velocity even far above the Walker field. Such a distinct trend of the DW velocity, which has never been predicted, can be explained in terms of magnetic soliton, of which topology can be protected by the DMI. Importantly, such a soliton-like DW motion is only observed in two dimensional systems, implying that the vertical Bloch lines (VBLs) creating inside of the magnetic domain-wall play a crucial role. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 15H05702, 26870300, 26870304, 26103002, 25.4251, Collaborative Research Program of the Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, and R & D Project for ICT Key Technology of MEXT from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  6. Characterization of the interaction between Actinin-Associated LIM Protein (ALP) and the rod domain of α-actinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaavuniemi, Tuula; Alho, Nanna; Hotulainen, Pirta; Kelloniemi, Annina; Havukainen, Heli; Permi, Perttu; Mattila, Sampo; Ylänne, Jari

    2009-01-01

    Background The PDZ-LIM proteins are a family of signalling adaptors that interact with the actin cross-linking protein, α-actinin, via their PDZ domains or via internal regions between the PDZ and LIM domains. Three of the PDZ-LIM proteins have a conserved 26-residue ZM motif in the internal region, but the structure of the internal region is unknown. Results In this study, using circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we showed that the ALP internal region (residues 107–273) was largely unfolded in solution, but was able to interact with the α-actinin rod domain in vitro, and to co-localize with α-actinin on stress fibres in vivo. NMR analysis revealed that the titration of ALP with the α-actinin rod domain induces stabilization of ALP. A synthetic peptide (residues 175–196) that contained the N-terminal half of the ZM motif was found to interact directly with the α-actinin rod domain in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. Short deletions at or before the ZM motif abrogated the localization of ALP to actin stress fibres. Conclusion The internal region of ALP appeared to be largely unstructured but functional. The ZM motif defined part of the interaction surface between ALP and the α-actinin rod domain. PMID:19327143

  7. COREMAP: Graphical user interface for displaying reactor core data in an interactive hexagon map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscat, F.L.; Derstine, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    COREMAP is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to assist users read and check reactor core data from multidimensional neutronic simulation models in color and/or as text in an interactive 2D planar grid of hexagonal subassemblies. COREMAP is a complete GEODST/RUNDESC viewing tool which enables the user to access multi data set files (e.g. planes, moments, energy groups ,... ) and display up to two data sets simultaneously, one as color and the other as text. The user (1) controls color scale characteristics such as type (linear or logarithmic) and range limits, (2) controls the text display based upon conditional statements on data spelling, and value. (3) chooses zoom features such as core map size, number of rings and surrounding subassemblies, and (4) specifies the data selection for supplied popup subwindows which display a selection of data currently off-screen for a selected cell, as a list of data and/or as a graph. COREMAP includes a RUNDESC file editing tool which creates ''proposed'' Run-description files by point and click revisions to subassembly assignments in an existing EBRII Run-description file. COREMAP includes a fully automated printing option which creates high quality PostScript color or greyscale images of the core map independent of the monitor used, e.g. color prints can be generated with a session from a color or monochrome monitor. The automated PostScript output is an alternative to the xgrabsc based printing option. COREMAP includes a plotting option which creates graphs related to a selected cell. The user specifies the X and Y coordinates types (planes, moment, group, flux ,... ) and a parameter, P, when displaying several curves for the specified (X, Y) pair COREMAP supports hexagonal geometry reactor core configurations specified by: the GEODST file and binary Standard Interface Files and the RUNDESC ordering

  8. Anomalous water dynamics at surfaces and interfaces: synergistic effects of confinement and surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2018-01-01

    In nature, water is often found in contact with surfaces that are extended on the scale of molecule size but small on a macroscopic scale. Examples include lipid bilayers and reverse micelles as well as biomolecules like proteins, DNA and zeolites, to name a few. While the presence of surfaces and interfaces interrupts the continuous hydrogen bond network of liquid water, confinement on a mesoscopic scale introduces new features. Even when extended on a molecular scale, natural and biological surfaces often have features (like charge, hydrophobicity) that vary on the scale of the molecular diameter of water. As a result, many new and exotic features, which are not seen in the bulk, appear in the dynamics of water close to the surface. These different behaviors bear the signature of both water–surface interactions and of confinement. In other words, the altered properties are the result of the synergistic effects of surface–water interactions and confinement. Ultrafast spectroscopy, theoretical modeling and computer simulations together form powerful synergistic approaches towards an understanding of the properties of confined water in such systems as nanocavities, reverse micelles (RMs), water inside and outside biomolecules like proteins and DNA, and also between two hydrophobic walls. We shall review the experimental results and place them in the context of theory and simulations. For water confined within RMs, we discuss the possible interference effects propagating from opposite surfaces. Similar interference is found to give rise to an effective attractive force between two hydrophobic surfaces immersed and kept fixed at a separation of d, with the force showing an exponential dependence on this distance. For protein and DNA hydration, we shall examine a multitude of timescales that arise from frustration effects due to the inherent heterogeneity of these surfaces. We pay particular attention to the role of orientational correlations and modification of

  9. Methodology for Training Small Domain-specific Language Models and Its Application in Service Robot Speech Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ONDAS Stanislav

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed paper introduces the novel methodology for training small domain-specific language models only from domain vocabulary. Proposed methodology is intended for situations, when no training data are available and preparing of appropriate deterministic grammar is not trivial task. Methodology consists of two phases. In the first phase the “random” deterministic grammar, which enables to generate all possible combination of unigrams and bigrams is constructed from vocabulary. Then, prepared random grammar serves for generating the training corpus. The “random” n-gram model is trained from generated corpus, which can be adapted in second phase. Evaluation of proposed approach has shown usability of the methodology for small domains. Results of methodology assessment favor designed method instead of constructing the appropriate deterministic grammar.

  10. Homophilic interactions mediated by receptor tyrosine phosphatases mu and kappa. A critical role for the novel extracellular MAM domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondag, G C; Koningstein, G M; Jiang, Y P

    1995-01-01

    and is found in diverse transmembrane proteins, is not known. We previously reported that both RPTP mu and RPTP kappa can mediate homophilic cell interactions when expressed in insect cells. Here we show that despite their striking structural similarity, RPTP mu and RPTP kappa fail to interact......The receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) mu and RPTP kappa have a modular ectodomain consisting of four fibronectin type III-like repeats, a single Ig-like domain, and a newly identified N-terminal MAM domain. The function of the latter module, which comprises about 160 amino acids...... in a heterophilic manner. To examine the role of the MAM domain in homophilic binding, we expressed a mutant RPTP mu lacking the MAM domain in insect Sf9 cells. Truncated RPTP mu is properly expressed at the cell surface but fails to promote cell-cell adhesion. Homophilic cell adhesion is fully restored...

  11. Is the tilt of the lipid head group correlated with the number of intermolecular interactions at the bilayer interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, Krzysztof; Markiewicz, Michal; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta

    2018-04-10

    Lipid and water molecules comprising the bilayer form an integral entity owing to only weak physical interactions. At the bilayer interface, these interactions chiefly involve hydrogen bonding and charge pairing. Lipid head groups make hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) predominantly with water, whereas inter-lipid H-bonds and charge pairs are less numerous. Both inter-lipid H-bonding and charge pairing depend on the distance and relative orientation of the interacting head groups. In this paper, correlations are analysed between the orientation of the lipid head group and the number of inter-lipid interactions at the interface of a bilayer made of galactolipids, forming direct inter-lipid H-bonds, and of phosphatidylcholines forming inter-lipid charge pairs. The correlations are not strong however, since in both bilayers they show a similar trend. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of the Josephin Domain protein-protein interaction by molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Deriu

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 3, the most common form of SCA, is a neurodegenerative rare disease characterized by polyglutamine tract expansion and self-assembly of Ataxin3 (At3 misfolded proteins into highly organized fibrillar aggregates. The At3 N-terminal Josephin Domain (JD has been suggested as being responsible for mediating the initial phase of the At3 double-step fibrillogenesis. Several issues concerning the residues involved in the JD's aggregation and, more generally, the JD clumping mechanism have not been clarified yet. In this paper we present an investigation focusing on the JD protein-protein interaction by means of molecular modeling. Our results suggest possible aminoacids involved in JD contact together with local and non-local effects following JD dimerization. Surprisingly, JD conformational changes following the binding may involve ubiquitin binding sites and hairpin region even though they do not pertain to the JD interaction surfaces. Moreover, the JD binding event has been found to alter the hairpin open-like conformation toward a closed-like arrangement over the simulated timescale. Finally, our results suggest that the JD aggregation might be a multi-step process, with an initial fast JD-JD binding mainly driven by Arg101, followed by slower structural global rearrangements involving the exposure to the solvent of Leu84-Trp87, which might play a role in a second step of JD aggregation.

  13. Mathematics for Maths Anxious Tertiary Students: Integrating the cognitive and affective domains using interactive multimedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Taylor

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, commencing university students come from a diversity of backgrounds and have a broad range of abilities and attitudes. It is well known that attitudes towards mathematics, especially mathematics anxiety, can affect students’ performance to the extent that mathematics is often seen as a barrier to success by many. This paper reports on the design, development and evaluation of an interactive multimedia resource designed to explicitly address students’ beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics by following five characters as they progress through the highs and low of studying a preparatory mathematics course. The resource was built within two theoretical frameworks, one related to effective numeracy teaching (Marr and Helme 1991 and the other related to effective educational technology development (Laurillard 2002. Further, it uses a number of multimedia alternatives (video, audio, animations, diarying, interactive examples and self assessment to encourage students to feel part of a group, to reflect on their feelings and beliefs about mathematics, to expose students to authentic problem solving and generally build confidence through practice and self-assessment. Evaluation of the resource indicated that it encouraged students to value their own mathematical ability and helped to build confidence, while developing mathematical problem solving skills. The evaluation clearly demonstrated that it is possible to address the affective domain through multimedia initiatives and that this can complement the current focus on computer mediated communication as the primary method of addressing affective goals within the online environment.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mahmoudpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite element method and scaled boundary finite element method is applied. Finite element method is used to analyze the structure, and scaled boundary finite element method is applied in the analysis of unbounded soil region. Due to analytical solution in the radial direction, the radiation condition is satisfied exactly. The material behavior of soil and structure is assumed to be linear. The soil region is considered as a homogeneous half-space. The analysis is performed in time domain. A computer program is prepared to analyze the soil-structure system. Comparing the results with those in literature shows the exactness and competency of the proposed method.

  15. A hypothesis of brain-to-brain coupling in interactive new media art and games using brain-computer interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Zioga, Polina; Chapman, Paul; Ma, Minhua; Pollick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Interactive new media art and games belong to distinctive fields, but nevertheless share common grounds, tools, methodologies, challenges, and goals, such as the use of applications and devices for engaging multiple participants and players, and more recently electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). At the same time, an increasing number of new neuroscientific studies explore the phenomenon of brain-to-brain coupling, the dynamics and processes of the interaction a...

  16. First-principles study of van der Waals interactions and lattice mismatch at MoS2/metal interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farmanbar Gelepordsari, M.; Brocks, G.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the adsorption of MoS 2 on a range of metal substrates by means of first-principles density functional theory calculations. Including van der Waals forces in the density functional is essential to capture the interaction between MoS 2 and a metal surface, and obtain reliable interface

  17. Homotypic interactions of the infectious bursal disease virus proteins VP3, pVP2, VP4, and VP5: mapping of the interacting domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacken, Mirriam G.J.; Beuken, Patricia A.J. van den; Peeters, Ben P.H.; Thomas, Adri A.M.; Rottier, Peter J.M.; Boot, Hein J.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus of chicken, encodes five proteins. Of these, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1) is specified by the smaller genome segment, while the large segment directs synthesis of a nonstructural protein (VP5) and a structural protein precursor from which the capsid proteins pVP2 and VP3 as well as the viral protease VP4 are derived. Using the recently redefined processing sites of the precursor, we have reevaluated the homotypic interactions of the viral proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system. Except for VP1, which interacted weakly, all proteins appeared to self-associate strongly. Using a deletion mutagenesis approach, we subsequently mapped the interacting domains in these polypeptides, where possible confirming the observations made in the two-hybrid system by performing coimmunoprecipitation analyses of tagged protein constructs coexpressed in avian culture cells. The results revealed that pVP2 possesses multiple interaction domains, consistent with available structural information about this external capsid protein. VP3-VP3 interactions were mapped to the amino-terminal part of the polypeptide. Interestingly, this domain is distinct from two other interaction domains occurring in this internal capsid protein: while binding to VP1 has been mapped to the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, interaction with the genomic dsRNA segments has been suggested to occur just upstream thereof. No interaction sites could be assigned to the VP4 protein; any deletion applied abolished its self-association. Finally, one interaction domain was detected in the central, most hydrophobic region of VP5, supporting the idea that this virulence determinant may function as a membrane pore-forming protein in infected cells

  18. The chitin-binding domain of a GH-18 chitinase from Vibrio harveyi is crucial for chitin-chitinase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suginta, Wipa; Sirimontree, Paknisa; Sritho, Natchanok; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2016-12-01

    Vibrio harveyi chitinase A (VhChiA) is a GH-18 glycosyl hydrolase with a structure containing three distinct domains: i) the N-terminal chitin-binding domain; ii) the (α/β) 8 TIM barrel catalytic domain; and iii) the α+β insertion domain. In this study, we cloned the gene fragment encoding the chitin-binding domain of VhChiA, termed ChBD Vh ChiA . The recombinant ChBD Vh ChiA was heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21 strain Tuner(DE3)pLacI host cells, and purified to homogeneity. CD measurements suggested that ChBD Vh ChiA contained β-sheets as major structural components and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the protein domain was folded correctly, and suitable for functional characterization. Chitin binding assays showed that ChBD Vh ChiA bound to both α- and β-chitins, with the greatest affinity for β-colloidal chitin, but barely bound to polymeric chitosan. These results identified the tandem N-acetamido functionality on chitin chains as the specific sites of enzyme-substrate interactions. The binding affinity of the isolated domain was significantly lower than that of intact VhChiA, suggesting that the catalytic domain works synergistically with the chitin-binding domain to guide the polymeric substrate into the substrate binding cleft. These data confirm the physiological role of the chitin-binding domain of the marine bacterial GH-18 chitinase A in chitin-chitinase interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The conservation pattern of short linear motifs is highly correlated with the function of interacting protein domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yiguo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many well-represented domains recognize primary sequences usually less than 10 amino acids in length, called Short Linear Motifs (SLiMs. Accurate prediction of SLiMs has been difficult because they are short (often Results Our combined approach revealed that SLiMs are highly conserved in proteins from functional classes that are known to interact with a specific domain, but that they are not conserved in most other protein groups. We found that SLiMs recognized by SH2 domains were highly conserved in receptor kinases/phosphatases, adaptor molecules, and tyrosine kinases/phosphatases, that SLiMs recognized by SH3 domains were highly conserved in cytoskeletal and cytoskeletal-associated proteins, that SLiMs recognized by PDZ domains were highly conserved in membrane proteins such as channels and receptors, and that SLiMs recognized by S/T kinase domains were highly conserved in adaptor molecules, S/T kinases/phosphatases, and proteins involved in transcription or cell cycle control. We studied Tyr-SLiMs recognized by SH2 domains in more detail, and found that SH2-recognized Tyr-SLiMs on the cytoplasmic side of membrane proteins are more highly conserved than those on the extra-cellular side. Also, we found that SH2-recognized Tyr-SLiMs that are associated with SH3 motifs and a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation motif are more highly conserved. Conclusion The interactome of protein domains is reflected by the evolutionary conservation of SLiMs recognized by these domains. Combining scoring matrixes derived from peptide libraries and conservation analysis, we would be able to find those protein groups that are more likely to interact with specific domains.

  20. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  1. Analysis on the Interaction Domain of VirG and Apyrase by Pull-Down Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available VirG is outer membrane protein of Shigella and affects the spread of Shigella. Recently it has been reported that apyrase influences the location of VirG, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The site of interaction between apyrase and VirG is the focus of our research. First we constructed recombinant plasmid pHIS-phoN2 and pS-(v1–1102, v53–758, v759–1102, v53–319, v320–507, v507–758 by denaturation-renaturation, the phoN2:kan mutant of Shigella flexneri 5a M90T by a modified version of the lambda red recombination protocol originally described by Datsenko and Wanner and the complemented strain M90TΔphoN2/pET24a(PhisphoN2. Second, the recombinant plasmid pHIS-phoN2 and the pS-(v1–1102, v53–758, v759–1102, v53–319, v320–507, v507–758 were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3 and induced to express the fusion proteins. Third, the fusion proteins were purified and the interaction of VirG and apyrase was identified by pull-down. Fourth, VirG was divided and the interaction site of apyrase and VirG was determined. Finally, how apyrase affects the function of VirG was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Accordingly, the results provided the data supporting the fact that apyrase combines with the α-domain of VirG to influence the function of VirG.

  2. Towards a symbiotic brain-computer interface: exploring the application-decoder interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, T.; Buteneers Wiersema, P., Jr.; Dambre, J.; Kindermans, PJ

    2015-12-01

    Objective. State of the art brain-computer interface (BCI) research focuses on improving individual components such as the application or the decoder that converts the user’s brain activity to control signals. In this study, we investigate the interaction between these components in the P300 speller, a BCI for communication. We introduce a synergistic approach in which the stimulus presentation sequence is modified to enhance the machine learning decoding. In this way we aim for an improved overall BCI performance. Approach. First, a new stimulus presentation paradigm is introduced which provides us flexibility in tuning the sequence of visual stimuli presented to the user. Next, an experimental setup in which this paradigm is compared to other paradigms uncovers the underlying mechanism of the interdependence between the application and the performance of the decoder. Main results. Extensive analysis of the experimental results reveals the changing requirements of the decoder concerning the data recorded during the spelling session. When few data is recorded, the balance in the number of target and non-target stimuli shown to the user is more important than the signal-to-noise rate (SNR) of the recorded response signals. Only when more data has been collected, the SNR becomes the dominant factor. Significance. For BCIs in general, knowing the dominant factor that affects the decoder performance and being able to respond to it is of utmost importance to improve system performance. For the P300 speller, the proposed tunable paradigm offers the possibility to tune the application to the decoder’s needs at any time and, as such, fully exploit this application-decoder interaction.

  3. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  4. Using minimal human-computer interfaces for studying the interactive development of social awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    According to the enactive approach to cognitive science, perception is essentially a skillful engagement with the world. Learning how to engage via a human-computer interface (HCI) can therefore be taken as an instance of developing a new mode of experiencing. Similarly, social perception is theorized to be primarily constituted by skillful engagement between people, which implies that it is possible to investigate the origins and development of social awareness using multi-user HCIs. We analyzed the trial-by-trial objective and subjective changes in sociality that took place during a perceptual crossing experiment in which embodied interaction between pairs of adults was mediated over a minimalist haptic HCI. Since that study required participants to implicitly relearn how to mutually engage so as to perceive each other's presence, we hypothesized that there would be indications that the initial developmental stages of social awareness were recapitulated. Preliminary results reveal that, despite the lack of explicit feedback about task performance, there was a trend for the clarity of social awareness to increase over time. We discuss the methodological challenges involved in evaluating whether this trend was characterized by distinct developmental stages of objective behavior and subjective experience.

  5. Interfacial Interactions and Nanostructure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaze Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant (LS plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-gylcerol] (DPPG and hexadecanol (HD, was prepared, and the surface pressure-area (π-A isotherms and nanostructure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulus (Cs-1 , excess Gibbs free energy (ΔGexcπ , activity coefficients (γ, and interaction parameter (ξ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nanostructure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids.

  6. Towards a responsive and interactive graphical user interface for neutron data reduction and visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Alok; Worlton, T.; Hammonds, J.; Loong, C.K.; Mikkelson, D.; Mikkelson, R.; Chen, D.

    2001-01-01

    An Integrated Spectral Analysis Workbench, ISAW has been developed at IPNS with the goal of providing a flexible and powerful tool to visualize and analyze neutron scattering time-of-flight data. The software, written in Java, is platform independent, object oriented and modular, making it easier to maintain and add features. The graphical user interface (GUI) for ISAW allows intuitive and interactive loading and manipulation of multiple spectra from different 'runs'. ISAW provides multiple displays of the spectra in a Runfile' and most of the functions can be performed through the GUI menu bar as well as through command scripts. All displays are simultaneously updated when the data is changed using the Observable-observer object-model pattern. All displays are observers of the Dataset (observable) and respond to changes or selections in it simultaneously. A 'tree' display of the spectra in run files is provided for a detailed view of detector elements and easy selection of spectra. The operations menu is instrument sensitive so that it displays the appropriate set of operators accordingly. Automatic menu generation is made possible by the ability of the DataSet objects to furnish a list of operations contained in the particular DataSet selected at the time the menu bar is accessed. The transformed and corrected data can be saved to a disk in different file formats for further analyses (e.g., GSAS for structure refinement). (author)

  7. USING OLFACTORY DISPLAYS AS A NONTRADITIONAL INTERFACE IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Efe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smell has its limitations and disadvantages as a display medium, but it also has its strengths and many have recognized its potential. At present, in communications and virtual technologies, smell is either forgotten or improperly stimulated, because non controlled odorants present in the physical space surrounding the user. Nonetheless a controlled presentation of olfactory information can give advantages in various application fields. Therefore, two enabling technologies, electronic noses and especially olfactory displays are reviewed. Scenarios of usage are discussed together with relevant psycho-physiological issues. End-to-end systems including olfactory interfaces are quantitatively characterised under many respects. Recent works done by the authors on field are reported. The article will touch briefly on the control of scent emissions; an important factor to consider when building scented computer systems. As a sample application SUBSMELL system investigated. A look at areas of human computer interaction where olfaction output may prove useful will be presented. The article will finish with some brief conclusions and discuss some shortcomings and gaps of the topic. In particular, the addition of olfactory cues to a virtual environment increased the user's sense of presence and memory of the environment. Also, this article discusses the educational aspect of the subsmell systems.

  8. A quartz crystal microbalance characterization of metal-oil interfaces and interactions with wax molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paso, K.; Kompalla, T.; Braathen, B.; Sjoblom, J. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Ugelstad Laboratory; Aske, N.; Ronningsen, H.P. [StatoilHydro, Stavanger (Norway); Viitala, T. [KSV Instruments, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the solid-liquid interface between stainless steel and model petroleum fluids at isothermal conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance. AISI 316 (Fe/Cr18/Ni10/Mo3) stainless steel was chosen to represent the metal surface, while paraffin components dissolved in dodecane constituted the petroleum model fluid. Commercial macro-crystalline and micro-crystalline waxes provided linear and branched paraffin components, respectively. A van't Hoff relationship was used to establish the paraffin solubility conditions. The well-defined solubility conditions were provided by model fluids prepared with the single-component alkanes n-C36 or n-C30 paraffin. According to the monitored changes in resonance frequency and dissipation factor of the quartz crystal resonator immersed in the model fluids, there was no continual deposition of paraffin components at isothermal conditions. Moreover, solid paraffin crystals dispersed in solution did not adhere to the stainless steel surface. The absence of attractive interactions between the stainless steel surface and dispersed paraffin crystals suggests that an axial transport mechanism exists for incipient wax deposit formation, where gelation kinetics play a key role. These conclusions were supported by QCM measurements performed under a thermal gradient.

  9. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianlong [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Blissard, Gary W. [Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United State (United States); Liu, Tong-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Zhaofei, E-mail: zhaofeili73@outlook.com [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  11. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  12. Designing Unobtrusive Interfaces to Increase Naturaof First Time Face-To-Face Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Khaorapapong, Nanda; Purver, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Social Proximity Applications (SPAs) have facilitated social networking in the real world. However, most applications are deployed in mobile devices (i.e. smartphone, PDA, tablet) restricted to traditional input and output (I/O) interfaces i.e. button, keyboard and screen. For people with low interpersonal skills, the requirements imposed by traditional interfaces can make their problems worse. In contrast, this paper describes the Icebreaker T-shirt, designed with natural interfaces to ease ...

  13. Nonlinear Time Domain Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) Deep Soil Site Methodology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, Robert Edward; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry perform seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis using equivalent linear numerical analysis tools. For lower levels of ground motion, these tools should produce reasonable in-structure response values for evaluation of existing and new facilities. For larger levels of ground motion these tools likely overestimate the in-structure response (and therefore structural demand) since they do not consider geometric nonlinearities (such as gaping and sliding between the soil and structure) and are limited in the ability to model nonlinear soil behavior. The current equivalent linear SSI (SASSI) analysis approach either joins the soil and structure together in both tension and compression or releases the soil from the structure for both tension and compression. It also makes linear approximations for material nonlinearities and generalizes energy absorption with viscous damping. This produces the potential for inaccurately establishing where the structural concerns exist and/or inaccurately establishing the amplitude of the in-structure responses. Seismic hazard curves at nuclear facilities have continued to increase over the years as more information has been developed on seismic sources (i.e. faults), additional information gathered on seismic events, and additional research performed to determine local site effects. Seismic hazard curves are used to develop design basis earthquakes (DBE) that are used to evaluate nuclear facility response. As the seismic hazard curves increase, the input ground motions (DBE's) used to numerically evaluation nuclear facility response increase causing larger in-structure response. As ground motions increase so does the importance of including nonlinear effects in numerical SSI models. To include material nonlinearity in the soil and geometric nonlinearity using contact (gaping and sliding) it is necessary to develop a nonlinear time domain methodology. This

  14. Risk Issues in Developing Novel User Interfaces for Human-Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Klinker, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. All rights are reserved. When new user interfaces or information visualization schemes are developed for complex information processing systems, it is not readily clear how much they do, in fact, support and improve users\\' understanding and use of such systems. Is a new interface better than an older one? In what respect, and in which situations? To provide answers to such questions, user testing schemes are employed. This chapter reports on a range of risks pertaining to the design and implementation of user interfaces in general, and to newly emerging interfaces (3-dimensionally, immersive, mobile) in particular.

  15. Dynamic conformations of nucleophosmin (NPM1 at a key monomer-monomer interface affect oligomer stability and interactions with granzyme B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei D Duan-Porter

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1 is an abundant, nucleolar tumor antigen with important roles in cell proliferation and putative contributions to oncogenesis. Wild-type NPM1 forms pentameric oligomers through interactions at the amino-terminal core domain. A truncated form of NPM1 found in some hepatocellular carcinoma tissue formed an unusually stable oligomer and showed increased susceptibility to cleavage by granzyme B. Initiation of translation at the seventh methionine generated a protein (M7-NPM that shared all these properties. We used deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to perform a detailed structural analysis of wild-type NPM1 and M7-NPM, and found dynamic conformational shifts or local "unfolding" at a specific monomer-monomer interface which included the β-hairpin "latch." We tested the importance of interactions at the β-hairpin "latch" by replacing a conserved tyrosine in the middle of the β-hairpin loop with glutamic acid, generating Y67E-NPM. Y67E-NPM did not form stable oligomers and further, prevented wild-type NPM1 oligomerization in a dominant-negative fashion, supporting the critical role of the β-hairpin "latch" in monomer-monomer interactions. Also, we show preferential cleavage by granzyme B at one of two available aspartates (either D161 or D122 in M7-NPM and Y67E-NPM, whereas wild-type NPM1 was cleaved at both sites. Thus, we observed a correlation between the propensity to form oligomers and granzyme B cleavage site selection in nucleophosmin proteins, suggesting that a small change at an important monomer-monomer interface can affect conformational shifts and impact protein-protein interactions.

  16. Interaction of optical and interface phonons and their anisotropy in GaAs/AlAs superlattices: Experiment and calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volodin, V. A., E-mail: volodin@isp.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Sachkov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Omsk Scientific Center, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Sinyukov, M. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    The angular anisotropy of interface phonons and their interaction with optical phonons in (001) GaAs/AlAs superlattices are calculated and experimentally studied. Experiments were performed by Raman light scattering in different scattering geometries for phonons with the wave vector directed normally to the superlattice and along its layers. Phonon frequencies were calculated by the extended Born method taking the Coulomb interaction into account in the rigid-ion approximation. Raman scattering spectra were calculated in the Volkenshtein bond-polarizability approximation. Calculations confirmed that the angular anisotropy of phonons observed in experiments appears due to interaction (mixing) of optical phonons, in which atoms are mainly displaced normally to superlattices, with interface phonons (TO-IF modes). In the scattering geometry, when the wave vector lies in the plane of superlattice layers, the mixed TO-IF modes are observed under nonresonance conditions. The Raman spectra for TO-IF modes depend on the mixing of atoms at heteroboundaries.

  17. Ketolide antimicrobial activity persists after disruption of interactions with domain II of 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Guy W; Jakobsen, Lene; Andersen, Niels M; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    Ketolides are the latest derivatives developed from the macrolide erythromycin to improve antimicrobial activity. All macrolides and ketolides bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit, where they come into contact with adenosine 2058 (A2058) within domain V of the 23S rRNA and block protein synthesis. An additional interaction at nucleotide A752 in the rRNA domain II is made via the synthetic carbamate-alkyl-aryl substituent in the ketolides HMR3647 (telithromycin) and HMR3004, and this interaction contributes to their improved activities. Only a few macrolides, including tylosin, come into contact with domain II of the rRNA and do so via interactions with nucleotides G748 and A752. We have disrupted these macrolide-ketolide interaction sites in the rRNA to assess their relative importance for binding. Base substitutions at A752 were shown to confer low levels of resistance to telithromycin but not to HMR3004, while deletion of A752 confers low levels of resistance to both ketolides. Mutations at position 748 confer no resistance. Substitution of guanine at A2058 gives rise to the MLS(B) (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype, which confers resistance to all the drugs. However, resistance to ketolides was abolished when the mutation at position 2058 was combined with a mutation in domain II of the same rRNA. In contrast, the same dual mutations in rRNAs conferred enhanced resistance to tylosin. Our results show that the domain II interactions of telithromycin and HMR3004 differ from each other and from those of tylosin. The data provide no indication that mutations within domain II, either alone or in combination with an A2058 mutation, can confer significant levels of telithromycin resistance.

  18. Hard and soft colloids at fluid interfaces: adsorption, interactions, assembly and rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, Omkar; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2015-01-01

    Soft microgel particles inherently possess qualities of both polymers as well as particles. We review the similarities and differences between soft microgel particles and stiff colloids at fluid–fluid interfaces. We compare two fundamental aspects of particle-laden interfaces namely the adsorption

  19. Hard and soft colloids at fluid interfaces: Adsorption, interactions, assembly and rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, O.S.; Ende, van den D.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Mugele, F.; Duits, M.

    2015-01-01

    Soft microgel particles inherently possess qualities of both polymers as well as particles. We review the similarities and differences between soft microgel particles and stiff colloids at fluid–fluid interfaces. We compare two fundamental aspects of particle-laden interfaces namely the adsorption

  20. Kinetics of Endophilin N-BAR Domain Dimerization and Membrane Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Benjamin R.; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Zhiming; Dunn, Joanna M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Baumgart, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment to plasma membrane invaginations of the protein endophilin is a temporally regulated step in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endophilin is believed to sense or stabilize membrane curvature, which in turn likely depends on the dimeric structure of the protein. The dynamic nature of the membrane association and dimerization of endophilin is thus functionally important and is illuminated herein. Using subunit exchange Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determine dimer dissociation kinetics and find a dimerization equilibrium constant orders of magnitude lower than previously published values. We characterize N-BAR domain membrane association kinetics under conditions where the dimeric species predominates, by stopped flow, observing prominent electrostatic sensitivity of membrane interaction kinetics. Relative to membrane binding, we find that protein monomer/dimer species equilibrate with far slower kinetics. Complementary optical microscopy studies reveal strikingly slow membrane dissociation and an increase of dissociation rate constant for a construct lacking the amphipathic segment helix 0 (H0). We attribute the slow dissociation kinetics to higher-order protein oligomerization on the membrane. We incorporate our findings into a kinetic scheme for endophilin N-BAR membrane binding and find a significant separation of time scales for endophilin membrane binding and subsequent oligomerization. This separation may facilitate the regulation of membrane trafficking phenomena. PMID:23482561

  1. Interactions of photoactive DNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: Identification of peptides in the DNA binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Y.J.K.; Evans, R.K.; Beach, C.M.; Coleman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (terminal transferase) was specifically modified in the DNA binding site by a photoactive DNA substrate (hetero-40-mer duplex containing eight 5-azido-dUMP residues at one 3' end). Under optimal photolabeling conditions, 27-40% of the DNA was covalently cross-linked to terminal transferase. The specificity of the DNA and protein interaction was demonstrated by protection of photolabeling at the DNA binding domain with natural DNA substrates. In order to recover high yields of modified peptides from limited amounts of starting material, protein modified with 32 P-labeled photoactive DNA and digested with trypsin was extracted 4 times with phenol followed by gel filtration chromatography. All peptides not cross-linked to DNA were extracted into the phenol phase while the photolyzed DNA and the covalently cross-linked peptides remained in the aqueous phase. The 32 P-containing peptide-DNA fraction was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Two sequences, Asp 221 -Lys 231 (peptide B8) and Cys 234 -Lys 249 (peptide B10), present in similar yield, were identified. Structure predictions placed the two peptides in an α-helical array of 39 angstrom which would accommodate a DNA helix span of 11 nucleotides. These peptides share sequence similarity with a region in DNA polymerase β that has been implicated in the binding of DNA template

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoomi Choi

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase. Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  3. Magnetic properties, domain-wall creep motion, and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in Pt/Co/Ir thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepley, Philippa M.; Tunnicliffe, Harry; Shahbazi, Kowsar; Burnell, Gavin; Moore, Thomas A.

    2018-04-01

    We study the magnetic properties of perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Ir thin films and investigate the domain-wall creep method of determining the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction in ultrathin films. Measurements of the Co layer thickness dependence of saturation magnetization, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and symmetric and antisymmetric (i.e., DM) exchange energies in Pt/Co/Ir thin films have been made to determine the relationship between these properties. We discuss the measurement of the DM interaction by the expansion of a reverse domain in the domain-wall creep regime. We show how the creep parameters behave as a function of in-plane bias field and discuss the effects of domain-wall roughness on the measurement of the DM interaction by domain expansion. Whereas modifications to the creep law with DM field and in-plane bias fields have taken into account changes in the energy barrier scaling parameter α , we find that both α and the velocity scaling parameter v0 change as a function of in-plane bias field.

  4. Boston type I keratoprosthesis-donor cornea interface evaluated by high-definition spectral-domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzaga Fernandez AG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ana G Alzaga Fernandez,* Nathan M Radcliffe,* Kimberly C Sippel, Mark I Rosenblatt, Priyanka Sood, Christopher E Starr, Jessica B Ciralsky, Donald J D'Amico, Szilárd KissDepartment of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this work and both are considered principal authorsBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess whether the resolution offered by two different, recently commercially available high-resolution, spectral-domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT instruments allows for detailed anatomic characterization of the critical device-donor cornea interface in eyes implanted with the Boston type I permanent keratoprosthesis.Methods: Eighteen eyes of 17 patients implanted with the Boston type I keratoprosthesis were included in this retrospective case series. All eyes were quantitatively evaluated using the Cirrus HD-OCT while a subset (five eyes was also qualitatively imaged using the Spectralis Anterior Segment Module. Images from these instruments were analyzed for evidence of epithelial migration onto the anterior surface of the keratoprosthesis front plate, and presence of a vertical gap between the posterior surface of the front plate and the underlying carrier donor corneal tissue. Quantitative data was obtained utilizing the caliper function on the Cirrus HD-OCT.Results: The mean duration between AS-OCT imaging and keratoprosthesis placement was 29 months. As assessed by the Cirrus HD-OCT, 83% of eyes exhibited epithelial migration over the edge of the front plate. Fifty-six percent of the keratoprosthesis devices displayed good apposition of the device with the carrier corneal donor tissue. When a vertical gap was present (44% of eyes, the mean gap was 40 (range 8–104 microns. The Spectralis Anterior Segment Module also displayed sufficient resolution to allow for similar characterization of the device

  5. DataHigh: graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R; Kaufman, Matthew T; Churchland, Mark M; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V; Yu, Byron M

    2012-01-01

    The activity of tens to hundreds of neurons can be succinctly summarized by a smaller number of latent variables extracted using dimensionality reduction methods. These latent variables define a reduced-dimensional space in which we can study how population activity varies over time, across trials, and across experimental conditions. Ideally, we would like to visualize the population activity directly in the reduced-dimensional space, whose optimal dimensionality (as determined from the data) is typically greater than 3. However, direct plotting can only provide a 2D or 3D view. To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) that allows the user to quickly navigate through a continuum of different 2D projections of the reduced-dimensional space. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of this GUI, we applied it to visualize population activity recorded in premotor and motor cortices during reaching tasks. Examples include single-trial population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded sequentially using single electrodes. Because any single 2D projection may provide a misleading impression of the data, being able to see a large number of 2D projections is critical for intuition-and hypothesis-building during exploratory data analysis. The GUI includes a suite of additional interactive tools, including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses. The use of visualization tools like the GUI developed here, in tandem with dimensionality reduction methods, has the potential to further our understanding of neural population activity.

  6. Structure and function of DnaA N-terminal domains: specific sites and mechanisms in inter-DnaA interaction and in DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshito; Jo, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yusaku; Matsunaga, Chika; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2007-06-15

    DnaA forms a homomultimeric complex with the origin of chromosomal replication (oriC) to unwind duplex DNA. The interaction of the DnaA N terminus with the DnaB helicase is crucial for the loading of DnaB onto the unwound region. Here, we determined the DnaA N terminus structure using NMR. This region (residues 1-108) consists of a rigid region (domain I) and a flexible region (domain II). Domain I has an alpha-alpha-beta-beta-alpha-beta motif, similar to that of the K homology (KH) domain, and has weak affinity for oriC single-stranded DNA, consistent with KH domain function. A hydrophobic surface carrying Trp-6 most likely forms the interface for domain I dimerization. Glu-21 is located on the opposite surface of domain I from the Trp-6 site and is crucial for DnaB helicase loading. These findings suggest a model for DnaA homomultimer formation and DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

  7. Mapping the Interactions between the Alzheimer’s Aβ-Peptide and Human Serum Albumin beyond Domain Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algamal, Moustafa; Milojevic, Julijana; Jafari, Naeimeh; Zhang, William; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ self-association and this novel, to our knowledge, function of HSA is of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. It is known that HSA interacts with Aβ oligomers through binding sites evenly partitioned across the three albumin domains and with comparable affinities. However, as of this writing, no information is available on the HSA-Aβ interactions beyond domain resolution. Here, we map the HSA-Aβ interactions at subdomain and peptide resolution. We show that each separate subdomain of HSA domain 3 inhibits Aβ self-association. We also show that fatty acids (FAs) compete with Aβ oligomers for binding to domain 3, but the determinant of the HSA/Aβ oligomer interactions are markedly distinct from those of FAs. Although salt bridges with the FA carboxylate determine the FA binding affinities, hydrophobic contacts are pivotal for Aβ oligomer recognition. Specifically, we identified a site of Aβ oligomer recognition that spans the HSA (494–515) region and aligns with the central hydrophobic core of Aβ. The HSA (495–515) segment includes residues affected by FA binding and this segment is prone to self-associate into β-amyloids, suggesting that sites involved in fibrilization may provide a lead to develop inhibitors of Aβ self-association. PMID:24094411

  8. Interface and interaction of graphene layers on SiC(0001[combining macron]) covered with TiC(111) intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Huang, Jianmei; Li, Wei-Qi; Chen, Guang-Hui; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-10-11

    It is important to understand the interface and interaction between the graphene layer, titanium carbide [TiC(111)] interlayer, and silicon carbide [SiC(0001[combining macron])] substrates in epitaxial growth of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. In this study, the fully relaxed interfaces which consist of up to three layers of TiC(111) coatings on the SiC(0001[combining macron]) as well as the graphene layers interactions with these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) were systematically studied using the density functional theory-D2 (DFT-D2) method. The results showed that the two layers of TiC(111) coating with the C/C-terminated interfaces were thermodynamically more favorable than one or three layers of TiC(111) on the SiC(0001[combining macron]). Furthermore, the bonding of the Ti-hollow-site stacked interfaces would be a stronger link than that of the Ti-Fcc-site stacked interfaces. However, the formation of the C/Ti/C and Ti/C interfaces implied that the first upper carbon layer can be formed on TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) using the decomposition of the weaker Ti-C and C-Si interfacial bonds. When growing graphene layers on these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates, the results showed that the interaction energy depended not only on the thickness of the TiC(111) interlayer, but also on the number of graphene layers. Bilayer graphene on the two layer thick TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) was thermodynamically more favorable than a monolayer or trilayer graphene on these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates. The adsorption energies of the bottom graphene layers with the TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates increased with the decrease of the interface vertical distance. The interaction energies between the bottom, second and third layers of graphene on the TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) were significantly higher than that of the freestanding graphene layers. All of these findings provided

  9. The process of co-creating the interface for VENSTER, an interactive artwork for nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Gaston; Luyten, Tom; Delsing, Rob; Braun, Susy

    2017-10-17

    Interactive art installations might engage nursing home residents with dementia. The main aim of this article was to describe the challenging design process of an interactive artwork for nursing home residents, in co-creation with all stakeholders and to share the used methods and lessons learned. This process is illustrated by the design of the interface of VENSTER as a case. Nursing home residents from the psychogeriatric ward, informal caregivers, client representatives, health care professionals and members of the management team were involved in the design process, which consisted of three phases: (1) identify requirements, (2) develop a prototype and (3) conduct usability tests. Several methods were used (e.g. guided co-creation sessions, "Wizard of Oz"). Each phase generated "lessons learned", which were used as the departure point of the next phase. Participants hardly paid attention to the installation and interface. There, however, seemed to be an untapped potential for creating an immersive experience by focussing more on the content itself as an interface (e.g. creating specific scenes with cues for interaction, scenes based on existing knowledge or prior experiences). "Fifteen lessons learned" which can potentially assist the design of an interactive artwork for nursing home residents suffering from dementia were derived from the design process. This description provides tools and best practices for stakeholders to make (better) informed choices during the creation of interactive artworks. It also illustrates how co-design can make the difference between designing a pleasurable experience and a meaningful one. Implications for rehabilitation Co-design with all stakeholders can make the difference between designing a pleasurable experience and a meaningful one. There seems to be an untapped potential for creating an immersive experience by focussing more on the content itself as an interface (e.g. creating specific scenes with cues for interaction

  10. Touch-based interfaces for interacting with 3D content in public exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachet, Martin; de la Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Laviole, Jérémy; Cohé, Aurélie; Cursan, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    A museum exhibition on the Lascaux caves provides the opportunity to experiment with touch-based interfaces manipulating 3D virtual objects. The researchers targeted three tasks: observing rare objects, reassembling object fragments, and reproducing artwork.

  11. Controlling the orientation of nucleobases by dipole moment interaction with graphene/h-BN interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vovusha, Hakkim

    2018-02-08

    The interfaces in 2D hybrids of graphene and h-BN provide interesting possibilities of adsorbing and manipulating atomic and molecular entities. In this paper, with the aid of density functional theory, we demonstrate the adsorption characteristics of DNA nucleobases at different interfaces of 2D hybrid nanoflakes of graphene and h-BN. The interfaces provide stronger binding to the nucleobases in comparison to pure graphene and h-BN nanoflakes. It is also revealed that the individual dipole moments of the nucleobases and nanoflakes dictate the orientation of the nucleobases at the interfaces of the hybrid structures. The results of our study point towards a possible route to selectively control the orientation of individual molecules in biosensors.

  12. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  13. Technical development of PubMed Interact: an improved interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches

    OpenAIRE

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The project aims to create an alternative search interface for MEDLINE/PubMed that may provide assistance to the novice user and added convenience to the advanced user. An earlier version of the project was the 'Slider Interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches' (SLIM) which provided JavaScript slider bars to control search parameters. In this new version, recent developments in Web-based technologies were implemented. These changes may prove to be even more valuable in enhanci...

  14. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  15. Exploration of the biomacromolecular interactions of an interpenetrating proteo-saccharide hydrogel network at the mucosal interface

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashingaidze, F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXPLORATION OF THE BIOMACROMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS OF AN INTERPENETRATING PROTEO-SACCHARIDE HYDROGEL NETWORK AT THE MUCOSAL INTERFACE 1Felix Mashingaidze, 1Yahya E. Choonara, 1Pradeep Kumar, 1Lisa C. du Toit, 2Vinesh Maharaj, 3Eckhart Buchmann, 4Valence M..., Department of Biosciences, Meiring Naud_e Road, Brummeria, Pretoria, South Africa 3University of the Witwatersrand, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 7 York Road, Parktown, 2193, Johannesburg, South Africa 4St. John’s...

  16. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Local Environment and Interactions of Liquid and Solid Interfaces Revealed by Spectral Line Shape of Surface Selective Nonlinear Vibrational Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Chase, Zizwe A.; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-11-10

    Vibrational spectral lineshape contains important detailed information of molecular vibration and reports its specific interactions and couplings to its local environment. In this work, recently developed sub-1 cm-1 high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) was used to measure the -C≡N stretch vibration in the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir or Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer as a unique vibrational probe, and the spectral lineshape analysis revealed the local environment and interactions at the air/water, air/glass, air/calcium fluoride and air/-quartz interfaces for the first time. The 8CB Langmuir or LB film is uniform and the vibrational spectral lineshape of its -C≡N group has been well characterized, making it a good choice as the surface vibrational probe. Lineshape analysis of the 8CB -C≡N stretch SFG vibrational spectra suggests the coherent vibrational dynamics and the structural and dynamic inhomogeneity of the -C≡N group at each interface are uniquely different. In addition, it is also found that there are significantly different roles for water molecules in the LB films on different substrate surfaces. These results demonstrated the novel capabilities of the surface nonlinear spectroscopy in characterization and in understanding the specific structures and chemical interactions at the liquid and solid interfaces in general.

  18. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Kondo Scattering at the PrAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Shirin; Guchhait, Samaresh; Markert, John

    We have investigated the effect of oxygen content, in the PO2 range of 6 ×10-6 - 1 ×10-3 torr, on the spin-orbit (SO) interaction at PrAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. The most-conducting 2-D-like PrAlO3 interfaces were not as conducting as comparable LaAlO3 samples, indicating either a steric or mixed-valent effect. The least-conducting, most oxygenated PrAlO3 interface exhibits hole conductivity, a departure from the typical electron-doped behavior. For 10-5 and 10-4 torr samples, high-temperature metallic behavior is accompanied by an upturn in resistivity at low temperatures, consistent with Kondo scattering theory; analysis gives a Kondo temperature 17 K. The magnetoresistance (MR) for the low PO2-grown samples was modeled with a positive part due to weak anti-localization (WAL) from a strong SO interaction, and a negative part due to the Kondo effect. The variation of MR suggests a strong SO interaction for the 10-5 torr sample with HSO = 1.25 T in both field orientations. The WAL effect is smaller for higher PO2-grown samples, where the high-field MR is dominated by the Kondo effect.

  19. A parallel interaction potential approach coupled with the immersed boundary method for fully resolved simulations of deformable interfaces and membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Meschini, Valentina; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Querzoli, Giorgio; de Tullio, Marco D.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show and discuss how the deformation dynamics of closed liquid-liquid interfaces (for example drops and bubbles) can be replicated with use of a phenomenological interaction potential model. This new approach to simulate liquid-liquid interfaces is based on the fundamental principle of minimum potential energy where the total potential energy depends on the extent of deformation of a spring network distributed on the surface of the immersed drop or bubble. Simulating liquid-liquid interfaces using this model require computing ad-hoc elastic constants which is done through a reverse-engineered approach. The results from our simulations agree very well with previous studies on the deformation of drops in standard flow configurations such as a deforming drop in a shear flow or cross flow. The interaction potential model is highly versatile, computationally efficient and can be easily incorporated into generic single phase fluid solvers to also simulate complex fluid-structure interaction problems. This is shown by simulating flow in the left ventricle of the heart with mechanical and natural mitral valves where the imposed flow, motion of ventricle and valves dynamically govern the behaviour of each other. Results from these simulations are compared with ad-hoc in-house experimental measurements. Finally, we present a simple and easy to implement parallelisation scheme, as high performance computing is unavoidable when studying large scale problems involving several thousands of simultaneously deforming bodies in highly turbulent flows.

  20. Structure, Stability, and Interaction of Fibrin αC-Domain Polymers†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurupa, Galina; Mahid, Ariza; Veklich, Yuri; Weisel, John W.; Medved, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that in fibrinogen the αC-domains are not reactive with their ligands, suggesting that their binding sites are cryptic and become exposed upon its conversion into fibrin, in which these domains form αC polymers. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that polymerization of the αC-domains in fibrin results in the exposure of their binding sites and that these domains adopt the physiologically active conformation only in αC-domain polymers. To test this hypothesis, we prepared a recombinant αC region (residues Aα221-610) including the αC-domain (Aα392-610), demonstrated that it forms soluble oligomers in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and stabilized such oligomers by covalent cross-linking with factor XIIIa. Cross-linked Aα221-610 oligomers were stable in solution and appeared as ordered linear, branching filaments when analyzed by electron microscopy. Spectral studies revealed that the αC-domains in such oligomers were folded into compact structures of high thermal stability with a significant amount of β-sheets. These findings indicate that cross-linked Aα221-610 oligomers are highly ordered and mimic the structure of fibrin αC polymers. The oligomers also exhibited functional properties of polymeric fibrin since, in contrast to the monomeric αC-domain, they bound tPA and plasminogen and stimulated activation of the latter by the former. Altogether, the results obtained with cross-linked Aα221-610 oligomers clarify the structure of the αC-domains in fibrin αC polymers and confirm our hypothesis that their binding sites are exposed upon polymerization. Such oligomers represent a stable, soluble model of fibrin αC polymers that can be used for further structure/function studies of fibrin αC-domains. PMID:21806028

  1. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ching Chang, E-mail: ccjwo@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chou, Ruey Hwang, E-mail: rhchou@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models—the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex—and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. - Highlights: • The interaction between mS100A5–RAGE V was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. • The interfacial residues on mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. • mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine complex models were generated from NMR restraints using HADDOCK program. • The bioactivity of the mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine complex was studied using WST-1 assay.

  2. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  3. A graph kernel approach for alignment-free domain-peptide interaction prediction with an application to human SH3 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Kousik; Costa, Fabrizio; Backofen, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    State-of-the-art experimental data for determining binding specificities of peptide recognition modules (PRMs) is obtained by high-throughput approaches like peptide arrays. Most prediction tools applicable to this kind of data are based on an initial multiple alignment of the peptide ligands. Building an initial alignment can be error-prone, especially in the case of the proline-rich peptides bound by the SH3 domains. Here, we present a machine-learning approach based on an efficient graph-kernel technique to predict the specificity of a large set of 70 human SH3 domains, which are an important class of PRMs. The graph-kernel strategy allows us to (i) integrate several types of physico-chemical information for each amino acid, (ii) consider high-order correlations between these features and (iii) eliminate the need for an initial peptide alignment. We build specialized models for each human SH3 domain and achieve competitive predictive performance of 0.73 area under precision-recall curve, compared with 0.27 area under precision-recall curve for state-of-the-art methods based on position weight matrices. We show that better models can be obtained when we use information on the noninteracting peptides (negative examples), which is currently not used by the state-of-the art approaches based on position weight matrices. To this end, we analyze two strategies to identify subsets of high confidence negative data. The techniques introduced here are more general and hence can also be used for any other protein domains, which interact with short peptides (i.e. other PRMs). The program with the predictive models can be found at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/SH3PepInt.tar.gz. We also provide a genome-wide prediction for all 70 human SH3 domains, which can be found under http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/Genome-Wide-Predictions.tar.gz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R. L.; Clemesha, A.; Lindquist, K. G.; Reyes, J.; Steidl, J. H.; Vernon, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively, without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository. Screenshot of the web-based waveform server interface

  5. The structure of Prp40 FF1 domain and its interaction with the crn-TPR1 motif of Clf1 gives a new insight into the binding mode of FF domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Alexander; Wiesner, Silke; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Ramirez-Espain, Ximena; Ruiz, Lidia; Macias, Maria J

    2006-01-06

    The yeast splicing factor Prp40 (pre-mRNA processing protein 40) consists of a pair of WW domains followed by several FF domains. The region comprising the FF domains has been shown to associate with the 5' end of U1 small nuclear RNA and to interact directly with two proteins, the Clf1 (Crooked neck-like factor 1) and the phosphorylated repeats of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (CTD-RNAPII). In this work we reported the solution structure of the first FF domain of Prp40 and the identification of a novel ligand-binding site in FF domains. By using chemical shift assays, we found a binding site for the N-terminal crooked neck tetratricopeptide repeat of Clf1 that is distinct and structurally separate from the previously identified CTD-RNAPII binding pocket of the FBP11 (formin-binding protein 11) FF1 domain. No interaction, however, was observed between the Prp40 FF1 domain and three different peptides derived from the CTD-RNAPII protein. Indeed, the equivalent CTD-RNAPII-binding site in the Prp40 FF1 domain is predominantly negatively charged and thus unfavorable for an interaction with phosphorylated peptide sequences. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree reconstructions using the FF domains of three functionally related proteins, Prp40, FBP11, and CA150, revealed that Prp40 and FBP11 are not orthologous proteins and supported the different ligand specificities shown by their respective FF1 domains. Our results also revealed that not all FF domains in Prp40 are functionally equivalent. We proposed that at least two different interaction surfaces exist in FF domains that have evolved to recognize distinct binding motifs.

  6. Promoter-enhancer interactions identified from Hi-C data using probabilistic models and hierarchical topological domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Gil; Globerson, Yuval; Moran, Dror; Kaplan, Tommy

    2017-12-21

    Proximity-ligation methods such as Hi-C allow us to map physical DNA-DNA interactions along the genome, and reveal its organization into topologically associating domains (TADs). As the Hi-C data accumulate, computational methods were developed for identifying domain borders in multiple cell types and organisms. Here, we present PSYCHIC, a computational approach for analyzing Hi-C data and identifying promoter-enhancer interactions. We use a unified probabilistic model to segment the genome into domains, which we then merge hierarchically and fit using a local background model, allowing us to identify over-represented DNA-DNA interactions across the genome. By analyzing the published Hi-C data sets in human and mouse, we identify hundreds of thousands of putative enhancers and their target genes, and compile an extensive genome-wide catalog of gene regulation in human and mouse. As we show, our predictions are highly enriched for ChIP-seq and DNA accessibility data, evolutionary conservation, eQTLs and other DNA-DNA interaction data.

  7. The nuclear cofactor RAC3/AIB1/SRC-3 enhances Nrf2 signaling by interacting with transactivation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Yu, S; Chen, J D; Kong, A N

    2013-01-24

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NM 006164, 605 AA) is essential for the antioxidant responsive element (ARE)-mediated expression of a group of detoxifying antioxidant genes that detoxify carcinogens and protect against oxidative stress. Several proteins have been identified as Nrf2-interacting molecules. In this study, we found that the overexpression of receptor-associated coactivator 3 (RAC3)/AIB-1/steroid receptor coactivator-3, a nuclear coregulator and oncogene frequently amplified in human breast cancers, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through Nrf2 transactivation in HeLa cells. Next, we determined the interaction between RAC3 and Nrf2 proteins using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. The results showed that RAC3 bound directly to the Nrf2 protein in the nucleus. Subsequently, we identified the interacting domains of Nrf2 and RAC3 using a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. The results showed that both the N-terminal RAC3-pasB and C-terminal RAC3-R3B3 domains were tightly bound to the Neh4 and Neh5 transactivation domains. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that RAC3 bound tightly to the ARE enhancer region of the HO-1 promoter via Nrf2 binding. These data suggest that Nrf2 activation is modulated and directly controlled through interactions with the RAC3 protein in HeLa cells.

  8. Influence of domain interactions on conformational mobility of the progesterone receptor detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Devrishi; Callaway, Celetta; Pascal, Bruce D; Kumar, Raj; Edwards, Dean P; Griffin, Patrick R

    2014-07-08

    Structural and functional details of the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1) of most nuclear receptors are poorly understood due to the highly dynamic intrinsically disordered nature of this domain. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass-spectrometry-based investigation of TATA box-binding protein (TBP) interaction with various domains of progesterone receptor (PR) demonstrate that agonist-bound PR interaction with TBP via AF1 impacts the mobility of the C-terminal AF2. Results from HDX and other biophysical studies involving agonist- and antagonist-bound full-length PR and isolated PR domains reveal the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic transcriptional activation mediated by AF1 and AF2, dominance of PR-B isoform over PR-A, and the necessity of AF2 for full AF1-mediated transcriptional activity. These results provide a comprehensive picture elaborating the underlying mechanism of PR-TBP interactions as a model for studying nuclear receptor (NR)-transcription factor functional interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Graphical user interfaces for symbol-oriented database visualization and interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkschulte, Uwe; Siormanolakis, Marios; Vogelsang, Holger

    1997-04-01

    In this approach, two basic services designed for the engineering of computer based systems are combined: a symbol-oriented man-machine-service and a high speed database-service. The man-machine service is used to build graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for the database service; these interfaces are stored using the database service. The idea is to create a GUI-builder and a GUI-manager for the database service based upon the man-machine service using the concept of symbols. With user-definable and predefined symbols, database contents can be visualized and manipulated in a very flexible and intuitive way. Using the GUI-builder and GUI-manager, a user can build and operate its own graphical user interface for a given database according to its needs without writing a single line of code.

  10. Distinct functional domains of PNMA5 mediate protein-protein interaction, nuclear localization, and apoptosis signaling in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Hoi; Pang, Siew Wai; Poh, Chit Laa; Tan, Kuan Onn

    2016-09-01

    Members of paraneoplastic Ma (PNMA) family have been identified as onconeuronal antigens, which aberrant expressions in cancer cells of patients with paraneoplastic disorder (PND) are closely linked to manifestation of auto-immunity, neuro-degeneration, and cancer. The purpose of present study was to determine the role of PNMA5 and its functional relationship to MOAP-1 (PNMA4) in human cancer cells. PNMA5 mutants were generated through deletion or site-directed mutagenesis and transiently expressed in human cancer cell lines to investigate their role in apoptosis, subcellular localization, and potential interaction with MOAP-1 through apoptosis assays, fluorescence microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitation studies, respectively. Over-expressed human PNMA5 exhibited nuclear localization pattern in both MCF-7 and HeLa cells. Deletion mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that C-terminus of PNMA5 is responsible for nuclear localization, while the amino acid residues (391KRRR) within the C-terminus of PNMA5 are required for nuclear targeting. Deletion mapping and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that PNMA5 interacts with MOAP-1 and N-terminal domain of PNMA5 is required for interaction with MOAP-1. Furthermore, co-expression of PNMA5 and MOAP-1 in MCF-7 cells significantly enhanced chemo-sensitivity of MCF-7 to Etoposide treatment, indicating that PNMA5 and MOAP-1 interact synergistically to promote apoptotic signaling in MCF-7 cells. Our results show that PNMA5 promotes apoptosis signaling in HeLa and MCF-7 cells and interacts synergistically with MOAP-1 through its N-terminal domain to promote apoptosis and chemo-sensitivity in human cancer cells. The C-terminal domain of PNMA5 is required for nuclear localization; however, both N-and C-terminal domains of PNMA5 appear to be required for pro-apoptotic function.

  11. The scavenger receptor SSc5D physically interacts with bacteria through the SRCR-containing N-terminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Bessa-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP of bacteria, fungi or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Towards establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSC5D (N-SSc5D, thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to E. coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively, and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR-based assay, and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5 and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that the N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3. Our work thus advocates the

  12. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  13. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. → This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. → NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. → The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction

  14. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Solution structure of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 SAM domain and identification of two distinct homotypic interaction sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Smalla, M.; Schmieder, P.; Kelly, M.; Ter Laak, A.; Krause, G.; Ball, L.; Wahl, M.; Bork, P.; Oschkinat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The sterile alpha motif (SAM) is a protein interaction domain of around 70 amino acids present predominantly in the N- and C-termini of more than 60 diverse proteins that participate in signal transduction and transcriptional repression. SAM domains have been shown to homo- and hetero-oligomerize and to mediate specific protein-protein interactions. A highly conserved subclass of SAM domains is present at the intracellular C-terminus of more than 40 Eph receptor tyrosine kinases that are invo...

  16. Toward affective brain-computer interfaces : exploring the neurophysiology of affect during human media interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.

    2012-01-01

    Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI), the sensing of emotions from brain activity, seems a fantasy from the realm of science fiction. But unlike faster-than-light travel or teleportation, aBCI seems almost within reach due to novel sensor technologies, the advancement of neuroscience, and the

  17. The Effect of Cholesterol on the Long-Range Network of Interactions Established among Sea Anemone Sticholysin II Residues at the Water-Membrane Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara García-Linares

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Actinoporins are α-pore forming proteins with therapeutic potential, produced by sea anemones. Sticholysin II (StnII from Stichodactyla helianthus is one of its most extensively characterized members. These proteins remain stably folded in water, but upon interaction with lipid bilayers, they oligomerize to form a pore. This event is triggered by the presence of sphingomyelin (SM, but cholesterol (Chol facilitates pore formation. Membrane attachment and pore formation require changes involving long-distance rearrangements of residues located at the protein-membrane interface. The influence of Chol on membrane recognition, oligomerization, and/or pore formation is now studied using StnII variants, which are characterized in terms of their ability to interact with model membranes in the presence or absence of Chol. The results obtained frame Chol not only as an important partner for SM for functional membrane recognition but also as a molecule which significantly reduces the structural requirements for the mentioned conformational rearrangements to occur. However, given that the DOPC:SM:Chol vesicles employed display phase coexistence and have domain boundaries, the observed effects could be also due to the presence of these different phases on the membrane. In addition, it is also shown that the Arg51 guanidinium group is strictly required for membrane recognition, independently of the presence of Chol.

  18. A truly human interface: Interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eCorti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots become hybrid agents (echoborgs capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg neither sensed nor suspected a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human-computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence.

  19. A truly human interface: interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Kevin; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower) repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots) become hybrid agents ("echoborgs") capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people's experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot's chance of passing but did increase interrogators' ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg did not sense a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human-computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence.

  20. The BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Regulates Cell Recognition and Morphogenesis by Interacting with Neph Proteins ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Höhne, Martin; Lorscheider, Johannes; von Bardeleben, Anna; Dufner, Matthias; Scharf, M. Antonia; Gödel, Markus; Helmstädter, Martin; Schurek, Eva-Maria; Zank, Sibylle; Gerke, Peter; Kurschat, Christine; Sivritas, Sema Hayriye; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke; Huber, Tobias B.; Reinhardt, H. Christian

    2011-01-01

    Neph proteins are evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins of the immunoglobulin superfamily that control the formation of specific intercellular contacts. Cell recognition through these proteins is essential in diverse cellular contexts such as patterning of the compound eye in Drosophila melanogaster, neuronal connectivity in Caenorhabditis elegans, and the formation of the kidney filtration barrier in mammals. Here we identify the PDZ and BAR domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting wit...

  1. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in

  2. RIM proteins tether Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S.; Deng, Lunbin; Wang, Yun; Dulubova, Irina; Liu, Xinran; Rizo, Josep; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY At a synapse, fast synchronous neurotransmitter release requires localization of Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones. How Ca2+-channels are recruited to active zones, however, remains unknown. Using unbiased yeast two-hybrid screens, we here identify a direct interaction of the central PDZ-domain of the active-zone protein RIM with the C-termini of presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels, but not L-type Ca2+-channels. To test the physiological significance of this interaction, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking all presynaptic RIM isoforms. Deletion of all RIMs ablated most neurotransmitter release by simultaneously impairing the priming of synaptic vesicles and by decreasing the presynaptic localization of Ca2+-channels. Strikingly, rescue of the decreased Ca2+-channel localization required the RIM PDZ-domain, whereas rescue of vesicle priming required the RIM N-terminus. We propose that RIMs tether N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain mediated interaction, thereby enabling fast, synchronous triggering of neurotransmitter release at a synapse. PMID:21241895

  3. Self-interacting domains in the C terminus of a cation-Cl- cotransporter described for the first time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Charles F; Brunet, Geneviève M; Daigle, Nikolas D; Montminy, Valérie; Caron, Luc; Isenring, Paul

    2004-09-24

    The first isoform of the Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1), a widely distributed member of the cation-Cl- cotransporter superfamily, plays key roles in many physiological processes by regulating the ion and water content of animal cells and by sustaining electrolyte secretion across various epithelia. Indirect studies have led to the prediction that NKCC1 operates as a dimer assembled through binding domains that are distal to the amino portion of the carrier. In this study, evidence is presented that NKCC1 possesses self-interacting properties that result in the formation of a large complex between the proximal and the distal segment of the cytosolic C terminus. Elaborate mapping studies of these segments showed that the contact sites are dispersed along the entire C terminus, and they also led to the identification of a critical interacting residue that belongs to a putative forkhead-associated binding domain. In conjunction with previous findings, our results indicate that the uncovered interacting domains are probably a major determinant of the NKCC1 conformational landscape and assembly into a high order structure. A model is proposed in which the carrier could alternate between monomeric and homo-oligomeric units via chemical- or ligand-dependent changes in conformational dynamics. Copyright 2004 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for neural development.

  5. A methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Farooq, Mohammad U.

    1986-01-01

    The definition of proposed research addressing the development and validation of a methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems is given. The major objectives of this research are: the development of a comprehensive, objective, and generalizable methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for information systems; the development of equations and/or analytical models to characterize user behavior and the performance of a designed interface; the design of a prototype system for the development and administration of user interfaces; and the design and use of controlled experiments to support the research and test/validate the proposed methodology. The proposed design methodology views the user interface as a virtual machine composed of three layers: an interactive layer, a dialogue manager layer, and an application interface layer. A command language model of user system interactions is presented because of its inherent simplicity and structured approach based on interaction events. All interaction events have a common structure based on common generic elements necessary for a successful dialogue. It is shown that, using this model, various types of interfaces could be designed and implemented to accommodate various categories of users. The implementation methodology is discussed in terms of how to store and organize the information.

  6. Prevalence, specificity and determinants of lipid-interacting PDZ domains from an in-cell screen and in vitro binding experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Ivarsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules involved in the wiring of protein networks. Emerging evidence indicates that some PDZ domains also interact with phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs, important regulators of cell polarization and signaling. Yet our knowledge on the prevalence, specificity, affinity, and molecular determinants of PDZ-PtdInsPs interactions and on their impact on PDZ-protein interactions is very limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened the human proteome for PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains by a combination of in vivo cell-localization studies and in vitro dot blot and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR experiments using synthetic lipids and recombinant proteins. We found that PtdInsPs interactions contribute to the cellular distribution of some PDZ domains, intriguingly also in nuclear organelles, and that a significant subgroup of PDZ domains interacts with PtdInsPs with affinities in the low-to-mid micromolar range. In vitro specificity for the head group is low, but with a trend of higher affinities for more phosphorylated PtdInsPs species. Other membrane lipids can assist PtdInsPs-interactions. PtdInsPs-interacting PDZ domains have generally high pI values and contain characteristic clusters of basic residues, hallmarks that may be used to predict additional PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains. In tripartite binding experiments we established that peptide binding can either compete or cooperate with PtdInsPs binding depending on the combination of ligands. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our screen substantially expands the set of PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains, and shows that a full understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins will require a comprehensive insight into the intricate relationships between PDZ domains and their peptide and lipid ligands.

  7. Electron Dynamics During High-Power, Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    us.af.mil) PI: Patrick E. Hopkins Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Virginia office...US-Japan Seminar on Dielectric and Piezoelectric Ceramics, Raleigh, NC, November 3 – 6, 2013 (Poster). 10) Giri, A., Hopkins, P.E., “Theory on...electron-phonon coupling and thermal conductance at free electron metal/insulator interfaces,” 2013 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress

  8. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  9. The phospholipase PNPLA7 functions as a lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolase and interacts with lipid droplets through its catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christoph; Kien, Benedikt; Huang, Feifei; Eichmann, Thomas O; Xie, Hao; Zechner, Rudolf; Chang, Ping-An

    2017-11-17

    Mammalian patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing proteins (PNPLAs) are lipid-metabolizing enzymes with essential roles in energy metabolism, skin barrier development, and brain function. A detailed annotation of enzymatic activities and structure-function relationships remains an important prerequisite to understand PNPLA functions in (patho-)physiology, for example, in disorders such as neutral lipid storage disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and neurodegenerative syndromes. In this study, we characterized the structural features controlling the subcellular localization and enzymatic activity of PNPLA7, a poorly annotated phospholipase linked to insulin signaling and energy metabolism. We show that PNPLA7 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein that specifically promotes hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine in mammalian cells. We found that transmembrane and regulatory domains in the PNPLA7 N-terminal region cooperate to regulate ER targeting but are dispensable for substrate hydrolysis. Enzymatic activity is instead mediated by the C-terminal domain, which maintains full catalytic competence even in the absence of N-terminal regions. Upon elevated fatty acid flux, the catalytic domain targets cellular lipid droplets and promotes interactions of PNPLA7 with these organelles in response to increased cAMP levels. We conclude that PNPLA7 acts as an ER-anchored lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolase that is composed of specific functional domains mediating catalytic activity, subcellular positioning, and interactions with cellular organelles. Our study provides critical structural insights into an evolutionarily conserved class of phospholipid-metabolizing enzymes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Campiglio, Marta; Jo, Hyunil; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Rumpf, Christine H; Pope, Lianne; Rossen, Nathan D; Flucher, Bernhard E; DeGrado, William F; Minor, Daniel L

    2017-06-21

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein-protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein-protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein-protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca V ) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (Ca V β). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:Ca V β interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to Ca V β. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the Ca V α 1 :Ca V β interaction that modulate Ca V function in an Ca V β isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein-protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based Ca V modulator design.

  11. E2A-PBX1 interacts directly with the KIX domain of CBP/p300 in the induction of proliferation in primary hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, Richard; Chuen, Luan; Currie, Richard A; Hyndman, Brandy D; Casselman, Richard; Blobel, Gerd A; LeBrun, David P

    2004-12-31

    The E2A gene encodes DNA-binding transcription factors, called E12 and E47, involved in cell specification and maturation. E2A is also involved in a chromosomal translocation that leads to the expression of an oncogenic transcription factor called E2A-PBX1 in cases of acute leukemia. In the work described here, we elucidate the interaction between E2A-PBX1 and transcriptional co-activators. We confirm that the E2A portion can interact with CBP and PCAF and map required elements on E2A and CBP. On CBP, the interaction involves the KIX domain, a well characterized domain that mediates interactions with several other oncogenic transcription factors. On E2A, the interaction with CBP requires conserved alpha-helical domains that reside within activation domains 1 and 2 (AD1 and AD2, respectively). Using purified, recombinant proteins, we show that the E2A-CBP interaction is direct. Notwithstanding the previously demonstrated ability of AD1 and AD2 to function independently, some of our findings suggest functional cooperativity between these two domains. Finally, we show that the CBP/p300-interactive helical domains of E2A are important in the induction of proliferation in cultured primary bone marrow cells retrovirally transduced with E2A-PBX1. Our findings suggest that some aspects of E2A-PBX1 oncogenesis involve a direct interaction with the KIX domain of CBP/p300.

  12. Faculty Social Networking Interactions: Using Social Domain Theory to Assess Student Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemetz, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    As educators consider using social networking sites, like Facebook, for educational innovations, they must be aware of possible vulnerabilities associated with the blurring of social and professional boundaries. This research uses social domain theory to examine how students rate the appropriateness of various faculty postings, behaviors, and…

  13. Interactions at the head-tape interface of a linear tape system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, M.A.

    2001-08-01

    Many of the recent improvements in the capacity of data cartridge systems have been achieved through the use of narrower tracks, higher linear densities and continuous servo tracking with multi-channel heads. These changes have produced new tribological problems at the head/tape interface. It is crucial that the tribology of such systems is understood and this will continue since increasing storage capacities and faster transfer rates are constantly being sought. Chemical changes in the surface of single and dual layer MP tape have been correlated to signal performance. An accelerated tape tester, consisting of a custom made cycler ( l oop tester ) , was used to ascertain if results could be produced that were representative of a real tape drive system. A second set of experiments used a modified tape drive (Georgens cycler), which allowed the effects of the tape transport system on the tape surface to be studied. To isolate any effects on the tape surface due to the head/tape interface, read/write heads were not fitted to the cycler. Two further sets of experiments were conducted which included a head in the tape path. This allowed the effects of the head/tape interface on the physical and chemical properties of the head and tape surfaces to be investigated. It was during the final set of experiments that the effect on the head/tape interface, of an energised MR element, was investigated. The effect of operating each cycler at extreme relative humidity and temperature was investigated through the use of an environmental chamber. Extensive use was made of surface specific analytical techniques such as XPS, AFM, AES and SEM to study the physical and chemical changes that occur at the head/tape interface. Results showed that cycling improved the signal performance of all the tapes tested. The data cartridge drive belt had an effect on the chemical properties of the tape surface on which it was in contact. Also binder degradation occurred for each tape and appeared to

  14. Combined use of frequency‐domain electromagnetic and electrical resistivity surveys to delineate the freshwater/saltwater interface near saline lakes in the Nebraska Sand Hills, Nebraska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, John T.; White, Eric A.; Lane, John W.; Halihan, Todd; Zlotnik, Vitaly A; Butler, Dwain K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the use of frequency‐domain electromagnetic (FDEM) and electrical resistivity (ER) surveys for rapid and detailed characterization of the direction of lake‐aquifer fluxes and the configuration of salt plumes generated from saline lakes. This methodology was developed and applied at several lakes in the Nebraska Sand Hills, Nebraska, in an area with both freshwater and saline lakes hydraulically connected to the freshwater surficial aquifer. The FDEM survey was conducted by mounting the instrument on a fiberglass cart towed by an all‐terrain vehicle. The towed FDEM surveys covered about 25 km per day and served as a reconnaissance method for choosing locations for the more quantitative and detailed ER surveys. Around the saline lakes, areas with high electrical conductivity are consistent with the regional direction of ground‐water flow. Lower electrical conductivity was measured around the freshwater lakes with anomalies correlating to a paleovalley axis inferred from previous studies. The efficacy of this geophysical approach is attributed to: (1) significant contrast in electrical conductivity between freshwater and saltwater, (2) near‐surface location of the freshwater/saltwater interface, (3) minimal cultural interference, and (4) relative homogeneity of the aquifer materials.

  15. The crystal structure of the Dachshund domain of human SnoN reveals flexibility in the putative protein interaction surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Nyman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human SnoN is an oncoprotein that interacts with several transcription-regulatory proteins such as the histone-deacetylase, N-CoR containing co-repressor complex and Smad proteins. This study presents the crystal structure of the Dachshund homology domain of human SnoN. The structure reveals a groove composed of conserved residues with characteristic properties of a protein-interaction surface. A comparison of the 12 monomers in the asymmetric unit reveals the presence of two major conformations: an open conformation with a well accessible groove and a tight conformation with a less accessible groove. The variability in the backbone between the open and the tight conformations matches the differences seen in previously determined structures of individual Dachshund homology domains, suggesting a general plasticity within this fold family. The flexibility observed in the putative protein binding groove may enable SnoN to recognize multiple interaction partners.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  16. Role of top and bottom interfaces of a Pt/Co/AlOx system in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, interface perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hui Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the role of top and bottom interfaces in inversion symmetry-breaking Pt/Co/AlOx systems by inserting ultra-thin Cu layers. Wedge-type ultrathin Cu layers (0-0.5 nm are introduced between Pt/Co or Co/AlOx interfaces. Interface sensitive physical quantities such as the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (iDMI energy density, the interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (iPMA, and the magneto-optical Kerr effects (MOKE are systematically measured as a function of Cu-insertion layer thickness. We find that the Cu-insertion layer in the bottom interface (Pt/Co plays a more important role in iDMI, PMA, and MOKE. In contrast, the top interface (Co/AlOx noticeably contributes to only PMA, while its contributions to iDMI and MOKE enhancement are less significant. Although the PMA mainly comes from the bottom interface (Pt/Co, the Cu-insertion layers of all interfaces (Pt/Co, Co/AlOx influence PMA. For iDMI, only the Cu-insertion layer in the bottom interface exerts SOC suppression which leads iDMI energy to decrease rapidly.

  17. Defect interactions with stepped CeO₂/SrTiO₃ interfaces: implications for radiation damage evolution and fast ion conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholabhai, Pratik P; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P

    2014-05-21

    Due to reduced dimensions and increased interfacial content, nanocomposite oxides offer improved functionalities in a wide variety of advanced technological applications, including their potential use as radiation tolerant materials. To better understand the role of interface structures in influencing the radiation damage tolerance of oxides, we have conducted atomistic calculations to elucidate the behavior of radiation-induced point defects (vacancies and interstitials) at interface steps in a model CeO2/SrTiO3 system. We find that atomic-scale steps at the interface have substantial influence on the defect behavior, which ultimately dictate the material performance in hostile irradiation environments. Distinctive steps react dissimilarly to cation and anion defects, effectively becoming biased sinks for different types of defects. Steps also attract cation interstitials, leaving behind an excess of immobile vacancies. Further, defects introduce significant structural and chemical distortions primarily at the steps. These two factors are plausible origins for the enhanced amorphization at steps seen in our recent experiments. The present work indicates that comprehensive examination of the interaction of radiation-induced point defects with the atomic-scale topology and defect structure of heterointerfaces is essential to evaluate the radiation tolerance of nanocomposites. Finally, our results have implications for other applications, such as fast ion conduction.

  18. Triatoma infestans Calreticulin: Gene Cloning and Expression of a Main Domain That Interacts with the Host Complement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Katherine; Collazo, Norberto; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen; Rosas, Carlos; Peña, Jaime; Pizarro, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Cattan, Pedro E.; Apt, Werner; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is an important hematophagous vector of Chagas disease, a neglected chronic illness affecting approximately 6 million people in Latin America. Hematophagous insects possess several molecules in their saliva that counteract host defensive responses. Calreticulin (CRT), a multifunctional protein secreted in saliva, contributes to the feeding process in some insects. Human CRT (HuCRT) and Trypanosoma cruzi CRT (TcCRT) inhibit the classical pathway of complement activation, mainly by interacting through their central S domain with complement component C1. In previous studies, we have detected CRT in salivary gland extracts from T. infestans. We have called this molecule TiCRT. Given that the S domain is responsible for C1 binding, we have tested its role in the classical pathway of complement activation in vertebrate blood. We have cloned and characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of CRT from T. infestans, and expressed its S domain. As expected, this S domain binds to human C1 and, as a consequence, it inhibits the classical pathway of complement, at its earliest stage of activation, namely the generation of C4b. Possibly, the presence of TiCRT in the salivary gland represents an evolutionary adaptation in hematophagous insects to control a potential activation of complement proteins, present in the massive blood meal that they ingest, with deleterious consequences at least on the anterior digestive tract of these insects. PMID:27895277

  19. Triatoma infestans Calreticulin: Gene Cloning and Expression of a Main Domain That Interacts with the Host Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Katherine; Collazo, Norberto; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen; Rosas, Carlos; Peña, Jaime; Pizarro, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Cattan, Pedro E; Apt, Werner; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-02-08

    Triatoma infestans is an important hematophagous vector of Chagas disease, a neglected chronic illness affecting approximately 6 million people in Latin America. Hematophagous insects possess several molecules in their saliva that counteract host defensive responses. Calreticulin (CRT), a multifunctional protein secreted in saliva, contributes to the feeding process in some insects. Human CRT (HuCRT) and Trypanosoma cruzi CRT (TcCRT) inhibit the classical pathway of complement activation, mainly by interacting through their central S domain with complement component C1. In previous studies, we have detected CRT in salivary gland extracts from T. infestans We have called this molecule TiCRT. Given that the S domain is responsible for C1 binding, we have tested its role in the classical pathway of complement activation in vertebrate blood. We have cloned and characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of CRT from T. infestans , and expressed its S domain. As expected, this S domain binds to human C1 and, as a consequence, it inhibits the classical pathway of complement, at its earliest stage of activation, namely the generation of C4b. Possibly, the presence of TiCRT in the salivary gland represents an evolutionary adaptation in hematophagous insects to control a potential activation of complement proteins, present in the massive blood meal that they ingest, with deleterious consequences at least on the anterior digestive tract of these insects. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  1. A robust Kalman algorithm to facilitate human-computer interaction for people with cerebral palsy, using a new interface based on inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Rafael; Rocon, Eduardo; Gallego, Juan A; Ceres, Ramón; Pons, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to create an advanced human-computer interface called ENLAZA for people with cerebral palsy (CP). Although there are computer-access solutions for disabled people in general, there are few evidences from motor disabled community (e.g., CP) using these alternative interfaces. The proposed interface is based on inertial sensors in order to characterize involuntary motion in terms of time, frequency and range of motion. This characterization is used to design a filtering technique that reduces the effect of involuntary motion on person-computer interaction. This paper presents a robust Kalman filter (RKF) design to facilitate fine motor control based on the previous characterization. The filter increases mouse pointer directivity and the target acquisition time is reduced by a factor of ten. The interface is validated with CP users who were unable to control the computer using other interfaces. The interface ENLAZA and the RKF enabled them to use the computer.

  2. Identifying interactions in the time and frequency domains in local and global networks - A Granger Causality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Shuixia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse-engineering approaches such as Bayesian network inference, ordinary differential equations (ODEs and information theory are widely applied to deriving causal relationships among different elements such as genes, proteins, metabolites, neurons, brain areas and so on, based upon multi-dimensional spatial and temporal data. There are several well-established reverse-engineering approaches to explore causal relationships in a dynamic network, such as ordinary differential equations (ODE, Bayesian networks, information theory and Granger Causality. Results Here we focused on Granger causality both in the time and frequency domain and in local and global networks, and applied our approach to experimental data (genes and proteins. For a small gene network, Granger causality outperformed all the other three approaches mentioned above. A global protein network of 812 proteins was reconstructed, using a novel approach. The obtained results fitted well with known experimental findings and predicted many experimentally testable results. In addition to interactions in the time domain, interactions in the frequency domain were also recovered. Conclusions The results on the proteomic data and gene data confirm that Granger causality is a simple and accurate approach to recover the network structure. Our approach is general and can be easily applied to other types of temporal data.

  3. An interactive and immersive human–computer interface for rapid composite part production design

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Roisin; Butterfield, Joe; Rafferty, Karen; Price, Mark; Murphy, Adrian; Burke, Robert; Legg, Adrian; Lemon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the need for better retention and exploitation of tacit knowledge for intelligent computer-aided design. It presents an automated design framework for the development of individual part forming tools for a composite stiffener incorporating parametrically developed design geometries. This work develops existing principles in knowledge-based engineering and parametric modelling beyond product design in the manufacturing planning domain. Outcomes demonstrate chronological ...

  4. Browsing and Querying in Online Documentation:A Study of User Interfaces and the Interaction Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Frøkjær, Erik

    1996-01-01

    A user interface study concerning the usage effectiveness of selected retrieval modes was conducted using an experimental text retrieval system, TeSS, giving access to online documentation of certain programming tools. Four modes of TeSS were compared: (1) browsing, (2) conventional boolean....... In the experiment the use of printed manuals is faster and provides answers of higher quality than any of the electronic modes. Therefore, claims about the effectiveness of computer-based text retrieval have to be wary in situations where printed manuals are manageable to the users. Among the modes of Te...

  5. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  6. ZebrafishMiner: an open source software for interactive evaluation of domain-specific fluorescence in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reischl Markus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput microscopy makes it possible to observe the morphology of zebrafish on large scale to quantify genetic, toxic or drug effects. The image acquisition is done by automated microscopy, images are evaluated automatically by image processing pipelines, tailored specifically to the requirements of the scientific question. The transfer of such algorithms to other projects, however, is complex due to missing guidelines and lack of mathematical or programming knowledge. In this work, we implement an image processing pipeline for automatic fluorescence quantification in user-defined domains of zebrafish embryos and larvae of different age. The pipeline is capable of detecting embryos and larvae in image stacks and quantifying domain activity. To make this protocol available to the community, we developed an open source software package called „ZebrafishMiner“ which guides the user through all steps of the processing pipeline and makes the algorithms available and easy to handle. We implemented all routines in an MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI that gives the user control over all image processing parameters. The software is shipped with a manual of 30 pages and three tutorial datasets, which guide the user through the manual step by step. It can be downloaded at https://sourceforge.net/projects/scixminer/.

  7. Structural characterization of the HSP70 interaction domain of the hepatitis C viral protein NS5A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Alan; Jung, Chun-Ling; Ganapathy, Ekambaram; Wheatley, Nicole; Sundberg, Christopher; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Dasgupta, Asim; French, Samuel W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified the NS5A/HSP70 binding site to be a hairpin moiety at C-terminus of NS5A domain I and showed a corresponding cyclized polyarginine-tagged synthetic peptide (HCV4) significantly blocks virus production. Here, sequence comparison confirmed five residues to be conserved. Based on NS5A domain I crystal structure, Phe171, Val173, and Tyr178 were predicted to form the binding interface. Substitution of Phe171 and Val173 with more hydrophobic unusual amino acids improved peptide antiviral activity and HSP70 binding, while similar substitutions at Tyr178 had a negative effect. Substitution of non-conserved residues with arginines maintained antiviral activity and HSP70 binding and dispensed with polyarginine tag for cellular entry. Peptide cyclization improved antiviral activity and HSP70 binding. The cyclic retro-inverso analog displayed the best antiviral properties. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed a secondary structure consisting of an N-terminal beta-sheet followed by a turn and a C-terminal beta-sheet. These peptides constitute a new class of anti-HCV compounds. PMID:25462345

  8. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zong-Sian, E-mail: gary810426@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Che Fu, E-mail: s9823002@m98.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fu, Brian, E-mail: brianfu9@gmail.com [Northwood High School, Irvine, CA (United States); Chou, Ruey-Hwang, E-mail: rhchou@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-02

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs. - Highlights: • The interfacial residues on hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. • hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex models were generated from NMR restraints by using HADDOCK program. • We analyzed hFGF1-Suramin complex models and found the interaction between hFGF1-Suramin is hydrophobic. • The bioactivity of the hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex was studied by using WST1 assay.

  9. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Santini, Simona; Coppari, Emilia; Bucciantini, Monica; Di Agostino, Silvia; Yamada, Tohru; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.

  10. The N-terminus of FILIA forms an atypical KH domain with a unique extension involved in interaction with RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juke Wang

    Full Text Available FILIA is a member of the recently identified oocyte/embryo expressed gene family in eutherian mammals, which is characterized by containing an N-terminal atypical KH domain. Here we report the structure of the N-terminal fragment of FILIA (FILIA-N, which represents the first reported three-dimensional structure of a KH domain in the oocyte/embryo expressed gene family of proteins. The structure of FILIA-N revealed a unique N-terminal extension beyond the canonical KH region, which plays important roles in interaction with RNA. By co-incubation with the lysates of mice ovaries, FILIA and FILIA-N could sequester specific RNA components, supporting the critical roles of FILIA in regulation of RNA transcripts during mouse oogenesis and early embryogenesis.

  11. AN INTELLIGENT CONVERSATION AGENT FOR HEALTH CARE DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karpagam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Computer Interaction is one of the pervasive application areas of computer science to develop with multimodal interaction for information sharings. The conversation agent acts as the major core area for developing interfaces between a system and user with applied AI for proper responses. In this paper, the interactive system plays a vital role in improving knowledge in the domain of health through the intelligent interface between machine and human with text and speech. The primary aim is to enrich the knowledge and help the user in the domain of health using conversation agent to offer immediate response with human companion feel.

  12. Physical and chemical interactions at the interface between atmospheric pressure plasmas and aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Byrns, Brandon; Knappe, Detlef; Graves, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Transport and reactions of charged species, neutrals, and photons at the interface between plasmas and liquids must be better quantified. The work presented here combines theoretical and experimental investigations of conditions in the gas and liquid phases in proximity to the interface for various discharges. OES is used to determine rotational and vibrational temperatures of OH, NO, and N2+; the relationship between these temperatures that characterize the distribution of internal energy states and gas and electron kinetic temperatures is considered. The deviation of OH rotational states from equilibrium under high humidity conditions is also presented. In contradiction with findings of other groups, high energy rotational states appear to become underpopulated with increasing humidity. In the aqueous phase, concentrations of longer-lived species such as nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone are determined using ion chromatography and colorimetric methods. Spin-traps and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) are investigated for characterization of short-lived aqueous radicals like OH, O2-, NO, and ONOO-. Finally, experimental results are compared to a numerical model which couples transport and reactions within and between the bulk gas and liquid phases.

  13. MHD modeling of ATLAS experiments to study transverse shear interface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Faehl, R J; Keinigs, R K; Lindemuth, I R

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. The transverse shear established at the interface of two solids moving at differential velocities on the order of the sound speed is being studied in experiments on the ATLAS capacitor bank at Los Alamos, beginning in August 2001. The ATLAS bank has finished certification tests and has demonstrated peak currents of 27.5 MA with a 5 microsecond risetime into an inductive load. One- and two-dimensional MHD calculations have been performed in support of these "friction-like" ATLAS experiments. Current flowing along the outer surface of a thick aluminum liner, roughly 8 mm thick, accelerates the solid liner to velocities ~1 km/s. This cylindrically imploding liner then impacts a target assembly, composed of alternating regions of high and low density materials. The different shock speeds in the two materials leads to a differential velocity along the interface. Shock heating, elastic- plastic flow, and stress transport are included in the calculations. Material strength properties are tre...

  14. Web GIS in practice: an interactive geographical interface to English Primary Care Trust performance ratings for 2003 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Boulos Maged N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On 21 July 2004, the Healthcare Commission http://www.healthcarecommission.org.uk/ released its annual star ratings of the performance of NHS Primary Care Trusts (PCTs in England for the year ending March 2004. The Healthcare Commission started work on 1 April 2004, taking over all the functions of the former Commission for Health Improvement http://www.chi.nhs.uk/, which had released the corresponding PCT ratings for 2002/2003 in July 2003. Results We produced two Web-based interactive maps of PCT star ratings, one for 2003 and the other for 2004 http://healthcybermap.org/PCT/ratings/, with handy functions like map search (by PCT name or part of it. The maps feature a colour-blind friendly quadri-colour scheme to represent PCT star ratings. Clicking a PCT on any of the maps will display the detailed performance report of that PCT for the corresponding year. Conclusion Using our Web-based interactive maps, users can visually appreciate at a glance the distribution of PCT performance across England. They can visually compare the performance of different PCTs in the same year and also between 2003 and 2004 (by switching between the synchronised 'PCT Ratings 2003' and 'PCT Ratings 2004' themes. The performance of many PCTs has improved in 2004, whereas some PCTs achieved lower ratings in 2004 compared to 2003. Web-based interactive geographical interfaces offer an intuitive way of indexing, accessing, mining, and understanding large healthcare information sets describing geographically differentiated phenomena. By acting as an enhanced alternative or supplement to purely textual online interfaces, interactive Web maps can further empower organisations and decision makers.

  15. Electrostatic interactions between the Bni1p Formin FH2 domain and actin influence actin filament nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-01-06

    Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here, we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and interprotein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and showed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L, or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations, the formin lost more interprotein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligand interactions: structural cross talk between ligands and the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M West

    Full Text Available Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R. In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands.

  17. Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment: Optimizing the Human Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment (HRI-RTE) integrates a grid-based, reconfigurable test arena and an operator workstation with...

  18. Solution of the Dynamic Interaction Problem between a Framed Structure and an Acoustic Cavity Using Imposed Deformation Functions at the Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcelo Vieira Ribeiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analytical procedure for solution of the dynamic interaction problem of a vibrating framed structure connected to a bidimensional cavity, containing an acoustic fluid. Initially the pressure solution for the fluid domain is developed, using the separation of variables technique. In a next step, this solution is applied to an entirely open cavity and to a closed cavity in the transversal direction, both containing a vibrating boundary with an arbitrary deformation. The generalized parameters of the structure (mass, rigidity, and force are obtained by means of the virtual work principle, with the generalized force represented by the dynamic pressures acting on the interface. The dynamic equilibrium equation of the system is established for an imposed deformation, making a parametric study of the involved variables possible. Finally, it is demonstrated that this procedure can be generalized, allowing the construction of practical abacuses for other boundary conditions of both the structure and the cavity, and that these results allow a reasonable interpretation of the coupling regions, including the prediction of added mass and added stiffness effects, as well as corresponding frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled problem.

  19. DGTD analysis of EM interactions on microwave systems loaded with circuit interfaced thin wires

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2016-11-16

    The discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method is gaining popularity among computational electromagnetics (CEM) practitioners. This can be attributed to the fact that it has several advantages over the classical finite element method. The DGTD method realizes “information exchange” between neighboring spatial discretization elements using numerical flux. Therefore all spatial operations are localized within a given element leading to a block-diagonal mass matrix which is inverted very efficiently only once before the time marching starts. Consequently, if an explicit time integrator is used, the DGTD method becomes high compact and efficient.

  20. Domain interaction in rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase. II. Small angle neutron scattering and computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consler, T G; Uberbacher, E C; Bunick, G J; Liebman, M N; Lee, J C

    1988-02-25

    The effects of ligands on the structure of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase were studied by small angle neutron scattering. The radius of gyration, RG, decreases by about 1 A in the presence of the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate, but increases by about the same magnitude in the presence of the allosteric inhibitor phenylalanine. With increasing pH or in the absence of Mg2+ and K+, the RG of pyruvate kinase increases. Hence, there is a 2-A difference in RG between two alternative conformations. Length distribution analysis indicates that, under all experimental conditions which increase the radius of gyration, there is a pronounced increase observed in the probability for interatomic distance between 80 and 110 A. These small angle neutron scattering results indicate a "contraction" and "expansion" of the enzyme when it transforms between its active and inactive forms. Using the alpha-carbon coordinates of crystalline cat muscle pyruvate kinase, a length distribution profile was calculated, and it matches the scattering profile of the inactive form. These observations are expected since the crystals were grown in the absence of divalent cations (Stuart, D. I., Levine, M., Muirhead, H., and Stammers, D. K. (1979) J. Mol. Biol. 134, 109-142). Hence, results from neutron scattering, x-ray crystallographic, and sedimentation studies (Oberfelder, R. W., Lee, L. L.-Y., and Lee, J.C. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 3813-3821) are totally consistent with each other. With the aid of computer modeling, the crystal structure has been manipulated in order to effect changes that are consistent with the conformational change described by the solution scattering data. The structural manipulation involves the rotation of the B domain relative to the A domain, leading to the closure of the cleft between these domains. These manipulations resulted in the generation of new sets of atomic (C-alpha) coordinates, which were utilized in calculations, the result of which compared favorably with the

  1. Macrolide-ketolide inhibition of MLS-resistant ribosomes is improved by alternative drug interaction with domain II of 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Hansen, L H; Mauvais, P

    2000-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and its 6-O-methyl derivative (clarithromycin) bind to bacterial ribosomes primarily through interactions with nucleotides in domains II and V of 23S rRNA. The domain II interaction occurs between nucleotide A752 and the macrolide 3-cladinose moiety. Removal...... cause of drug resistance in some clinical pathogens. The 2058G mutation disrupts the drug-domain V contact and leads to a further > 25 000-fold decrease in the binding of RU 56006. Drug binding to resistant ribosomes can be improved over 3000-fold by forming an alternative and more effective contact...... to A752 via alkyl-aryl groups linked to a carbamate at the drug 11/12 position (in the ketolide antibiotics HMR 3647 and HMR 3004). The data indicate that simultaneous drug interactions with domains II and V strengthen binding and that the domain II contact is of particular importance to achieve...

  2. In Vivo Role of Complement-Interacting Domains of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein Gc

    OpenAIRE

    Lubinski, John; Wang, Liyang; Mastellos, Dimitri; Sahu, Arvind; Lambris, John D.; Friedman, Harvey M.

    1999-01-01

    Immune evasion is critical for survival of viruses that establish persistent or recurrent infections. However, at the molecular level, little is known about how viruses evade immune attack in vivo. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 glycoprotein gC has two domains that are involved in modulating complement activation; one binds C3, and the other is required for blocking C5 and properdin (P) binding to C3. To evaluate the importance of these regions in vivo, HSV-1 gC mutant viruses were constructed ...

  3. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  4. Human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  5. Browsing and Querying in Online Documentation:A Study of User Interfaces and the Interaction Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Frøkjær, Erik

    1996-01-01

    A user interface study concerning the usage effectiveness of selected retrieval modes was conducted using an experimental text retrieval system, TeSS, giving access to online documentation of certain programming tools. Four modes of TeSS were compared: (1) browsing, (2) conventional boolean...... retrieval, (3) boolean retrieval based on Venn diagrams, and (4) these three combined. Further, the modes of TeSS were compared to the use of printed manuals. The subjects observed were 87 computer science students who solved a number of information retrieval tasks in an area of computing new to them....... In the experiment the use of printed manuals is faster and provides answers of higher quality than any of the electronic modes. Therefore, claims about the effectiveness of computer-based text retrieval have to be wary in situations where printed manuals are manageable to the users. Among the modes of TeSS...

  6. Interaction domains in permanent-magnetic rare-earth transition-metal compounds; Wechselwirkungsdomaenen in permanentmagnetischen Seltenerd-Uebergangsmetall-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielsch, Juliane

    2015-02-05

    In the framework of this dissertation the phenomenon of the interaction domains was studied both experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulation. Object of the study were one-phase NdFeB magnets, which were fabricated from commercial MQU-F powders of the Magnequench Inc. company by hot pressing and subsequent warm deformation in the IWF Dresden. Additionally via the same fabrication way also composite samples of NdFeB and Fe with different original particle sizes ere obtained and studied. Supported wer the experimental works by simulations with the FEMME software package, which is based on a hybrid finite-element method/boundary-element method.

  7. Characterization of the NTPR and BD1 interacting domains of the human PICH-BEND3 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitchai, Ganesha P; Hickson, Ian D; Streicher, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome integrity depends on DNA structure-specific processing complexes that resolve DNA entanglement between sister chromatids. If left unresolved, these entanglements can generate either chromatin bridging or ultrafine DNA bridging in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures...... are defined by the presence of the PICH protein, which interacts with the BEND3 protein in mitosis. To obtain structural insights into PICH-BEND3 complex formation at the atomic level, their respective NTPR and BD1 domains were cloned, overexpressed and crystallized using 1.56 M ammonium sulfate...

  8. AtPID: the overall hierarchical functional protein interaction network interface and analytic platform for Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zang, Weidong; Li, Yuhua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Jigang; Shi, Tieliu

    2011-01-01

    Protein interactions are involved in important cellular functions and biological processes that are the fundamentals of all life activities. With improvements in experimental techniques and progress in research, the overall protein interaction network frameworks of several model organisms have been created through data collection and integration. However, most of the networks processed only show simple relationships without boundary, weight or direction, which do not truly reflect the biological reality. In vivo, different types of protein interactions, such as the assembly of protein complexes or phosphorylation, often have their specific functions and qualifications. Ignorance of these features will bring much bias to the network analysis and application. Therefore, we annotate the Arabidopsis proteins in the AtPID database with further information (e.g. functional annotation, subcellular localization, tissue-specific expression, phosphorylation information, SNP phenotype and mutant phenotype, etc.) and interaction qualifications (e.g. transcriptional regulation, complex assembly, functional collaboration, etc.) via further literature text mining and integration of other resources. Meanwhile, the related information is vividly displayed to users through a comprehensive and newly developed display and analytical tools. The system allows the construction of tissue-specific interaction networks with display of canonical pathways. The latest updated AtPID database is available at http://www.megabionet.org/atpid/.

  9. Structure of the SPRY domain of the human RNA helicase DDX1, a putative interaction platform within a DEAD-box protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, Julian N.; Meinhart, Anton, E-mail: anton.meinhart@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-08-25

    The structure of the SPRY domain of the human RNA helicase DDX1 was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The SPRY domain provides a putative protein–protein interaction platform within DDX1 that differs from other SPRY domains in its structure and conserved regions. The human RNA helicase DDX1 in the DEAD-box family plays an important role in RNA processing and has been associated with HIV-1 replication and tumour progression. Whereas previously described DEAD-box proteins have a structurally conserved core, DDX1 shows a unique structural feature: a large SPRY-domain insertion in its RecA-like consensus fold. SPRY domains are known to function as protein–protein interaction platforms. Here, the crystal structure of the SPRY domain of human DDX1 (hDSPRY) is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals two layers of concave, antiparallel β-sheets that stack onto each other and a third β-sheet beneath the β-sandwich. A comparison with SPRY-domain structures from other eukaryotic proteins showed that the general β-sandwich fold is conserved; however, differences were detected in the loop regions, which were identified in other SPRY domains to be essential for interaction with cognate partners. In contrast, in hDSPRY these loop regions are not strictly conserved across species. Interestingly, though, a conserved patch of positive surface charge is found that may replace the connecting loops as a protein–protein interaction surface. The data presented here comprise the first structural information on DDX1 and provide insights into the unique domain architecture of this DEAD-box protein. By providing the structure of a putative interaction domain of DDX1, this work will serve as a basis for further studies of the interaction network within the hetero-oligomeric complexes of DDX1 and of its recruitment to the HIV-1 Rev protein as a viral replication factor.

  10. Mining IP to Domain Name Interactions to Detect DNS Flood Attacks on Recursive DNS Servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Roberto; Monroy, Raúl; Trejo, Luis A

    2016-08-17

    The Domain Name System (DNS) is a critical infrastructure of any network, and, not surprisingly a common target of cybercrime. There are numerous works that analyse higher level DNS traffic to detect anomalies in the DNS or any other network service. By contrast, few efforts have been made to study and protect the recursive DNS level. In this paper, we introduce a novel abstraction of the recursive DNS traffic to detect a flooding attack, a kind of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS). The crux of our abstraction lies on a simple observation: Recursive DNS queries, from IP addresses to domain names, form social groups; hence, a DDoS attack should result in drastic changes on DNS social structure. We have built an anomaly-based detection mechanism, which, given a time window of DNS usage, makes use of features that attempt to capture the DNS social structure, including a heuristic that estimates group composition. Our detection mechanism has been successfully validated (in a simulated and controlled setting) and with it the suitability of our abstraction to detect flooding attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that work is successful in using this abstraction to detect these kinds of attacks at the recursive level. Before concluding the paper, we motivate further research directions considering this new abstraction, so we have designed and tested two additional experiments which exhibit promising results to detect other types of anomalies in recursive DNS servers.

  11. Mining IP to Domain Name Interactions to Detect DNS Flood Attacks on Recursive DNS Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Alonso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Domain Name System (DNS is a critical infrastructure of any network, and, not surprisingly a common target of cybercrime. There are numerous works that analyse higher level DNS traffic to detect anomalies in the DNS or any other network service. By contrast, few efforts have been made to study and protect the recursive DNS level. In this paper, we introduce a novel abstraction of the recursive DNS traffic to detect a flooding attack, a kind of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS. The crux of our abstraction lies on a simple observation: Recursive DNS queries, from IP addresses to domain names, form social groups; hence, a DDoS attack should result in drastic changes on DNS social structure. We have built an anomaly-based detection mechanism, which, given a time window of DNS usage, makes use of features that attempt to capture the DNS social structure, including a heuristic that estimates group composition. Our detection mechanism has been successfully validated (in a simulated and controlled setting and with it the suitability of our abstraction to detect flooding attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that work is successful in using this abstraction to detect these kinds of attacks at the recursive level. Before concluding the paper, we motivate further research directions considering this new abstraction, so we have designed and tested two additional experiments which exhibit promising results to detect other types of anomalies in recursive DNS servers.

  12. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Weak Interactions between Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase and Subunit-binding Domain of the Branched-chain [alpha]-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Naik, Mandar T.; Young, Brittany B.; Huang, Tai-huang; Chuang, David T. (AS); (UTSMC)

    2012-02-27

    The purified mammalian branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC), which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain {alpha}-keto acids, is essentially devoid of the constituent dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3). The absence of E3 is associated with the low affinity of the subunit-binding domain of human BCKDC (hSBDb) for hE3. In this work, sequence alignments of hSBDb with the E3-binding domain (E3BD) of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex show that hSBDb has an arginine at position 118, where E3BD features an asparagine. Substitution of Arg-118 with an asparagine increases the binding affinity of the R118N hSBDb variant (designated hSBDb*) for hE3 by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The enthalpy of the binding reaction changes from endothermic with the wild-type hSBDb to exothermic with the hSBDb* variant. This higher affinity interaction allowed the determination of the crystal structure of the hE3/hSBDb* complex to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. The structure showed that the presence of Arg-118 poses a unique, possibly steric and/or electrostatic incompatibility that could impede E3 interactions with the wild-type hSBDb. Compared with the E3/E3BD structure, the hE3/hSBDb* structure has a smaller interfacial area. Solution NMR data corroborated the interactions of hE3 with Arg-118 and Asn-118 in wild-type hSBDb and mutant hSBDb*, respectively. The NMR results also showed that the interface between hSBDb and hE3 does not change significantly from hSBDb to hSBDb*. Taken together, our results represent a starting point for explaining the long standing enigma that the E2b core of the BCKDC binds E3 far more weakly relative to other {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes.

  13. Multimodal interaction with W3C standards toward natural user interfaces to everything

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents new standards for multimodal interaction published by the W3C and other standards bodies in straightforward and accessible language, while also illustrating the standards in operation through case studies and chapters on innovative implementations. The book illustrates how, as smart technology becomes ubiquitous, and appears in more and more different shapes and sizes, vendor-specific approaches to multimodal interaction become impractical, motivating the need for standards. This book covers standards for voice, emotion, natural language understanding, dialog, and multimodal architectures. The book describes the standards in a practical manner, making them accessible to developers, students, and researchers. Comprehensive resource that explains the W3C standards for multimodal interaction clear and straightforward way; Includes case studies of the use of the standards on a wide variety of devices, including mobile devices, tablets, wearables and robots, in applications such as assisted livi...

  14. Quantifying gaze and mouse interactions on spatial visual interfaces with a new movement analytics methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Demšar

    Full Text Available Eye movements provide insights into what people pay attention to, and therefore are commonly included in a variety of human-computer interaction studies. Eye movement recording devices (eye trackers produce gaze trajectories, that is, sequences of gaze location on the screen. Despite recent technological developments that enabled more affordable hardware, gaze data are still costly and time consuming to collect, therefore some propose using mouse movements instead. These are easy to collect automatically and on a large scale. If and how these two movement types are linked, however, is less clear and highly debated. We address this problem in two ways. First, we introduce a new movement analytics methodology to quantify the level of dynamic interaction between the gaze and the mouse pointer on the screen. Our method uses volumetric representation of movement, the space-time densities, which allows us to calculate interaction levels between two physically different types of movement. We describe the method and compare the results with existing dynamic interaction methods from movement ecology. The sensitivity to method parameters is evaluated on simulated trajectories where we can control interaction levels. Second, we perform an experiment with eye and mouse tracking to generate real data with real levels of interaction, to apply and test our new methodology on a real case. Further, as our experiment tasks mimics route-tracing when using a map, it is more than a data collection exercise and it simultaneously allows us to investigate the actual connection between the eye and the mouse. We find that there seem to be natural coupling when eyes are not under conscious control, but that this coupling breaks down when instructed to move them intentionally. Based on these observations, we tentatively suggest that for natural tracing tasks, mouse tracking could potentially provide similar information as eye-tracking and therefore be used as a proxy for

  15. Effect of moisture content on solid-state interaction at the interface between magnesium stearate and captopril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Ting; Wang, Shun-Li; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2008-12-01

    A grinding process was used to accelerate the solid-state interaction at the interface between magnesium stearate (MgSt) and captopril (CAP) in the presence or absence of water. The 110 °C-preheated MgSt/CAP or MgSt/CAP ground mixture showed a 5.06% (w/w) or 6.07% (w/w) water content, respectively, which was >4.29% (w/w) for the original MgSt alone. The increased water content in each ground mixture was due to the atmospheric absorption of water caused by grinding. A small infrared (IR) peak at 1562 cm -1 appeared in the IR spectrum of the 110 °C-preheated MgSt/CAP ground mixture, whereas a stronger IR peak at 1541 cm -1 with a shoulder at 1556 cm -1 was observed for the MgSt/CAP ground mixture. These IR peaks were possibly related to the solid-state interaction at the interface between MgSt and CAP via hydrogen bonding of adsorbed water. However, an excess of water added in the MgSt/CAP ground mixture could exacerbate the solid-state interaction of MgSt and CAP to form a stearic acid as evidenced by the IR peak at 1705 cm -1. This may be due to the neutralization between basic MgSt and acidic CAP. In addition, thermal Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy also confirmed that the thermal-dependent dehydration process might alter the IR peak intensity of MgSt/CAP ground mixtures.

  16. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P...

  17. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  18. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  19. Modelling and analysis of nonlinear guided waves interaction at a breathing crack using time-domain spectral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuai; Ng, Ching Tai

    2017-08-01

    This study proposes a time-domain spectral finite element (SFE) model and investigates nonlinear guided wave interaction at a breathing crack. An extended time-domain SFE method based on the Mindlin-Hermann rod and Timoshenko beam theory is proposed to predict the nonlinear guided wave generation at the breathing crack. An SFE crack element is proposed to simulate the mode-conversion effect, in which a bilinear crack mechanism is implemented to take into account the contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. There is good agreement between the results calculated using the proposed time-domain SFE method and three-dimensional finite element simulation. This demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed SFE method in simulating contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. Parametric studies using the fundamental symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) modes of guided waves are also carried out to provide physical insights into the higher harmonics generated due to the contact nonlinearity at the breathing crack. The magnitude of the higher harmonics generated as a function of the crack depth is investigated in detail. The results show that the mode-converted higher harmonic guided waves provide valuable information for damage detection.

  20. Brain-Computer Interfaces. Applying our Minds to Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Desney S.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person’s mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science

  1. Validation of the interface-GMRES(R) solution method for fluid-structure interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michler, C.; Van Brummelen, E.H.; In 't Groen, R.; De Borst, R.

    2006-01-01

    The numerical solution of fluid-structure interactions with the customary subiteration method incurs numerous deficiencies. We validate a recently proposed solution method based on the conjugation of subiteration with a Newton-Krylov method, and demonstrate its superiority and beneficial

  2. Approaches to characterizing biogeochemistry effects of groundwater and surface water interaction at the riparian interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater-surface water interaction (GSI) in riparian ecosystems strongly influences biological activity that controls nutrient flux and processes. Shallow groundwater in riparian zones is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for solutes, and a target for ...

  3. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg; Nikolajsen, Louise Fletcher; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt

    2015-01-01

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signaling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking...... of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs resembling immuno T-cell receptor activation motifs(ITAMs). However, contrary to the observations made for ITAMs, lipid association of the prolactin and growth hormone receptor ICDs was shown to be unaccompanied by changes in transient secondary...... structure and independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. The data presented here provides a new structural platform for studying class 1 cytokine receptors and may implicate the membrane as an active component regulating intracellular signaling....

  4. Interactive and Participatory Decision Support: Linking Cyberinfrastructure, Multi-Touch Interfaces, and Substantive Dialogue for Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, R.; Pierce, S. A.; Bass, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    geothermal resource potential as well as integrate the decision support system with multi-touch interfaces which allow multiple stakeholders to view and interact with data. Beyond visual and tactile appeal, these interfaces also allow participants to dynamically update decision variables and decision preferences to create multiple scenarios and evaluate potential outcomes. Through this interactive scenario building, potential development sites can be targeted and stakeholders can interact with data to engage in substantive dialogue for related long-term planning or crisis response.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Phase-field simulation of the effect of interaction among ordered domains on interdiffusion in Ni-Al-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Jin-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Gen-Cang; Zhou, Yao-He

    2009-10-01

    The effect of interaction among γ' ordered domains on the interdiffusion process in γ + γ'/γ and γ + γ'/γ + γ' diffusion couples is investigated by using the phase-field method, in which bulk free energy and mobility are linked with thermodynamic and kinetic databases. Simulated results show that the interaction among γ' ordered domains has great influence on the microstructure, the interdiffusion velocity and the volume fraction of γ' phase on both sides of the diffusion couples.

  6. Measuring Single-Domain Antibody Interactions with Epitopes in Jet Fuel Using Microscale Thermophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    marker troponin I (Zhang et al. 2014) and the explosive trinitrotoluene (Charles et al. 2014), as well as use in lateral-flow and cellulose paper...M. Orson . 2012. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum. PLoS One. 7(7): e40518. Song, K.-M., S. Lee, and C. Ban. 2012

  7. Concept-Driven Interaction Design Research in the domain of attractive aging: the example of Walky

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena; Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Nagargoje, Arun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we answer the call for “designing for an attractive ageing” by designing for social interaction of senior citizens within their local community. In this vein, we present Walky, a design exploration through which we explored if, and how, augmenting the rollator that senior citizens u...

  8. Essential domain of receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) for interaction with Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Wada, Akihiro; Yamasaki, Eiki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces a potent exotoxin, VacA, which causes progressive vacuolation as well as gastric injury. Although VacA was able to interact with two receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, RPTPbeta and RPTPalpha, RPTPbeta was found to be responsible for gastric damage caused...

  9. Role of the transmembrane domain of FXYD7 in structural and functional interactions with Na,K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ciming; Crambert, Gilles; Thuillard, Delphine; Roy, Sophie; Schaer, Danièle; Geering, Käthi

    2005-12-30

    Members of the FXYD family are tissue-specific regulators of the Na,K-ATPase. Here, we have investigated the contribution of amino acids in the transmembrane (TM) domain of FXYD7 to the interaction with Na,K-ATPase. Twenty amino acids of the TM domain were replaced individually by tryptophan, and combined mutations and alanine insertion mutants were constructed. Wild type and mutant FXYD7 were expressed in Xenopus oocytes with Na,K-ATPase. Mutational effects on the stable association with Na,K-ATPase and on the functional regulation of Na,K-ATPase were determined by co-immunoprecipitation and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques, respectively. Most residues important for the structural and functional interaction of FXYD7 are clustered in a face of the TM helix containing the two conserved glycine residues, but others are scattered over two-thirds of the FXYD TM helix. Ile-35, Ile-43, and Ile-44 are only involved in the stable association with Na,K-ATPase. Glu-26, Met-30, and Ile-44 are important for the functional effect and/or the efficient association of FXYD7 with Na,K-ATPase, consistent with the prediction that these amino acids contact TM domain 9 of the alpha subunit (Li, C., Grosdidier, A., Crambert, G., Horisberger, J.-D., Michielin, O., and Geering, K. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 38895-38902). Several amino acids that are not implicated in the efficient association of FXYD7 with the Na,K-ATPase are specifically involved in the functional effect of FXYD7. Leu-32 and Phe-37 influence the apparent affinity for external K+, whereas Val-28 and Ile-42 are implicated in the apparent affinity for both external K+ and external Na+. These amino acids act in a synergistic way. These results highlight the important structural and functional role of the TM domain of FXYD7 and delineate the determinants that mediate the complex interactions of FXYD7 with Na,K-ATPase.

  10. Using WICID (Web-based Interface to Census Interaction Data in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stillwell

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Census of Population is one of the key sources of data for social science research in the UK. Many census results appear in published reports, but most data are available directly from the Office of National Statistics or from web sites offering extraction services for registered users. Many Geography students use information from the census to undertake projects and to complete dissertations, frequently when studying small geographical areas. It is important that students learn the skills for downloading census data and understand what shortcomings are associated with the data as well as knowing how to incorporate the data into GIS and to analyse it effectively. This paper focuses on how students at the University of Leeds are taught to use one particular product of the census, the Origin-Destination Statistics, that are available from a web-based interface known as WICID. The paper briefly outlines the context and characteristics of the data before explaining the rudiments of building queries and extracting data. A typical class assignment is presented to demonstrate how a student learns how to build queries using WICID before analysing the results or mapping the data using an independent GIS. Experience indicates that students need to think hard about their requirements before using WICID for project work.

  11. Human-computer interaction reflected in the design of user interfaces for general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara; Stoicu-Tivadar, Vasile

    2006-01-01

    To address the problem of properly built health information systems in general practice as an important issue for their approval and use in clinical practice. We present how a national general practitioner (GP) network was built, put in practice and several results of its activity seen from the clinician's and the software application team's points of view. We used a multi-level incremental development appropriate for the conditions of the required information system. After the development of the first version of the software components (based on rapid prototyping) of the sentinel network, a questionnaire addressed the needs and improvements required by the health professionals. Based on the answers, the functionality of the system and the interface were improved regarding the real needs expressed by the end-users. The network is functional and the collected data from the network are being processed using statistical methods. The academic software team developed a GP application that is well received by the GPs in the network, as resulted from the survey and discussions during the training period. As an added confirmation, several GPs outside the network enrolled after seeing the software at work. Another confirmation that we did a good job was that after the final presentation of the results of the project a representative from the Romanian Society for Cardiology expressed the wish of this society to access the data yielded by the network.

  12. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  13. Structure and Function of Interacting IcmR-IcmQ Domains from a Type IVb Secretion System in Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raychaudhury, S.; Farelli, J; Montminy, T; Matthews, M; Menetret, J; Dumenil, G; Roy, C; Head, J; Isberg, R; Akey, C

    2009-01-01

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each protein forms an ?-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.

  14. Structure and function of interacting IcmR-IcmQ domains from a type IVb secretion system in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhury, Suchismita; Farelli, Jeremiah D; Montminy, Timothy P; Matthews, Miguelina; Ménétret, Jean-François; Duménil, Guillaume; Roy, Craig R; Head, James F; Isberg, Ralph R; Akey, Christopher W

    2009-04-15

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each protein forms an alpha-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.

  15. DNA binding by FOXP3 domain-swapped dimer suggests mechanisms of long-range chromosomal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongheng; Chen, Chunxia; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Chun-Chi; Johnson, Matthew E.; Espinoza, Celso A.; Edsall, Lee E.; Ren, Bing; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Grant, Struan F.A.; Wells, Andrew D.; Chen, Lin (LICR); (UPENN); (USC)

    2015-01-07

    FOXP3 is a lineage-specific transcription factor that is required for regulatory T cell development and function. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the FOXP3 forkhead domain bound to DNA. The structure reveals that FOXP3 can form a stable domain-swapped dimer to bridge DNA in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that FOXP3 may play a role in long-range gene interactions. To test this hypothesis, we used circular chromosome conformation capture coupled with high throughput sequencing (4C-seq) to analyze FOXP3-dependent genomic contacts around a known FOXP3-bound locus, Ptpn22. Our studies reveal that FOXP3 induces significant changes in the chromatin contacts between the Ptpn22 locus and other Foxp3-regulated genes, reflecting a mechanism by which FOXP3 reorganizes the genome architecture to coordinate the expression of its target genes. Our results suggest that FOXP3 mediates long-range chromatin interactions as part of its mechanisms to regulate specific gene expression in regulatory T cells.

  16. Bio-interfaces--interaction of PLL/HA thick films with nanoparticles and microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirtach, Andre G; Volodkin, Dmitry V; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-03-15

    The interaction of biocompatible, exponentially grown films composed of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (HA) polymers with gold nanoparticles and microcapsules is studied. Both aggregated and non-aggregated nanoparticle states are achieved; desorption of PLL accounts for aggregation of nanoparticles. The presence of aggregates of gold nanoparticles on films enables remote activation by near-infrared irradiation due to local, nanometer confined heating. Thermally shrunk microcapsules, which are remarkably monodisperse upon preparation but gain polydispersity after months of storage, are also adsorbed onto films. PLL polymers desorbed from films interact with microcapsules introducing a charge imbalance which leads to an increase of the microcapsule size, thus films amplify this effect. Multifunctional, biocompatible, thick gel films with remote activation and release capabilities are targeted for cell cultures in biology and tissue engineering in medicine.

  17. Interaction at interface between superconducting yttrium ceramics and copper or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Medved', N.V.; Myshlyaeva, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Light metallography, scanning electron microscopy and local energy dispersion analysis have been used to study the interaction of Y-ceramics with copper and niobium. Samples in the form of wire of two types were employed, that is, consisting of ceramic core YBaCuO and Cu shell or a ceramic core YBaCuO and bimetallic Cu/Nb shell. The interaction of the ceramics with the shell metal began already at 500 deg with the formation at the interafaces Cu-YBaCuO of oxide layers containing ceramic elements, and in the ceramic core - nonsuperconducting phases. A thin Al-layer placed between the ceramics and the shell appreciably decreased the reactability of the ceramics with respect to copper and niobium

  18. ATLAS data sonification: a new interface for musical expression and public interaction

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00345031; The ATLAS collaboration; Goldfarb, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to transform ATLAS data into sound and explore how ATLAS audio can be a source of inspiration and education for musicians and for the general public. Real-time ATLAS data is sonified and streamed as music on a dedicated website. Listeners may be motivated to learn more about the ATLAS experiment and composers have the opportunity to explore the physics in the collision data through a new medium. The ATLAS collaboration has shared its expertise and access to the live data stream from which the live event displays are generated. This talk tells the story of a long journey from the hallways of CERN where the project collaboration began to the halls of the Montreux Jazz Festival where harmonies were performed. The mapping of the data to sound will be outlined and interactions with musicians and contributions to conferences dedicated to human-computer interaction will also be discussed.

  19. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and supported platinum catalyst is essential. It directly influences platinum accessibility, stability of carbon support and platinum, proton conductivity and electron conductivity in an electrode. In this study, we compare the adsorption......, the ionomer may have an adsorption preference to the platinum nano particle rather than to the overall catalyst. This was verified by a close examination on the decomposition temperature of the carbon support and the ionomer. The electrochemical stability of the catalyst ionomer composite electrode suggests...... behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals...

  20. Hierarchthis: An Interactive Interface for Identifying Mission-Relevant Components of the Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litomisky, Krystof

    2012-01-01

    Even though NASA's space missions are many and varied, there are some tasks that are common to all of them. For example, all spacecraft need to communicate with other entities, and all spacecraft need to know where they are. These tasks use tools and services that can be inherited and reused between missions, reducing systems engineering effort and therefore reducing cost.The Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System, or AMMOS, is a collection of multimission tools and services, whose development and maintenance are funded by NASA. I created HierarchThis, a plugin designed to provide an interactive interface to help customers identify mission-relevant tools and services. HierarchThis automatically creates diagrams of the AMMOS database, and then allows users to show/hide specific details through a graphical interface. Once customers identify tools and services they want for a specific mission, HierarchThis can automatically generate a contract between the Multimission Ground Systems and Services Office, which manages AMMOS, and the customer. The document contains the selected AMMOS components, along with their capabilities and satisfied requirements. HierarchThis reduces the time needed for the process from service selections to having a mission-specific contract from the order of days to the order of minutes.

  1. Interface interaction and wetting of Sc2O3 exposed to Cu-Al and Cu-Ti melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilai, S.; Nagar, H.; Froumin, N.; Frage, N.; Aizenshtein, M.

    2009-01-01

    Scandia is a thermodynamically stable oxide and could be used as a structural material for a crucible in order to avoid a melt contamination. In the present study wetting experiments of Cu-Al and Cu-Ti melts on Scandia substrate were preformed at 1423 K by a sessile drop method. It was established that Al and Ti additions lead to the improved wetting and that the final contact angle decreases with increasing the additives concentration. For Al containing melts, the contact angle changes gradually with time, and a relatively thick interaction layer, which consists of Al 2 O 3 , Sc 2 O 3 , and metallic channels, was formed at the Sc 2 O 3 /Cu-Al interface. For Ti containing melts, the final contact angle is achieved already during heating, and an extremely thin layer based on a Ti-Sc-O compound was detected by AES at the Sc 2 O 3 /Cu-Ti interface. The results of a thermodynamic analysis, which takes into account the formation free energy of the oxides, involved in the systems, and the thermodynamic properties of the liquid solutions are in a good agreement with the experimental observations. (orig.)

  2. Interactions of calcium and fulvic acid at the goethite-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Li Ping; Koopal, Luuk K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of calcium and fulvic acid (Strichen ) with the surface of goethite were studied with batch and titration experiments. The mutual influence of the interactions on the adsorption of fulvic acid, calcium ions and protons were examined. Adsorption of the fulvic acid to goethite decreased with increase in pH (pH range 3-11). Addition of Ca (1.0 mM) at intermediate and high pH significantly enhanced the adsorption of fulvic acid. Compared to the adsorption to pure goethite, the presence of fulvic acid enhanced the adsorption of Ca significantly. In comparison to the simple linear sum of Ca bound to fulvic acid and goethite, the interactions between goethite and fulvic acid led to a reduced adsorption of Ca at low pH and an enhanced adsorption at high pH. With the adsorption of fulvic acid, protons were released at low pH and coadsorbed at high pH. When Ca was added, fewer protons were released at low pH and fewer coadsorbed at high pH. The experimental results can be adequately described using a surface complexation model, the Ligand and Charge Distribution (LCD) model, in which the CD-MUSIC model for ion adsorption to mineral oxides and the NICA model for ion binding to humics are integrated. In the model calculations, adequate descriptions of the ternary system data (Ca-fulvic acid-goethite) were obtained with parameters derived from three binary systems (fulvic acid-goethite, Ca-goethite and Ca-fulvic acid) without further adjustment. The model calculations suggest that the interactions between Ca and fulvic acid at the surface of goethite are mainly due to the electrostatic effects.

  3. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  4. Interaction of indigo carmine dye with silica modified with humic acids at solid/liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Alexandre G. S.; Miranda, Bárbara S.; Jacintho, Guilherme V. M.

    2003-09-01

    Two distinct humic acids, one extracted from Brazilian peat soil, HA PS, and another one obtained from commercial source, HA FL, were attachment onto silica gel modified with aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, producing two material named SiHA PS and SiHA FL, respectively. The ability of these materials in removing indigo carmine dye from aqueous solution was followed through series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to modified Langmuir equation. The maximum number of moles adsorbed gave 6.82 ± 0.12 × 10 -4 and 2.15 ± 0.17 × 10 -4 mol g -1 for SiHA PS and SiHA FL, respectively. Same interactions were calorimetrically followed and the thermodynamic data showed endothermic enthalpic values: 12.31 ± 0.55 and 24.69 ± 1.05 kJ mol -1 for SiHA PS and SiHA FL surfaces, respectively. Gibbs free energies for two adsorption processes of indigo carmine dye presented negative values, reflecting dye/surface interactions must be accompanied by an increased in entropy values, which are 65 ± 3 and 98 ± 5 J mol -1 K -1 for SiHA PS and SiHA FL materials, respectively. The adsorption processes for both materials were spontaneous in nature although they presented an endothermic enthalpy for the interaction, resulting in an entropically favored process.

  5. Unique Boron Carbide Nanoparticle Nanobio Interface: Effects on Protein-RNA Interactions and 3-D Spheroid Metastatic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Robert K; Hurst, Miranda N; Aryal, Santosh; Inchun, Nantipoor K

    2016-05-01

    The effect of boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles (NP) on protein-RNA complexes and metastatic phenotype of 3-D tumor spheroids was investigated. Characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential (ZP), 2-dimensional fluorescence difference spectroscopy (2-D FDS), gel electrophoresis, MTT, haemolysis and 3-D tumor spheroid assays. TEM showed NP were homogenous (≤50 nm) and spherical in shape. Zeta potential (ζ) of NP (-43.3) shifted upon protein:RNA interaction (+26.9). Protein:RNA complex interaction with NP was confirmed by 2-D FDS, demonstrating excitation/emission blue shift and lowered fluorescence intensity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), where presence of B4C ablated visualization of the complex. B4C NP cytotoxicity was less than zinc oxide by MTT assay, protected haemolysis and effected 3-D tumor spheroid metastatic phenotype. Nanobio interface of B4C nanoparticles is unique and its anticancer potential may be mediated by altering protein and RNA interactions. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. The use of the virtual reality Helmet Samsung gear VR as interaction interface of a radioactive waste repository simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Julio A. dos; Mól, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. Do E.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive waste is all material resulting from human activity that contains elements that emit radiation that can generate risks to health and the environment. In this sense, they are very toxic also for those who perform the storage of radioactive waste in nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the virtual reality (VR) has been destined to the most diverse purposes, like simulations for educational systems, for military purposes as for diverse training. VR can be considered as the junction of three basic principles: immersion, interaction and involvement. Bases on these principles of VR, this work aimed to develop a simulator of a repository of nuclear tailings, for mobile computing, whose interaction interface will be through the Samsung Gear VR helmet. The simulator of the nuclear waste repository was developed in the unity 3D tool and the elements that make up the scenario in the 3D MAX program. In this work we tried to put virtual reality under scrutiny in conjunction with Gear VR, to help in the sensation of immersion, as well as, the possibility of interaction with joysticks. The purpose was to provide greater insight into the operating environment. (author)

  7. The use of the virtual reality Helmet Samsung gear VR as interaction interface of a radioactive waste repository simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Julio A. dos; Mól, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. Do E., E-mail: julio_andrade11@hotmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive waste is all material resulting from human activity that contains elements that emit radiation that can generate risks to health and the environment. In this sense, they are very toxic also for those who perform the storage of radioactive waste in nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the virtual reality (VR) has been destined to the most diverse purposes, like simulations for educational systems, for military purposes as for diverse training. VR can be considered as the junction of three basic principles: immersion, interaction and involvement. Bases on these principles of VR, this work aimed to develop a simulator of a repository of nuclear tailings, for mobile computing, whose interaction interface will be through the Samsung Gear VR helmet. The simulator of the nuclear waste repository was developed in the unity 3D tool and the elements that make up the scenario in the 3D MAX program. In this work we tried to put virtual reality under scrutiny in conjunction with Gear VR, to help in the sensation of immersion, as well as, the possibility of interaction with joysticks. The purpose was to provide greater insight into the operating environment. (author)

  8. Huntingtin interacts with the cue domain of gp78 and inhibits gp78 binding to ubiquitin and p97/VCP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin (htt protein, but the exact mechanism of HD pathogenesis remains uncertain. Recent evidence suggests that htt proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, probably by interfering with ER-associated degradation (ERAD. Here we report that mutant htt interacts and interferes with the function of gp78, an ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase (E3 involved in ERAD. Mapping studies showed that the HEAT repeats 2&3 of htt interact with the cue domain of gp78. The interaction competitively reduces polyubiquitinated protein binding to gp78 and also sterically blocks gp78 interaction of p97/VCP, a molecular chaperone that is essential for ERAD. These effects of htt negatively regulate the function of gp78 in ERAD and are aggravated by polyglutamine expansion. Paradoxically, gp78 is still able to ubiquitinate and facilitate degradation of htt proteins with expanded polyglutamine. The impairment of ERAD by mutant htt proteins is associated with induction of ER stress. Our studies provide a novel molecular mechanism that supports the involvement of ER stress in HD pathogenesis.

  9. Individual Differences in Verbal and Spatial Stroop Tasks: Interactive Role of Handedness and Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Ambrosini, Ettore; Vallesi, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding debate in psychology concerns the relation between handedness and cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to contribute to this debate by comparing performance of right- and non-right-handers on verbal and spatial Stroop tasks. Previous studies have shown that non-right-handers have better inter-hemispheric interaction and greater access to right hemisphere processes. On this ground, we expected performance of right- and non-right-handers to differ on verbal and spatial Stroop tasks. Specifically, relative to right-handers, non-right-handers should have greater Stroop effect in the color-word Stroop task, for which inter-hemispheric interaction does not seem to be advantageous to performance. By contrast, non-right-handers should be better able to overcome interference in the spatial Stroop task. This is for their preferential access to the right hemisphere dealing with spatial material and their greater inter-hemispheric interaction with the left hemisphere hosting Stroop task processes. Our results confirmed these predictions, showing that handedness and the underlying brain asymmetries may be a useful variable to partly explain individual differences in executive functions. PMID:29176946

  10. Individual Differences in Verbal and Spatial Stroop Tasks: Interactive Role of Handedness and Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Ambrosini, Ettore; Vallesi, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding debate in psychology concerns the relation between handedness and cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to contribute to this debate by comparing performance of right- and non-right-handers on verbal and spatial Stroop tasks. Previous studies have shown that non-right-handers have better inter-hemispheric interaction and greater access to right hemisphere processes. On this ground, we expected performance of right- and non-right-handers to differ on verbal and spatial Stroop tasks. Specifically, relative to right-handers, non-right-handers should have greater Stroop effect in the color-word Stroop task, for which inter-hemispheric interaction does not seem to be advantageous to performance. By contrast, non-right-handers should be better able to overcome interference in the spatial Stroop task. This is for their preferential access to the right hemisphere dealing with spatial material and their greater inter-hemispheric interaction with the left hemisphere hosting Stroop task processes. Our results confirmed these predictions, showing that handedness and the underlying brain asymmetries may be a useful variable to partly explain individual differences in executive functions.

  11. Towards Interactive Visual Exploration of Parallel Programs using a Domain-Specific Language

    KAUST Repository

    Klein, Tobias

    2016-04-19

    The use of GPUs and the massively parallel computing paradigm have become wide-spread. We describe a framework for the interactive visualization and visual analysis of the run-time behavior of massively parallel programs, especially OpenCL kernels. This facilitates understanding a program\\'s function and structure, finding the causes of possible slowdowns, locating program bugs, and interactively exploring and visually comparing different code variants in order to improve performance and correctness. Our approach enables very specific, user-centered analysis, both in terms of the recording of the run-time behavior and the visualization itself. Instead of having to manually write instrumented code to record data, simple code annotations tell the source-to-source compiler which code instrumentation to generate automatically. The visualization part of our framework then enables the interactive analysis of kernel run-time behavior in a way that can be very specific to a particular problem or optimization goal, such as analyzing the causes of memory bank conflicts or understanding an entire parallel algorithm.

  12. Emotional pictures and sounds: A review of multimodal interactions of emotion cues in multiple domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje B M Gerdes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In everyday life, multiple sensory channels jointly trigger emotional experiences and one channel may alter processing in another channel. For example, seeing an emotional facial expression and hearing the voice’s emotional tone will jointly create the emotional experience. This example, where auditory and visual input is related to social communication, has gained considerable attention by researchers. However, interactions of visual and auditory emotional information are not limited to social communication but can extend to much broader contexts including human, animal, and environmental cues. In this article, we review current research on audiovisual emotion processing beyond face-voice stimuli to develop a broader perspective on multimodal interactions in emotion processing. We argue that current concepts of multimodality should be extended in considering an ecologically valid variety of stimuli in audiovisual emotion processing. Therefore, we provide an overview of studies in which emotional sounds and interactions with complex pictures of scenes were investigated. In addition to behavioral studies, we focus on neuroimaging, electro- and peripher-physiological findings. Furthermore, we integrate these findings and identify similarities or differences. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

  13. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Sebesta, Marek; Sisakova, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    was defective in primer extension at the MAT locus as well as in vitro, but additional biochemical analysis revealed that this mutant also had diminished ATPase activity and an inability to promote D-loop formation. Further mutational analysis of the putative PIP-box uncovered that other phenotypically relevant...... mutants in this domain also resulted in a loss of ATPase activity. Therefore, we have found that although Rad54 interacts with PCNA, the PIP-box motif likely plays only a minor role in stabilizing the PCNA interaction, and rather, this conserved domain is probably an extension of the ATPase domain III....

  14. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface.

    Sci